Kw2 ch04 final

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  • Figure Caption:
    Figure 4-1: The Market for Apartments in the Absence of Government Controls
    Without government intervention, the market for apartments reaches equilibrium at point E with a market rent of $1,000 per month and 2 million apartments rented.
  • Figure Caption:
    Figure 4-2: The Effects of a Price Ceiling
    The black horizontal line represents the government-imposed price ceiling on rents of $800 per month. This price ceiling reduces the quantity of apartments supplied to 1.8 million, point A, and increases the quantity demanded to 2.2 million, point B. This creates a persistent shortage of 400,000 units: 400,000 people who want apartments at the legal rent of $800 but cannot get them
  • Figure Caption:
    Figure 4-3: A Price Ceiling Causes Inefficiently Low Quantity
    A price ceiling reduces the quantity supplied below the market equilibrium quantity. The area of the shaded triangle corresponds to the amount of total surplus lost due to inefficiently low quantity transacted.
  • Figure Caption:
    Figure 4-4: The Market for Butter in the Absence of Government Controls
    Without government intervention, the market for butter reaches equilibrium at a price of $1 per pound with 10 million pounds of butter bought and sold.
  • Figure Caption:
    Figure 4-5: The Effects of a Price Floor
    The dark horizontal line represents the government-imposed price floor of $1.20 per pound of butter. The quantity of butter demanded falls to 9 million pounds, and the quantity supplied rises to 12 million pounds, generating a persistent surplus of 3 million pounds of butter.
  • Figure Caption:
    Figure 4-6: A Price Floor Causes Inefficiently Low Quantity
    A price floor reduces the quantity demanded below the market equilibrium quantity. Because sellers can’t sell more units of a good than buyers are willing to buy, a price floor reduces the quantity of a good bought and sold.
  • Figure Caption:
    Figure 4-7: The Market for Taxi Rides in the Absence of Government Controls
    Without government intervention, the market reaches equilibrium with 10 million rides taken per year at a fare of $5 per ride.
  • Figure Caption:
    Figure 4-8: Effect of a Quota on the Market for Taxi Rides
    The table shows the demand price and the supply price corresponding to each quantity: the price at which that quantity would be demanded and supplied, respectively. The city government imposes a quota of 8 million rides by selling licenses for only 8 million rides, represented by the black vertical line. The price paid by consumers rises to $6 per ride, the demand price of 8 million rides, shown by point A. The supply price of 8 million rides is only $4 per ride, shown by point B. The difference between these two prices is the quota rent per ride, the earnings that accrue to the owner of a license. The quota rent drives a wedge between the demand price and the supply price and the quota discourages mutually beneficial transactions.
  • Kw2 ch04 final

    1. 1. chapter: SUMMARY 4 >> Market Strikes Back Krugman/Wells ©2009  Worth Publishers 1 of 35
    2. 2. WHAT YOU WILL LEARN IN THIS CHAPTER:     The meaning of price controls and quantity controls, two kinds of government interventions in markets. How price and quantity controls create problems and can make a market inefficient. Why the predictable side effects of intervention in markets often lead economists to be skeptical of its usefulness. Who benefits and who loses from market interventions, and why they are used despite their well-known problems. 2 of 35
    3. 3. Why Governments Control Prices     The market price moves to the level at which the quantity supplied equals the quantity demanded. BUT this equilibrium price does not necessarily please either buyers or sellers. Therefore, the government intervenes to regulate prices by imposing price controls, which are legal restrictions on how high or low a market price may go. Price ceiling is the maximum price sellers are allowed to charge for a good or service. Price floor is the minimum price buyers are required to pay for a good or service. 3 of 35
