Plan Your Retirement & Not Uncle Sam's

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The Truth About Qualified Plans

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Plan Your Retirement & Not Uncle Sam's

  1. 1. Are You Planning for Your Retirement or Uncle Sam’s?<br />RETIREMENT<br />AFTER<br />TAXES<br />Your 401(k), 403(b), IRA and Pension Benefits<br />will probably be taxable at a higher rate at retirement<br />
  2. 2. If What You Know to Be True Turned Out Not to Be True, When Would You Want to Know?<br />“The problem in America isn’t so much what people don’t know; the problem is what people think they know that just ain’t so.”<br />
  3. 3. FOUR PHASES OF RETIREMENT PLANNING<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Taxed<br />Taxed<br />Traditional Qualified Plans: IRAs & 401(k)s/403(b)s<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />ACCUMULATION<br />TRANSFER<br />The Four Phases of Retirement Planning<br />
  4. 4. FOUR PHASES OF RETIREMENT PLANNING<br />Traditional Qualified Plans: IRAs & 401(k)s/403(b)s<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />ACCUMULATION<br />TRANSFER<br />The Four Phases of Retirement Planning<br />FOUR PHASES OF RETIREMENT PLANNING<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Taxed<br />Taxed<br />Phase I—Contribution<br />The first phase of retirement planning is the contribution phase. During this phase, we make contributions or deposits into investments or savings vehicles. If the account is a qualified plan, we are allowed to deduct those contributions from our gross income on our tax return or contribute money with pre-taxed dollars. (Otherwise, the contribution would be done with after-tax dollars.)<br />
  5. 5. FOUR PHASES OF RETIREMENT PLANNING<br />Traditional Qualified Plans: IRAs & 401(k)s/403(b)s<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />ACCUMULATION<br />TRANSFER<br />The Four Phases of Retirement Planning<br />FOUR PHASES OF RETIREMENT PLANNING<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Taxed<br />Taxed<br />Phase II—Accumulation<br />The second phase of our retirement planning overlaps the first phase. In this phase, we can accumulate money through compound in­terest, asset appreciation, or the reinvestment of dividends and capital gains. The accumulation takes place free of tax under qualified plans because any dividends, capital gains, or credited interest stays and compounds with the account and is not reportable as a taxable event on your annual tax return. Therefore, the compounding that takes place in a tax-deferred environment allows greater growth because the “children” of the investments (the interest) also help your account to blossom without being taxed during the accumulation phase.<br />This arrangement may seem ideal—to be able to contribute dollars before being taxed and have them continue to compound and grow without being taxed on the gain during the growth process. Most retirement account advisors focus only on the contribution and accumulation phases. I ask, however, “What about the most important phase, the time when you will use your accumulated money during retirement?”<br />
  6. 6. FOUR PHASES OF RETIREMENT PLANNING<br />Traditional Qualified Plans: IRAs & 401(k)s/403(b)s<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />ACCUMULATION<br />TRANSFER<br />The Four Phases of Retirement Planning<br />FOUR PHASES OF RETIREMENT PLANNING<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Taxed<br />Taxed<br />Phase III—Distribution<br />The distribution phase is when we withdraw money for retirement income. Under traditional IRAs and 401(k)s, we must now report 100 percent of our distribution on our annual tax return to be taxed. All too often, when we thought we would be in a lower bracket, we find ourselves in a bracket as high—or higher. We are no longer contributing money to IRAs; we have no mortgage interest deductions because our mortgage is paid off; we no longer have children at home (who qualify as dependents); and so on.<br />
