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  • (Dawn) Good morning ladies and gentlemen. Thank you for joining us for this early start to the conference. My name is Dawn Feavyour, Curator of the Visual Resources Collection in the Department of Art and Art History at Rollins College in Winter Park, Florida. I’d like to introduce the organizer and co-presenter for this workshop - Elizabeth Schaub – the Director of the School of Architecture's Visual Resources Collection at The University of Texas at Austin. We would both like to thank the Visual Resources Association Foundation for their generous support in sponsoring this workshop.   The idea for this workshop grew from a discussion Elizabeth and I had last year during the VRA conference in Toronto. At that time, I had just started on the journey of strategically planning for the VRC at Rollins College, and I was fortunate to have an excellent road map (Elizabeth’s strategic plan) to help me navigate. As I steered the Department of Art and Art History and the VRC through the process, I constantly referred to her plan for inspiration, guidance, and, at times, motivation!   Strategic planning is a journey of discovery that takes you outside the normal day to day operations of your VRC. It is a process of discovering the big picture of where your unit fits in relation to your institution. The aim of this workshop is to offer some strategies for helping you to bring your VRC closer toward reflecting the big picture at your respective institution. And, it is important to remember that your strategic plan will help guide your day to day activities so it's something you'll refer to on a regular basis. (Elizabeth) At this point, perhaps it would be a good idea for everyone to introduce themselves.
  • (Elizabeth) The workshop will be split into 4 sections. We will cover: The rationale for developing a strategic plan. Outline strategies for authoring and promoting the plan. Explore ways to measure the success of the plan once it's been implemented. When to update the plan and the process for doing so. We will cover strategic planning scenarios and strategies adopted by the respective Visual Resource Collections we manage at The University of Texas at Austin and at Rollins College. During the course of the workshop there will be three brainstorming sessions of 20 minutes where we will cover: The rationale : the reasons why you want to create a plan. This will be done as an individual brainstorm. Defining your VRC’s primary and secondary constituents, your mission and vision statements, and how you expect your VRC to achieve those statements. This brainstorm will be done in groups. Finally we will consider who to involve in the planning process, and how to involve them. Again, this brainstorm will be done in groups. There will be two breaks lasting 15 minutes each, at 9:00 am and at 10:20 am. Questions are welcome, but we ask that you hold them until the introductory part of each section is over. We have set aside time at the end of the workshop for exploring questions in more detail.
  • (Dawn) The process of strategic planning gives you the opportunity to: 1. do some visionary thinking. 2. analyze the immediate (and potential) problems that affect your VRC’s day to day operations. 3. identify solutions (or opportunities). 4. establish priorities and needs. 5. bring clarity and direction to everything you are trying to accomplish in the VRC.
  • ( Dawn) Elizabeth and I have found there are four areas to focus on that we used to develop our strategic plans. These include: The rationale. The reasons why you want to create a strategic plan. Definitions. Defining your primary and secondary customers (or constituents). Defining your Mission and Vision. Defining your Goals to achieve the Mission and Vision Defining your Objectives or the steps you will take to achieve those Goals. Strategies. Who will you involve in the planning process? Who will author and who will coordinate the development of the plan? Where will you get the data from to support your definitions? How will you build consensus for those definitions? What formats will you use to create and distribute the plan for review? How you will promote the plan to the rest of the organization? Implementation of the plan. How you will measure the plan's success once it is implemented? When and how will you update the plan? Once again, who will you involve in that updating process? During the course of this workshop, you will learn that the strategic planning process is multi-faceted and done collaboratively. During the planning process you may find yourself in discussions with other units in your organization, some of which may not be your primary constituents, but may have an impact on the ability of your VRC to achieve its Goals and Objectives. For example: The funding and sustainability of technology provided by IT may impact your ability to process and deliver digital images for the classroom. Longevity of subscriptions to databases like ARTstor provided by the Library. What will happen if the Library suddenly ends its subscription to ARTstor? Do they know how this will impact your customers? Facilities maintenance – do they know about your unique needs for the VRC, such as the relationship between temperature and humidity levels for the slide collection? Other departments may have a level of anticipation of being able to use the VRC's resources and services.   At this stage, we would like to introduce our respective institutions and VRCs and give context for the reasons why we developed strategic plans at The University of Texas at Austin and Rollins College.