    4. 4. Price Ceilings  Price ceilings are typically imposed during crises— wars, harvest failures, natural disasters—because these events often lead to sudden price increases that hurt many people but produce big gains for a lucky few.  Examples:   U.S. Government imposed ceilings on aluminum and steel during World War II Rent control in New York 4 of 35
    5. 5. The Market for Apartments in the Absence of Government Controls Monthly rent (per apartment) S $1,400 1,300 1,200 1,100 E 1,000 900 800 700 600 0 D 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Monthly rent (per apartment) $1,400 1,300 1,200 1,100 1,000 900 800 700 600 Quantity of apartments (millions) Quantity Quantity demanded supplied 1.6 1.7 1.8 1.9 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.2 2.1 2.0 1.9 1.8 1.7 1.6 2.4 Quantity of apartments (millions) 5 of 35
    6. 6. The Effects of a Price Ceiling Monthly rent (per apartment) S $1,400 1,200 E 1,000 A B Price ceiling 800 Housing shortage of 400,000 apartments caused by price ceiling 600 0 1.6 1.8 2.0 D 2.2 2.4 Quantity of apartments (millions) 6 of 35
    7. 7. How Price Ceilings Cause Inefficiency      Inefficiently Low Quantity Inefficient Allocation to Customers Wasted Resources Inefficiently Low Quality Black Markets 7 of 35
    8. 8. A Price Ceiling Causes Inefficiently Low Quantity Monthly rent (per apartment) S $1,400 1,200 E 1,000 Price ceiling 800 600 0 D 1.6 1.8 Quantity supplied with rent control 2.0 2.2 Quantity supplied without rent control 2.4 Quantity of apartments (millions) 8 of 35
    9. 9. How Price Ceilings Cause Inefficiency  Price ceilings often lead to inefficiency in the form of inefficient allocation to consumers: people who want the good badly and are willing to pay a high price don’t get it, and those who care relatively little about the good and are only willing to pay a low price do get it.  Price ceilings typically lead to inefficiency in the form of wasted resources: people expend money, effort and time to cope with the shortages caused by the price ceiling.  Price ceilings often lead to inefficiency in that the goods being offered are of inefficiently low quality: sellers offer low-quality goods at a low price even though buyers would prefer a higher quality at a higher price. 9 of 35
    10. 10. How Price Ceilings Cause Inefficiency  A black market is a market in which goods or services are bought and sold illegally—either because it is illegal to sell them at all or because the prices charged are legally prohibited by a price ceiling. 10 of 35
    11. 11. FOR INQUIRING MINDS Rent Control, Mumbai Style     How far would you go to keep a rent-controlled apartment? In May 2006, three people were killed when four floors in a rent-controlled apartment building in Mumbai collapsed. Despite demands by the city government to vacate the deteriorated building, 58 tenants refused to leave. Rent control began in Mumbai in 1947 to address a critical shortage that was caused by a flood of refugees fleeing conflict between Hindus and Muslims. It was extended 20 times and now it applies to about 60% of the buildings in the city center. 11 of 35
    12. 12. FOR INQUIRING MINDS Rent Control, Mumbai Style Tenants pass apartments on to their heirs or sell the right to occupy to other tenants.  Landlords of rent-controlled buildings have suffered financially.  12 of 35
    13. 13. So Why Are There Price Ceilings? Case: Rent Control in New York  Price ceilings hurt most residents but give a small minority of renters much cheaper housing than they would get in an unregulated market (those who benefit from the controls are typically better organized and more influential than those who are harmed by them).  When price ceilings have been in effect for a long time, buyers may not have a realistic idea of what would happen without them.  Government officials often do not understand supply and demand analysis! 13 of 35
    14. 14. ►ECONOMICS IN ACTION Hard Shopping in Caracas     Supermarket shopping in Caracas, Venezuela, is a bizarre experience. Shelves are fully stocked with scotch whiskey and imported cheese, but basic staples like black beans and beef are often absent because of price controls. Since 1998, the president pursued policies favoring the poor and working classes like price controls on basic foods such as beans, chicken, sugar, etc. These policies in turn led to sporadic shortages, higher spending by consumers and sharply rising prices for goods whose prices were not controlled. There was an increase in demand for price-controlled goods. On the other hand, a sharp decline in the value of Venezuela’s currency led to a fall in imports of foreign foods. The result was empty shelves in the nation’s food stores. 14 of 35
