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Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
Lean Lego Game workshop
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Lean Lego Game workshop

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  • Developmentsince
  • 3rd Annual ”State of Agile Development” Survey June-July 20083061 respondents80 countries
  • Problem: project bloat, instead: chunk project into small pieces
  • Like Detroit Automakers, industrial IT is performingbadly. Whichbusinesses are performingbetter, why is that, and whatits equivalent in IT? Photo credit: Ben Wojdyla, The Ruins of Detroit Industry
  • Culture of high involvementThriving in anindustry of high changeSustainsbest-in-industry performance over time
  • In April 2006, the companyownedby the Inditex Group, took the lead in fastfashionapparelawayfromgiantSwedishretailer, H&M.8.15 billioncompared to 7.87 billion (2005)300 designers in La Corunaproduce 1000 newstyles per month.Four to fiveweeks from identified need and concept to clothes in stores (new version of existing model in 2 weeks).This process takes six to twelve months for an average retailer.Spends 0.3% of sales on ads (25M), compared to 3-4% typically spent by rivals (250M).
  • http://www.newbalance.com/corporate/pressroom/corporate_docs/NBEE.pdfhttp://www.newbalance.com/USA/
  • Expectation: Information crosses too many tiers, lots of handoffs.Bricks not the right form, amount.Result: not much profit.Lots of data processing before data is presented to customer in valuable format.
  • Winston W. Royce, Managing the Development of Large Software Systemshttp://www.cs.umd.edu/class/spring2003/cmsc838p/Process/waterfall.pdfExpectation: Information crosses too many tiers, lots of handoffs.Bricks not the right form, amount.Result: not much profit.Lots of data processing before data is presented to customer in valuable format.
  • Taken from http://agilemanager.blogspot.com/2009/06/case-for-restructuring-it.html
  • “Lean” is a term developed by Jim Womack used to describe the Toyota Production System (TPS), aimed at eliminating waste and transforming operations from mass production to continuous flow.
  • A wellknown cartoon…
  • The whole value chain knows which information is valuable, because it is clear what needs to be doneEveryone is alignedWorthless information is filtered early
  • Sources: Lean Engineering Basics V6.3 Slide 5, MassachusettsInstititue of TechnologyPoppendieck LLC
  • XP: Planning Game: agileestimating & planning, user stories, story points, release and iteration planningXP: Simple Design: avoidcomplexity (= waste), avoid Big Design Up Front (BDUF)XP: Embracechange, avoid Big Requirements Up Front (BRUF)XP: Testing – test early, test firstXP: YAGNI,no extra featuresLSD: A3 report vs. Heavy ceremony, documentationLSD: Self-organization, responsibilitybased planning & control
  • XP: Planning Game: agileestimating & planning, user stories, story points, release and iteration planningXP: Simple Design: avoidcomplexity (= waste), avoid Big Design Up Front (BDUF)XP: Embracechange, avoid Big Requirements Up Front (BRUF)XP: Testing – test early, test firstXP: YAGNI,no extra featuresLSD: A3 report vs. Heavy ceremony, documentationLSD: Self-organization, responsibilitybased planning & control
  • After three years of research for the Kansas DOT, (KDOT: www.ink.org/public/kdot/index.html) Mack Blackwell, National Transportation Research Center (MBTC: www.mackblackwell.org) and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS: www.hwysafety.org), the overall conclusion is that the Modern Roundabout is the safest and most efficient form of intersection traffic control available today.Safety: In a recent IIHS study of 24 intersections in the USA where stop control and traffic signals were replaced with Modern Roundabouts, there was a:39% overall crash reduction76% injury crash reduction90% fatal crash reductionEfficiency: Our studies show significant reductions in vehicle delay, queue length and stopping. (Actual numbers will be made available in future sections)http://www.k-state.edu/roundabouts/ada/
  • Work packages, requirements, design documentation, open defects, standards, tooling, specific build and test scripts for a module that you are about to build should be available from the startLike a surgeon, all tools are ready-to-hand, everything is there to enter a programming FLOW
  • Work packages, requirements, design documentation, open defects, standards, tooling, specific build and test scripts for a module that you are about to build should be available from the startLike a surgeon, all tools are ready-to-hand, everything is there to enter a programming FLOW
