The Curious Researcher<br />The Fifth Week<br />
Revising for Purpose<br />You should determine whether the purpose of your paper is clear and examine how well the informa...
Wrestling with the Draft<br />Choose a page of your draft somewhere in the middle<br />Mark the parts where where you’re a...
The Thesis as a Tool for Revision<br />Purpose and thesis are closely related<br />Purpose is a statement of intention<br ...
Using a Reader<br />Peer response is helpful<br />After peers read your paper, have them answer these four questions:<br /...
Cut-and-Paste Revision<br />Photocopy or print two copies of the first draft<br />Cut apart the copy of your research pape...
Cut-and-Paste Revision cont’d<br />Ask yourself these questions while looking at each paragraph:<br />Does it develop my t...
Three things the essay must do<br />You must be confidence that your purpose is stated clearly<br />Research Question<br /...
Revising for Information and Language<br />Use the internet to search for specific facts<br />Refdesk.com<br />US Census B...
Scrutinizing Paragraphs and Sentences<br />Anchor quotes and ideas to people or publications in your paper<br />Say words ...
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The Curious Researcher

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  • You express your main point in the next draft but you will also get the guidance about how you might approach the revision
  • The controlling idea of your paper should be connected to everything elseCore paragraph is the most important paragraph in the paper and contains the thesis
  • Refdesk.com has encyclopedias, biographical indexes, newspapers, dictionaries, magazinesUS Census Bureau is a good source for demographic information on all kinds of subjectsReading it aloud to yourself:-This is the voice you want readers to hear-Rewrite it in your own voiceVerbal gestures: background, analysis, speculation, alignment
  • Search your paragraph for be’s and see if any sentences are written in the passive voiceStrong verbs: list of active verbs on page 245
  • The Curious Researcher

    1. 1. The Curious Researcher<br />The Fifth Week<br />
    2. 2. Revising for Purpose<br />You should determine whether the purpose of your paper is clear and examine how well the information is organized around that purpose<br />The main purpose of my essay on _______________ is to (use the appropriate word or words) explain, argue, explore, describe _______________________<br />Clarify your research question<br />Sometimes you see that you need to hitch your specific question to a larger idea<br />
    3. 3. Wrestling with the Draft<br />Choose a page of your draft somewhere in the middle<br />Mark the parts where where you’re a less active author<br />Less active is material from another source<br />Mark the parts where you’re a more active author<br />More active is material from your own brain<br />
    4. 4. The Thesis as a Tool for Revision<br />Purpose and thesis are closely related<br />Purpose is a statement of intention<br />A thesis is a tool that will help you reopen the material you’ve gathered, rearrange it, and understand it in a new way<br />Write down your thesis<br />Make a list of three or more questions<br />Questions may directly challenge the thesis or they can help you clarify what you’re trying to say<br />Rewrite thesis statement at least three times<br />Rearrange how you state the thesis<br />
    5. 5. Using a Reader<br />Peer response is helpful<br />After peers read your paper, have them answer these four questions:<br />What would you say is the main question that the paper is trying to focus on?<br />What is the main point?<br />What do you remember that convinces you most? What convinces you the least?<br />Where is it the most interesting and most dull?<br />
    6. 6. Cut-and-Paste Revision<br />Photocopy or print two copies of the first draft<br />Cut apart the copy of your research paper paragraph by paragraph. Shuffle the paragraphs around<br />Go through the stack and find the core paragraph<br />Work your way through the remaining stack of paragraphs and make two new stacks: one stack is relevant to the core paragraph and one is not<br />Set aside the reject pile<br />Assemble the rough draft including your core paragraph<br />Look for gaps where you should add information<br />
    7. 7. Cut-and-Paste Revision cont’d<br />Ask yourself these questions while looking at each paragraph:<br />Does it develop my thesis or further the purpose of my paper, or does it seem an unnecessary tangent that could be part of another paper with a different focus?<br />Does it provide important evidence that supports my main point?<br />Does it explain something that’s key to understanding what I’m trying to say?<br />Does it illustrate a key concept?<br />Does it help establish the importance of what I’m trying to say?<br />Does it raise (or answer) a question that I must explore, given what I’m trying to say?<br />
    8. 8. Three things the essay must do<br />You must be confidence that your purpose is stated clearly<br />Research Question<br />What is the purpose of this investigation? What do I want to know?<br />So What?<br />Why is the question I’m asking significant for people other than me?<br />Say One Thing<br />What is my thesis? What seems the best answer to my question?<br />
    9. 9. Revising for Information and Language<br />Use the internet to search for specific facts<br />Refdesk.com<br />US Census Bureau<br />Listen to your paper by reading it aloud to yourself<br />Avoid drawing more attention to who the writer is rather than what he has to say<br />Control information by stating facts and put them together in a paragraph<br />Revise them to make each version more lively<br />Find your own way of saying things<br />Surround factual information with your own analysis<br />Verbal gestures <br />
    10. 10. Scrutinizing Paragraphs and Sentences<br />Anchor quotes and ideas to people or publications in your paper<br />Say words such as: argues, observes, says, contends, believes, and offers<br />Each paragraph should be about one idea<br />Try to cut short the paragraphs <br />Use active voice<br />Use strong verbs<br />Keep sentences at a reasonable length<br />

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