  • (Elizabeth)   The University of Texas at Austin Overview The following from http://www.utexas.edu/welcome/profile.html. Accessed 2/3/10. Location: 
Austin, Texas, in the heart of the scenic Central Texas Hill Country
Central Austin, about 2 miles from downtown and the State Capitol Size:  More than  350 Acres Founded:  1881 Opened:  1883 17 Colleges and Schools Graduate/undergraduate enrollment: 11,000 graduate/39,000 undergraduate = 50,000 students Living Alumni:  about 450,000  Degree Programs Offered: 
More than 100 Undergraduate
More than 170 Graduate Degrees awarded yearly: 12,000 Employees: 2,500 faculty and 14,000 staff members Total yearly budget: $1.7 billion Research funding: $411 million Museums and libraries: Seven museums and 17 libraries (More than  eight million volumes  in the library system) Mascot: Bevo the Texas longhorn   The following from http://www.utexas.edu/welcome/index.html. Accessed 2/3/10. Mission: The mission of The University of Texas at Austin is to achieve excellence in the interrelated areas of undergraduate education, graduate education , research and public service . The university provides superior and comprehensive educational opportunities at the baccalaureate through doctoral and special professional educational levels. The university contributes to the advancement of society through research, creative activity, scholarly inquiry and the development of new knowledge. The university preserves and promotes the arts, benefits the state’s economy, serves the citizens through public programs and provides other public service. Core Purpose:  To transform lives for the benefit of society. Core Values are: Learning  - A caring community, all of us students, helping one another grow. Discovery  - Expanding knowledge and human understanding. Freedom  - To seek the truth and express it. Leadership  - The will to excel with integrity and the spirit that nothing is impossible. Individual Opportunity  - Many options, diverse people and ideas; one university. Responsibility  - To serve as a catalyst for positive change in Texas and beyond.
  • (Elizabeth)  The School of Architecture Overview The following from http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs/ug08-10/ch03/ug08.ch03.html#general-information. Accessed 2/3/10. Purpose: (excerpt) The School of Architecture seeks to assist those who wish to develop knowledge, sensitivity, and skill in design, planning, and construction, so that as architects, interior designers, and planners may improve the human environment. Location: The School of Architecture is centrally located on campus in four adjacent buildings: the historically significant Battle Hall (1911); Sutton Hall (1918, renovated in 1982), designed by distinguished American architect Cass Gilbert; Goldsmith Hall (1933, expanded and renovated in 1988), designed by noted architect Paul Philippe Cret, one of the primary planners of the forty-acre campus; and the West Mall Office Building (1961). History: The University began offering professional degrees in architecture in 1910 within the Department of Engineering. The School of Architecture was established in 1948 as a division of the College of Engineering and became an autonomous school of the University in September 1951. Graduate study in architecture began at the University in 1912. More than four thousand undergraduate and graduate degrees in architecture and planning have been conferred. Education in community and regional planning was first offered as an undergraduate study option in the School of Architecture from 1948 to 1957.  The Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning was formally approved in October 1959; the Doctor of Philosophy, in April 1995. Education in interior design was first offered in 1939 within the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics. In 1992 the College of Natural Sciences created the Bachelor of Science in Interior Design degree program; in the fall of 1998 this program was revised and transferred to the School of Architecture. The first interior design degrees were conferred by the school in May 2001. The following from "The University of Texas School of Architecture School Profile 2009-10" TOTAL undergraduate enrollment = 353 Breakdown: Bachelor of Architecture = 263 Bachelor of Science in Architectural Studies = 20 Bachelor of Science in Interior Design = 48 Bachelor of Architecture/Plan II (dual degree) = 5 Bachelor of Architecture/Architectural Engineering (dual degree) = 17   TOTAL graduate enrollment = 395 Master of Architecture [First professional] = 173 Master of Architecture [Post-professionl] = 18 Master of Landscape Architecture = 42 Master of Arts in Architectural History = 6 Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning = 96 Master of Science in Historic Preservation = 16 Master of Science in Sustainable Design = 17 Master of Science in Urban Design = 4 Ph.D. in Planning = 15 Ph.D. in Architecture = 8   Number of full-time faculty = 78 tenured = 33 tenure track = 16 non-tenure track = 29 Student/faculty ratio = 10:1
  • (Elizabeth)  The SOA Visual Resources Collection Overview The Visual Resources Collection (VRC) is a unit within the School of Architecture (SOA). The VRC’s primary function is to provide a sustainable and searchable collection of visual images to support current classroom teaching with an emphasis on the SOA’s curriculum as well as reflecting the specializations of the VRC’s patrons. As of spring 2010 the image collection is comprised of over 80,000 digital images, over 250,000 35mm slides, video tapes, CDROMs and DVDs. The majority of the VRC's image collection is hosted by ARTstor.
