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Web 2.0 Herausforderung für die Verwaltung
 

Web 2.0 Herausforderung für die Verwaltung

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  • 1992 hat eine Untersuchung der Gehirnstruktur von Primaten ergeben, dass aufgrund der Größe dieser Region (Neocortex) die maximale stabile Gruppengröße ungefähr 150 Individuen umfassen kann. Robin Dunbar, Professor für Evolutionspsychologie von der Universität Liverpol hat darauf 1998 eine Untersuchung zur Größe der sozialen Netzwerkstruktur von Menschen anhand des Austauschs von Weihnachtskarten durchgeführt. Das Ergebnis war die Bestätigung dieser Zahl von 150, die seither den Namen Dunbar Zahl trägt. Diese Zahl wurde dann durchaus kontroversiel diskutiert, konnte aber durch geschichtliche Beobachtungen bestätigt werden. Die typische Sippengröße in der Steinzeit betrug um 150 Individuen, überstieg eine Hutter-Gemeinschaft die Größe von ca. 150 musste eine Abspaltung stattfinden oder wenn man die Truppengrößen von Armeen betrachtet, bewegt sich diese auch in diesem Bereich.
  • In the past ground breaking technological advancements inavertable changed the way we communicate. The number one media revolution was printing. While not strictly invented by Gutenberg it was him who developed a way to easily reproduce and spread the written word. In certain countries of the former iron curtain printing machines and copier were forbidden as they imposed a threat to the establishment. Media revolution number 2: Wired point to point connections. It was Graham Bell from Bell Telco first brought relatives and later continents close together. Communication establishment now was a matter of seconds. Meida revolution number 3: Waves in the ether. Guglielmo Marconi realized that electromagnetic wave propagation at the light of speed can be used to transport information. The radio was born and when the technology got cheap enough, there was no place on earth, where British world service or voice of America could not be heard. Media revolution number 4 really was an improvement to voice over the air in that it was now possible to transmit pictures. When Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon to take it as property for the good of all human beings, already millions worldwide followed his first steps into space on their TV set. Unsurprisingly media revolution number 5 is the internet. This fifth revolution is different though. First it really was not the invention of a single person nor can be attributed to a single country. It is the application of different technologies working seamlessly together over well defined protocol stacks. But what it really makes to a revolution is the fact, that every single person can participate form mere information gathering up to full service providing and this often for free. The internet has reached a level of usability, technical maturity and cheapness that it can be considered a commodity. It is omnipresent. None of these former technologies have ever been brought entirely under state control even if the establishment relentlessly tried to do so. Wherever a way to detour state control has been found, it has been taken. And as it has never been so easy to be both information consumer and producer and as these two roles more and more converge into the prosumer, we can expect completely different, very direct ways of democratic involvement for the future.
  • Web 2.0 is in effect the participative web or the shift from a wide area network of unrelated largely static and content filled sites, to a conjoined virtual world of interactive conversation, conducted in real time by real people on issues which have real value. First of all, Web 2.0 has coined a number of new phrases that are very quickly becoming mainstream colloquialisms: […. Stripped ….. ] Interestingly, however, many of the ‘new’ Web 2.0 applications have origins and routes that stretch back over a decade, for example wiki, or weblog. Indeed, arguably two of the better known and indeed more commercially successful websites that have used and embraced the inclusive techniques espoused by exponents of Web 2.0 are EBay and Amazon. Neither are new, both were ahead of their time and both have withstood the boom bust economics of the early internet. Which can only really lead to one conclusion, that Web 2.0 is in actual fact the original idea behind the internet without all the hype? In effect, Web 2.0 is Web 1.0 without Web 1.5 (or the dot com bubble) jammed in between! Quite possibly. It is a reasonable assumption that the participative web, or Web 2.0 is in effect the concept that Tim Berners Lee had for package switching when he ‘invented’ the internet, but either way, it doesn’t really matter. What matters to organisations today is that the participative web has genuinely captured the imagination of web users the world over, which at 1.3 billion and counting, is a decent target audience by anyone’s standards.
  • Rob McEwen owned an underperforming gold mine in northwestern Ontario, and he needed new ideas about where to dig. So he broke new ground -- and made data on the mine available online to anyone who wanted to help. Eureka! The Internet gold rush was on. In January 1848, a work crew at John Sutter's mill, near Sacramento, California, came across a few select nuggets of gold. Before long, a half-million prospectors arrived there seeking instant riches. The gold rush was on. Some 153 years later, another gold rush broke out at an old mine called Red Lake, in northwestern Ontario. This time, the fortune hunters wielded geological-modeling software and database mining tools rather than picks and shovels. The big winners were from Australia. And they had never even seen the mine. Rob McEwen, chairman and CEO of Goldcorp Inc., based in Toronto, had triggered the gold rush by issuing an extraordinary challenge to the world's geologists: We'll show you all of our data on the Red Lake mine online if you tell us where we're likely to find the next 6 million ounces of gold. The prize: a total of $575,000, with a top award of $105,000. The mining community was flabbergasted. "We've seen very large data sets from government surveys online," says Nick Archibald, managing director of Fractal Graphics, the winning organization from West Perth, Australia. "But for a company to post that information and say, 'Here I am, warts and all,' is quite unusual indeed." McEwen knew that the contest, which he called the Goldcorp Challenge, entailed big risks. For one thing, it exposed the company to a hostile-takeover bid. But the risks of continuing to do things