    15. 15. Price Floors  Sometimes governments intervene to push market prices up instead of down.  The minimum wage is a legal floor on the wage rate, which is the market price of labor.  Just like price ceilings, price floors are intended to help some people but generate predictable and undesirable side effects. 15 of 35
    16. 16. The Market for Butter in the Absence of Government Controls Quantity of butter (millions of pounds) Price of butter (per pound) Price of butter (per pound) S $1.40 1.30 1.20 1.10 E 1.00 0.90 $1.40 $1.30 $1.20 $1.10 $1.00 $0.90 $0.80 $0.70 $0.60 Quantity demanded 8.0 8.5 9.0 9.5 10.0 10.5 11.0 11.5 12.0 Quantity supplied 14.0 13.0 12.0 11.0 10.0 9.0 8.0 7.0 6.0 0.80 0.70 0.60 0 D 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Quantity of butter (millions of pounds) 16 of 35
    17. 17. The Effects of a Price Floor Price of butter (per pound) $1.40 Butter surplus of 3 million pounds caused by price floor 1.20 A S B Price floor E 1.00 0.80 0.60 0 D 6 8 9 10 12 14 Quantity of butter (millions of pounds) 17 of 35
    18. 18. FOR INQUIRING MINDS Price Floors and School Lunches     When you were in grade school, did your school offer free or very cheap lunches? If so, you were probably a beneficiary of price floors. During the 1930s, when the U.S. economy was going through the Great Depression, prices were low and farmers were suffering. To aid, the U.S. government imposed price floors on agricultural products like beef, sugar, pork, etc. Price floors are meant to create a surplus. Government reduces supply by paying farmers not to grow crops and also buys the surplus, thus taking excess surplus off the market. The government then gives away this excess surplus to schools as free or cheap lunches. 18 of 35
    19. 19. How a Price Floor Causes Inefficiency  The persistent surplus that results from a price floor creates missed opportunities—inefficiencies—that resemble those created by the shortage that results from a price ceiling. These include:      Inefficiently low quantity Inefficient allocation of sales among sellers Wasted resources Inefficiently high quality Temptation to break the law by selling below the legal price 19 of 35
    20. 20. A Price Floor Causes Inefficiently Low Quantity Price of butter (per pound) S $1.40 1.20 Price floor E 1.00 0.80 0.60 0 D 6 8 9 Quantity demanded with price floor 10 12 14 Quantity of butter (millions of pounds) Quantity demanded without price floor 20 of 35
    21. 21. How a Price Floor Causes Inefficiency  Price floors lead to inefficient allocation of sales among sellers: those who would be willing to sell the good at the lowest price are not always those who actually manage to sell it.  Price floors often lead to inefficiency in that goods of inefficiently high quality are offered: sellers offer high-quality goods at a high price, even though buyers would prefer a lower quality at a lower price. 21 of 35
    22. 22. PITFALLS Ceilings, Floors and Quantities  A price ceiling pushes the price of a good down.  A price floor pushes the price of a good up.  Both floors and ceilings reduce the quantity bought and sold.  If sellers don’t want to sell as much as buyers want to buy, it’s the sellers who determine the actual quantity sold, because buyers can’t force unwilling sellers to sell and vice versa. 22 of 35
    23. 23. ►ECONOMICS IN ACTION “Black Labor” in Southern Europe      Minimum wages in many European countries have been set much higher than in the United States. The persistent surplus that results from this price floor appears in the form of high unemployment. In countries where enforcement of labor law is lax, it results in widespread evasion of the law. In Italy and Spain, workers are employed by companies that pay them less than the minimum wage and fail to provide health care and retirement benefits. Many jobs also go unreported. In fact, Spaniards waiting to collect checks from the unemployment office have been known to complain about the long lines that keep them from getting back to work! 23 of 35
