Introducing cultural prompts in a semantic data browser
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Introducing cultural prompts in a semantic data browser

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  • Conference 21 st century skills Tom – 21 st century Social media savvy Recent graduate So informal learning does happen for the 21 st century learners So far ad hoc bases
  • Just for Dhaval: If you noticed in the previous slide, what if he did not know about handshake, how does he comes to that Exploratory search seems suitable for this Or if he knew abt handshake, he can benefit from nowing what are the other body language around handshake?
  • Semantic data browsers[3] are the new breed of applications to come from the research efforts in the semantic community. Such browsers offer browsing of ontologies and semantically augmented data (e.g. content) by laying out browsing trajectories using relationships in the ontologies.
  • Semantic data browsers[3] are the new breed of applications to come from the research efforts in the semantic community. Such browsers offer browsing of ontologies and semantically augmented data (e.g. content) by laying out browsing trajectories using relationships in the ontologies.
  • Semantic browsers can offer opportunities to build learning environments in which exploration of content is governed by ontologies that capture contextual aspects. Data browsers assume that the users are in charge of what they do when using the browser. This puts the cognitive onus on the user, and is particularly acute in the case of a user being a learner, i.e. not familiar with the conceptual space in the domain and may be unable to decide what is the best course of action for him/her.
  • (semantic Data = semantically augmented digital traces & ontologies of the domain)
  • Few clarifications Culture is complex, sensitive and difficult subject It is also good to define the boundaries up front – culture based on work, religion http://laofutze.wordpress.com/tag/hofstedes-model-ppt/
  • http://laofutze.wordpress.com/tag/hofstedes-model-ppt/
  • Geert Hofstede conducted a study on employees at IBM, a multinational company. He questioned over 11,000 employees of the business in some 40 countries about their value orientation. Which resulted in 5 cultural dimensions Years: 1967 to 1973 http://laofutze.wordpress.com/tag/hofstedes-model-ppt/
  • http://geert-hofstede.com/united-kingdom.html
  • http://laofutze.wordpress.com/tag/hofstedes-model-ppt/
  • http://laofutze.wordpress.com/tag/hofstedes-model-ppt/
  • GLOBE is the acronym for “Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness,” the name of a cross-cultural research effort that exceeds all others (including Geert Hofstede’s landmark 1980 study) in scope, depth, duration, and sophistication. 
  • GLOBE is the acronym for “Global Leadership and Organizational Behavior Effectiveness,” the name of a cross-cultural research effort that exceeds all others (including Geert Hofstede’s landmark 1980 study) in scope, depth, duration, and sophistication. 
  • (semantic Data = semantically augmented digital traces & ontologies of the domain)
  • Many things: As abstract as 33% to 56% And that not exposed to others And that he has been to countries with higher Power distance and low mascility factor
  • (semantic Data = semantically augmented digital traces & ontologies of the domain)
  • (semantic Data = semantically augmented digital traces & ontologies of the domain)
  • http://localhost/ICAW/web/kbpages_nervous_culture.php?kbItem=sentiwn:nervous http://www.thunderbird.edu/wwwfiles/sites/globe/pdf/jwb_eastern_europe_cluster.pdf
  • http://localhost/ICAW/web/kbpages_nervous_culture.php?kbItem=sentiwn:nervous http://www.thunderbird.edu/wwwfiles/sites/globe/pdf/jwb_eastern_europe_cluster.pdf
  • http://localhost/ICAW/web/kbpages_nervous_culture.php?kbItem=sentiwn:nervous http://www.thunderbird.edu/wwwfiles/sites/globe/pdf/jwb_eastern_europe_cluster.pdf
  • http://localhost/ICAW/web/kbpages_nervous_culture.php?kbItem=sentiwn:nervous http://www.thunderbird.edu/wwwfiles/sites/globe/pdf/jwb_eastern_europe_cluster.pdf
  • http://localhost/ICAW/web/kbpages_nervous_culture.php?kbItem=sentiwn:nervous http://www.thunderbird.edu/wwwfiles/sites/globe/pdf/jwb_eastern_europe_cluster.pdf
  • For example, more than one clusters user is not exposed to which information we display first.