the old way were even greater. "Mining is one of humanity's oldest industrial pursuits," McEwen says. "This is old old economy. But a mineral discovery is like a technological discovery. There's the same rapid creation of wealth as rising expectations improve profitability. If we could find gold faster, we could really improve the value of the company." McEwen, a small, soft-spoken man with a neatly trimmed mustache and meticulous tailoring, had one big advantage over his slow-footed competitors: He wasn't a miner, he didn't think like a miner, and he wasn't constrained by a miner's conventional wisdom. As a young man, he went to work for Merrill Lynch, following his father into the investment business. But his father also had a fascination with gold, and McEwen grew up hearing tales of miners, prospectors, and grubstakes at the dinner table. Soon he was bitten by the gold bug too, and he hammered out a template of what he thought a 21st-century gold-mining company should look like. In 1989, he saw his chance. He stepped into a takeover battle as a white knight and emerged as majority owner of an old and underperforming mine in Ontario. It was hardly a dream come true. The gold market was depressed. The mine's operating costs were high. The miners went on strike. McEwen even got a death threat. But the new owner knew that the mine had potential. "The Red Lake gold district had 2 operating gold mines and 13 former mines that had produced more than 18 million ounces combined," he says. "The mine next door had produced about 10 million ounces. Ours had produced only 3 million." McEwen believed that the high-grade ore that ran through the neighboring mine was present in parts of the 55,000-acre Red Lake stake -- if only he could find it. His strategy began to take shape at a seminar at MIT in 1999. Company presidents from around the world had come there to learn about advances in information technology. Eventually, the group's attention turned to the Linux operating system and the open-source revolution. "I said, 'Open-source code! That's what I want!' " McEwen recalls. His reasoning: If he could attract the attention of world-class talent to the problem of finding more gold in Red Lake, just as Linux managed to attract world-class programmers to the cause of better software, he could tap into thousands of minds that he wouldn't normally have access to. He could also speed up exploration and improve his odds of discovery. At first, Goldcorp's geologists were appalled at the idea of exposing their super-secret data to the world. "This is a very conservative, very private industry," says Dr. James M. Franklin, former chief geoscientist for the Geological Survey of Canada and a judge in the Goldcorp Challenge. "Confidentiality and secrecy about reserves and exploration have been its watchwords. This was a totally unconventional thing to do." But in March 2000, at an industry meeting, McEwen unveiled the Goldcorp Challenge. The external response was immediate. More than 1,400 scientists, engineers, and geologists from 50 countries downloaded the company's data and started their virtual exploration. When the entries started coming in, the panel of five judges was astonished by the creativity of the submissions. The top winner was a collaboration by two groups in Australia: Fractal Graphics, in West Perth, and Taylor Wall & Associates, in Queensland, which together had developed a powerful 3-D graphical depiction of the mine. Rob McEwen owned an underperforming gold mine in northwestern Ontario, and he needed new ideas about where to dig. So he broke new ground -- and made data on the mine available online to anyone who wanted to help. Eureka! The Internet gold rush was on. For McEwen, the contest itself was a gold mine. "We have drilled four of the winners' top five targets and have hit on all four," he says. "But what's really important is that from a remote site, the winners were able to analyze a database and generate targets without ever visiting the property. It's clear that this is part of the future." Between the new high-grade discoveries and the mine's modernized facilities, Red Lake is finally performing along the lines that McEwen had envisioned. In 1996, Red Lake was producing at an annual rate of 53,000 ounces at $360 an ounce. By 2001, the mine was producing 504,000 ounces at $59 an ounce. On the open market, gold currently trades for about $307 an ounce. The grade of the ore at McEwen's mine is extraordinarily high, confirming his suspicion that the vein that ran through the neighboring mine continues through Red Lake. For McEwen, whose passion for gold is evident from the 82-pound sample rock containing 300 ounces of gold that he displays in his office and the dazzling gold, diamond, and lapis wedding ring that he sports on his finger, it doesn't get much better than this. "When you first pick up a piece of gold and hold it in your hand, when you feel the weight and see the luster, you feel like this is something special," McEwen says. "It's different than mining coal." Contact Rob McEwen by email ( [email_address] ). To learn more about all of the Fast 50 winners, click here . Sidebar: Nuggets of Wisdom Red Lake, Ontario and West Perth, Australia are at opposite ends of the earth. But that didn't stop Nick Archibald and his team of geologists at Fractal Graphics, an Australian geoscience consulting firm, from thinking that they could find gold in Canada. First-place winners of the 2001 Goldcorp Challenge, Archibald and his mates shared a grand prize of $105,000 for their presentation detailing likely targets for finding gold. "I'd never been to the mine," Archibald says. "I'd never even been to Canada." But when he learned of the contest, Archibald recognized an opportunity for his company, which specializes in the production of 3-D models of mines. The prize money was appealing, but Archibald knew that winning would give a boost to his own hopes for expansion funds as well. "Our industry has been going through a hard time," he says. "We had been trying to raise venture capital. Any positive news could only be a big help for us." Although the prize money, which Archibald's team shared with Taylor Wall & Associates, barely covered the cost of the project, the publicity has boosted the firm's business. "It would have taken us years to get the recognition in North America that this project gave us overnight," he says. More important, Archibald adds, the Challenge has opened the industry's eyes to a new way of doing exploration. "This has been a big change for mining," he says. "This has been like a beacon in a sea of darkness."
