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Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
Pairing food and beer - 2012
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Pairing food and beer - 2012

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Some beer-and-food pairings. Some canonical, some developed by us.

Some beer-and-food pairings. Some canonical, some developed by us.

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  • Describe each dimension. (moreroasting = roasty flavors, duh!)Constant body and bitterness, variable color: (heavy) IPA vs India Brown Ale vs Black IPA (Cascadian Dark Ale)
  • Malttype as well as roastiness.Timing of hop additions
  • Weight that refers to the richness of the beer and the dish– how do these things feel when sitting in your stomachVolume refers to the intensity of flavor of the dish– if you were putting the food’s flavor through a speaker, how loud would it be? Food that is relatively light and delicate should match beer that is also light in weight and quiet in volume, and food that is rich and flavorful should be paired with an equally rich and flavorful beerSo an example of a light food would be something like a white fish where you don’t feel really full after eating itAn example of a heavy food would be something like a steak where you have to wiggle it down to make room for dessertAn example of a quiet food would be something like a shrimp scampi where the flavors are really delicate and subtleAn example of a loud food would be something like a blue cheese or anything with chili peppers in it– things that really take over the flavor of a dishMost people have their rules of thumb for wine: white wines go with white foods and vegetables, red wines go with red foods, pork can go with either. These rules can apply to the beer spectrum as wellIn addition to thinking about the food itself, certain preparations can influence the weight and volume of the food.Light Preparation includes boiling, poaching, and steaming where you’re not adding any fats to the food, and these three techniques tend to make the food volume fairly quiet because the food expresses its own delicate natural flavorsMedium preparation are things which add some fat to the food, and medium volume preparation includes techniques that allow the food to concentrate their juices. This includes baking, sauteing, and roastingHeavy preparation is anything that adds a flavorful liquid such as braising and stewing, and grilling makes food louder in flavor because of the smoky/char flavor it introduces
  • Umami can be anything that makes something savory and robust– herbs, roast, and spice come to mind
  • Citrus aromatics—cascade hop used in American pale ale, great for cutting through the fat in a coconut milk dish and the citrus melds with lime in a lot of Thai dishesIn general for highly herbal dishes like those with a lot of cilantro or things like pesto, you want something that can both match the herbs and cut the fat of the dish