Introducing cultural prompts in a semantic data browser Introducing cultural prompts in a semantic data browser Presentation Transcript

  • INTRODUCING CULTURAL PROMPTS IN A SEMANTIC DATA BROWSER Dhaval Thakker, Vania Dimitrova, Gaye Ediboğlu International Workshop on Intelligent Exploration of Semantic DataSD) 2012
  • Exploitation of digital tracesas a source for informal learning
  • Exploitation of digital traces as a source for informal learning Exploration Environment digital tracesdigimind.com Taming Semantic Web Technologies •Retrieve • Semantic Data browsers •Aggregate • Semantic Nudges •Organise
  • Semantic Data Browser Focus Concept FactsEye Contact is Body Language Social Content
  • Semantic Data Browser
  • Processing Pipeline: Semantic Data Browser Digital Traces Collection Semantic Augmentation & Browsing & Query InteractionBespokeOntologies Ontology& Linked UnderpinningData Cloud
  • Semantic Data Browser for Learning• Data browsers Limitations: • Cognitive onus on Learner • Not always possible to decide best course of action for him/her. •Influence options in a way that will support choosers to act in their own interest, preserving freedom of choice •Signposting & Prompts Thakker, D., Dimoklis, D.,Dimitrova, V., Lau, L., Brna, P. (2012) Taming Digital Traces for Informal Learning: A Semantic-Driven Approach. EC-TEL 2012, pp. 348--362. Springer, Heidelberg, Saarbrücken (Germany), 18 - 21 September 2012.
  • Semantic Nudges:Signposting
  • Semantic Nudges: Prompts
  • So far…Semantic Data Browser Interaction Digital Traces +User: Country of origin, visited, Focus Semantic Tagsresidence Semantic Data Browser Digital Traces Ontology
  • • Hofstede: “[culture is] the collective programming of the human mind that distinguishes the members of one human group from those of another. Culture in this sense is a system of collectively held values.” [12].• National culture is fundamental for distinguishing the people of one country from other people from other countries.• Intercultural communication – cultural differences in terms of personal distance, gestures, body language, norms http://geert-hofstede.com/geert-hofstede.html
  • Culture awareness & Exposure• Cultural awareness is “.. understanding some key facts about a particular culture”.• Cultural exposure is experience of culture by visit/origin/residence.• Aim: Inform users about cultural aspects (basics, intercultural dimensions – such as gestures)
  • Cultural Models for NationalCultures: Hofstede Model http://geert-hofstede.com/national-culture.html
  • Power Distance(The degree to which power differentials within society and organizations are accepted.)
  • United Kingdom & ChinaIDV LTOIn Individualist The extent tosocieties people which a societyare supposed to shows alook after pragmaticthemselves and future-orientedtheir direct perspectivefamily only. rather than a conventionalIn Collectivist historical short-societies people term point ofbelong to ‘in view.groups’ that takecare of them inexchange forloyalty.
  • Stereotypical Information from Hofstede model - for UK• Power distance • At 35 Britain sits in the lower rankings of PDI – i.e. a society that believes that inequalities amongst people should be minimized.• Individualism • At a score of 89 the UK is amongst the highest of the individualistic scores, beaten only by some of the commonwealth countries it spawned i.e. Australia and the USA.• Masculinity / Femininity • At 66 Britain is a masculine society – highly success oriented and driven. A key point of confusion for the foreigner lies in the apparent contradiction between the British culture of modesty and understatement which is at odds with the underlying success driven value system in the culture.• Uncertainty avoidance • At 35 the UK has a low score on uncertainty avoidance which means that as a nation they are quite happy to wake up not knowing what the day brings and they are happy to ‘make it up as they go along’ changing plans as new information comes to light.• Long term orientation • At 25 the UK scores as a short term oriented society which drives a great respect for history and tradition as well as a focus on quick results in the future.