  • At the Crossroads of Media, Marketing and Technology… Home About Greg Satell Why Digital Tonto ? In the Media The Primal Forces that Drive Social Networks 2009 September 6 tags: Albert-Laszlo Barabasi , Chris Andersen , Duncan Watts , Long Tail , Mark Granovetter , Network Theory , Réka Albert , Social Media , Steven Strogatz by Greg   Print This Post Social Networks are revolutionizing how we view our world.  People are connecting, businesses are being created or transformed, and the world seems like a smaller place.  As with any transformation on a grand scale, a plethora of consultants, gurus, blogs, and how-to books have risen to meet the demand for information about the social revolution. However, it is very rare to hear anything about the underlying forces that actually drive the social network phenomenon. It’s a shame because the story is a great one that has implications, not only for social media, but for fields as diverse as counter-terrorism, ecology, economics, organizational theory and cancer research.  Network Theory has fundamentally changed our understanding about how the world works since its inception a decade ago.  Most of all, by understanding how networks form and grow, we can build better ones. Fireflies and the President of the United States Our story begins in 1996 at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, where an adventurous rock climber and former Australian Navy Officer named, Duncan Watts , was thinking about how crickets, frogs, fireflies, and pacemaker cells all seem to be able to synchronize their behavior within large groups. His mind must have began to wander because he suddenly remembered that his father once told him that everybody is just six relationships away from the President of the United States. The concept had existed in literature early in the 20th century and was documented in Stanley Milgram’s famous “ Small World Experiment ”. In a flash of inspiration he went to his PhD thesis advisor, Steven Strogatz , and told him that he wanted to, yet again, change his thesis topic.  Watts had a hunch that both phenomena might be related.  Strogatz, somewhat used to giving his brilliant student leeway, consented. The Strength of Weak Ties As he began his research, Watts came across a highly cited paper written by Mark Granovetter called “The Strength of Weak Ties” about how people find jobs.  He found that most people don’t locate employment through their friends, but through friends of friends. Granovetter dubbed these relationships “weak ties” (after the attraction between water molecules that give the liquid many of its properties).  Granovetter surmised that it is through weak ties that information is largely distributed.  While we can maintain relationships with relatively few people, the people they know greatly increase our access to facts, knowledge and wisdom. We have friends from work, school, our neighborhood, etc.  While our ties may be strong ties to us, they are weak ties to our friends from separate clusters.  For instance, the felon in our neighborhood can be connected to the law professor at our university in only two steps! Spacemen vs. Cavemen Watts also began thinking about his youthful love of science fiction and two Isaac Asimov novels in particular; one about spacemen and another about cavemen. The spacemen communicated remotely so that the people they knew didn’t know each other, while the cavemen lived in isolated groups and knew everybody their friends knew.  He decided to build a mathematical model that would describe both situations and every possibility in between. In addition to the “degrees of separation” metric (the average number of links it takes to get from one network member to another), Watts also created a “cluster coefficient,” in effect how tightly clustered communities are within the network. A good analogy is a school lunchroom.  How many people who have close relationships would be calculated by the cluster coefficient while how many introductions one would need, on average, to get to any particular person, would be the degrees of separation (or more technically, path length).  This type of calculation has been second nature for poor note-takers and class-cutters alike for ages. Armed with mathematical representations for both his “spacemen and his “cavemen” he could experiment with different types of networks. Small World Networks What he found was startling. In his model, as communities connect to each other, the social distance between people increases – up to a point – and then immediately comes crashing down.  It turns out that it takes just a little bit of mixing for the social distance to decrease by an enormous amount, but a lot of mixing to kill communities.  Although surprising, the pattern was familiar.  Similar “instantaneous phase transitions” have been long known in Physics. Moreover, he found that in almost all cases, the same result appeared, it was only a matter of time for a network under fairly normal conditions to reach the optimal state.  Globally connected networks with strong local cohesion are not only possible, they are the equilibrium case – you just needed a relatively small number of Granovetter’s “weak ties” mixed in to make the whole thing work. He called the result a “Small World Network” after Milgram’s famous experiment. Hey!  Networks Grow, Don’t They? Watts published a paper on his findings with Strogatz and it became an immediate success, widely read and cited throughout the scientific community.  At Notre Dame University, Albert-Laszlo Barabasi and his student, Réka Albert , noticed an oversight – networks grow over time and large communities within networks drive the growth.  They quickly published their own paper. What they found was that networks follow a very specific mathematical rule called a “power law” that described well known phenomena such as the “ 80/20 rule ” and Chris Andersen’s now famous long tail .  Their findings suggested that even very large networks were driven by relatively few “hubs” around which everything else was organized. The two teams continued to trade papers back and forth and in a very short time Network Theory had arrived! Implications of Network Theory for Social Media Through understanding the forces that drive social networks, we can take some practical steps to improve Social Media performance. Communities are primary :  A network is only as strong as the communities that it contains.  A big mistake that many Social Media efforts make is to pursue broad coverage early on.  Building enthusiastic, devoted communities requires a local approach (either geographically or in social space).  Those local communities have “weak ties” to other communities in other places, even faraway places.  So you really can think globally by acting locally. People want to connect: Connections between communities naturally grow over time for the same reasons that information wants to be free and dictatorships are expensive to maintain.  Any opportunity to implement open architecture (while maintaining security protocols for the site core) should be seized upon. Walling off a social network is choosing the path to obscurity (although hardly the one less traveled). Large clusters drive the network: A small number of extremely active members drive network growth.  Mostly, they are driven by reputation and attention so it is crucial to give users every opportunity to be recognized by their peers. Social Media isn’t successful… until it is : A network doesn’t grow in a linear fashion and it doesn’t grow in just one direction, but two: outward and inward.  Watts described a network maturing as an “instantaneous phase transition” similar to a crystal forming.  The process moves relatively slowly and then, suddenly, a new global state is achieved.  Once a “Small World Network” has formed, the growth becomes exponential. Social Networks on the web can be extremely powerful.  Once you understand the forces that drive them, you can make their horsepower work with you and not against you. http://www.digitaltonto.com/2009/forces-drive-social-networks/- Greg Note:  For those of you who are interested in learning more, Watts and Barabasi have both published highly readable and informative accounts of their Network Theory adventure and the friendly rivalry.  It’s a lot of fun to read both sides and learn both about their triumphs and their frustration when the other one uncovered something which seemed fairly obvious in retrospect.  Besides being brilliant both write well and in friendly and engaging styles.  In fact, the books are much more accessible than journalist accounts of the same events. The titles are “ Six Degrees ” (Watts) and “ Linked ” (Barabasi).  Steven Strogatz has also published a great book called “ Sync ” that covers pre-cursor work to Network Theory.  All are refreshing counterpoints to “guru books” and offer true insight and wisdom.