  • Dessert flavors– chocolate, caramel, dark fruits, vanilla, coffee, toffeeLambic flavors—sweet cherry, tart cherry, brown sugar, peach, raspberry, currant, grape, strawberry, apple, banana, pineapple, plum, blueberry, apricot, even lemonTry making an ice cream float at some point using either a chocolate stout or a lambic as the stand-in for sodaContrary to popular opinion, cheese and wine are often very hard to pair together. Most red wines (except sweet ones) don’t pair well with cheese at all. Cheese is good for blunting a bad wine, which is why it’s great to serve at art gallery openings etc. However, if you really want a brilliant flavor pairing with cheese, beer can often be a better flavor match than wine ex: cheddars have sharp acidity, some fruitiness, and some nutiness. English IPAs also have all these features ex: Gruyere is nutty with a funky alpine grassiness– Doppelbock is great with this because it matches the nuttiness and also can have some herbal undertones ex: stilton and barleywine—stilton is salty and pungent and barleywine similarly has earthy flavors but contrasts the saltiness of the cheese with sweetness
  • Italians use bitterness in their aperitifs like campariUnroasted malts without hops will make the beer taste like soda. Roasted malts can often add their own bitterness similar to espresso.If you’re eating a steak, you don’t go for a beer or wine that’s just sweet– you want a drier red like a cabernet sauvignon or a beer with enough bitterness to cut through the deep flavors of the steak. This is why porters can be so delicious with steak.International bitterness units– don’t actually tell you about the character of the hops which change like spiciness– some are in your face and then gone, others build, others coat your mouth like a carpet
  • Barley and wheat are two building blocks of beer, and both of these can have nutty, warm, and bread-like flavors. Malty beers tend to be full-bodiedSweetness often accompanies malt. This is from the malt sugar that the yeast didn’t consume.Bitterness and sweetness balance each other. The more bitter a beer is, the less sweet it often is and vise versa. Because of this, if bitterness is low beers that are very low in residual sugar can still taste sweet, and dry beers can still have a malty flavor and aroma such as northern German pilsnersCarbonation increases acidity and concetrates bitterness– the more carbonation there is, the drier a beer will seemTemperature can also impact the perception of sweetness– the colder a beer is the drier and more bitter it will seemBeers that have malty and carmel-y flavors are great to pair with grilled and roasted foods because they actually match the carmel flavor of the burnt sugar in these foods. Wine isn’t able to match this flavor, only contrast with it
  • When you roast malts, beers take on the flavors of chocolate and coffeeMakes beers made with roasted malts a GREAT pair for desserts because you can actually match these flavors unlike with wine. Also tastes great with the char on grilled dishesContrasts wonderfully with salty dishes like ham and proscuitto
  • Transcript

    • 1. GPSCY Beer Tasting 11 November 2012 Header image source: thebeerjournal.com
    • 2. 9.0% ABV Strong Dark Belgian Ale Brewed by Trappist monks Complementation: Complex, dry, and somewhat nutty dark ale provides flavors which complement both the chocolate and almonds
    • 3. Lagers •Light-bodied •Light-colored •Less bitter Ales •Heavy •Dark-colored •Bitter
    • 4. Color (malt character) Hoppiness (hop quantity) Body (malt quantity)