  • (Elizabeth)  In addition to visual material, the VRC maintains and circulates 35mm slide projectors and slide carousels.   In January 2005 the VRC initiated an exhibit program. The VRC curates two exhibits each academic year, one in the fall and the other during the spring/summer. The exhibits may be viewed in the VRC’s during business hours and past exhibits can be viewed online. Exhibit openings afford an opportunity for faculty, students, staff, and members of the general public to come together within the VRC's space.   The VRC administers the SOA’s Photo Union in order to encourage documentation of student work and investigation into the photographic medium as it relates to the SOA curriculum. The Photo Union is a student organization; membership is open to any currently enrolled SOA student. Members have access to a fully equipped black and white darkroom and may borrow Photo Union 35mm camera equipment from the VRC.   The VRC is engaged with social networking tools such as:   + Wordpress Blog (Deep Focus)  + Delicious + Facebook + Flickr + YouTube   The VRC is involved in cross campus collaborative efforts with colleagues in the: + Architecture & Planning Library + Alexander Architectural Archive + College of Liberal Arts + Division of Instructional Innovation and Assessment + Fine Arts Library + University of Texas Libraries Digital Repository   Why I developed a strategic plan for the School of Architecture VRC at UT Austin Interest in: + aligning VRC's goals more clearly with the school's goals and those of the university at large + showing how the VRC was helping the school and the university meet stated goals + creating a visionary road map for VRC activities that was informed by the big picture + establishing measurable objectives to drive day-to-day activities
  • (Dawn) For compiling this overview, I used the Rollins College website http://www.rollins.edu/ and the Rollins College Fast Facts brochure http://www.rollins.edu/our-people/fact-brochure.pdf   Accessed on 2/8/10.   Bordering the shores of Lake Virginia, Rollins College occupies a beautiful 70-acre campus in Winter Park in Central Florida. The campus is defined by its traditional Spanish-Mediterranean architecture and is about a 20-minute drive from downtown Orlando, about an hour’s drive from the Atlantic Ocean, and about 2 hours from the Gulf of Mexico.   Rollins was established in 1885 and is the oldest college in the state. The College enrolls approximately 3,200 undergraduate and graduate students in diverse degree programs, and is supported by approximately 200 full time faculty.   The Rollins College Mission Statement http://www.rollins.edu/why-rollins/mission.html   “ Rollins College educates students for global citizenship and responsible leadership, empowering graduates to pursue meaningful lives and productive careers. We are committed to the liberal arts ethos and guided by its values and ideals. Our guiding principles are excellence, innovation, and community.   Rollins is a comprehensive liberal arts college. Rollins is nationally recognized for its distinctive undergraduate Arts & Sciences program. The Crummer Graduate School of Business offers a nationally ranked MBA program. The Hamilton Holt School serves the community through exceptional undergraduate and graduate evening degree and outreach programs. We provide opportunities to explore diverse intellectual, spiritual, and aesthetic traditions. We are dedicated to scholarship, academic achievement, creative accomplishment, cultural enrichment, social responsibility, and environmental stewardship. We value excellence in teaching and rigorous, transformative education in a healthy, responsive, and inclusive environment.”
  • (Dawn) The Department of Art and Art History is based in the College of Arts and Sciences.   The College of Arts and Sciences Mission http://www.rollins.edu/as/academics/mission.html   “ Our mission is to provide a rigorous liberal arts baccalaureate education of the highest quality, encouraging in our faculty pedagogical innovation and continued professional growth, and fostering in our students both the intellectual curiosity that underlies a desire for lifelong education and the practice of making principled, ethical decisions for functioning as responsible citizens and workers in a global society.   To obtain knowledge of the distinctive methodologies and subject matter of the sciences, social sciences, arts, and  humanities.  Ability to read, think, write, and speak critically and analytically. Ability to identify and articulate ethical dimensions of a personal or social issue.”   The Department of Art and Art History’s Mission is: “ To provide outstanding educational experiences through the liberal arts curriculum, thus achieving the liberal arts mission of Rollins College.”   The Department is home to three academic programs: Art History, Studio Art and Classical Studies, which is also housed in the Philosophy and Religion Department. The curriculum supports majors and minors in the visual arts, as well as students majoring in other disciplines who wish to engage in the study of art history or a structured studio experience as part of their liberal arts education at the College.   The Department enjoys a close working relationship with the Cornell Fine Arts Museum and each year, senior art majors and minors present an exhibition of their work at the Museum.  This capstone experience prepares studio majors for a variety of art-related careers.  Art history majors are required to complete a senior thesis.   The Department’s student make up in Spring 2010: Declared Art History Majors 33 Declared Art History Minors 11 Declared Studio Art Majors 43 Declared Studio Art Minors 14   The Department consists of 7 faculty, 3 adjuncts, the part time administrative assistant and myself, the part time Visual Resources Curator. I am assisted, during semesters, by two part-time work-study student employees.