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  • 1. Track Iran-related hashtags and keywords on Twitter Twitter is, far and away, the best social media tool for second-by-second information on what’s happening in Iran. People on-the-ground and across the globe are chatting about every breaking update, every news item, and every story they find. However, all this chatter can be overwhelming – here are some tips to help organize the noise: Know your hashtags: The top hashtags and keywords being used by people talking about the Iran situation are # IranElection , Ahmadinejad , Mousavi , and Tehran . Track these keywords first. Twitter Search () : You can go to the source and search Twitter for keywords. Monitter: One of our favorite tools, Monitter goes a step beyond Twitter search and allows you to watch the Twitter conversation around keywords in real-time. Create multiple columns or even embed them with a widget. This makes it much easier to consume all the information at once. Please note that while Twitter is the fastest source of breaking news, it’s also sometimes a source of misinformation, and has a poor signal-to-noise ratio. 2. YouTube is your ally Everybody’s favorite social video site YouTube () has been a central distribution medium for the Iran riots. Iranians have been posting videos nonstop of what’s happening on the ground. This really is the best way to see what’s happening without any filters. Now, how to find the videos? We’ve picked out key YouTube accounts and search terms to track for the latest videos out of Iran: - Iran Riots - Associated Press YouTube Channel - Iran Protests (sorted by newest videos) - Irandoost09’s channel - Iran Election 2009 (sorted by newest videos) 3. Blogs moving faster than the news While most news sources are now picking up on the Iran situation, the blogosphere has been far quicker with news and multimedia from Iran. Thus, your best bet for organizing all of this blog chatter is via Google Blog Search . Compliment this with Google News and you’ll have a fuller picture of the situation on the ground. Google’s () algorithms have already pushed Iran election stories to the top of the pile, but you can dig deeper with specific searches for the Iran Riots , Ahmadinejad and Mousavi . Extra Note: One blog stands out for its Iran coverage: Revolutionary Road has been bringing constant updates on the Iran Riots from the front lines. We rely on citizens like these to get us news from the ground. 4. Flickr images really tell the story Image Credit: TheStyx via Flickr The social media photo site Flickr () is brimming with some eye-popping and gut-wrenching imagery from the ground. Beatings, protests, military photos from the election…it’s all there, in full color. Once again, search terms like Iran Elections and Iran Riots 2009 will help you pinpoint the most relevant images. 5. Final notes Social media comes fast, and because of that, the information can be overwhelming. Use filters and tools to help you understand what’s happening in real-time. If you’re looking for background on the situation, get yourself up-to-speed using Wikipedia () ( Iranian presidential elections 2009 and 2009 Iranian election protests are being constantly updated). Finally, if you want to help bring awareness to the situation, then share ! Share the videos you find via Twitter () , blog about the situation, email your friends: everybody can play a part in this new media ecosystem. View my My Posts Facebook Twitter LinkedIn # CNNfail : Twitter Blasts CNN Over Iran Election June 14th, 2009 | by Pete Cashmore View comments 44 Comments and 763 Reactions Twitter users blasted CNN this weekend for a lack of coverage of the Tehran protests, with Iranian citizens claiming ballot fraud and taking to the streets. Twitter has proven a powerful tool for spreading news of developing events in the country, but it has also taken on the role of media watchdog: thousands of Twitter users adopted the hashtag # CNNfail to highlight a lack of Iran ( ) coverage from the news organization. The movement may lose traction today: CNN has stepped up TV coverage of the Iranian election and the CNN.com homepage now lists the protests as its top story. According to the Twitter trend tracking site Twist (image above), use of the term peaked on Sunday morning and has since decayed. One Twitter user, Michael Pinto , sent us the image below showing the state of CNN’s homepage on Saturday, and comparing it to other news sites. The screenshots tell a tale more nuanced than the provocative “new media beats old media” narrative. Rather, they show that while Twitter ( ) , Flickr ( ) , YouTube ( ) and other social media sites are both a source of unfiltered information and a venue for public discussion, we still look to CNN, the BBC and their ilk to add context and meaning to this flood of data. And when they fail us, we demand more of them.