    • 5. • Malt type – Barley – Wheat – Rye – Sorghum – Rice – Corn – Etc. • Hoppiness – Bitterness – Hop flavor – Hop aroma • Hop Flavor/ Aroma – Citrusy – Herbal – Piney
    • 6. • Yeast – Saccharomyces cerevisiae – S. patorianus – Brettanomyces • Bacteria – Lactobacillus • Barrel aging • Added flavorants: – Orange peel – Coriander, nutmeg – Fruits – Candi sugar – etc. • Water • Carbonation Ok, but what’s an “ale” and what’s a “lager”?
    • 7. Source: BJCP Guidelines, 2008 Edition. 1. LIGHT LAGER 1A. Lite American Lager 1B. Standard American Lager 1C. Premium American Lager 1D. Munich Helles 1E. Dortmunder Export 2. PILSNER 2A. German Pilsner (Pils 2B. Bohemian Pilsener 2C. Classic American Pilsner 3. EUROPEAN AMBER LAGER 3A. Vienna Lager 3B. Oktoberfest/Märzen 4. DARK LAGER 4A. Dark American Lager 4B. Munich Dunkel 4C. Schwarzbier (Black Beer) 5. BOCK 5A. Maibock/Helles Bock 5B. Traditional Bock 5C. Doppelbock 5D. Eisbock 6. LIGHT HYBRID BEER 6A. Cream Ale 6B. Blonde Ale 6C. Kölsch 6D. American Wheat or Rye Beer 7. AMBER HYBRID BEER 7A. Northern German Altbier 7B. California Common Beer 7C. Düsseldorf Altbier 8. ENGLISH PALE ALE 8A. Standard/Ordinary Bitter 8B. Special/Best/Premium Bitter 8C. Extra Special/Strong Bitter (English Pale Ale) 9. SCOTTISH AND IRISH ALE 9A. Scottish Light 60/- 9B. Scottish Heavy 70/- 9C. Scottish Export 80/- 9D. Irish Red Ale 9E. Strong Scotch Ale 10. AMERICAN ALE 10A. American Pale Ale 10B. American Amber Ale 10C. American Brown Ale 11. ENGLISH BROWN ALE 11A. Mild 11B. Southern English Brown 11C. Northern English Brown Ale 12. PORTER 12A. Brown Porter 12B. Robust Porter 12C. Baltic Porter 13. STOUT 13A. Dry Stout 13B. Sweet Stout 13C. Oatmeal Stout 13D. Foreign Extra Stout 13E. American Stout 13F. Russian Imperial Stout 14. INDIA PALE ALE (IPA) 14A. English IPA 14B. American IPA 14C. Imperial IPA 15. GERMAN WHEAT AND RYE BEER 15A. Weizen/Weissbier 15B. Dunkelweizen 15C. Weizenbock 15D. Roggenbier (German Rye Beer) 16. BELGIAN AND FRENCH ALE 16A. Witbier 16B. Belgian Pale Ale 16C. Saison 16D. Bière de Garde 16E. Belgian Specialty Ale 17. SOUR ALE 17A. Berliner Weisse 17B. Flanders Red Ale 17C. Flanders Brown Ale/Oud Bruin 17D. Straight (Unblended) Lambic 17E. Gueuze 17F. Fruit Lambic 18. BELGIAN STRONG ALE 18A. Belgian Blond Ale 18B. Belgian Dubbel 18C. Belgian Tripel 18D. Belgian Golden Strong Ale 18E. Belgian Dark Strong Ale 19. STRONG ALE 19A. Old Ale 19B. English Barleywine 19C. American Barleywine 20. FRUIT BEER 21. SPICE/HERB/VEGETABLE BEER 21A. Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer 21B. Christmas/Winter Specialty Spiced Beer 22. SMOKE-FLAVORED/WOOD- AGED BEER 22A. Classic Rauchbier 22B. Other Smoked Beer 22C. Wood-Aged Beer 23. SPECIALTY BEER Easy Drinking
    • 8. Source: BJCP Guidelines, 2008 Edition. 1. LIGHT LAGER 1A. Lite American Lager 1B. Standard American Lager 1C. Premium American Lager 1D. Munich Helles 1E. Dortmunder Export 2. PILSNER 2A. German Pilsner (Pils 2B. Bohemian Pilsener 2C. Classic American Pilsner 3. EUROPEAN AMBER LAGER 3A. Vienna Lager 3B. Oktoberfest/Märzen 4. DARK LAGER 4A. Dark American Lager 4B. Munich Dunkel 4C. Schwarzbier (Black Beer) 5. BOCK 5A. Maibock/Helles Bock 5B. Traditional Bock 5C. Doppelbock 5D. Eisbock 6. LIGHT HYBRID BEER 6A. Cream Ale 6B. Blonde Ale 6C. Kölsch 6D. American Wheat or Rye Beer 7. AMBER HYBRID BEER 7A. Northern German Altbier 7B. California