  • Limit WIP – Iterations,Small Releases, Sprints40-Hour Week (prevent burnout)Compare 80% utilization @ Google, ortrafficlight at congestedhighways (1 car per sign)Ask not: how long will this take?Ask instead: What can be done by this date?DailyStandup Meetings (Scrum): discussproblems/challengesVelocityLSD: #5 SpeedLSD: MistakeProofing (automation); build management; one click build, scheduledbuilds, buildresultnotification, one-step release, bullet-proofinstallationLean: Due Date Performance
  • Limit WIP – Iterations,Small Releases, Sprints40-Hour Week (prevent burnout)Compare 80% utilization @ Google, ortrafficlight at congestedhighways (1 car per sign)Ask not: how long will this take?Ask instead: What can be done by this date?DailyStandup Meetings (Scrum): discussproblems/challengesVelocityLSD: #5 SpeedLSD: MistakeProofing (automation); build management; one click build, scheduledbuilds, buildresultnotification, one-step release, bullet-proofinstallationLean: Due Date Performance
  • Only built what is being asked, just 20% of functionality of custom built business systems is used on a regular basis; 2/3 of functionality is used seldomly.Lots of productivity gain by writing less code, why bother coding functionality that is never used. Know what the customer (really) wants and deliver that as fast as possible.Let them experience the application and from this new priorities will arise. Repeating this feedback loop will create value for the customer and figure out what he really need.This way you won’t spoil your code, less testing, documenting, depoyment, maintenance, less complex.Higher value
  • XP: InformativeworkspaceScrum: Scrum Board (balancedwork) LSD:Decide as Late as Possible, Set Based DesignPull = Flow + PredictableCycle Time, whereCycle Time <= Lead TimeTakt Time,BalancedWorkCustomer pulls value (throughprioritization).Standard WorkSingle PieceFlowKanban, Andon, Visual Control
  • Transcript

    • 1. WorkshopLean DevelopmentMartin van Amersfoorth, Freek Leemhuis, Maarten MetzJava & Oracle Practice, C&PS, Logica
      Original idea by Francisco Trindade & Danilo Sato
    • 2. Workshop | Lean Development
    • 3. Agility
    • 4. AgilityAgile ManifestoIndividuals and interactions over processes and tools Working software over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan …Craftsmanship over crap
    • 5. Agility | Methods
      A group of software development methodologies that promotes development iterations, open collaboration, and process adaptability throughout the life-cycle of the project.
    • 6. Agility | Methods
      Bron: 3rd Annual ”State of Agile Development” Survey June-July 2008
      3061 respondents from 80 countries
    • 7. Agility | Methods
      More prescriptive
      More adaptive
      XP
      (13)
      Scrum
      (9)
      Kanban
      (3)
      Do Whatever
      (0)
      RUP
      (120+)
    • Agility | ScrumScrum = Management Process
      Scrum Master
      Product Owner
      Team
      Sprint Planning Meeting
      Daily Scrum
      Sprint Review
      Product Backlog
      Sprint Backlog
      BurndownChart
    • 155. Agility | XPExtreme ProgrammingXP = Engineering Process
      TestingSmall ReleasesRefactoringSimple DesignPlanning GamePair Programming
      Onsite CustomerSystem MetaphorCollective Code OwnershipContinuous IntegrationCoding ConventionsSustainable Pace
    • 156. Performance
    • 157. Performance
      Source: Ross Petitt, Restructuring IT: The Detroitification of IT (2009)
    • 158. Performance
    • 159. Performance | ToyotaJust In Time (ジャストインタイム) – JITJidoka(自働化)Autonomation – automation with human intelligenceHeijunka(平準化)Production SmoothingKaizen(改善)Continuous ImprovementPoka-yoke (ポカヨケ)fail-safing – to avoid inadvertent errorsKanban(看板, also かんばん) Sign, Index CardAndon(アンドン)SignboardMuri(無理)OverburdenMura(斑 or ムラ)UnevennessMuda(無駄, also ムダ)WasteGenchiGenbutsu(現地現物)Go and see for yourself
    • 160. Performance | BoeingDetailed customer knowledge and focusWe will seek to understand, anticipate and be responsive to our customers&apos; needs. Large-scale systems integrationWe will continuously develop, advance, and protect the technical excellence that allows us to integrate effectively the systems we design and produce. Lean enterpriseOur entire enterprise will be a lean operation, characterized by the efficient use of assets, high inventory turns, excellent supplier management, short cycle times, high quality and low transaction costs.