  • 1. Track Iran-related hashtags and keywords on Twitter Twitter is, far and away, the best social media tool for second-by-second information on what’s happening in Iran. People on-the-ground and across the globe are chatting about every breaking update, every news item, and every story they find. However, all this chatter can be overwhelming – here are some tips to help organize the noise: Know your hashtags: The top hashtags and keywords being used by people talking about the Iran situation are # IranElection , Ahmadinejad , Mousavi , and Tehran . Track these keywords first. Twitter Search () : You can go to the source and search Twitter for keywords. Monitter: One of our favorite tools, Monitter goes a step beyond Twitter search and allows you to watch the Twitter conversation around keywords in real-time. Create multiple columns or even embed them with a widget. This makes it much easier to consume all the information at once. Please note that while Twitter is the fastest source of breaking news, it’s also sometimes a source of misinformation, and has a poor signal-to-noise ratio. 2. YouTube is your ally Everybody’s favorite social video site YouTube () has been a central distribution medium for the Iran riots. Iranians have been posting videos nonstop of what’s happening on the ground. This really is the best way to see what’s happening without any filters. Now, how to find the videos? We’ve picked out key YouTube accounts and search terms to track for the latest videos out of Iran: - Iran Riots - Associated Press YouTube Channel - Iran Protests (sorted by newest videos) - Irandoost09’s channel - Iran Election 2009 (sorted by newest videos) 3. Blogs moving faster than the news While most news sources are now picking up on the Iran situation, the blogosphere has been far quicker with news and multimedia from Iran. Thus, your best bet for organizing all of this blog chatter is via Google Blog Search . Compliment this with Google News and you’ll have a fuller picture of the situation on the ground. Google’s () algorithms have already pushed Iran election stories to the top of the pile, but you can dig deeper with specific searches for the Iran Riots , Ahmadinejad and Mousavi . Extra Note: One blog stands out for its Iran coverage: Revolutionary Road has been bringing constant updates on the Iran Riots from the front lines. We rely on citizens like these to get us news from the ground. 4. Flickr images really tell the story Image Credit: TheStyx via Flickr The social media photo site Flickr () is brimming with some eye-popping and gut-wrenching imagery from the ground. Beatings, protests, military photos from the election…it’s all there, in full color. Once again, search terms like Iran Elections and Iran Riots 2009 will help you pinpoint the most relevant images. 5. Final notes Social media comes fast, and because of that, the information can be overwhelming. Use filters and tools to help you understand what’s happening in real-time. If you’re looking for background on the situation, get yourself up-to-speed using Wikipedia () ( Iranian presidential elections 2009 and 2009 Iranian election protests are being constantly updated). Finally, if you want to help bring awareness to the situation, then share ! Share the videos you find via Twitter () , blog about the situation, email your friends: everybody can play a part in this new media ecosystem. View my My Posts Facebook Twitter LinkedIn # CNNfail : Twitter Blasts CNN Over Iran Election June 14th, 2009 | by Pete Cashmore View comments 44 Comments and 763 Reactions Twitter users blasted CNN this weekend for a lack of coverage of the Tehran protests, with Iranian citizens claiming ballot fraud and taking to the streets. Twitter has proven a powerful tool for spreading news of developing events in the country, but it has also taken on the role of media watchdog: thousands of Twitter users adopted the hashtag # CNNfail to highlight a lack of Iran ( ) coverage from the news organization. The movement may lose traction today: CNN has stepped up TV coverage of the Iranian election and the CNN.com homepage now lists the protests as its top story. According to the Twitter trend tracking site Twist (image above), use of the term peaked on Sunday morning and has since decayed. One Twitter user, Michael Pinto , sent us the image below showing the state of CNN’s homepage on Saturday, and comparing it to other news sites. The screenshots tell a tale more nuanced than the provocative “new media beats old media” narrative. Rather, they show that while Twitter ( ) , Flickr ( ) , YouTube ( ) and other social media sites are both a source of unfiltered information and a venue for public discussion, we still look to CNN, the BBC and their ilk to add context and meaning to this flood of data. And when they fail us, we demand more of them.
  • 1. Track Iran-related hashtags and keywords on Twitter Twitter is, far and away, the best social media tool for second-by-second information on what’s happening in Iran. People on-the-ground and across the globe are chatting about every breaking update, every news item, and every story they find. However, all this chatter can be overwhelming – here are some tips to help organize the noise: Know your hashtags: The top hashtags and keywords being used by people talking about the Iran situation are # IranElection , Ahmadinejad , Mousavi , and Tehran . Track these keywords first. Twitter Search () : You can go to the source and search Twitter for keywords. Monitter: One of our favorite tools, Monitter goes a step beyond Twitter search and allows you to watch the Twitter conversation around keywords in real-time. Create multiple columns or even embed them with a widget. This makes it much easier to consume all the information at once. Please note that while Twitter is the fastest source of breaking news, it’s also sometimes a source of misinformation, and has a poor signal-to-noise ratio. 2. YouTube is your ally Everybody’s favorite social video site YouTube () has been a central distribution medium for the Iran riots. Iranians have been posting videos nonstop of what’s happening on the ground. This really is the best way to see what’s happening without any filters. Now, how to find the videos? We’ve picked out key YouTube accounts and search terms to track for the latest videos out of Iran: - Iran Riots - Associated Press YouTube Channel - Iran Protests (sorted by newest videos) - Irandoost09’s channel - Iran Election 2009 (sorted by newest videos) 3. Blogs moving faster than the news While most news sources are now picking up on the Iran situation, the blogosphere has been far quicker with news and multimedia from Iran. Thus, your best bet for organizing all of this blog chatter is via Google Blog Search . Compliment this with Google News and you’ll have a fuller picture of the situation on the ground. Google’s () algorithms have already pushed Iran election stories to the top of the pile, but you can dig deeper with specific searches for the Iran Riots , Ahmadinejad and Mousavi . Extra Note: One blog stands out for its Iran coverage: Revolutionary Road has been bringing constant updates on the Iran Riots from the front lines. We rely on citizens like these to get us news from the ground. 4. Flickr images really tell the story Image Credit: TheStyx via Flickr The social media photo site Flickr () is brimming with some eye-popping and gut-wrenching imagery from the ground. Beatings, protests, military photos from the election…it’s all there, in full color. Once again, search terms like Iran Elections and Iran Riots 2009 will help you pinpoint the most relevant images. 5. Final notes Social media comes fast, and because of that, the information can be overwhelming. Use filters and tools to help you understand what’s happening in real-time. If you’re looking for background on the situation, get yourself up-to-speed using Wikipedia () ( Iranian presidential elections 2009 and 2009 Iranian election protests are being constantly updated). Finally, if you want to help bring awareness to the situation, then share ! Share the videos you find via Twitter () , blog about the situation, email your friends: everybody can play a part in this new media ecosystem. View my My Posts Facebook Twitter LinkedIn # CNNfail : Twitter Blasts CNN Over Iran Election June 14th, 2009 | by Pete Cashmore View comments 44 Comments and 763 Reactions Twitter users blasted CNN this weekend for a lack of coverage of the Tehran protests, with Iranian citizens claiming ballot fraud and taking to the streets. Twitter has proven a powerful tool for spreading news of developing events in the country, but it has also taken on the role of media watchdog: thousands of Twitter users adopted the hashtag # CNNfail to highlight a lack of Iran ( ) coverage from the news organization. The movement may lose traction today: CNN has stepped up TV coverage of the Iranian election and the CNN.com homepage now lists the protests as its top story. According to the Twitter trend tracking site Twist (image above), use of the term peaked on Sunday morning and has since decayed. One Twitter user, Michael Pinto , sent us the image below showing the state of CNN’s homepage on Saturday, and comparing it to other news sites. The screenshots tell a tale more nuanced than the provocative “new media beats old media” narrative. Rather, they show that while Twitter ( ) , Flickr ( ) , YouTube ( ) and other social media sites are both a source of unfiltered information and a venue for public discussion, we still look to CNN, the BBC and their ilk to add context and meaning to this flood of data. And when they fail us, we demand more of them.
