Use of Metaphor

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Compare the use of metaphor to convey intended message in at least three of the set texts.

By Cheryl Xu, Janice Leung and Mavis Cheng

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Use of Metaphor

  1. 1. English  Literature  Presentation   Topic  10    Compare  the  use  of  metaphor  to  convey  intended   message  in  at  least  three  of  the  set  texts.   Group  8   Mavis  Cheng   Cheryl  Xu   Janice  Leung  
  2. 2. Texts  chosen   •  ‘Stopping  by  Woods  on  a  Snowy  Evening’  by   Robert  Frost   •  ‘Mushrooms’  by  Sylvia  Plath   •  ‘The  Chrysanthemums’  by  John  Steinbeck   •  ‘Seventeen  Syllables’  by  Hisaye  Yamamoto  
  3. 3. Escapism/  Desire  for  Freedom     1.  ‘Stopping  by  Woods  on  a  Snowy  Evening’    Woods  → freedom    Realistic  world    responsibilities  +  burden           •  The  persona  wants  freedom  from  responsibilities,  which   is  what  the  woods  represent.  ‘The  woods  are  lovely,   dark,  and  deep’  (13),  seducing  the  persona  away  from   the  ‘promises  to  keep’(14).     → related  to  responsibilities/  social  roles  
  4. 4. Escapism/  Desire  for  Freedom   2.  ‘Mushrooms’   •       The  mushrooms  =  women  in  society.      They  penetrate  through  the  bounds  of  social  expectations,   with  their  ‘soft  Uists  [insisting]  on/  Heaving  the  needles’   and  ‘[Widening]  the  crannies,/  [Shouldering]  through   holes’.  They  act  like  mushrooms,  ‘quietly’  gaining  power  in   society.   Power  expanding  →  escape  from  domestic  restrictions  
  5. 5. Escapism/  Desire  for  Freedom   3.    ‘The  Chrysanthemums’   • Tinker  =  the  outside  world    -­‐  “Here  eyes  shone,  she  tore  off  the  battered  hat  and  shook   out  her  dark  pretty  hair.”  → liberation    -­‐  “She  was  kneeling  on  the  ground  looking  up  at  him.  Her   breast  swelled  passionately”,  “her  face  was  tight  with   eagerness”,  “Elisa’s  voice  grew  husky”  → connects  with  the   tinker   • Escapism:  out  from  behind  fence  → breaks  free          
  6. 6. Escapism/  Desire  for  Freedom   4.  ‘Seventeen  Syllables’   •  Tome  wants  to  be  isolated  in  the  world  of  haiku,  the  place   of  her  autonomy,  where  she  Uinds  freedom  of  her  Ulow  of   creativity.  She  is  able  to  express  herself  through  Japanese   literature.   •  Haiku  =  creativity,  which  enables  her  to  connect  with  the   outside  world.  
  7. 7. Responsibilities/  Social  roles   1.  ‘Stopping  by  Woods  on  a  Snowy  Evening’   •  ‘Promises  to  keep   → his  responsibilities  ‘miles’  away.      He  has  ‘miles  to  go’  before  he  can  Uinally  rest  from  work   and  responsibilities.  
  8. 8. Responsibilities/  Social  roles   2.  ‘Mushrooms’   •  Women,  as  mushrooms,  have  a  domestic  responsibility  in   society.    →‘heaving  the  needles’    →  ‘We  are  shelves,  we  are/  Tables’  (furniture  &  women   are  both  quiet  and  easily  found)   •  Women  have  no  social  standing   →‘we  are  edible’  
  9. 9. Responsibilities/  Social  roles   3.    ‘The  Chrysanthemums’   •  Elisa’s  self-­‐imposed  responsibilities:        chrysanthemums  =  babies,  children    ‘No  aphids  were  there,  no  sowbugs  or  snails  or  cutworms.   Her  terrier  Uingers  destroyed  such  pests  before  they  could   get  started’    Elisa  takes  good  care  of  her  chrysantheums   as  if  they  were  her  babies.  
  10. 10. Responsibilities/  Social  roles   4.  ‘Seventeen  Syllables’   •  Tome  has  the  responsibilities  of  a  Japanese-­‐American  wife   and  mother.  She  has  the  responsibility  of  passing  on  the   traditions  of  the  Japanese  culture,  such  as  the  language  and   its  literature.  She  teaches  her  daughter  Rosie  about  them,   though  Rosie  fails  to  understand.  
  11. 11. Realization   1.  ‘Stopping  by  Woods  on  a  Snowy  Evening’   •  ‘To  watch  his  woods  Uill  up  with  snow’  → escape.     •  ‘Little  horse’  ‘gives  his  harness  bells  a  shake’  to  warn  the   persona  from  being  allured  by  the  thought  of  escaping   from  his  ‘promises’.     •  The  horse  makes  the  persona  realize  that  he  has  ‘promises   to  keep’,  and  ‘miles  to  go  before  [he  sleeps]’.  
  12. 12. Realization   2.  ‘Mushrooms’   •  Women  realize  that  there  are  ‘so  many  of  [them]’  that   they  feel  proud  of  being  multiple.     →Realize  their  strength  when  they  unite,  and  they   ‘shall  by  morning  Inherit  the  earth.’  
  13. 13. Realization   3.    ‘The  Chrysanthemums’   •  Tinker  =  Elisa’s  inspiration  for  her  realization  of  her  need   of  emotionally  opening  up  to  others.  The  tinker  somehow   emotionally  connects  with  Elisa,  who  starts  to  open  her   heart  to  others.    e.g.:   →‘Elisa  took  off  her  gloves  and  stuffed  them  in  the  apron  pocket  with  the  scissors.’   →‘She  was  kneeling  on  the  ground  looking  up  at  him.  Her  breast  swelleed   passionately.’   →‘In  the  bathroom  she  tore  off  her  soiled  clothes  and  Ulung  them  into  the  corner.   And  then  she  scrubbed  herself  with  a  little  block  of  purnice,  legs  and  thighs,   loins  and  chest  and  arms,  until  her  skin  was  scratched  and  red.’  
  14. 14. Realization   4.  ‘Seventeen  Syllables’   •  Tome  realizes  that  she  can  only  be  free  in  writing  haikus.   Haikus  =  her  freedom  in  expressing  her  ideas.  She  is  able  to   connect  with  the  Japanese-­‐American  society  through   publishing  her  work  in  Japanese  newspapers.  

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