Common Beer 7C. Düsseldorf Altbier 8. ENGLISH PALE ALE 8A. Standard/Ordinary Bitter 8B. Special/Best/Premium Bitter 8C. Extra Special/Strong Bitter (English Pale Ale) 9. SCOTTISH AND IRISH ALE 9A. Scottish Light 60/- 9B. Scottish Heavy 70/- 9C. Scottish Export 80/- 9D. Irish Red Ale 9E. Strong Scotch Ale 10. AMERICAN ALE 10A. American Pale Ale 10B. American Amber Ale 10C. American Brown Ale 11. ENGLISH BROWN ALE 11A. Mild 11B. Southern English Brown 11C. Northern English Brown Ale 12. PORTER 12A. Brown Porter 12B. Robust Porter 12C. Baltic Porter 13. STOUT 13A. Dry Stout 13B. Sweet Stout 13C. Oatmeal Stout 13D. Foreign Extra Stout 13E. American Stout 13F. Russian Imperial Stout 14. INDIA PALE ALE (IPA) 14A. English IPA 14B. American IPA 14C. Imperial IPA 15. GERMAN WHEAT AND RYE BEER 15A. Weizen/Weissbier 15B. Dunkelweizen 15C. Weizenbock 15D. Roggenbier (German Rye Beer) 16. BELGIAN AND FRENCH ALE 16A. Witbier 16B. Belgian Pale Ale 16C. Saison 16D. Bière de Garde 16E. Belgian Specialty Ale 17. SOUR ALE 17A. Berliner Weisse 17B. Flanders Red Ale 17C. Flanders Brown Ale/Oud Bruin 17D. Straight (Unblended) Lambic 17E. Gueuze 17F. Fruit Lambic 18. BELGIAN STRONG ALE 18A. Belgian Blond Ale 18B. Belgian Dubbel 18C. Belgian Tripel 18D. Belgian Golden Strong Ale 18E. Belgian Dark Strong Ale 19. STRONG ALE 19A. Old Ale 19B. English Barleywine 19C. American Barleywine 20. FRUIT BEER 21. SPICE/HERB/VEGETABLE BEER 21A. Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer 21B. Christmas/Winter Specialty Spiced Beer 22. SMOKE-FLAVORED/WOOD- AGED BEER 22A. Classic Rauchbier 22B. Other Smoked Beer 22C. Wood-Aged Beer 23. SPECIALTY BEER Flavorful
    • 9. Source: BJCP Guidelines, 2008 Edition. 1. LIGHT LAGER 1A. Lite American Lager 1B. Standard American Lager 1C. Premium American Lager 1D. Munich Helles 1E. Dortmunder Export 2. PILSNER 2A. German Pilsner (Pils 2B. Bohemian Pilsener 2C. Classic American Pilsner 3. EUROPEAN AMBER LAGER 3A. Vienna Lager 3B. Oktoberfest/Märzen 4. DARK LAGER 4A. Dark American Lager 4B. Munich Dunkel 4C. Schwarzbier (Black Beer) 5. BOCK 5A. Maibock/Helles Bock 5B. Traditional Bock 5C. Doppelbock 5D. Eisbock 6. LIGHT HYBRID BEER 6A. Cream Ale 6B. Blonde Ale 6C. Kölsch 6D. American Wheat or Rye Beer 7. AMBER HYBRID BEER 7A. Northern German Altbier 7B. California Common Beer 7C. Düsseldorf Altbier 8. ENGLISH PALE ALE 8A. Standard/Ordinary Bitter 8B. Special/Best/Premium Bitter 8C. Extra Special/Strong Bitter (English Pale Ale) 9. SCOTTISH AND IRISH ALE 9A. Scottish Light 60/- 9B. Scottish Heavy 70/- 9C. Scottish Export 80/- 9D. Irish Red Ale 9E. Strong Scotch Ale 10. AMERICAN ALE 10A. American Pale Ale 10B. American Amber Ale 10C. American Brown Ale 11. ENGLISH BROWN ALE 11A. Mild 11B. Southern English Brown 11C. Northern English Brown Ale 12. PORTER 12A. Brown Porter 12B. Robust Porter 12C. Baltic Porter 13. STOUT 13A. Dry Stout 13B. Sweet Stout 13C. Oatmeal Stout 13D. Foreign Extra Stout 13E. American Stout 13F. Russian Imperial Stout 14. INDIA PALE ALE (IPA) 14A. English IPA 14B. American IPA 14C. Imperial IPA 15. GERMAN WHEAT AND RYE BEER 15A. Weizen/Weissbier 15B. Dunkelweizen 15C. Weizenbock 15D. Roggenbier (German Rye Beer) 16. BELGIAN AND FRENCH ALE 16A. Witbier 16B. Belgian Pale Ale 16C. Saison 16D. Bière de Garde 16E. Belgian Specialty Ale 17. SOUR ALE 17A. Berliner Weisse 17B. Flanders Red Ale 17C. Flanders Brown Ale/Oud Bruin 17D. Straight (Unblended) Lambic 17E. Gueuze 17F. Fruit Lambic 18. BELGIAN STRONG ALE 18A. Belgian Blond Ale 18B. Belgian Dubbel 18C. Belgian Tripel 18D. Belgian Golden Strong Ale 18E. Belgian Dark Strong Ale 19. STRONG ALE 19A. Old Ale 19B. English Barleywine 19C. American Barleywine 20. FRUIT BEER 21. SPICE/HERB/VEGETABLE BEER 21A. Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer 21B. Christmas/Winter Specialty Spiced Beer 22. SMOKE-FLAVORED/WOOD- AGED BEER 22A. Classic Rauchbier 22B. Other Smoked Beer 22C. Wood-Aged Beer 23. SPECIALTY BEER Unique & Interesting
    • 10. Source: BJCP Guidelines, 2008 Edition. 1. LIGHT LAGER 1A. Lite American Lager 1B. Standard American Lager 1C. Premium American Lager 1D. Munich Helles 1E. Dortmunder Export 2. PILSNER 2A. German Pilsner (Pils 2B. Bohemian Pilsener 2C. Classic American Pilsner 3. EUROPEAN AMBER LAGER 3A. Vienna Lager 3B. Oktoberfest/Märzen 4. DARK LAGER 4A. Dark American Lager 4B. Munich Dunkel 4C. Schwarzbier (Black Beer) 5. BOCK 5A. Maibock/Helles Bock 5B. Traditional Bock 5C. Doppelbock 5D. Eisbock 6. LIGHT HYBRID BEER 6A. Cream Ale 6B. Blonde Ale 6C. Kölsch 6D. American Wheat or Rye Beer 7. AMBER HYBRID BEER 7A. Northern German Altbier 7B. California Common Beer 7C. Düsseldorf Altbier 8. ENGLISH PALE ALE 8A. Standard/Ordinary Bitter 8B. Special/Best/Premium Bitter 8C. Extra Special/Strong Bitter (English Pale Ale) 9. SCOTTISH AND IRISH ALE 9A. Scottish Light 60/- 9B. Scottish Heavy 70/- 9C. Scottish Export 80/- 9D. Irish Red Ale 9E. Strong Scotch Ale 10. AMERICAN ALE 10A. American Pale Ale 10B. American Amber Ale 10C. American Brown Ale 11. ENGLISH BROWN ALE 11A. Mild 11B. Southern English Brown 11C. Northern English Brown Ale 12. PORTER 12A. Brown Porter 12B. Robust Porter 12C. Baltic Porter 13. STOUT 13A. Dry Stout 13B. Sweet Stout 13C. Oatmeal Stout 13D. Foreign Extra Stout 13E. American Stout 13F. Russian Imperial Stout 14. INDIA PALE ALE (IPA) 14A. English IPA 14B. American IPA 14C. Imperial IPA 15. GERMAN WHEAT AND RYE BEER 15A. Weizen/Weissbier 15B. Dunkelweizen 15C. Weizenbock 15D. Roggenbier (German Rye Beer) 16. BELGIAN AND FRENCH ALE 16A. Witbier 16B. Belgian Pale Ale 16C. Saison 16D. Bière de Garde 16E. Belgian Specialty Ale 17. SOUR ALE 17A. Berliner Weisse 17B. Flanders Red Ale 17C. Flanders Brown Ale/Oud Bruin 17D. Straight (Unblended) Lambic 17E. Gueuze 17F. Fruit Lambic 18. BELGIAN STRONG ALE 18A. Belgian Blond Ale 18B. Belgian Dubbel 18C. Belgian Tripel 18D. Belgian Golden Strong Ale 18E. Belgian Dark Strong Ale 19. STRONG ALE 19A. Old Ale 19B. English Barleywine 19C. American Barleywine 20. FRUIT BEER 21. SPICE/HERB/VEGETABLE BEER 21A. Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer 21B. Christmas/Winter Specialty Spiced Beer 22. SMOKE-FLAVORED/WOOD- AGED BEER 22A. Classic Rauchbier 22B. Other Smoked Beer 22C. Wood-Aged Beer 23. SPECIALTY BEER