  • Grouping countries in clusters for measuring exposure to more abstract level • Hofstede Model: K-mean Clustering Cluster 1 Cluster 2 Cluster 3 Cluster 4 Cluster 5 Netherlands, El Salvador, Turkey, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Panama, Mexico, Chile, Portugal, Ghana, Nigeria,Norway, Sweden, Philippines, India Venezuela, Uruguay, Greece, Singapore, HongDenmark, Finland Spain Ecuador, Kong, Kenya Colombia Cluster 6 Cluster 7 Cluster 8 Cluster 9 Cluster 10Egypt, Iraq, Kuwait, France, Poland, USA, Australia, UK, South Africa, Peru, Thailand, Lebanon, Libya, Belgium, Czech Ireland, New Germany, Pakistan, Taiwan,UAE, Saudi Arabia, Republic, Japan, Italy, Zealand Switzerland, Austria South Korea Brazil, Iran Argentina, Hungary Available from : http://imash.leeds.ac.uk/publications/support/culturalprompts/
  • National Culture Models: Globe project• Cross-cultural research effort – wider in scope, depth, duration.• Nine units of measurement – cultural dimensions Performance Uncertainty Humane Orientation Avoidance Orientation Institutional In-Group Assertiveness Collectivism Collectivism Gender Future Power Distance Egalitarianism Orientation http://www.grovewell.com/pub-GLOBE-intro.html
  • Globe Cultural Model: ClustersAnglo - 7 Latin Europe - 6Nordic Europe - 3 Germanic Europe - 5Eastern Europe - 8 Latin America - 10Sub-Saharan Africa - 5 Middle East - 5Southern Asia - 6 Confucian Asia - 6
  • …Semantic Data Browser + Cultural Model Cultural Models Culture dimensions Stereotypical Culture Information clusters Interaction Digital Traces +User: Country of origin, visited, Focus Semantic Tagsresidence Semantic Data Browser Digital Traces Ontology
  • User Model : Culture exposure of user mapped to Cultural Models • U = < Corigin, Cresidence, Cvisited, Ehof, Eglobe> • Ehof & Eglobe = Mapping Corigin, Cresidence, Cvisited to Hofstede Clusters and Globe Clusters • For example, a user who has visited Egypt, Iraq, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, India Cluster 1 Cluster 2 Cluster 3 Cluster 4 Cluster 5 Netherlands, El Salvador, Turkey, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Panama, Mexico, Chile, Portugal, Ghana, Nigeria,Norway, Sweden, Philippines, India Venezuela, Uruguay, Greece, Singapore, HongDenmark, Finland Spain Ecuador, Kong, Kenya 33% Colombia Cluster 6 Cluster 7 Cluster 8 Cluster 9 Cluster 10Egypt, Iraq, Kuwait, France, Poland, USA, Australia, UK, South Africa, Peru, Thailand, Lebanon, Libya, Belgium, Czech Ireland, New Germany, Pakistan, Taiwan,UAE, Saudi Arabia, Republic, Japan, Italy, Zealand Switzerland, Austria South Korea Brazil, Iran Argentina, Hungary 56%
  • …Semantic Data Browser + Cultural Model + User ModelUser Model Cultural Models User Model Culture dimensions Stereotypical Culture Information clusters Interaction Digital Traces + User: Country of origin, visited, Focus Semantic Tags residence Semantic Data Browser Digital Traces Ontology
  • …Semantic Data Browser + Cultural Model + User Model = Prompt ModelUser Model Cultural Models User Model Culture dimensions Stereotypical Culture Information clusters Prompt Model Interaction Digital Traces + User: Country of origin, visited, Focus Semantic Tags residence Semantic Data Browser Digital Traces Ontology
  • Goals of Prompts• G1. Create awareness of cultural aspects. In the cases when the evidence (from user model) suggests that no exposure to a particular cultural cluster exist, i.e. Ehof<ClusterHofi, Val) ∧ Val = ϕ ∨ Eglobe<ClusterGloi, Val) ∧ Val = ϕ.• G2. Expand awareness on certain cultural aspects. In the cases when the evidence (from user model) suggests that there is a limited exposure to a particular culture cluster, where the limit is some threshold θ• G3. Reflect on cultural awareness. In the cases when the evidence (from user model) suggests that there is good exposure to a particular culture cluster
  • Prompt Model: Using User Model, Globe Model• User Model: No exposure to Globe cultural cluster (‘Eastern Europe’)• General Goal: Create Awareness• Aim: to create awareness for the ‘Eastern Europe’ cluster and influence the content user browses.
  • Prompt Model: Using UserModel, Globe Model
  • Prompt Model: Using User Model, Hofstede Model• User Model: The user has exposure to countries with contrasting power distance index (PDI- as defined by Hofstede)• General Goal: Create Awareness• Aim: to create awareness by informing about contrasting PDI
  • Prompt Model: Using User Model, Hofstede Model• User Model: The user has exposure to countries with contrasting power distance index (PDI- as defined by Hofstede)• General Goal: Create Awareness• Aim: to create awareness by informing about contrasting PDI
  • Prompt Model: Using Interaction Focus, Hofstede/Globe Model• Interaction Focus: The user is at an Entity page, that contains comment mentioning countries.• Condition: countries mentioned in comment are within a cluster• Specific Goal: Inform the user about countries belonging to a specific cluster
  • Future work• Prompt Model – Type of the prompts and list so far is what can be generated – Which prompt to display & when (e.g. more than one matching specific goal) is not worked out yet – “WHAT, HOW” is answered but not “WHEN” – Interaction history can be important – Evaluation
  • 1. Learning context:– Informal Learning is important– Social spaces and user generated content offer new opportunities2. Technology:– Semantic Nudges to empower exploration in Semantic Data Browser– Cultural Prompts for introducing cultural aspects in semantic data browserThank You!Dr Dhaval Thakker, Research Fellow, University of LeedsD.Thakker@leeds.ac.ukhttp://www.imreal-project.eu/