  • (Dawn) And here they are …   The Visual Resources Collection (VRC) is located within the Department of Art and Art History. The VRC’s Mission is:   “ To assist the primary constituency, the Department of Art and Art History, in achieving their mission, and, where possible, to assist other units on campus.   The VRC supports the pedagogical needs of faculty, staff and students of the Department, through the development and management of a sustainable centralized collection of visual resources … through the provision of training and user support in these resources, and through maintenance of the Department’s Art History teaching classroom which is outfitted with Smart Technology to enhance the learning experience of students at Rollins College.”
  • (Dawn) In academic year 2009 - 2010, the VRC consists of approximately 5,000 digital images, 70,000 slides, 150 audiovisual materials, 200 reference books, archival files, and visual resource production and projection equipment. Slide acquisitions ceased in 2008, and only 20 slides have circulated this current academic year.   I joined Rollins in 2006 and from the start I adopted a campus-wide approach for exploring and finding solutions to deal with redundancy in analog technologies and for managing user expectations of digital technologies. I involved the VRC in a number of collaborative projects with other units on campus, thus raising the profile of the VRC and the Department at Rollins.
  • (Dawn) I maintain strong working relationships with staff and faculty in the Olin Library, the Cornell Fine Arts Museum, IT, the Department of Environmental Health, Human Resources Risk Management, Facilities Management, and various academic departments.   One positive effect from all of this interaction is that I now serve a number of liaison roles at Rollins: I’m the Department’s contact for:   IT and the Olin Library on computer and technology issues. Cornell Fine Arts Museum for initially processing faculty image requests from their permanent collection.. I’m the Department’s CONTENTdm Collection Administrator. I’m the  College’s ARTstor User Support and Instructor Privileges Administrator. Thus, the VRC’s Vision Statement is:   “ Rollins College can leverage the VRC’s knowledge and expertise in the management of digitization projects for creating a digital image library; in the instruction of how to use technologies for teaching with images, and in copyright as it relates to the use of images in the classroom, by building on the VRC’s rich history of serving the needs of its immediate constituency, the Department of Art and Art History.”
  • (Dawn) So why did I develop a strategic plan for the VRC?   There were a number of factors affecting our VRC operations which highlighted the need for me to strategically plan for processes, policies and procedures for dealing with certain situations, now and in the future. The main factors were: Changes in our users expectations and demands for technologies. The Department of Art and Art History has completely moved over to using digital images in the classroom. The emergence of new technologies for delivering those digital images and the training needs of faculty, eg. ARTstor and the OIV. The announcement by Kodak in 2004 of withdrawal of their support for analog technologies in 2011. The extremely low accession and circulation figures for our slide collection. The Department needed to consider what to do with the slide collection since no one is using it? The absence of any acquisitions and collection development policies for the VRC. The temporary relocation of the VRC during the summer of 2009. In the fall of 2008, the VRC was affected by a flood from the HVAC system in the roof. This was one of the factors in the College’s decision to replace the antiquated HVAC system in the building housing the Department of Art and Art History and the VRC. During the renovations, the Olin Library generously offered two rooms to re-house the VRC. This process involved an incredible amount of planning, communication and coordination across many units on campus, including the Department of Art and Art History, Provost’s Office, Olin Library, Facilities, IT, and raised awareness of the VRC and its unique needs within the Rollins community. Through researching the history of the VRC and fielding image requests from outside the Department, it was becoming clear that other departments have a certain level of anticipation of being able to use the VRC's resources and services. I felt our primary constituency, the Department, needed to be aware of demands from our secondary constituencies.   The rationale for developing the VRC strategic plan was included in all draft versions reviewed by the Department. The rationale was a temporary section intended to help the Department focus on reasons why a plan was needed, and was removed in the final version published on the VRC’s webpage.