    • 11. Source: BJCP Guidelines, 2008 Edition. 1. LIGHT LAGER 1A. Lite American Lager 1B. Standard American Lager 1C. Premium American Lager 1D. Munich Helles 1E. Dortmunder Export 2. PILSNER 2A. German Pilsner (Pils 2B. Bohemian Pilsener 2C. Classic American Pilsner 3. EUROPEAN AMBER LAGER 3A. Vienna Lager 3B. Oktoberfest/Märzen 4. DARK LAGER 4A. Dark American Lager 4B. Munich Dunkel 4C. Schwarzbier (Black Beer) 5. BOCK 5A. Maibock/Helles Bock 5B. Traditional Bock 5C. Doppelbock 5D. Eisbock 6. LIGHT HYBRID BEER 6A. Cream Ale 6B. Blonde Ale 6C. Kölsch 6D. American Wheat or Rye Beer 7. AMBER HYBRID BEER 7A. Northern German Altbier 7B. California Common Beer 7C. Düsseldorf Altbier 8. ENGLISH PALE ALE 8A. Standard/Ordinary Bitter 8B. Special/Best/Premium Bitter 8C. Extra Special/Strong Bitter (English Pale Ale) 9. SCOTTISH AND IRISH ALE 9A. Scottish Light 60/- 9B. Scottish Heavy 70/- 9C. Scottish Export 80/- 9D. Irish Red Ale 9E. Strong Scotch Ale 10. AMERICAN ALE 10A. American Pale Ale 10B. American Amber Ale 10C. American Brown Ale 11. ENGLISH BROWN ALE 11A. Mild 11B. Southern English Brown 11C. Northern English Brown Ale 12. PORTER 12A. Brown Porter 12B. Robust Porter 12C. Baltic Porter 13. STOUT 13A. Dry Stout 13B. Sweet Stout 13C. Oatmeal Stout 13D. Foreign Extra Stout 13E. American Stout 13F. Russian Imperial Stout 14. INDIA PALE ALE (IPA) 14A. English IPA 14B. American IPA 14C. Imperial IPA 15. GERMAN WHEAT AND RYE BEER 15A. Weizen/Weissbier 15B. Dunkelweizen 15C. Weizenbock 15D. Roggenbier (German Rye Beer) 16. BELGIAN AND FRENCH ALE 16A. Witbier 16B. Belgian Pale Ale 16C. Saison 16D. Bière de Garde 16E. Belgian Specialty Ale 17. SOUR ALE 17A. Berliner Weisse 17B. Flanders Red Ale 17C. Flanders Brown Ale/Oud Bruin 17D. Straight (Unblended) Lambic 17E. Gueuze 17F. Fruit Lambic 18. BELGIAN STRONG ALE 18A. Belgian Blond Ale 18B. Belgian Dubbel 18C. Belgian Tripel 18D. Belgian Golden Strong Ale 18E. Belgian Dark Strong Ale 19. STRONG ALE 19A. Old Ale 19B. English Barleywine 19C. American Barleywine 20. FRUIT BEER 21. SPICE/HERB/VEGETABLE BEER 21A. Spice, Herb, or Vegetable Beer 21B. Christmas/Winter Specialty Spiced Beer 22. SMOKE-FLAVORED/WOOD- AGED BEER 22A. Classic Rauchbier 22B. Other Smoked Beer 22C. Wood-Aged Beer 23. SPECIALTY BEER
    • 12. The weight and intensity of the beer should match the weight and intensity of the dish Lighter/Quieter Heavier/Louder Ingredients Fish Shellfish Vegetables Pork Poultry Veal Beef Game Lamb Techniques Boiling Poaching Steaming Baking Sautéing Roasting Braising Grilling Stewing Sauces Citrus/lemon Vinaigrette Butter/cream Olive oil Demi-glace Meat stock Beers Lager Pilsner Wheat Bock Marzen American Pale ale Scotch ales Porter Stout
    • 13. • Taste components: sweet, sour, bitter, salt, umami Compare Contrast Sweet foods with malted beers or lambics* Bitter foods (walnuts, greens, grilled dishes) with bitter/hoppy beers like American IPAs or American pale ales Bitter foods with fruity, full-flavored beers such as Scotch Ale or a malty Brown ale Sour/acidic foods such as ceviche with sour beers like Belgian sours Sour/acidic foods such as lemon salmon with spiced beers like dunkel weissen Salty foods like cheese with lambics* Herbal/spiced food with herb/spiced beer flavors* Herbal food with a sweet lambic Roasted foods with roasty beers such as browns and scotch ales* Roasted food with a clean herbal beer such as the ones from England or France Spicy food with hopped beers* Spicy food with malted beer to cut spice
    • 14. 5.4% ABV Hefeweizen From the world’s oldest brewery Complementation: Yeasty, citrusy ale & the chick peas, pita, lemon juice. Clearance: High carbonation helps cleanse palate after eating rich foods.
