Rhetorical terms review game

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Rhetorical terms review game

  1. 1. Rhetorical Terms Review “Game” All terms and definitions taken from Sylva Rhetoricae ( http://humanities.byu.edu/rhetoric/silva.htm)
  2. 2. How to Play <ul><li>A rhetorical term will appear on the screen </li></ul><ul><li>As a group, you will have 30 seconds to define it on your paper </li></ul><ul><li>When time is up, every group will read their answer </li></ul><ul><li>Groups that correctly define the word earn 100 points; groups that have no answer or an incorrect answer earn 0 points </li></ul>
  3. 3. ellipsis <ul><li>Omission of a word or short phrase easily understood in context </li></ul>
  4. 4. apostrophe <ul><li>Turning one's speech from one audience to another. Most often, apostrophe occurs when one addresses oneself to an abstraction, to an inanimate object, or to the absent </li></ul>
  5. 5. irony <ul><li>Speaking in such a way as to imply the contrary of what one says, often for the purpose of derision, mockery, or jest </li></ul>
  6. 6. epimone <ul><li>Persistent repetition of the same plea in much the same words </li></ul>
  7. 7. epistrophe <ul><li>Ending a series of lines, phrases, clauses, or sentences with the same word or words </li></ul>
  8. 8. climax <ul><li>Generally, the arrangement of words, phrases, or clauses in an order of increasing importance, often in parallel structure. More specifically, climax is the repetition of the last word of one clause or sentence at the beginning of the next, through several clauses or sentences </li></ul>
  9. 9. allegory <ul><li>A sustained metaphor continued through whole sentences or even through a whole discourse </li></ul>
  10. 10. chiasmus <ul><li>Repetition of ideas or grammatical structures in inverted order </li></ul>
  11. 11. asyndeton <ul><li>The omission of conjunctions between clauses, often resulting in a hurried rhythm or vehement effect </li></ul>
  12. 12. metalepsis <ul><li>Reference to something by means of another thing that is remotely related to it, either through a farfetched causal relationship, or through an implied intermediate substitution of terms. Often used for comic effect through its preposterous exaggeration </li></ul>
  13. 13. litotes <ul><li>Deliberate understatement, especially when expressing a thought by denying its opposite </li></ul>
  14. 14. digressio <ul><li>A departure from logical progression in a speech </li></ul>
  15. 15. metonymy <ul><li>Reference to something or someone by naming one of its attributes </li></ul>
  16. 16. synecdoche <ul><li>A whole is represented by naming one of its parts (genus named for species), or vice versa (species named for genus) </li></ul>
  17. 17. hyperbole <ul><li>Rhetorical exaggeration. Hyperbole is often accomplished via comparisons, similes, and metaphors </li></ul>
  18. 18. parabola <ul><li>The explicit drawing of a parallel between two essentially dissimilar things, especially with a moral or didactic purpose. A parable. </li></ul>
  19. 19. erotema <ul><li>The rhetorical question. To affirm or deny a point strongly by asking it as a question </li></ul>
  20. 20. zeugma <ul><li>A general term describing when one part of speech (most often the main verb, but sometimes a noun) governs two or more other parts of a sentence (often in a series) </li></ul>
  21. 21. enigma <ul><li>Obscuring one's meaning by presenting it within a riddle or by means of metaphors that purposefully challenge the reader or hearer to understand </li></ul>
  22. 22. euphemismus <ul><li>Substituting a more favorable for a pejorative or socially delicate term </li></ul>
  23. 23. onomatopoeia <ul><li>Using or inventing a word whose sound imitates that which it names (the union of phonetics and semantics) </li></ul>
  24. 24. tautologia <ul><li>The repetition of the same idea in different words, but (often) in a way that is wearisome or unnecessary </li></ul>
  25. 25. metaphor <ul><li>A direct comparison between two basically unlike things </li></ul>
  26. 26. paradox <ul><li>A statement that is self-contradictory on the surface, yet seems to evoke a truth nonetheless </li></ul>
  27. 27. oxymoron <ul><li>Placing two ordinarily opposing terms adjacent to one another. A compressed paradox </li></ul>
  28. 28. systrophe <ul><li>The listing of many qualities or descriptions of someone or something, without providing an explicit definition </li></ul>
  29. 29. metastasis <ul><li>Denying and turning back on your adversaries arguments used against you </li></ul>
  30. 30. epitasis <ul><li>The addition of a concluding sentence that merely emphasizes what has already been stated. A kind of amplification </li></ul>
  31. 31. polysyndeton <ul><li>Employing many conjunctions between clauses, often slowing the tempo or rhythm </li></ul>
  32. 32. epanodos <ul><li>Repeating the main terms of an argument in the course of presenting it; OR returning to the main theme after a digression; OR returning to and providing additional detail for items mentioned previously (often using parallelism) </li></ul>