  7. 7. DISTRIBUTION<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />ACCUMULATION<br />TRANSFER<br />FOUR PHASES OF RETIREMENT PLANNING<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Tax<br />Favored<br />Taxed<br />Taxed<br />Phase IV—Transfer<br />What if you do not use all of the money before you pass away? What happens to your qualified retirement funds during the transfer of that money to a spouse or non-spousal heir? The transfer phase is often overlooked until it is too late.<br />People don’t want to outlive their money, so they try to keep enough saved in case they need long-term health care. (The fastest-growing age group in American society is the group over age 100.) But we are not getting out of here alive, so when people do die, they usu­ally end up leaving behind some money. If that money is in a qualified retirement plan, the beneficiaries will be subject to income tax when they use the money, and might even be subject to an additional estate tax. Estate tax may be due (based on the size of the estate and the tax laws at the time of death) upon the second of two spouses’ deaths, as the remaining money passes down to non-spousal heirs. Therefore, retirement plan assets may be taxed twice.<br />To avoid this, many financial advisors recommend the heirs use a “stretch IRA,” which means that either the IRA continues to grow tax-deferred or the distributions are stretched out over a long period of time. Under such arrangements, the taxes might be less in each given year than if the entire account were distributed in one year; but string­ing out the tax liability may end up increasing the overall tax that is paid. It may be better to bite the bullet, pay the tax in today’s brackets, and re-position the net after-tax amount into vehicles that will grow from that point forward tax-free. <br />
  8. 8. Tax Bracket: Higher or Lower at Retirement?<br />When You Retire…<br />Do you think your Tax Bracket<br />will be Higher, the SameorLower<br />than what it is now?<br />INCOME TAX RATES<br />
  9. 9. History of the Marginal Tax Bracket<br />Tax Foundation- Federal Income Tax Rates 1913-2007<br />
  10. 10. History of the Marginal Tax Bracket<br />N I XON<br />G<br />H<br />BUS H<br />W I L SON<br />E I S ENHOWE R<br />FORD<br />ROOSVELT<br />C L I NTON<br />C A R T E R<br />HARD I N G<br />J F K<br />COOLIDGE<br />JOHN SON<br />G<br />W<br />BUS H<br />REAGAN<br />TRUMAN<br />HOOV E R<br />Tax Foundation- Federal Income Tax Rates 1913-2007<br />
  11. 11. Federal Income TaxMarginal Tax Rate History( 1913 – 2009 )<br />100%<br />90%<br />80%<br />70%<br />60%<br />50%<br />40%<br />30%<br />20%<br />10%<br />0%<br />1913<br />1919<br />1925<br />1931<br />1937<br />1943<br />1949<br />1955<br />1961<br />1967<br />1973<br />1979<br />1985<br />1991<br />1997<br />2003<br />2009<br />Highest Marginal Tax Rates<br />Lowest Marginal Tax Rates<br />
  12. 12. History of High Tax Rates<br />The last time the “highest” taxes were this low was in 1991 at 31%!<br />The last time the 10% “lowest” rate of today was back in 1941!<br />
  13. 13. Federal Income Tax Marginal Tax Bracket History<br />
  14. 14. TAXES<br />FEDERAL INCOME TAX ~ SOCIAL SECURITY TAX ~ STATE TAX ~ CITY TAX ~ COUNTY TAX ~ PROPERTY TAX ~ PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX ~ SCHOOL TAX ~ LONG CAPITAL GAINS TAX ~ SHORT CAPITAL GAINS TAX ~ SALES TAX ~ ESTATE TAX ~ GASOLINE TAX ~ WATER TAX ~ SEWER TAX ~ TAX ON ENERGY – GAS ~ ELECTRIC ~ HEATING OIL ~ BUSINESS TAX ~ AIRPORT TAX ~ TELEPHONE TAX ~ LICENSE PLATE TAX ~ HOTEL TAX ~ CABLE TV TAX ~ USER TAXES ~ UNEMPLOYMENT TAX ~ WORKERS COMP. TAX ~ 100’S OF REGULATORY FEES ~ CIGARETTE TAX ~ CORPORATE INCOME TAX ~ INHERITANCE TAX ~ ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE TAX ~ INVENTORY TAX ~ MARRIAGE LICENSE TAX ~ LIQUOR TAX ~ BUILDING