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MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
MLA Citation Style
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MLA Citation Style

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Basics of MLA citation style for students

Basics of MLA citation style for students

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  • 1. The Basics of MLA Style A guide to student papers
  • 2. Three areas of concern:
    • Part I: Formatting your paper
    • Part II: The reference list
    • Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation
  • 3. Part I: Formatting your paper
    • Use 8½ X 11 inch paper
    • 12 point, New Times Roman, or similar font
    • 1 inch margins
    • Double-space your text
    • Use a running header
    • Number pages consecutively, starting on the first page
  • 4. Part I: Formatting your paper
    • A title page is not necessary
    • Your name
    • Instructor
    • Course number
    • Date
    • Title of paper
  • 5. Part I: Formatting your paper
    • Indent the first line of each paragraph by five spaces (tab button)
    • Place tables and illustrations as close as possible to their related text
    • After the body of your paper comes the Works Cited page
  • 6. Part II: The reference list
    • Reference sources used in your paper must be listed
    • In MLA format, this page is labeled “Works Cited”
    • List sources alphabetically by author’s last name (or title, if author not known)
  • 7. Example
    • Works Cited
    • Heinerman, John. Heinerman’s Encyclopedia of Fruits, Vegetables and
    • Herbs . Paramus, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1988.
    • Kowalchik, Claire and William H. Hylton. Rodale’s Illustrated
    • Encyclopedia of Herbs . Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press, 1998.
    • Wardlaw, Gordon M. and Anne M. Smith. Contemporary Nutrition .
    • Boston: McGraw Hill, 2006.
  • 8. Part II: The reference list
    • MLA is used mostly in the humanities disciplines (history, literature, fine arts)
    • MLA style emphasizes brevity and clarity
    • The purpose of a reference list is to:
      • Identify and credit the sources you used
      • Enable the reader to locate your sources
  • 9. Part II: The reference list
    • Books
    • Lastname, Firstname. Title of book . Location: Publisher, Year.
    • Lipson, Charles. Doing Honest Work in College . Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2004.
  • 10. Part II: The reference list
    • Anthology or Compilation
    • Carroll, Andrew, ed. Letters of a Nation . New York: Kodansha International, 1997.
    • Book by two or more authors
    • Walker, Geraldene, and Joseph Janes. Online Retrieval: a Dialogue of Theory and Practice . Englewood: Libraries Unlimited, 1999.
  • 11. Part II: The reference list
    • Article in a journal
    • Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Article.” Title of Journal volume (year): pp-pp.
    • Sacks, Samuel. “Fraud Risk: Are You Prepared?” Journal of Accountancy 198.3 (2004): 57-63.
  • 12. Part II: The reference list
    • Article in a Magazine
    • Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Article.” Title of Magazine day month year: pp-pp.
    • Weintraub, Arlene, and Laura Cohan. “A Thousand-Year Plan for Nuclear Waste.” Business Week 6 May 2002: 94-96.
    • Paul, Annie Murphy. “Self-Help: Shattering the Myths.” Psychology Today Mar.-Apr. 2001: 60-68.
  • 13. Part II: The reference list
    • References to Electronic Sources
    • Basic entry
    • Lastname, Firstname. “Title of Document.” Information about print publication. Information about electronic publication. Access information.
    • Belli, Brita. “Nuking Food: Contamination Fears and Market Possibilities Spur an Irradiation Revival.” E Magazine July-Aug. 2007: 136-142. 8 Sept. 2007 <www.emagazine.com/view/?3790>.
  • 14. Part II: The reference list
    • Periodical article from a library subscription database
    • Paul, Annie Murphy. “Self-Help: Shattering the Myths.” Psychology Today Mar.-Apr. 2001: 60-68. Academic Search Elite . Ebsco. Brown Mackie College, Tucson, AZ. 1 Jan. 2008 < http:// search.epnet.com >.
  • 15. Part II: The reference list
    • Entire Web site, no author
    • Title of Web site. Editor. Electronic publication info including version #, date of publication or latest update. Name of any sponsoring organization. Date of access <URL>.
    • Jane Austen Information Page . Ed. Henry Churchyard. 6 Sept. 2000. 15 June 2002 <http://pemberly.com/janeinfo/janeinfo.html>.
  • 16. Part II: The reference list
    • Page on a web site, with author.
    • Firstname, Lastname. “Title of Page.” Name of Web site . Date of publication or latest update. Sponsoring organization. Date of access <URL>.
    • Stolley, Karl. “MLA Formatting and Style Guide.” The OWL at Purdue .10 May 2006. Purdue University Writing Lab. 12 May 2006 <http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/557/01/>.
  • 17. Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation
    • Within the body of your text, you must cite your sources as you use them.
    • You must cite any and all data, facts, information, opinions, ideas, tables, charts, graphics, photographs, etc. that you obtained in your research.
  • 18. Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation
    • References in the text must clearly point to specific sources in the list of works cited.
    • Identify the location of the borrowed information as specifically as possible.
    • Readability is important. Keep citations as brief as clarity and accuracy permit.
  • 19. Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation
    • Author’s name in text
    • Lipson has argued this point (38-40).
    • Author’s name in reference
    • This point has already been argued (Lipson 38-40).
    • Lipson, Charles. Doing Honest Work in College . Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2004.
  • 20. Part III: Parenthetical, or in-text citation
    • Author’s name in text
    • Lipson’s first rule of academic honesty is, “When you say you did the work yourself, you actually did it” (3).
    • Author’s name in reference
    • “ When you say you did the work yourself, you actually did it,” is a good rule to keep in mind (Lipson 3).
    • Lipson, Charles. Doing Honest Work in College . Chicago: U of Chicago P, 2004.
  • 21. Conclusion
    • Formatting rules make research papers uniform and easy to read
    • The ability to verify facts through proper citation of sources is essential to good scholarship
    • In-text citation and the reference list:
      • Identify and credit the sources you used
      • Enable the reader to locate your sources

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