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The Basics of MLA Style A guide to student papers
Three areas of concern: <ul><li>Part I: Formatting your paper </li></ul><ul><li>Part II: The reference list </li></ul><ul>...
Part I: Formatting your paper <ul><li>Use 8½ X 11 inch paper </li></ul><ul><li>12 point, New Times Roman, or similar font ...
Part I: Formatting your paper <ul><li>A title page is not necessary </li></ul><ul><li>Your name </li></ul><ul><li>Instruct...
Part I: Formatting your paper <ul><li>Indent the first line of each paragraph by five spaces (tab button) </li></ul><ul><l...
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Reference sources used in your paper must be listed </li></ul><ul><li>In MLA format, t...
Example <ul><li>Works Cited </li></ul><ul><li>Heinerman, John.  Heinerman’s Encyclopedia of Fruits, Vegetables and  </li><...
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>MLA is used mostly in the humanities disciplines (history, literature, fine arts)  </l...
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Books </li></ul><ul><li>Lastname, Firstname.  Title of book .  Location: Publisher, Ye...
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Anthology or Compilation </li></ul><ul><li>Carroll, Andrew, ed.  Letters of a Nation ....
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Article in a journal </li></ul><ul><li>Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Article.”  Title...
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Article in a Magazine </li></ul><ul><li>Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Article.”  Titl...
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>References to Electronic Sources </li></ul><ul><li>Basic entry </li></ul><ul><li>Lastn...
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Periodical article from a library subscription database </li></ul><ul><li>Paul, Annie ...
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Entire Web site, no author </li></ul><ul><li>Title of Web site.  Editor. Electronic pu...
Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Page on a web site, with author. </li></ul><ul><li>Firstname, Lastname. “Title of Page...
Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation <ul><li>Within the body of your text, you must cite your sources as you use t...
Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation <ul><li>References in the text must clearly point to specific sources in the ...
Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation <ul><li>Author’s name in text </li></ul><ul><li>Lipson has argued this point ...
Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation <ul><li>Author’s name in text </li></ul><ul><li>Lipson’s first rule of academ...
Conclusion <ul><li>Formatting rules make research papers uniform and easy to read </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to verify ...
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MLA Citation Style

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Basics of MLA citation style for students

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  1. 1. The Basics of MLA Style A guide to student papers
  2. 2. Three areas of concern: <ul><li>Part I: Formatting your paper </li></ul><ul><li>Part II: The reference list </li></ul><ul><li>Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation </li></ul>
  3. 3. Part I: Formatting your paper <ul><li>Use 8½ X 11 inch paper </li></ul><ul><li>12 point, New Times Roman, or similar font </li></ul><ul><li>1 inch margins </li></ul><ul><li>Double-space your text </li></ul><ul><li>Use a running header </li></ul><ul><li>Number pages consecutively, starting on the first page </li></ul>
  4. 4. Part I: Formatting your paper <ul><li>A title page is not necessary </li></ul><ul><li>Your name </li></ul><ul><li>Instructor </li></ul><ul><li>Course number </li></ul><ul><li>Date </li></ul><ul><li>Title of paper </li></ul>
  5. 5. Part I: Formatting your paper <ul><li>Indent the first line of each paragraph by five spaces (tab button) </li></ul><ul><li>Place tables and illustrations as close as possible to their related text </li></ul><ul><li>After the body of your paper comes the Works Cited page </li></ul>
  6. 6. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Reference sources used in your paper must be listed </li></ul><ul><li>In MLA format, this page is labeled “Works Cited” </li></ul><ul><li>List sources alphabetically by author’s last name (or title, if author not known) </li></ul>
  7. 7. Example <ul><li>Works Cited </li></ul><ul><li>Heinerman, John. Heinerman’s Encyclopedia of Fruits, Vegetables and </li></ul><ul><li>Herbs . Paramus, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1988. </li></ul><ul><li>Kowalchik, Claire and William H. Hylton. Rodale’s Illustrated </li></ul><ul><li>Encyclopedia of Herbs . Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press, 1998. </li></ul><ul><li>Wardlaw, Gordon M. and Anne M. Smith. Contemporary Nutrition . </li></ul><ul><li>Boston: McGraw Hill, 2006. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>MLA is used mostly in the humanities disciplines (history, literature, fine arts) </li></ul><ul><li>MLA style emphasizes brevity and clarity </li></ul><ul><li>The purpose of a reference list is to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify and credit the sources you used </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable the reader to locate your sources </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Books </li></ul><ul><li>Lastname, Firstname. Title of book . Location: Publisher, Year. </li></ul><ul><li>Lipson, Charles. Doing Honest Work in College . Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2004. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Anthology or Compilation </li></ul><ul><li>Carroll, Andrew, ed. Letters of a Nation . New York: Kodansha International, 1997. </li></ul><ul><li>Book by two or more authors </li></ul><ul><li>Walker, Geraldene, and Joseph Janes. Online Retrieval: a Dialogue of Theory and Practice . Englewood: Libraries Unlimited, 1999. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Article in a journal </li></ul><ul><li>Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Article.” Title of Journal volume (year): pp-pp. </li></ul><ul><li>Sacks, Samuel. “Fraud Risk: Are You Prepared?” Journal of Accountancy 198.3 (2004): 57-63. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Article in a Magazine </li></ul><ul><li>Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Article.” Title of Magazine day month year: pp-pp. </li></ul><ul><li>Weintraub, Arlene, and Laura Cohan. “A Thousand-Year Plan for Nuclear Waste.” Business Week 6 May 2002: 94-96. </li></ul><ul><li>Paul, Annie Murphy. “Self-Help: Shattering the Myths.” Psychology Today Mar.-Apr. 2001: 60-68. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>References to Electronic Sources </li></ul><ul><li>Basic entry </li></ul><ul><li>Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Document.” Information about print publication. Information about electronic publication. Access information. </li></ul><ul><li>Belli, Brita. “Nuking Food: Contamination Fears and Market Possibilities Spur an Irradiation Revival.” E Magazine July-Aug. 2007: 136-142. 8 Sept. 2007 <www.emagazine.com/view/?3790>. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Periodical article from a library subscription database </li></ul><ul><li>Paul, Annie Murphy. “Self-Help: Shattering the Myths.” Psychology Today Mar.-Apr. 2001: 60-68. Academic Search Elite . Ebsco. Brown Mackie College, Tucson, AZ. 1 Jan. 2008 < http:// search.epnet.com >. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Entire Web site, no author </li></ul><ul><li>Title of Web site. Editor. Electronic publication info including version #, date of publication or latest update. Name of any sponsoring organization. Date of access <URL>. </li></ul><ul><li>Jane Austen Information Page . Ed. Henry Churchyard. 6 Sept. 2000. 15 June 2002 <http://pemberly.com/janeinfo/janeinfo.html>. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Part II: The reference list <ul><li>Page on a web site, with author. </li></ul><ul><li>Firstname, Lastname. “Title of Page.” Name of Web site . Date of publication or latest update. Sponsoring organization. Date of access <URL>. </li></ul><ul><li>Stolley, Karl. “MLA Formatting and Style Guide.” The OWL at Purdue .10 May 2006. Purdue University Writing Lab. 12 May 2006 <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/557/01/>. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation <ul><li>Within the body of your text, you must cite your sources as you use them. </li></ul><ul><li>You must cite any and all data, facts, information, opinions, ideas, tables, charts, graphics, photographs, etc. that you obtained in your research. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation <ul><li>References in the text must clearly point to specific sources in the list of works cited. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify the location of the borrowed information as specifically as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Readability is important. Keep citations as brief as clarity and accuracy permit. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation <ul><li>Author’s name in text </li></ul><ul><li>Lipson has argued this point (38-40). </li></ul><ul><li>Author’s name in reference </li></ul><ul><li>This point has already been argued (Lipson 38-40). </li></ul><ul><li>Lipson, Charles. Doing Honest Work in College . Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2004. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation <ul><li>Author’s name in text </li></ul><ul><li>Lipson’s first rule of academic honesty is, “When you say you did the work yourself, you actually did it” (3). </li></ul><ul><li>Author’s name in reference </li></ul><ul><li>“ When you say you did the work yourself, you actually did it,” is a good rule to keep in mind (Lipson 3). </li></ul><ul><li>Lipson, Charles. Doing Honest Work in College . Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2004. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Conclusion <ul><li>Formatting rules make research papers uniform and easy to read </li></ul><ul><li>The ability to verify facts through proper citation of sources is essential to good scholarship </li></ul><ul><li>In-text citation and the reference list: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify and credit the sources you used </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable the reader to locate your sources </li></ul></ul>
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