    • 15. • Brightness – Dry briskness on palate/ acidic zip – Citrus or apple-peel aromatics • Darkness – Roasted flavors like chocolate, toffee, cara mel, coffee – Dark fruits like plums, raisins, olives – Sweet spices like cinnamon and nutmeg – Earthy flavors like mushrooms
    • 16. 6.0% ABV Flanders Red Lactobacillus & Brettanomyces contribute sourness Clearance: High acidity helps cut through richness of the eggs. Contrast: Complex, sour fruitiness of ale stands out against simpler food.
    • 17. Dessert • If you know beer well, you can actually match the sweetness as well as the flavor of the dessert • Can also complement the flavors by mixing lambics with chocolates and vanillas Cheese • Look for harmony as well as contrast – Matching nutty, fruity and herbal flavors – Sweet beers with salty cheeses • Sweet cheeses pair well with fruit beers
    • 18. 5.0% ABV Cherry Lambic Fruit is added to spontaneously fermenting ales of varying ages Clearance: Carbonation of lambic cleanses palate from fats. Contrast: Saltiness of cheese contrasts sweetness of beer.
    • 19. • Stimulate the appetite • Can provide balance to sweetness • To pair with food, cuts through heavy sauces, fats, and oil to leave palate cleansed • Measured in IBUs – Anything above 40 is likely to be bitter
    • 20. Complementation: Belgian yeast flavors complement herbal flavors and flavor intensity is also matched. Clearance: carbonation helps with fat. 8.3% ABV Belgian IPA Newer style of beer not yet in a set category
    • 21. Cleansing: High hop bitterness and alcohol sweetness initially intensify but subsequently clear spicy flavors. 8.2% ABV Imperial IPA A distinctively American style of beer
    • 22. • Sweetness – Bitterness , sweetness  – Carbonation , sweetness  – Temperature , sweetness 
    • 23. 8.5% ABV Scotch Ale Complementation: Sweetness and heaviness of scotch ale match sauce sweetness (pecan!) and heaviness of food.
    • 24. • Roasted malts – Chocolate and coffee – Contrasts with salt
    • 25. 9.0% ABV Russian Imperial Stout Complementation: Sweet, chocolatey, and roasty flavors present in both
    • 26. # Beer Name Food 1 CHIMAY Grande Reserve Cocoa dusted almonds 2 WEIHENSTEPHANER Hefeweizen Chick pea hummus 3 RODENBACH Grand Cru Devilled eggs 4 BOON Kriek Camembert 5 FLYING DOG Raging Bitch Pesto pasta 6 SOUTHERN TIER 2X IPA Pad 7 FOUNDERS Dirty Bastard BBQ pulled pork 8 NORTH COAST Old Rasputin Chocolate & espresso cupcakes0 Saison DUPONT

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