PERMIT TAX ~ MEDICARE TAX ~ FISHING LICENSE TAX ~ REAL ESTATE TAX ~ FOOD LICENSE TAX ~ FUEL PERMIT TAX ~ HUNTING LICENSE TAX ~ ROAD USAGE TAX (TRUCKERS) ~ LUXURY TAX ~ RECREATIONAL VEHICLE TAX ~ UTILITY TAX ~ SEPTIC PERMIT TAX ~ WELL PERMIT TAX ~ ROAD TOLL BOOTH TAX ~ VEHICLE SALES TAX ~ WORKERS COMPENSATION TAX ~ TRAILER REGISTRATION TAX ~ WATERCRAFT REGISTRATION TAX ~ LONG TERM CAPITAL GAINS TAX ~ SHORT TERM CAPITAL GAINS TAX ~ TELEPHONE FEDERAL EXCISE TAX ~ TELEPHONE STATE AND LOCAL TAX ~ TELEPHONE USAGE CHARGE TAX ~ TELEPHONE FEDERAL UNIVERSAL SERVICE FEE TAX<br />FEDERAL INCOME TAX ~ SOCIAL SECURITY TAX ~ STATE TAX ~ CITY TAX ~ COUNTY TAX ~ PROPERTY TAX ~ PERSONAL PROPERTY TAX ~ SCHOOL TAX ~ LONG CAPITAL GAINS TAX ~ SHORT CAPITAL GAINS TAX ~ SALES TAX ~ ESTATE TAX ~ GASOLINE TAX ~ WATER TAX ~ SEWER TAX ~ TAX ON ENERGY – GAS ~ ELECTRIC ~ HEATING OIL ~ BUSINESS TAX ~ AIRPORT TAX ~ TELEPHONE TAX ~ LICENSE PLATE TAX ~ HOTEL TAX ~ CABLE TV TAX ~ USER TAXES ~ UNEMPLOYMENT TAX ~ WORKERS COMP. TAX ~ 100’S OF REGULATORY FEES ~ CIGARETTE TAX ~ CORPORATE INCOME TAX ~ INHERITANCE TAX ~ ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE TAX ~ INVENTORY TAX ~ MARRIAGE LICENSE TAX ~ LIQUOR TAX ~ BUILDING PERMIT TAX ~ MEDICARE TAX ~ FISHING LICENSE TAX ~ REAL ESTATE TAX ~ FOOD LICENSE TAX ~ FUEL PERMIT TAX ~ HUNTING LICENSE TAX ~ ROAD USAGE TAX (TRUCKERS) ~ LUXURY TAX ~ RECREATIONAL VEHICLE TAX ~ UTILITY TAX ~ SEPTIC PERMIT TAX ~ WELL PERMIT TAX ~ ROAD TOLL BOOTH TAX ~ VEHICLE SALES TAX ~ WORKERS COMPENSATION TAX ~ TRAILER REGISTRATION TAX ~ WATERCRAFT REGISTRATION TAX ~ LONG TERM CAPITAL GAINS TAX ~ SHORT TERM CAPITAL GAINS TAX ~ TELEPHONE FEDERAL EXCISE TAX ~ TELEPHONE STATE AND LOCAL TAX ~ TELEPHONE USAGE CHARGE TAX ~ TELEPHONE FEDERAL UNIVERSAL SERVICE FEE TAX<br />
  15. 15. Hidden (Stealth) Taxes<br />Accounts Receivable Tax<br />Amusement Tax<br />Blueberry Tax<br />Building Permit Tax<br />Corporate Income Tax <br />Flush Tax<br />Fountain Soda Tax <br />Fuel Permit Tax<br />Fur Clothing Tax <br />Gasoline Tax<br />Inheritance Tax<br />Liquor Tax<br />Marriage License Tax <br />Medicare Tax <br />Recreational Vehicle Tax <br />Road Usage Tax <br />Septic Permit Tax<br />Service Charge Tax<br />Social Security Tax<br />Sparkler and Novelties Tax<br />Tattoo Tax<br />Telephone Federal Excise Tax <br />Telephone Federal Tax<br />Telephone Federal Universal Service Tax <br />Telephone State and Local Tax<br />Toll Bridge Tax<br />Toll Road Booth Tax<br />Trailer Registration Tax<br />Utilities Tax<br />Vehicle License Registration Tax <br />Vehicle Sales Tax<br />Wagering Tax<br />Watercraft Registration Tax<br />Well Permit Tax<br />
  16. 16. Social Security Benefit Taxation<br />
  17. 17. LEVEL 1. At this level, no Social Security benefits are taxed. So, 85 cents of each dollar goes to the employee and 15 cents to the IRS. That's a good deal that's rapidly disappearing.<br />LEVEL 2. At this level, 50 cents of Social Security benefits are taxed for each dollar withdrawn. And the likely tax rate is 15 percent. So, 77.5 cents of each dollar will go to the employee and 22.5 cents will go to the IRS. Basically, about two- thirds of the employer contribution goes straight to the IRS.<br />LEVEL 3. Here, 85 cents of Social Security benefits are taxed for each dollar withdrawn, and the basic tax rate is 15 percent. So, 72.25 cents of each dollar goes to the employee and 27.75 cents of each dollar goes to the IRS. About 84 percent of the employer contribution goes to the IRS.<br />LEVEL 4. As with Level 3, 85 cents of Social Security benefits are taxed for each dollar withdrawn, but the basic tax rate is 25 percent. As a consequence, 53.75 cents of each dollar goes to the employee and 46.25 cents goes to the IRS. In effect, the entire employer contribution (33 cents) plus 13.25 cents of the employee contribution goes to the IRS.<br />How this tax mess will affect you depends on your income level and your age. If you are young, odds are your employer contribution will never buy you a slice of bread. It's really a fund for the IRS.<br />BUSINESS & PERSONAL FINANCE, statesman.com Sunday, May 27, 2007<br />