      Boeing’s core competencieshttp://boeing.com/aboutus/culture/index.html
    • 161. Performance | ZaraIn fashion, stock is like food, it goes bad quick(=&gt; 35-40% sold at discounts)New styles manufactured in Europe (@ 17-20 x higher labor costs than Asia) Small batches to avoid oversupply (higher avg. selling price) Designers in daily contact with store managers to discover bestselling itemsSpends 5-10 x less on IT than its rivals
    • 162. Performance | Southwest Airlines
      Excellent Customer Service
      Reliable Performance
      Point-to-Point Routing
      Consistent Low Fares
      No “Nuisance Charges”
      Lots of FlightOptions
      Most Punctual
      Lost the LeastBags
      Had the FewestComplaints
      Rated “Most Admired” US Airline
      Made a profiteveryyear
      Operates at LowestLoad Factor
    • 163. Performance | New BalanceA Boston company and just about the onlyathletic footwear maker left manufacturing in the USDeploys lean manufacturing principles to keepits domestic production (25%) globally competitive30% of NB shoes sold in European market are manufactured at the New Balance facility in EnglandReduced replenishment cycle from 110 to 5 daysallowing it to match stock levels to demandand prevents from manufacturing unwanted shoes
    • 164. Run #1 | Briefing1. Table 1: sort on color. Move sorted bricks to table 22. Table 2: sort on color and form. Move sorted bricks to table 33. Table 3: collect bricks that are necessary to build 1 house. Move collection to table 44.Table 4: assemble house according to instructionsYou’ve got 1 minute per table!
    • 165. Run #1 | Debriefing
      Winston W. Royce, Managing the Development of Large Software Systems (1970)
    • 166. Lean
      Thinking
    • 167. Lean Thinking | GuidelinesSpecify value: value is defined by the customer in terms of specific products and servicesIdentify the value stream: map out all end-to-end linked actions, processes and functions necessary for transforming inputs to outputs to identify and eliminate wasteMake value flow continuously, having eliminated waste, make remaining value-creating steps “flow”Let customers pull value: customer’s “pull” cascades all the way back to the lowest level supplier, enabling just-in-time productionPursue perfection: pursue continuous process of improvement striving for perfection
      James Womack and Daniel T. Jones, Lean Thinking, 1996
    • 168. Lean Thinking | ValueSpecify value: value is defined by the customer in terms of specific products and servicesIdentify the value stream: map out all end-to-end linked actions, processes and functions necessary for transforming inputs to outputs to identify and eliminate wasteMake value flow continuously, having eliminated waste, make remaining value-creating steps “flow”Let customers pull value: customer’s “pull” cascades all the way back to the lowest level supplier, enabling just-in-time productionPursue perfection: pursue continuous process of improvement striving for perfection
    • 169. Lean Thinking | ValueAgile Manifesto: “Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software”“Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.”
      Practices: Onsite Customer (XP), Product Owner (Scrum)
    • 170. Lean Thinking | Value Agile Manifesto: “Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.”
      Practices: Team (Scrum), Scrum Master (Scrum)
      © 2007 Poppendieck LLC
    • 171. Lean Thinking | ValueValue Added ActivityTransforms or shapes material or information or peopleAnd it’s done right the first timeAnd the customer wants itNon-Value Added Activity – Necessary WasteNo value is created, but cannot be eliminated based on current technology, policy, or thinkingExamples: project coordination, regulatory, company mandate, lawNon-Value Added Activity – Pure WasteConsumes resources, but creates no value in the eyes of the customerExamples: idle/wait time, inventory, rework, excess checkoffs
      Lean Thinking v6.3 © MassachusettsInstitute of Technology.
    • 172. Run #2 | Briefing1. Table 1: sort on color. Move only value adding sorted bricks to table 22. Table 2: sort on color and form. Move only value adding sorted bricks to table 33. Table 3: collect bricks that are necessary to build 1 house. Move collection to table 44.Table 4: assemble house according to instructionsYou’ve got 1 minute per table!
    • 173. Run #2 | Debriefing
    • 174. Lean Thinking | Value
      Often or always used: 20%, rarely or never used: 64%.
      Source: Standish Group Studyreported at XP2002 by Jim Johnson (Chairman)
      Muda(無駄, also ムダ)Waste
    • 175. Lean Thinking | Value StreamSpecify value: value is defined by the customer in terms of specific products and servicesIdentify the value stream: map out all end-to-end linked actions, processes and functions necessary for transforming inputs to outputs to identify and eliminate wasteMake value flow continuously, having eliminated waste, make remaining value-creating steps “flow”Let customers pull value: customer’s “pull” cascades all the way back to the lowest level supplier, enabling just-in-time productionPursue perfection: pursue continuous process of improvement striving for perfection
    • 176. Lean Thinking | Value StreamAgile Manifesto: “Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.”“Working software is the primary measure of progress”
      The Planning Game, Small Releases (XP), Sprints and Sprint Planning Meeting, Sprint Backlog (Scrum)
    • 177. Lean Thinking | Value Stream Agile Manifesto: “Simplicity – the art of maximizing the amount of work not done – is essential”“The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.”