  • 1. Track Iran-related hashtags and keywords on Twitter Twitter is, far and away, the best social media tool for second-by-second information on what’s happening in Iran. People on-the-ground and across the globe are chatting about every breaking update, every news item, and every story they find. However, all this chatter can be overwhelming – here are some tips to help organize the noise: Know your hashtags: The top hashtags and keywords being used by people talking about the Iran situation are # IranElection , Ahmadinejad , Mousavi , and Tehran . Track these keywords first. Twitter Search () : You can go to the source and search Twitter for keywords. Monitter: One of our favorite tools, Monitter goes a step beyond Twitter search and allows you to watch the Twitter conversation around keywords in real-time. Create multiple columns or even embed them with a widget. This makes it much easier to consume all the information at once. Please note that while Twitter is the fastest source of breaking news, it’s also sometimes a source of misinformation, and has a poor signal-to-noise ratio. 2. YouTube is your ally Everybody’s favorite social video site YouTube () has been a central distribution medium for the Iran riots. Iranians have been posting videos nonstop of what’s happening on the ground. This really is the best way to see what’s happening without any filters. Now, how to find the videos? We’ve picked out key YouTube accounts and search terms to track for the latest videos out of Iran: - Iran Riots - Associated Press YouTube Channel - Iran Protests (sorted by newest videos) - Irandoost09’s channel - Iran Election 2009 (sorted by newest videos) 3. Blogs moving faster than the news While most news sources are now picking up on the Iran situation, the blogosphere has been far quicker with news and multimedia from Iran. Thus, your best bet for organizing all of this blog chatter is via Google Blog Search . Compliment this with Google News and you’ll have a fuller picture of the situation on the ground. Google’s () algorithms have already pushed Iran election stories to the top of the pile, but you can dig deeper with specific searches for the Iran Riots , Ahmadinejad and Mousavi . Extra Note: One blog stands out for its Iran coverage: Revolutionary Road has been bringing constant updates on the Iran Riots from the front lines. We rely on citizens like these to get us news from the ground. 4. Flickr images really tell the story Image Credit: TheStyx via Flickr The social media photo site Flickr () is brimming with some eye-popping and gut-wrenching imagery from the ground. Beatings, protests, military photos from the election…it’s all there, in full color. Once again, search terms like Iran Elections and Iran Riots 2009 will help you pinpoint the most relevant images. 5. Final notes Social media comes fast, and because of that, the information can be overwhelming. Use filters and tools to help you understand what’s happening in real-time. If you’re looking for background on the situation, get yourself up-to-speed using Wikipedia () ( Iranian presidential elections 2009 and 2009 Iranian election protests are being constantly updated). Finally, if you want to help bring awareness to the situation, then share ! Share the videos you find via Twitter () , blog about the situation, email your friends: everybody can play a part in this new media ecosystem. View my My Posts Facebook Twitter LinkedIn # CNNfail : Twitter Blasts CNN Over Iran Election June 14th, 2009 | by Pete Cashmore View comments 44 Comments and 763 Reactions Twitter users blasted CNN this weekend for a lack of coverage of the Tehran protests, with Iranian citizens claiming ballot fraud and taking to the streets. Twitter has proven a powerful tool for spreading news of developing events in the country, but it has also taken on the role of media watchdog: thousands of Twitter users adopted the hashtag # CNNfail to highlight a lack of Iran ( ) coverage from the news organization. The movement may lose traction today: CNN has stepped up TV coverage of the Iranian election and the CNN.com homepage now lists the protests as its top story. According to the Twitter trend tracking site Twist (image above), use of the term peaked on Sunday morning and has since decayed. One Twitter user, Michael Pinto , sent us the image below showing the state of CNN’s homepage on Saturday, and comparing it to other news sites. The screenshots tell a tale more nuanced than the provocative “new media beats old media” narrative. Rather, they show that while Twitter ( ) , Flickr ( ) , YouTube ( ) and other social media sites are both a source of unfiltered information and a venue for public discussion, we still look to CNN, the BBC and their ilk to add context and meaning to this flood of data. And when they fail us, we demand more of them.