  18. 18. Excise Tax<br />“Those who don't remember history<br />are doomed to repeat it.”<br />Congress in 1986 implemented<br />an additional 15% Tax on<br />Retirement Savings Withdrawals <br />to pay this country's bills.<br />It lasted for 10 years and became<br />known as “an IRA for the IRS.”<br />For heirs, the total for ALL taxes was over 100%!<br />A Court Ruled the Maximum Tax was 100%!<br />
  19. 19. As a graduate student at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, I attended lectures on various topics.<br />During a discussion on Hemophilia, the professor discussed how a person can go into shock or die from slow, continuous bleeding.<br />“Ah,”said a voice in the back of the room, “The IRS Method.”<br />
  20. 20. Planning for Success or Failure?<br />Now tell me…<br />Are you planning be financially successful or are you planning to be a failure? <br />
  21. 21. There are only Two Main Sources of Income<br />PEOPLE AT WORK<br />MONEY AT WORK<br />
  22. 22. Being Financially SuccessfulMeans You Have Accumulated Money to Work for You<br />BUT at RETIREMENT…<br />No more Tax-Deferral Plan<br />No more Child Tax Credit<br />No more Mortgage Tax Deduction<br />This Success May Result in<br /> Being in the Same Tax Bracket<br />or Possibly at a Higher Tax Bracket!<br />Your Financial Success & Loss of Tax Benefits<br />May Result Being in the Same Tax Bracket<br />or Most Probably at a Higher Tax Bracket!<br />
  23. 23. Qualified Plans<br />Qualified Plans<br />What’s the Rest of the Story?<br />403 b<br />TSA<br />
  24. 24. Qualified PlansWhat’s the Rest of the Story?<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 15%<br />$11,250<br />Capital:<br />Rate of Return:<br />Interest Income:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Tax to Uncle Sam:<br />Retirement Income:<br />Annual Tax Payment:<br />Net Spendable Retirement Income:<br />$75,000<br />11,250<br />$63,750<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Annual IRA/401(k) Contribution:<br />$6,000 x 35 Years = $210,000<br />Tax Bracket:<br />15%<br />Total Tax Deferral:<br />$900 x 35 Years = $31,500<br />ACCUMULATION<br />PHASE<br />$6,000 per Year Growing at 7.5% for 35 Years<br />(Tax-Deferred) + 1 Payment = $1,000,000<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Just<br />3 Years<br />of Taxes<br />= $75,000<br />In Just <br />2.8 Years of Taxes <br />= $31,500<br />and pay tax as long as Principal is not depleted.<br />
  25. 25. Qualified PlansWhat’s the Rest of the Story?<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 20%<br />$15,000<br />Capital:<br />Rate of Return:<br />Interest Income:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Tax to Uncle Sam:<br />Retirement Income:<br />Annual Tax Payment:<br />Net Spendable Retirement Income:<br />$75,000<br />15,000<br />$60,000<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Annual IRA/401(k) Contribution:<br />$6,000 x 35 Years = $210,000<br />Tax Bracket:<br />20%<br />Total Tax Deferral:<br />$1,200 x 35 Years = $42,000<br />ACCUMULATION<br />PHASE<br />$6,000 per Year Growing at 7.5% for 35 Years<br />(Tax-Deferred) + 1 Payment of $6,000= $1,000,000<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Just<br />4 Years<br />of Taxes<br />= $75,000<br />In Just <br />2.8 Years of Taxes <br />= $42,000<br />and pay tax as long as Principal is not depleted.<br />