  33. 33. paralipsis <ul><li>Stating and drawing attention to something in the very act of pretending to pass it over. A kind of irony </li></ul>
  34. 34. parallelism <ul><li>Similarity of structure in a pair or series of related words, phrases, or clauses </li></ul>
  35. 35. personification <ul><li>Reference to abstractions or inanimate objects as though they had human qualities or abilities </li></ul>
  36. 36. rhetorical question <ul><li>any question asked for a purpose other than to obtain the information the question asks. The question as a grammatical form has important rhetorical dimensions; the technical term for rhetorical questions in general is erotema. </li></ul>
  37. 37. simile <ul><li>An indirect comparison, using the words “like” or “as”, between two basically unlike things </li></ul>
  38. 38. solecismus <ul><li>An element of speech or writing that is incorrect grammatically </li></ul>
  39. 39. Round Two <ul><li>This time, either a definition or (more likely) an example will appear on the screen </li></ul><ul><li>As a group, you will have 30 seconds to identify on your paper the device being defined or used </li></ul><ul><li>When time is up, every group will read their answer </li></ul><ul><li>Groups that correctly identify the device earn 100 points; groups that have no answer or an incorrect answer earn 0 points </li></ul>
  40. 40. It is boring to eat; to sleep is fulfilling <ul><li>chiasmus </li></ul>
  41. 41. The ship of state has sailed through rougher storms than the tempest of these lobbyists <ul><li>allegory </li></ul>
  42. 42. Just why are you so stupid? <ul><li>erotema OR rhetorical question </li></ul>
  43. 43. What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny compared to what lies within us . <ul><li>epistrophe </li></ul>
  44. 44. The Sounds of Silence <ul><li>oxymoron </li></ul>
  45. 45. Whosoever loses his life, shall find it. <ul><li>paradox </li></ul>
  46. 46. For ever since that time you went away I've been a rabbit burrowed in the wood <ul><li>metaphor </li></ul>
  47. 47. We’re sorry to hear that your husband has passed on . <ul><li>euphemismus </li></ul>
  48. 48. Running a marathon in under two hours is no small accomplishment <ul><li>litotes </li></ul>
  49. 49. The insatiable hunger for imagination preys upon human life <ul><li>personification </li></ul>
  50. 50. I came; I saw; I conquered <ul><li>asyndeton </li></ul>
  51. 51. The scent of the rose rang like a bell through the garden <ul><li>synaesthesia </li></ul>
  52. 52. Employing many conjunctions between clauses, often slowing the tempo or rhythm <ul><li>polysyndeton </li></ul>
  53. 53. O villain! thou wilt be condemned into everlasting redemption for this <ul><li>Malapropism </li></ul>
  54. 54. Miss America was not so much interested in serving herself as she was eager to serve her family, her community, and her nation <ul><li>climax </li></ul>
  55. 55. The explicit drawing of a parallel between two essentially dissimilar things, especially with a moral or didactic purpose <ul><li>parabola </li></ul>
  56. 56. I've told you a million times not to exaggerate <ul><li>hyperbole </li></ul>
  57. 57. The pen is mightier than the sword <ul><li>metonymy </li></ul>
  58. 58. A departure from logical progression in a speech <ul><li>digressio </li></ul>
  59. 59. The average person thinks he isn't <ul><li>ellipsis </li></ul>
  60. 60. Listen, you've got to come take a look at my new set of wheels <ul><li>synecdoche </li></ul>
  61. 61. My love is like a red, red rose <ul><li>simile </li></ul>
  62. 62. Those hunger most who are most full <ul><li>enigma </li></ul>
  63. 63. Clean your bedroom. All of it. <ul><li>epitasis </li></ul>
  64. 64. Denying and turning back on your adversaries arguments used against you. <ul><li>metastasis </li></ul>
  65. 65. The repetition of the same idea in different words, but (often) in a way that is wearisome or unnecessary <ul><li>tautologia </li></ul>
  66. 66. She tried to make her pastry fluffy, sweet, and delicate <ul><li>parallelism </li></ul>
  67. 67. It would be unseemly for me to dwell on Senator Kennedy's drinking problem, and too many have already sensationalized his womanizing... <ul><li>paralipsis </li></ul>
  68. 68. Final Round <ul><li>On the next slide, the name of a device will appear. </li></ul><ul><li>As a group, you will have two minutes to write and original example of that device. </li></ul><ul><li>When time is up, every group will read their answer </li></ul><ul><li>Groups that accurately create and example of the device earn 500 points; groups that have no answer or an incorrect answer earn 0 points. </li></ul>
  69. 69. The device is: <ul><li>Synaesthesia </li></ul>
  70. 70. Congratulations! <ul><li>You are now an official expert in Rhetorical devices! </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul>

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