  • (Elizabeth) Now we would like to give you the opportunity to do some visionary thinking. Please take the next  10  minutes to consider the questions on Worksheet #1 (YELLOW) as you ask yourself why you want to create a strategic plan for your VRC. The questions can be broken down into categories that will help during the development of your plan …
  • (Elizabeth) For the next 10 minutes, we would like to open the workshop for discussion and comments on your worksheets...   The Background and the Values can help in establishing the history of your VRC and can also feed into your Mission statement. This data can be repurposed to form the “About Us” sections in other VRC materials, such as the website, disaster plan, operations manual, work study manual, annual reports, etc.   Challenges could influence your Goals. Strengths and Opportunities may help define your Objectives, and Opportunities may also help with crafting your Vision statement. Summary of responses.
  • (Elizabeth) Welcome back. Before the break we covered the rationale for creating a strategic plan. The next section of this workshop will focus on how to create your strategic plan. To recap, we will look at: Definitions: Defining your primary and secondary customers (or constituents). Defining your Mission and Vision. Defining your Goals that will achieve the Mission and Vision Defining your Objectives (or the steps you will take to achieve those Goals). We will also look at Strategies: Who will you involve in the planning process? Who will author and who will coordinate the development of the plan? Where will you get the data from to support your definitions? How will you build consensus for those definitions? What formats will you use to create the plan? And how you will promote the plan to the rest of the organization.
  • (Dawn) The strategic planning process is as important as the plan itself, in providing a timeline for gathering data, a forum for visionary thinking, expressing views, reaching consensus on a shared Mission, Vision, Goals and Objectives, and establishing a process for monitoring and updating the plan. The aim of the planning process is to ensure the VRC is constantly aligned with the Mission and Vision of its main constituency, as well as the parent organization’s Mission and Vision.   The strategic plan should be regarded as a “living’ document because your VRC's goals and objectives will change in response to evolving image management and delivery practices as well as to the climate at your own institution.   For any strategic plan to be successful, it requires consensus and commitment from the main constituency. Depending on how your VRC is administered, your main constituency might be the faculty and staff of the Art Department, the Library, the IT Department, the Museum, and so on.   At Rollins, the VRC comes under the administration of the Department of Art and Art History. As head of the VRC, I report to both the Department Chair and the Co-Chair who represent Studio Art and Art History. The Chair positions swap over at the start of each academic year. So in my case, the Department is the VRC's main constituency.   The Rollins College VRC Strategic Plan was developed during the spring and fall of 2009 in collaboration with the Department of Art and Art History, and it covers the years 2009 -2012.   The resources I used during the development of the plan included: Existing campus plans (the Rollins College plan, the IT master plan and the Olin Library's strategic plan). Strategic plans from other VRCs (School of Architecture at The University of Texas at Austin, The Communication, Humanities and Social Sciences Division at Central New Mexico Community College, and the College of Architecture and Planning, University of Colorado Denver/Boulder). Publications from professional organizations such as the Visual Resources Association (VRA) and Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS-NA). Various business management publications (listed in our citations). (Elizabeth) The Visual Resources Collection that I manage at UT comes under the administration of the School of Architecture. I report to the school's Assistant Dean for Administration. The School of Architecture's faculty, students, and staff members are the VRC's main constituency.   I developed the VRC's first strategic plan in 2006. The plan covered the years 2006-2009. The current plan was drafted in 2009 and goes through 2012.   I consulted the following sources during the plan's development: 1) Local documents including: +The School of Architecture's Charter +The School of Architecture's Compact with the Vice Provost authored by the school's Dean +The University of Texas at Austin's mission and vision statements +The University of Texas Libraries Strategic Plan   2) A draft plan from another university +The University of Colorado at Denver/Boulder College of Architecture and Planning Digital Asset Management Strategic Plan for the Next Three Years (Draft)   3) Field related "visionary" literature + The Visual Resources Environment at Liberal Arts Colleges, published by National Institute for Technology and Liberal Education (2006) + The Horizon Report 2006 Edition, published by The New Media Consortium and the Educause Learning Initiative   4) Strategic planning guides + Strategic Planning in Higher Education: A Guide for Heads of Institutions, Senior Managers and Members of Governing Bodies, published by Higher Education Funding Council for England (2000) + Strategic Planning Handbook, published by the Special Libraries Association (current version updated May 2001)
  • (Dawn) We would like to hand the workshop over to you again. First we would like you to split into groups … Please may we have a volunteer from each group to be an idea recorder? We would like you to write down the ideas generated by your group and present them to the collective group. To help us keep on track, we have some guidelines for these group brainstorming sessions. Please focus on generating as many ideas as you can. Don't be afraid to think outside the box. Please take the next  15  minutes to consider the questions on Worksheet #2 (PINK) as you think about who your constituents are, what is your VRC’s mission, what might your VRC’s vision be, and what steps you might need to take to achieve that mission and vision. Again, the questions can be broken down into categories that will help during the development of your plan …