  • 1. Track Iran-related hashtags and keywords on Twitter Twitter is, far and away, the best social media tool for second-by-second information on what’s happening in Iran. People on-the-ground and across the globe are chatting about every breaking update, every news item, and every story they find. However, all this chatter can be overwhelming – here are some tips to help organize the noise: Know your hashtags: The top hashtags and keywords being used by people talking about the Iran situation are # IranElection , Ahmadinejad , Mousavi , and Tehran . Track these keywords first. Twitter Search () : You can go to the source and search Twitter for keywords. Monitter: One of our favorite tools, Monitter goes a step beyond Twitter search and allows you to watch the Twitter conversation around keywords in real-time. Create multiple columns or even embed them with a widget. This makes it much easier to consume all the information at once. Please note that while Twitter is the fastest source of breaking news, it’s also sometimes a source of misinformation, and has a poor signal-to-noise ratio. 2. YouTube is your ally Everybody’s favorite social video site YouTube () has been a central distribution medium for the Iran riots. Iranians have been posting videos nonstop of what’s happening on the ground. This really is the best way to see what’s happening without any filters. Now, how to find the videos? We’ve picked out key YouTube accounts and search terms to track for the latest videos out of Iran: - Iran Riots - Associated Press YouTube Channel - Iran Protests (sorted by newest videos) - Irandoost09’s channel - Iran Election 2009 (sorted by newest videos) 3. Blogs moving faster than the news While most news sources are now picking up on the Iran situation, the blogosphere has been far quicker with news and multimedia from Iran. Thus, your best bet for organizing all of this blog chatter is via Google Blog Search . Compliment this with Google News and you’ll have a fuller picture of the situation on the ground. Google’s () algorithms have already pushed Iran election stories to the top of the pile, but you can dig deeper with specific searches for the Iran Riots , Ahmadinejad and Mousavi . Extra Note: One blog stands out for its Iran coverage: Revolutionary Road has been bringing constant updates on the Iran Riots from the front lines. We rely on citizens like these to get us news from the ground. 4. Flickr images really tell the story Image Credit: TheStyx via Flickr The social media photo site Flickr () is brimming with some eye-popping and gut-wrenching imagery from the ground. Beatings, protests, military photos from the election…it’s all there, in full color. Once again, search terms like Iran Elections and Iran Riots 2009 will help you pinpoint the most relevant images. 5. Final notes Social media comes fast, and because of that, the information can be overwhelming. Use filters and tools to help you understand what’s happening in real-time. If you’re looking for background on the situation, get yourself up-to-speed using Wikipedia () ( Iranian presidential elections 2009 and 2009 Iranian election protests are being constantly updated). Finally, if you want to help bring awareness to the situation, then share ! Share the videos you find via Twitter () , blog about the situation, email your friends: everybody can play a part in this new media ecosystem. View my My Posts Facebook Twitter LinkedIn # CNNfail : Twitter Blasts CNN Over Iran Election June 14th, 2009 | by Pete Cashmore View comments 44 Comments and 763 Reactions Twitter users blasted CNN this weekend for a lack of coverage of the Tehran protests, with Iranian citizens claiming ballot fraud and taking to the streets. Twitter has proven a powerful tool for spreading news of developing events in the country, but it has also taken on the role of media watchdog: thousands of Twitter users adopted the hashtag # CNNfail to highlight a lack of Iran ( ) coverage from the news organization. The movement may lose traction today: CNN has stepped up TV coverage of the Iranian election and the CNN.com homepage now lists the protests as its top story. According to the Twitter trend tracking site Twist (image above), use of the term peaked on Sunday morning and has since decayed. One Twitter user, Michael Pinto , sent us the image below showing the state of CNN’s homepage on Saturday, and comparing it to other news sites. The screenshots tell a tale more nuanced than the provocative “new media beats old media” narrative. Rather, they show that while Twitter ( ) , Flickr ( ) , YouTube ( ) and other social media sites are both a source of unfiltered information and a venue for public discussion, we still look to CNN, the BBC and their ilk to add context and meaning to this flood of data. And when they fail us, we demand more of them.

Web 2.0 Herausforderung für die Verwaltung Web 2.0 Herausforderung für die Verwaltung Presentation Transcript

  • 8. Meeting Scientific Community Club Krems E-Government und Web 2.0 Herausforderung für die Verwaltung Johann Höchtl Donau Universität Krems Zentrum für E-Government
  • Agenda
    • (E-)Gesellschaft Gestern, Heute, Morgen
    • Enabler der Konvergenz
    • Was ist Web 2.0 ? (Web 3.0?)
    • Anwendungen in der Wirtschaft
    • Die Herausforderung für die Verwaltung
    • Anwendungen in der Verwaltung
      • Eine Stärkung der Demokratie?
    • E-Government 2.0 ? – Ein Ausblick
  • Gesellschaft Gestern 150 Personen
  • Gesellschaft heute
    • 300 Millionen UserInnen
    • 1 Million Österr. in 2 Jahren
    • Obama hat mehr als eine Million „Freunde“
  • Gesellschaft heute ? Quelle: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091015061348AAGyuel 1000+ Personen
  • Gesellschaft heute Quelle: http://www.facebook.com/press/info.php?statistics
  • Gesellschaft heute
  • Politische Konvergenz als Enabler
    • Fall der physischen Mauer(n): Berliner Mauer
    • Fall der virtuellen Mauern: Zölle, Handelsbe-schränkungen
  • Technische Konvergenz als Enabler “ Mailüfterl” Größe 4 x 2 Meter Gewicht 1 Tonne Geschwindigkeit : 3 MIPS Speicher 60kByte “ iPod Shuffle” Größe 1,7 x 0,7 cm Gewicht 11 Gramm Geschwindigkeit : 533 MIPS Speicher 4GByte (>60.000!) 1966 2009
  • Moore’s law
  • Technische Konvergenz als Enabler Quelle: http://mediaconvergence.economist.com/
  • Technische Konvergenz als Enabler
    • Wikipedia wurde 2001 gegründet
    • Heute insgesamt 13 Millionen Seiten in 200 Sprachen
    • Ciscos Nexus 7000 Data Switch kann die entsprechende Datenmenge in 0,001 Sekunden übertragen!
    Quelle: http://mediaconvergence.economist.com/
  • Soziale Konvergenz als Enabler
    • 21-jährige von heute (USA) haben
      • 20.000 Stunden ferngesehen
      • 10.000 Stunden Videospiele gespielt
      • 10.000 Stunden telefoniert
      • 250.000 SMS oder Chat-Nachrichten gesendet
      • zu mehr als 50% Content am Web produziert
    • Mehr als 70% der 4-jährigen sind schon am PC gesessen
  • Web 2.0 Technik Mensch Web 1.0 Technik Gemeinschaft Web 2.0 Semantik Web 3.0? Technik Gesellschaft “ Web 3.0 = Web 2.0 + 1“
  • Web 2.0 – Was steckt drinnen?