  26. 26. Qualified PlansWhat’s the Rest of the Story?<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 25%<br />$18,750<br />Capital:<br />Rate of Return:<br />Interest Income:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Tax to Uncle Sam:<br />Retirement Income:<br />Annual Tax Payment:<br />Net Spendable Retirement Income:<br />$75,000<br />18,750<br />$56,250<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Annual IRA/401(k) Contribution:<br />$6,000 x 35 Years = $210,000<br />Tax Bracket:<br />25%<br />Total Tax Deferral:<br />$1,500 x 35 Years = $52,500<br />ACCUMULATION<br />PHASE<br />$6,000 per Year Growing at 7.5% for 35 Years<br />(Tax-Deferred) + 1 Payment of $6,000= $1,000,000<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Just<br />4 Years<br />of Taxes<br />= $75,000<br />In Just <br />2.8 Years of Taxes <br />= $52,500<br />and pay tax as long as Principal is not depleted.<br />
  27. 27. Qualified PlansWhat’s the Rest of the Story?<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 33.3%<br />$25,000<br />Capital:<br />Rate of Return:<br />Interest Income:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Tax to Uncle Sam:<br />Retirement Income:<br />Annual Tax Payment:<br />Net Spendable Retirement Income:<br />$75,000<br />25,000<br />$50,000<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Annual IRA/401(k) Contribution:<br />$6,000 x 35 Years = $210,000<br />Tax Bracket:<br />33.3%<br />Total Tax Deferral:<br />$2,000 x 35 Years = $70,000<br />ACCUMULATION<br />PHASE<br />$6,000 per Year Growing at 7.5% for 35 Years<br />(Tax-Deferred) + 1 Payment = $1,000,000<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Just<br />3 Years<br />of Taxes<br />= $75,000<br />In Just <br />2.8 Years of Taxes <br />= $70,000<br />and pay tax as long as Principal is not depleted.<br />
  28. 28. Qualified PlansWhat’s the Rest of the Story?<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 15%<br />$11,250<br />Capital:<br />Rate of Return:<br />Interest Income:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Tax to Uncle Sam:<br />Retirement Income:<br />Annual Tax Payment:<br />Net Spendable Retirement Income:<br />$75,000<br />11,250<br />$63,750<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Annual IRA/401(k) Contribution:<br />$6,000 x 35 Years = $210,000<br />Tax Bracket:<br />33.3%<br />Total Tax Deferral:<br />$ 2,000 x 35 Years = $70,000<br />ACCUMULATION<br />PHASE<br />$6,000 per Year Growing at 7.5% for 35 Years<br />(Tax-Deferred) + 1 Payment = $1,000,000<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Just<br />3 Years<br />of Taxes<br />= $75,000<br />In Just <br />6.22 Years of Taxes = $70,000<br />and pay tax as long as Principal is not depleted.<br />
  29. 29. Qualified PlansWhat’s the Rest of the Story?<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 20%<br />$15,000<br />Capital:<br />Rate of Return:<br />Interest Income:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Tax to Uncle Sam:<br />Retirement Income:<br />Annual Tax Payment:<br />Net Spendable Retirement Income:<br />$75,000<br />15,000<br />$60,000<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Annual IRA/401(k) Contribution:<br />$6,000 x 35 Years = $210,000<br />Tax Bracket:<br />33.3%<br />Total Tax Deferral:<br />$ 2,000 x 35 Years = $70,000<br />ACCUMULATION<br />PHASE<br />$6,000 per Year Growing at 7.5% for 35 Years<br />(Tax-Deferred) + 1 Payment = $1,000,000<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Just<br />3 Years<br />of Taxes<br />= $75,000<br />In Just <br />4.67 Years of Taxes = $70,000<br />and pay tax as long as Principal is not depleted.<br />
  30. 30. Qualified PlansWhat’s the Rest of the Story?<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 25%<br />$18,750<br />Capital:<br />Rate of Return:<br />Interest Income:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Tax to Uncle Sam:<br />Retirement Income:<br />Annual Tax Payment:<br />Net Spendable Retirement Income:<br />$75,000<br />18,750<br />$56,250<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Annual IRA/401(k) Contribution:<br />$6,000 x 35 Years = $210,000<br />Tax Bracket:<br />33.3%<br />Total Tax Deferral:<br />$ 2,000 x 35 Years = $70,000<br />ACCUMULATION<br />PHASE<br />$6,000 per Year Growing at 7.5% for 35 Years<br />(Tax-Deferred) + 1 Payment = $1,000,000<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Just<br />3 Years<br />of Taxes<br />= $75,000<br />In Just <br />3.73 Years of Taxes = $70,000<br />and pay tax as long as Principal is not depleted.<br />