  • (Dawn) Please can you return to your seats? We will address each question with the idea recorders reporting back to the group. Summary of responses. For the next 20 minutes, we would like to open the workshop for discussion and comments on your worksheets... To determine where it is going over the next 3 to 5 years, the VRC needs to know where it is now (the Mission ), where it wants to go (the Vision ) and how it will get there (through a set of Goals and Objectives ). Defining those areas is one of the more difficult aspects in developing a strategic plan.   The Mission statement should define the fundamental purpose of the VRC, describing why it exists, for whom it exists, its guiding principles and operations, in a way that is realistic and achievable for all constituents. The Mission generally concentrates on the present.   Goals and Objectives will be unique for each VRC but, as a profession, we share similar aims and objectives. When I created the Rollins College VRC Plan, I found my Goals and Objectives very similar to Elizabeth’s, even though our collections are different in size, scope and intended audience.   Establishing the  challenges could influence your Goals. Looking at the challenges as Opportunities may help define your Objectives and will feed into your Vision statement.   The Vision statement should define the VRC’s future, giving a solid foundation for basing all future VRC operations and decisions. The Vision should become assimilated into the culture of the VRC and the person in charge of the VRC should communicate this Vision regularly, acting as a role model by embodying the Vision, and ensuring all VRC decisions are compatible with that Vision .
  • (Elizabeth) Now we'd like to turn to who might be involved in the strategic planning process. The questions that we'd like to answer are:   Who should facilitate the creation of this “road map”? Who do we ask to help us plan this “road map”?   The question of who to involve in the creation and authoring of the plan will depend on the size and availability of staff and/or faculty from your VRC and your main constituency.   I decided on my own to create a strategic plan-it was not something that was required of me by my supervisor or the dean. My approach to creating the plan was much less formal-and less inclusive-than the approach taken by Dawn which she will describe in a moment. I spent the better part of the summer of 2006 researching and writing the plan for 2006-2009.   As the author of the plan I relied on feedback from my direct supervisor, the School of Architecture's Assistant Dean for Administration, as the plan went from draft to final form.   (Dawn)   At Rollins, I am the solo curator, so I was author, facilitator and coordinator of the plan. Faculty and staff from the Department were involved in the planning process, and planning discussions were included in Department monthly meetings.
  • (Dawn) As Elizabeth mentioned, I felt a formal, inclusive approach to be the most appropriate method for engaging the Department during the planning process. So I started with a timeline …   Creating a timeline for developing a strategic plan is usually referred to as the "Plan to Plan". It is helpful for establishing milestones for reaching decisions and actions, and will help you stay focused and on track. A search on your institution’s website may show another unit has already developed a timeline that can be repurposed for your VRC.
  • (Dawn) http://docs.google.com/View?docid=ds65s49_1gnpb59 Accessed on 2/8/10. I used the Olin Library’s Plan to Plan as a template for developing the VRC’s Plan to Plan …
  • (Dawn) … which looked like this. For each section, I took the following steps: 1. Data gathering and environmental scan timeline (Spring 2009). I researched the history of the VRC from very sparse documentation gathered ideas for the Mission, Vision, Goals, Objectives, measurement and monitoring of the plan established relationships between existing Rollins College plans (for the Library, IT, etc.) reviewed and suggested connections to the VRC for those plans researched strategic plans from peer VRCs   2. Strategic Plan development timeline (Spring/Summer/Fall 2009). I created a draft version in Word met with the Department of Art and Art History to discuss the planning process put out draft versions for review, in Blackboard sought Departmental consensus on the Mission, Vision, Goals, Objectives, measurement and monitoring of the plan   3. Presentation of the final version of the plan (Fall 2009). I published the final version to the Department of Art and Art History in Blackboard published the plan as a pdf on the VRC’s webpage sent the link for the plan to the Directors of the Olin Library, IT and Cornell Fine Arts Museum   So what is left on my TO DO LIST? 4. Integrate the plan into my annual review (Summer 2010)   5. Begin Annual Planning Cycle (Fall 2010) This is where I will evaluate the objectives to feedback into my annual review decide whether to continue, cease, and/or develop new objectives for 2010 – 2011 review and agree on those objectives with the Department of Art and Art History update the plan and publish the updated version on the VRC’s webpage
  • (Elizabeth)   Now we'd like to address format options:   What formats should you use to create the plan? Very simply, I created the plan as a Word document that was sent back and forth between me and my supervisor.   (Dawn)   I also created the plan in Word and initially circulated draft paper versions in separate binders, one for each faculty member, because I knew that faculty would find it harder to lose a binder sitting in their in tray than a document. Unfortunately this meant a few trees suffered in the process!   One faculty member wanted me to explore a greener way to do this, so I looked at online alternatives. Again, a search on your institution’s website may show another unit has already developed something that can be repurposed for your VRC.