  • Web 2.0 – Versuch einer Definition
    • Technisch bedeutet Web 2.0 eine maßgebliche Steigerung der Interaktivität und user experience durch Verwendung asynchroner Datenübertragung zwischen Client und Server (AJAX)
    • Die soziale Auswirkung von Web 2.0 besteht in der „ Ermächtigung “ ( empowerment ) aller Systembeteiligten, vernetzt als content producer und content consumer in gleicher Weise aufzutreten
    •  Prosumer !
  • The Media Revolution Print – One to Many Telephone - One to One Radio – One to Many TV – One to Many The Internet – Many2Many
  • Web 1.0 read only top down Web 2.0 read/write bottom up Web 3.0 read/write understand bottom up
  • Ist Web 2.0 eine Modeerscheinung?
    • 8 der 20 Top-Internetseiten weltweit sind Social Web 2.0 Seiten
    • 1/8 aller Paare, die in den USA heirateten, haben sich über Social Web Sites kennengelernt
    • Facebook: Mehr als 100 Millionen neuer Benutzer in weniger als 9 Monaten
    • Auf Youtube wird in 2 Monaten mehr Inhalt aufgeladen, als die Sender ABC, CBS und CNN seit 1948 hätten ausstrahlen können
    • ABC, CBS & CNN haben zusammen 10 Millionen Besucher / Monat – Facebook, Myspace & Youtube haben 250 Millionen unterschiedliche Benutzer
    • Google.com
    • Facebook.com
    • Yahoo!
    • YouTube
    • Windows Live
    • Wikipedia
    • Blogger.com
    • Baidu.com
    • Microsoft Network
    • Yahoo.co.jp
    • QQ.COM
    • Myspace
    • Google India
    • Google China
    • Twitter
    • Google.de
    • Sina
    • Microsoft Corporation
    • WordPress.com
    • Google UK
    Quelle: http://www.alexa.com/topsites , 22. November 2009
  • Ist Web 2.0 eine Modeerscheinung? Quelle: www.daemondigital.com It’s a bottom – up grassroot movement!
  • Anwendungen in der Wirtschaft
  • … und nicht nur dort! vs
  • vs
  • BLOGs vs
  • “ Gratis” arbeiten? – Die Motivatoren
    • Information
    • Soziale Anerkennung
    • Selbstdarstellung
    • Altruismus
    • Spaß & Freude!
  • Anwendungen in der Verwaltung
  • ABER …..
  • … für die Verwaltung arbeitet niemand gratis!
    • Es gibt kein einziges Beteiligungsmodell in der Verwaltung, dass nachhaltig erfolgreich und selbst tragfähig wäre !
    • Fehlen der Motivatoren
    • Grundlegendes Misstrauen gegen den Staat
    • Rolle des „citizen“: Kunde vs. Bürger
    • Unternehmen ändern sich – der Staat bleibt gleich
      • Staat kann ich seine „Kunden“ nicht aussuchen!
    • Strukturelles Problem: Staat ist Monopolist
  • Web 2.0 – Eine Stärkung der Demokratie?
    • Beteiligung ist dort erfolgreich, wo sie mobilisiert
      • Track Iran-related hashtags and keywords on Twitter
      • YouTube is your ally
      • Blogs moving faster than the news
      • Flickr images really tell the story
    • „ Freie Reporter“ üben Druck auf die traditionellen Medien aus
    Quelle: http://mashable.com/2009/06/14/cnnfail/
  • Web 2.0 – Eine Stärkung der Demokratie?
  • Web 2.0 – Eine Stärkung der Demokratie? 32.045 stille? Unterstützer!
  • Web 2.0 – Eine Stärkung der Demokratie? Internet TV-Sender Unibrennt.tv
  • Web 2.0 – Eine Stärkung der Demokratie?
    • Nutzung vieler Plattformen zusammen, um breite Mobilisierung zu erreichen
    • Abschalten des WLAN-Netzes im Audimax der Universität
    • UMTS/EDGE/HSDPA ersetzt Breitbandzugang
    • Der Protest geht weiter
    • Das ist Konvergenz!
  • vs 1993 2009
  • Web 2.0 – Eine Stärkung der herkömmlichen Demokratie
    • Web 2.0 Technologien
      • helfen mit, das Entscheidungen des Staates „informierter“ getroffen werden
        • ..to become the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustainable economic growth with more and better jobs and greater social cohesion.’ (Lisbon Council, March 2000)
      • „ I-Government“
      • They will come, but … Motivatoren und Incentive-Modelle nicht vergessen!
      • Transparenz mindert Gefahr von Willkürakten, Betrug und Bestechung
      • Schafft keine Demokratie 2.0
  • Government 2.0
    • Government 2.0: Wie können Social Media Werkzeuge und Methoden in den Bereichen Transparenz, Partizipation und Zusammenarbeit im Government berücksichtigt werden
    • Open Government
    • Wissensmanagement
      • Make it easier to contribute
      • Make participation a side effect
      • Edit, don’t create
      • Reward, but don’t over-reward, participants
      • Promote quality contributors
  • Government 2.0
    • Neudefinition der Staatsfunktionen notwendig
    • Verfassungs- und Verwaltungsreform überfällig
    • Vor allem eine Kulturfrage, in der die Rahmenbedingungen stimmen müssen
    Command & Control Enable & Cooperate
  • Government 2.0
    • Atmosphäre der Innovation schaffen – „Open Innovation“
    • O pen = default (access, standards, …)
    • D esign for cooperation = always simple
    • L earn from your users & hackers
    • S timulate experimentation & partnership
  • Government von Morgen? vs vs
  • Danke für die Aufmerksamkeit! Mag. Johann Höchtl Zentrum für E-Government Donau-Universität Krems www.slideshare.net/dgpazegovzpi digitalgovernment.wordpress.com Fragen?