Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Movement West
Movement West
Movement West
Movement West
Movement West
Movement West
Movement West
Movement West
Movement West
Movement West
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Movement West

938

Published on

Published in: Education, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
938
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. The Movement West
    United States Studies
  • 2. Here’s What We’ll Learn
    The West’s Geography
    Why Easterners moved West
    Conflict with Native Americans
    Attempted “assimilation” of Native Americans
    The Cattle Boom
    Living in the West
  • 3. Statehood
  • 4. Why Move West?
    Pull Factors:
    Railroads—sold left-over land cheap
    Homestead Act (1862)—160 acres
    21 years old or head of a family
    American citizen or immigrant applying for citizenship
    Live on land for 6 months for 5 years
    Railroads (Transcontinental Railroad)
  • 5. Why Move West?
    Push Factors:
    Eastern farmland costly
    Restart (African-Americans)
    Escape religious repression (Mormons)
    Who Settled?
    Germans Immigrants: Texas to Missouri
    African-Americans: Kansas (Exodusters)
    Scandinavians: Iowa & Minnesota (climate)
    Mexicans: Texas & New Mexico
  • 6. Fighting Native Americans
    Whites: “Indian Problem”
    Natives: Life or death—must do an all-out assault
    Great Plains was their area: nomadic—followed buffalo herds
    Indian Land until the Gold Rush & Homestead Act
    First—made treaties (some kept; others not) to buy land, stop movement of Nomads, or put Natives in Reservations
  • 7. Result: Battles
    1871: U.S. Government: won’t sign treaties any more; fight instead
    Battle lines shifted; forts couldn’t be built; desertion common
    Buffalo Soldiers (10th Cavalry)
    Battle of Little Bighorn (1876): Custer’s Last Stand—Sitting Bull & Crazy Horse (Sioux) won
    Battle of Wounded Knee (1890): Last battle between Natives & US Army
  • 8. New Policies Towards Natives
    They were defeated, so…
    1. Assimilation: Give up culture, learn English, children go to school
    2. Dawes Act: Created many new reservations, Natives given 160 acres & granted US citizenship (went against Native ideas of shared land & tribal leadership)
    3. More land for settlement (squatters)
  • 9. Homesteaders
    Difficult life (~$1000 setup)
    Sod house (leaky roofs; dirt floors)
    Farming: no machines; tough land (backbreaking labor)
    Pests: grasshopper & mosquito infestations; rattlesnakes get into sod homes easily)
    Droughts common in great Plains
    Help was on the way: irrigation; farm machinery (both increased debt)
    “Bonanza Farms” were created too
  • 10. Making Money
    Sutter’s Mill (Ca. Gold Rush)
    Comstock Lode (Silver & Gold in Nevada)
    Black Hills (many ores in Dakotas)
    Result: boom towns
    Cattle drive (Great Plains): Texas ranchers’ cattle escaped when they went to fight for the Confederacy
    US: beef binge; ranchers made $
    Cowboys: 18 hour days!
    Cattle boom ended as price dropped and land became fenced

×