  • (Dawn) http://olinplan.pbworks.com/ Accessed on 2/8/10. A publicly accessible Strategic Planning wiki was used by the Olin Library during their planning process. This method may be appropriate for your organization, but I felt a less “public” environment for our planning discussions was needed.
  • (Dawn) I worked with Classroom Technology to create an internal area in Blackboard for storing departmental documents, such as meeting agendas, minutes, manuals, etc. This area gave us the opportunity to use the Discussion Board feature for commenting on the different versions of the plan. We could see at a glance how decisions had been reached and it gave the Department a sense of involvement in the strategic planning process.
  • (Dawn) How did I promote the plan? I published the plan as a pdf on the VRC’s website and sent the link to the directors of the Library, IT and Museum. I plan to meet with the Department Chair and Co-Chair twice during semesters to report on progress related to the goals and objectives outlined in the plan, and will review the plan annually.   How does one measure the plan's success once implemented? I’m not at this stage yet. Integrating the plan into my annual review and establishing an Annual Planning Cycle to evaluate the plan's objectives is something I will be doing at the end of the academic year.   (Elizabeth)   My approach to promoting the VRC's plan is as follows: Once the plan was completed I distributed it to the dean, my supervisor, and members of the school's Library and Collections Committee comprised of faculty, my colleagues in the school and in the Architecture & Planning Library and the Alexander Architectural Archive, and student representatives serving on the committee.   Now, how does one measure the plan's success once implemented? My objectives for each semester are formulated based on the objectives outlined in the strategic plan.   I systematically work to accomplish each objective and my performance is assessed based on my success in accomplishing each objective. I meet with my supervisor on a regular basis, usually once every four weeks or so, and report on progress related to my objectives.   When should you update the plan? During the summer prior to the upcoming academic year, I review the plan, make minor adjustments and map the plan's objectives to my personal objectives for the upcoming semester in consultation with my supervisor.
  • (Elizabeth) Now we would like to hand over the workshop to you. First we would like you to work in your groups again. Your designated “idea collector” should write down the ideas from your group and report them back to the workshop. Please focus on generating as many ideas as you can. Again, don't be afraid to think outside the box.   Please take the next 10 minutes to consider the questions on Worksheet #3 (GREEN) . The questions can be broken down into categories that will help during the development of your plan …
  • (Elizabeth) Now it is time for the idea collectors to report back to the workshop. For the next 10 minutes, we would like to open the workshop for discussion and comments on your worksheets...  Summary of responses.
  • (Dawn) Remain calm in the chaos. Creating layers of transparency across your VRC means you and your operations will be under close scrutiny from your parent unit. Keep focused on the end result. Encourage discussion about “difficult” issues to prevent them from being avoided. Keep everyone on track and try not to become emotionally involved with “hot” issues. Handle criticism constructively rather than destructively. Be honest and fair. No-one is neutral – people have opinions and want to express them. You need to make a clear distinction between opinions and facts. Be open to all ideas.   Offer insights and ideas from an outsider’s perspective.
  • (Dawn) Set achievable goals. Ensure the goals you set for the VRC are achievable in the time frame you set for yourself. A goal can have multiple objectives that are addressed over time with the cumulative effect of meeting your stated goal. Engage your constituency. Could apply to VR professionals under Department administration - Your primary constituency may not be as interested as you are in strategically planning their resource. Keep a campus wide perspective on this process. Don’t lose sight of that big picture: Avoid thinking about issues solely from the point of view of your parent unit. Information gathered in the strategic planning process (VRC background, mission and vision) can be re-purposed for the “About Us” section on your VRC website, disaster plan, operations manual, work study manual, annual reports, etc.