  31. 31. Qualified PlansWhat’s the Rest of the Story?<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 33.3%<br />$25,000<br />Capital:<br />Rate of Return:<br />Interest Income:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Tax to Uncle Sam:<br />Retirement Income:<br />Annual Tax Payment:<br />Net Spendable Retirement Income:<br />$75,000<br />25,000<br />$50,000<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Annual IRA/401(k) Contribution:<br />$6,000 x 35 Years = $210,000<br />Tax Bracket:<br />33.3%<br />Total Tax Deferral:<br />$ 2,000 x 35 Years = $70,000<br />ACCUMULATION<br />PHASE<br />$6,000 per Year Growing at 7.5% for 35 Years<br />(Tax-Deferred) + 1 Payment = $1,000,000<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Just<br />3 Years<br />of Taxes<br />= $75,000<br />In Just <br />2.8 Years of Taxes = $70,000<br />and pay tax as long as Principal is not depleted.<br />
  32. 32. Qualified PlansWhat’s the Rest of the Story?<br />CONTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />Annual IRA/401(k) Contribution:<br />$6,000 x 35 Years = $210,000<br />Tax Bracket:<br />33.3%<br />Total Tax Deferral:<br />$2,000 x 35 Years = $70,000<br />ACCUMULATION<br />PHASE<br />$6,000 per Year Growing at 7.5% for 35 Years<br />(Tax-Deferred) + 1 Payment of $6,000 = $1,000,000<br />DISTRIBUTION<br />PHASE<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 15%<br />$11,250<br />Capital:<br />Rate of Return:<br />Interest Income:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Tax to Uncle Sam:<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 33.3%<br />$25,000<br />$1,000,000<br />x 7.5%<br />$75,000<br />x 25%<br />$18,750<br />Just<br />5 Years<br />of Taxes<br />= $75,000<br />Retirement Income:<br />Annual Tax Payment:<br />Net Spendable Retirement Income:<br />$75,000<br />11,250<br />$63,750<br />$75,000<br />25,000<br />$50,000<br />$75,000<br />18,750<br />$56,250<br />2.8 Years<br />3.7 Years<br />6.2 Years<br />Number of Years for Paid Taxes to Equal $70,000:<br />
  33. 33. 2010 Individual Income Tax Rates<br />www.taxpolicycenter.org/taxfacts/Content/PDF/individual_rates.pdf<br />
  34. 34. Whose Future RetirementAre You Saving for?<br />Your<br />Retirement?<br />Uncle Sam’s<br />Retirement?<br />or<br />
  35. 35. The Government Knows Exactly How & When to Harvest<br />PREDICTABILITY EXERCISES<br />
  36. 36. Predictability Exercise<br />When I have an audience do this exercise, I know exactly what about 80% of them will come up with for their answers. <br /> Let's see if you are among the majority. <br />
  37. 37. Predictability Exercise<br />D<br />E<br />G<br />Decipher the following three words that are spelled backward: kramneD, tnahpelE, yarG<br />
  38. 38. Predictability Exercise<br />D<br />E<br />G<br />Are these the three words you came up with?<br />Denmark, Elephant, Gray<br />How did I do that? I simply created Predictability.<br />
  39. 39. Who is Your Role Model?<br /> Pick your favorite number between 1-9<br />Multiply it by 3<br />Add 3 <br />Again multiply by 3 and you'll get a 2 digit number<br />Add the digits together<br />Now with that number, see who your ROLE MODEL is by matching it with the list that follows.<br />
  40. 40. Who is Your Role Model?<br />1. Albert Einstein<br />2. Abraham Lincoln<br />3. Mother Teresa<br />4. John F. Kennedy<br />5. Bill Gates<br /> 6. Mahatma Gandhi<br /> 7. Thomas Edison<br /> 8. Helen Keller<br /> 9. DUKE WILWAYCO<br />10. Nelson Mandela<br />