      Simple Design, System Metaphor, Coding Conventions (XP)
    • 178. Value Stream | Example
      Bron: via www.poppendieck.com
    • 179. Value Stream | Example
    • 180. Lean Thinking | FlowSpecify value: value is defined by the customer in terms of specific products and servicesIdentify the value stream: map out all end-to-end linked actions, processes and functions necessary for transforming inputs to outputs to identify and eliminate wasteMake value flow continuously, having eliminated waste, make remaining value-creating steps “flow”Let customers pull value: customer’s “pull” cascades all the way back to the lowest level supplier, enabling just-in-time productionPursue perfection: pursue continuous process of improvement striving for perfection
    • 181. Lean Thinking | Flow
      “Thismaybe the single most import device ever created to help controltrafficsafely and smoothly” (Discover, June 2001).
    • 182. Run #3 | Briefing1. Table 1: collect bricks that are necessary to build 1 house. Move collection to table 2 2. Table 2: assemble house according to instructions You’ve got 2 minutes per table!
    • 183. Overproduction, Cash forClunkers
      Run #3 | Debriefing
    • 184. Lean Thinking | Flow Agile Manifesto: “Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.”
      Testing, 40-Hour Week, Continuous Integration, Collective Code Ownership, Sustainable Pace (XP), Daily Scrum (Scrum)
      Muri(無理)Overburden
      S.J. Chapman, Hours of Labor, The Economic Journal, 1909
    • 185. Lean Thinking | PullSpecify value: value is defined by the customer in terms of specific products and servicesIdentify the value stream: map out all end-to-end linked actions, processes and functions necessary for transforming inputs to outputs to identify and eliminate wasteMake value flow continuously, having eliminated waste, make remaining value-creating steps “flow”Let customers pull value: customer’s “pull” cascades all the way back to the lowest level supplier, enabling just-in-time productionPursue perfection: pursue continuous process of improvement striving for perfection
    • 186. Lean Thinking | PullLittle’s Law: Time Through System = # Things in Process / Avg Completion RateOptimize Throughput – Not Utilization- Minimize # Things in Process- Minimize Size of Things in ProcessLimit Work to Capacity- Timebox, Don’t Scopebox- Pull – Don’t PushLevel the Workload- Even out the Arrival of Work- Establish a Regular Cadence
      Source: Poppendieck LLC
      Heijunka(平準化)Production Smoothing
    • 187. Lean Thinking | Pull
      Kanban(看板, also かんばん) Sign, Index Card
    • 188. Run #4 | Briefing1.Use KanBan cards to build houses according to customer demand.You’ve got 4 minutes!
    • 189. Run #4 | Debriefing
      Source: Henrik Kniberg
      • Visualize the workflow
      • 190. Limit WIP (work in progress)
      • 191. Measure & optimize flow
      To do
      Dev
      Release
      Test
      Done!
      3
      3
      5
      2
      F
      H
      C
      D
      A
      I
      E
      G
      B
      J
      K
      FLOW
    • 192. Run #4 | Debriefing
      Source: Henrik Kniberg
    • 193. Lean Thinking | PullAgile Manifesto: “Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer&apos;s competitive advantage.”
      OnsiteCustomer(XP), Product Owner, Product and Sprint Backlog(Scrum)
    • 194. Lean Thinking | PerfectionSpecify value: value is defined by the customer in terms of specific products and servicesIdentify the value stream: map out all end-to-end linked actions, processes and functions necessary for transforming inputs to outputs to identify and eliminate wasteMake value flow continuously, having eliminated waste, make remaining value-creating steps “flow”Let customers pull value: customer’s “pull” cascades all the way back to the lowest level supplier, enabling just-in-time productionPursue perfection: pursue continuous process of improvement striving for perfection
    • 195. Lean Thinking | Perfection Agile Manifesto: “The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams”“Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility”
      Pair Programming, Testing, Refactoring (XP), Sprint Review / Retrospective, Burndown Chart (Scrum)
      Argentina vs. Serbia and Montenegro (6-0), World Cup 2006
    • 196. Resources| Lean Thinking
    • 197. Resources| Lean Development
      http://blog.crisp.se/henrikkniberg/2009/04/03/1238795520000.html
    • 198. Done.

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