  • ( Dawn) During this workshop we covered the four areas to focus on when developing a strategic plan. To recap these are: The rationale.   The reasons why you want to create a strategic plan. Definitions. Defining your primary and secondary customers (or constituents). Defining your Mission and Vision. Defining your Goals to achieve the Mission and Vision Defining your Objectives or the steps you will take to achieve those Goals. Strategies. Who will you involve in the planning process? Who will author and who will coordinate the development of the plan? Where will you get the data from to support your definitions? How will you build consensus for those definitions? What formats will you use to create and distribute the plan for review? How you will promote the plan to the rest of the organization? Implementation of the plan. How you will measure the plan's success once it is implemented? When and how will you update the plan? Once again, who will you involve in that updating process?
  • (Elizabeth) We have budgeted time (15 minutes) for you to fill out the survey (WHITE SHEET) included in your information packets. Please do so before leaving. Thank you for your participation!

Transcript

  • 1. STRATEGIC PLANNING: WHO, WHAT, WHY, AND HOW VRA 2010 Atlanta Dawn Feavyour, Rollins College Elizabeth Schaub, The University of Texas at Austin
  • 2. Agenda
    • Rationale
    • Brainstorm
    • Break
    • Strategies
    • Brainstorm
    • Break
    • Strategies
    • Measurement
    • Monitoring
    • Brainstorm
    • Tips
    • Questions
    • Survey
  • 3.  
  • 4. Strategic Plan Foci
    • Rationale
    • Definitions
    • Strategies
    • Implementation
  • 5. Image by Bonita Sarita
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8.  
  • 9. Rollins College Images courtesy of Rollins College
  • 10. Department of Art and Art History Images courtesy of Dawn Feavyour
  • 11. Visual Resources Collection Images courtesy of Dawn Feavyour
  • 12. Visual Resources Collection Images courtesy of Dawn Feavyour
  • 13. Cornell Fine Arts Museum and Olin Library Images courtesy of Dawn Feavyour and Rollins College
  • 14. WHY?
  • 15.  
  • 16. Exercise 1: WHY? Who are we? Background Where are we now? Background How did we get there? Background Why do we do what we do? Values What challenges are we dealing with? Challenges What are we doing to address these challenges? Strengths If we continue to follow this direction, where will we end up? Opportunities
  • 17. QUESTIONS?
  • 18. BREAK
  • 19. Agenda
    • Rationale
    • Brainstorm
    • Break
    • Strategies
    • Brainstorm
    • Break
    • Strategies
    • Measurement
    • Monitoring
    • Brainstorm
    • Tips
    • Questions
  • 20. Strategic Plan Foci
    • Rationale
    • Definitions
    • Strategies
    • Implementation
  • 21. HOW?
  • 22.  
  • 23. Exercise 2: HOW? What do we do? Mission Who are our primary customer? What do they do? Mission, Vision Who are our secondary customers? What do they do? Mission, Vision Where should we be going? Vision, Goals What steps should we take to get there? Objectives Who will do what and when to achieve these steps? Allocation of resources What challenges will we have to deal with as we get there? Challenges What should we do to address them? Opportunities, Objectives
  • 24. QUESTIONS?
  • 25. BREAK
  • 26. Agenda
    • Rationale
    • Brainstorm
    • Break
    • Strategies
    • Brainstorm
    • Break
    • Strategies
    • Measurement
    • Monitoring
    • Brainstorm
    • Tips
    • Questions
  • 27. WHO?
  • 28. HOW?
  • 29. The Olin Library’s Plan to Plan
  • 30. The Olin Library’s Plan to Plan
  • 31. Rollins College VRC Plan to Plan as at 10/19/2009
    • Data gathering and environmental scan timeline
        • (Spring 2009)
    • Strategic Plan development timeline
        • (Spring/Summer/Fall 2009)
    • Presentation of the final version of the plan ( Fall 2009)
    • TO DO …
    • Integrate the plan into the Visual Resources Curator’s annual review (Summer 2010)
    • Begin Annual Planning Cycle (Fall 2010)
  • 32. WHAT?
  • 33. The Olin Library’s Strategic Planning Wiki
  • 34. Blackboard
  • 35. HOW?
  • 36.  
  • 37. Exercise 3 How will we know if/when we have gotten to where we want to go? Measuring the success of the plan If the plan is not working, how and when do we fix it? Monitoring the plan
  • 38. Tips
    • Remain calm
    • Keep focused
    • Be honest and fair
    • Be open to all ideas
  • 39. Things to be aware of:
    • Set achievable goals
    • Engage your constituency
    • Campus perspective
    • Repurpose the data
  • 40. Strategic Plan Foci
    • Rationale
    • Definitions
    • Strategies
    • Implementation
  • 41. QUESTIONS?
  • 42. SURVEY
  • 43. THANK YOU