  41. 41. Of course, tax deductibility enables you to save more during your working years.<br />But does it actually result in more “net spendable income” during your retirement years?<br />Tax-Deductibility or Net Spendable Income?<br />
  42. 42. The Best Retirement Plan might not be the one that accumulates the most money , but the one that produces the most “after-tax income.”<br />Best Retirement Plan<br />
  43. 43. Summing It Up<br />“Retirement planning strategies are no different. <br />Predictably, qualified retirement plans motivate the majority of people to invest in order to get tax-favored treatment during the “Contribution” and “Accumulation” phases of retirement planning.Later, when traditional qualified plans are liquidated and used for retirement, they produce the taxable results that the government predicted and intended.It always sounds better to us when we are shown the tax breaks we can get immediately. But I maintain it doesn't make sense to postpone tax for some perceived advantage in the future.”<br />- Douglas R. Andrew<br />
  44. 44. POSTPONING TAX MAY NOT BE THE BEST IDEA?<br />
  45. 45. Postponing Taxes: Is It the Best Idea?<br />Pre-Tax:<br />Interest Rate:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Post Tax:<br />Interest Rate:<br />Tax Bracket:<br />Annual Pre-Tax Contribution:Assumed Tax Bracket:<br />Annual After-Tax Contribution:<br />$6,000<br />6.00%28.00%<br />$4,320<br />6.00%28.00%<br />$6,000<br />28%<br />$4,320<br />Cost of Money:<br />Tax Paid:<br />No. of Years:<br />6%$1,68030<br />End of Year Fund:<br />@ 28% Tax Rate:<br />Net After Tax:<br />$502,810<br />140,787<br />$362,023<br />Taxes plus Lost Opportunity Cost:<br />$140,787<br />
  46. 46. Pay Tax<br />on the Seed?<br />Pay Tax<br />on the Harvest?<br />You Have a Choice<br />Which Would You Prefer?<br />
  47. 47. Qualified Plans<br />The Best Savings Bond Uncle Sam Has Ever Devised for Himself<br />Uncles Sam’s Best Savings Bond<br />
  48. 48. Qualified Plans<br />“Uncle Sam’s Money Farm”<br />PLAN PARTICIPANT<br />…and you are one of his farm hands!<br />During the Distribution Phase, after returning all the taxes you deferred during the Contribution Phase, he is also assured of a Retirement Annuity or a Lump Sum from you by way of taxes.<br />
  49. 49. R<br />S<br />I<br />John and Mary Jones’ hope is that maybe someday their ship will come in. One thing they’re sure of, is that when that day comes, the will be there... to help unload it for them.<br />
  50. 50. POSTPONING TAX MAY NOT BE THE BEST IDEA!<br />Because your 401(k), 403(b), IRA and pension benefits<br />will probably be taxable at a higher rate at retirement<br />RETIREMENT<br />AFTER<br />TAXES<br />Would you be interested in a strategy:<br /><ul><li>Where there are no restrictions on how much you can put in?
  51. 51. Where you can withdraw money if needed without IRS penalties?
  52. 52. Where you are not obligated to put it back unless you want to?
  53. 53. Where your retirement funds accumulate tax-deferred ?
  54. 54. Where you can access the funds whenever you want to, on a tax-free basis (including the interest or gain), without having to wait until you’re Age 59½?
  55. 55. Where if you don't use up your retirement funds before you pass away, they will blossom in value and can be transferred free of income tax to your heirs?
  56. 56. In case of Disability, your plan continues to grow because your contributions are paid for you?</li></li></ul><li>You Need to Act<br />“ But even if you are on the right track,you’ll get run overif you just sit there.”- Will Rogers<br />
  57. 57. We Can Help YouReverse the Situationand Put You in Control!<br />for viewing the presentation.<br />We hope it helped clarify what Qualified Plans are all about.<br />
  58. 58. SynergiaBusiness Presentations<br />Joaquin “Duke” G. Wilwayco8301 Ephraim Road, Austin, TX 78717Phone: (512) 799-2999<br />Fax: (512) 671-6377Email: dgwilwayco@aol.com<br />
  59. 59. You Need to Act<br />

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