    24. 24. Controlling Quantities     A quantity control, or quota, is an upper limit on the quantity of some good that can be bought or sold. The total amount of the good that can be legally transacted is the quota limit. An example is the taxi medallion system in New York. A license gives its owner the right to supply a good. The demand price of a given quantity is the price at which consumers will demand that quantity. The supply price of a given quantity is the price at which producers will supply that quantity. 24 of 35
    25. 25. The Market for Taxi Rides in the Absence of Government Controls Quantity of rides (millions per year) Fare (per ride) Fare (per ride) S Quantity supplied 3.50 3.00 9 11 10 10 11 9 12 8 13 7 $3.00 4.00 12 $3.50 4.50 8 $4.00 5.00 13 $5.00 E 7 $4.50 5.50 14 $5.50 6.00 6 $6.00 6.50 $7.00 $6.50 $7.00 0 Quantity demanded 14 6 D 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Quantity of rides (millions per year) 25 of 35
    26. 26. Effect of a Quota on the Market for Taxi Rides Quantity of rides (millions per year) Fare (per ride) Fare (per ride) Quantity demanded Quantity supplied $7.00 6 14 $6.50 7 13 $6.00 8 12 $5.50 9 11 5.00 $5.00 10 10 4.50 $4.50 11 9 $4.00 12 8 $3.50 13 7 $3.00 14 6 S $7.00 6.50 6.00 5.50 A The “wedge” E 4.00 B 3.50 3.00 D Quota 0 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Quantity of rides (millions per year) 26 of 35
    27. 27. The Anatomy of Quantity Controls  A quantity control, or quota, drives a wedge between the demand price and the supply price of a good; that is, the price paid by buyers ends up being higher than that received by sellers.  The difference between the demand and supply price at the quota limit is the quota rent, the earnings that accrue to the license-holder from ownership of the right to sell the good. It is equal to the market price of the license when the licenses are traded. 27 of 35
    28. 28. The Costs of Quantity Controls  Some mutually beneficial transactions don’t occur.  Incentives for illegal activities. 28 of 35
    29. 29. ►ECONOMICS IN ACTION The Clams of New Jersey   In the 1980s, excessive fishing threatened to wipe out New Jersey’s clam beds. To save the resource, the U.S. government introduced a clam quota, which set an overall limit on the number of bushels of clams to be caught and allocated licenses to owners of fishing boats based on their historical catches. 29 of 35
    30. 30. SUMMARY 1. Even when a market is efficient, governments often intervene to pursue greater fairness or to please a powerful interest group. Interventions can take the form of price controls or quantity controls, both of which generate predictable and undesirable side effects. 2. A price ceiling, a maximum market price below the equilibrium price, benefits successful buyers but creates persistent shortages. Price ceilings lead to inefficiencies in the form inefficiently low quantity, inefficient allocation to consumers, wasted resources, and inefficiently low quality. It also encourages illegal activity as people turn to black markets to get the good. 30 of 35
    31. 31. SUMMARY 3. A price floor, a minimum market price above the equilibrium price, benefits successful sellers but creates persistent surplus. Price floors lead to inefficiencies in the form of inefficiently low quantity, inefficient allocation of sales among sellers, wasted resources, and inefficiently high quality. It also encourages illegal activity and black markets. The most well-known kind of price floor is the minimum wage, but price floors are also commonly applied to agricultural products. 31 of 35
    32. 32. SUMMARY 4. Quantity controls, or quotas, limit the quantity of a good that can be bought or sold. The quantity allowed for sale is the quota limit. The government issues licenses to individuals, the right to sell a given quantity of the good. Economists say that a quota drives a wedge between the demand price and the supply price; this wedge is equal to the quota rent. Quantity controls encourage illegal activity. 32 of 35
    33. 33. The End of Chapter 5 Coming attraction: Chapter 6: Elasticity 33 of 35

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