Developing Digital Literacies Through Digital Storytelling in Pre-Service Teacher StudentsDaniela Gachago,Cape Peninsula U...
2010 Faculty of Education Digital Storytelling project<br />
1. What is digital literacy?<br />Three components of digital literacy emerge from the literature<br />Social awareness<br...
Research questions<br />Quantitative study: surveys and student scores<br />
Images<br />RQ1: students perception of ICT access and skills <br />
“In South Africa, for students who grew up during apartheid years, issues of language and race tended to cohere with educa...
RQ2: Improvement of digital literacy skills<br />Image from Flickr by Leif (CC)<br />
RQ3: Contradictions<br />
1. What is digital literacy?<br />Three components of digital literacy emerge from the literature<br />Social awareness<br...
What are students’ existing social practices?<br />What tools are they already using?<br />In which language do they want ...
I would like to acknowledge and thank the 2010 Digital Stories students who have made this project such a success!<br />
Further contact: Daniela Gachago, CPUT gachagod@cput.ac.za or gachagod@gmail.com<br />
References<br />Engestroem, Y. (1987). Learning by expanding: An activity-theoretical approach to developmental research. ...
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eLearning Africa 2011 Using digital stories to improve digital literacy skills

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  • A critical reflection on the use of digital stories to improve digital literacies in pre service teacher students
  • What are digital stories?
  • This study focuses on a project carried out in 2010 in the Faculty of Education at a University of Technology in South Africa. Diverse student population, from coloured, white and black African demographic backgrounds. English is the language of instruction at this institution which, for many students, is not their mother tongue.About half of the class of 60 students volunteered to join the digital stories project, while the rest of the class followed the traditional route of paper-based portfolio. Both groups’ instructions were to reflect over the seven roles of a teacher, which are the basis of the South African National Teacher Curriculum (Department of Education, 2000).
  • Three components emerge from the literature.First, digital tool use. What some call computer or ICT literacy. You need to know what tools are available, how they work, how you can link them together.Second, a ‘higher order’ skill of what I’ll call – for wont of a better term - critical thinking – basically evaluating, synthesising, contextualising, reflectionThird, a social element is a little more intangible. It involves an understanding of your place in the digital society and how to work within it. Knowing rules for socialising or collaborating digitally, understanding how to adapt your digital presence according to context or audience.
  • Research question 1
  • Research question 1
  • Apartheid legacy: in South Africa issues of language and race tend to cohere with educational and economic privilege, white students speaking english or Afrikaans at home most privileged
  • Black students higher perceived improvement of skills – but not significantZPD: students who come with lower skills level can take more advantage of support a slightly knowledgeable other can provice
  • Are we disadvantaging our students by introducing technologies? Not an inclusive way of using technology…what do we assess? Outcome or process?
  • eLearning Africa 2011 Using digital stories to improve digital literacy skills

    1. 1. Developing Digital Literacies Through Digital Storytelling in Pre-Service Teacher StudentsDaniela Gachago,Cape Peninsula University of Technology <br />
    2. 2.
    3. 3. 2010 Faculty of Education Digital Storytelling project<br />
    4. 4. 1. What is digital literacy?<br />Three components of digital literacy emerge from the literature<br />Social awareness<br />(understand your identity, collaborate, adapt communication to context/audience)<br />Critical thinking<br />(evaluating, contextualising – information literacy?)<br />Knowledge of digital tools<br />(hard/software awareness/competence – ICT literacy?)<br />Newman, 2009<br />
    5. 5. Research questions<br />Quantitative study: surveys and student scores<br />
    6. 6. Images<br />RQ1: students perception of ICT access and skills <br />
    7. 7. “In South Africa, for students who grew up during apartheid years, issues of language and race tended to cohere with educational and economic privilege, where white students speaking English or Afrikaans as a home language tended to be the most privileged...” (Alexander, 1997)<br />
    8. 8.
    9. 9.
    10. 10. RQ2: Improvement of digital literacy skills<br />Image from Flickr by Leif (CC)<br />
    11. 11.
    12. 12. RQ3: Contradictions<br />
    13. 13.
    14. 14. 1. What is digital literacy?<br />Three components of digital literacy emerge from the literature<br />Social awareness<br />(understand your identity, collaborate, adapt communication to context/audience)<br />Critical thinking<br />(evaluating, contextualising – information literacy?)<br />Knowledge of digital tools<br />(hard/software awareness/competence – ICT literacy?)<br />Newman, 2009<br />
    15. 15. What are students’ existing social practices?<br />What tools are they already using?<br />In which language do they want to tell their stories?<br />How should we assess our students’ improvement in digital literacies?<br />
    16. 16. I would like to acknowledge and thank the 2010 Digital Stories students who have made this project such a success!<br />
    17. 17. Further contact: Daniela Gachago, CPUT gachagod@cput.ac.za or gachagod@gmail.com<br />
    18. 18. References<br />Engestroem, Y. (1987). Learning by expanding: An activity-theoretical approach to developmental research. Helsinki: Orienta-Konsultit.<br />Leibowitz, B., Bozalek, V., Rohleder, P., Carolissen, R., & Swartz, L. (2010). Ah, but the witheys love to talk about themselves: discomfort as a pedagogy for change. Race Ethnicity and Education, 13(1), 83-100. (source of citation Alexander 1997)<br />Mills, K. A. (2010). A Review of the Digital Turnʼ' in the New Literacy Studies. Review of Educational Research, 80(2), 246-271. Retrieved December 12, 2010, from http://rer.sagepub.com/content/80/2/246.full.pdf+html.<br />Newman, T. (2009). Consequences of a digital literacy review: moving from terminology to action. Retrieved May 2011 from http://www.slideshare.net/TabethaNewman/digital-literacy-literature-review-from-terminology-to-action<br />Street, B. (2003). Whatʼs “new” in the new literacy studies? Critical approaches to literacy in theory and practice. Current Issues in Comparative Education, 5(2), 77-91.<br />Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society. The Development of Higher Psychological Processes. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Retrieved November 20, 2010, from http://www.stanford.edu/dept/SUSE/projects/ireport/articles/self-regulation/self-regulated learning-motivation.pdf.<br />
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