A Lecturer’s Perception of the Adoption of the Inverted Classroom or Flipped Method of Curriculum Delivery in a Hydrology Course, in a Resource Poor University of Technology
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A Lecturer’s Perception of the Adoption of the Inverted Classroom or Flipped Method of Curriculum Delivery in a Hydrology Course, in a Resource Poor University of Technology

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Presentation by Anton Thiart et al at the ICEL2013 in June 2013 in Cape Town

Presentation by Anton Thiart et al at the ICEL2013 in June 2013 in Cape Town

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    A Lecturer’s Perception of the Adoption of the Inverted Classroom or Flipped Method of Curriculum Delivery in a Hydrology Course, in a Resource Poor University of Technology A Lecturer’s Perception of the Adoption of the Inverted Classroom or Flipped Method of Curriculum Delivery in a Hydrology Course, in a Resource Poor University of Technology Presentation Transcript

    • A lecturer’s perceptionof the adoptionof the invertedor flipped methodof curriculumdeliveryin a Hydrologycourse,in a resourcepoor Universityof Technology Ivala,E,Thiart,A,Gachago,D.
    • HEI’s Traditional classroom? - Qualityteachingandlearning? - Deeplearning?
    • TWOPHASESOF LEARNING AND THE TRADITIONALCLASSROOM
    • Humanlearning takes placein two phases: TRANSMISSION/ ACQUISITION ASSIMILATION Acquiring information, understanding through Lectures, reading & listening Making meaning, connections, integrating through Homework, lab work, cooperative learning, projects, discussions,
    • Bloom (1956) Assimilation>> Transmission from a cognitive standpoint
    • Potentiallyserious issue withtraditionalmodel! COGNITIVE LOAD ACCESSIBILITY OF HELP
    • Students have the GREATEST accessibility to expert learner/content domain during the tasks of LOWEST cognitive complexity. Students work on tasks of GREATEST cognitive complexity and DEEPEST learning when the instructor is LEAST accessible. False sense of mastery Disengagement Academic dishonesty Shallow learning
    • Howdo we respond? COGNITIVE LOAD ACCESSIBILITY OF HELP ACCESSIBILITY OF HELP
    • THEINVERTEDCLASSROOMMETHOD (ICM)
    • TRANSMISSION By “inverting”the classroomwe mean: ASSIMILATION In class Outside class ASSIMILATION TRANSMISSION
    • Shift in what happens during class time!
    • TRANSMISSION Mainly Outside CLASS
    • The basicinvertedclassroomworkflow Front-loading
    • Sometips on out-of class work e.g basic exercises such as crosswords
    • Inclass on mobile devices
    • Theoretical Framework
    • External variables Technology Acceptance model (Davis1989) Perceived Ease of use Perceived usefulness Actual system use Behavioural intention of use Technology self efficacy
    • Adapted Framework (Chigona) Technological Self-efficacy Teacher Self- efficacy External Variables Perceived ease of use of ICM Perceived usefulness of ICM Behavioural intention to use ICM
    • Data analysis and results
    • Technological self-efficacy • “Perception of the individual’s ability to use technology in accomplishment of a sophisticated task….” • ICM relies heavily on Technology • other faculty lacks knowledge and experience in Technology – reluctant to implement ICM • However, lecturer implemented ICM partly because of technological self-efficiency
    • Teacher self-efficacy • “belief in the individual’s capabilities to bring about desired outcomes of student engagement and learning, even with unmotivated students” • Lecturer had very high levels of SE • reflect on • own teaching methods • context of teaching • Impact on learning • Adopt alternative methods e.g. ICM • Increased levels of work enjoyment
    • Perceived usefulness of ICM • “degree to which an individual believes a particular system would enhance the job of teaching” • The lecturer believed in ICM as an effective means of curriculum delivery to • facilitate deep learning • Enhance job satisfaction
    • Perceived ease of use of ICM • “the degree to which the individual believes that using a particular system would be free of effort” • Labour intensive and time consuming to develop learning material • Co-teachers using different methods of teaching • Poor classroom conditions • Lack of technology and support in poor universities
    • Conclusions • The lecturer perceived ICM as • Significant for promoting deep learning • Enhance job satisfaction • Adoption of ICM by other teachers affected by teacher’s • Technological self efficacy coupled by teacher self- efficacy • Negative impacts such as labour intensive production of learning materials and contextual and social issues at the particular university