Team Development on Force.com with Github and Ant

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Team Development on Force.com with Github and Ant

  1. 1. Team Development on Force.comwith Github and AntTom Patros, Red Argyle, Principal@tompatros
  2. 2. Safe Harbor Safe harbor statement under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995: This presentation may contain forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties, and assumptions. If any such uncertainties materialize or if any of the assumptions proves incorrect, the results of salesforce.com, inc. could differ materially from the results expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements we make. All statements other than statements of historical fact could be deemed forward-looking, including any projections of product or service availability, subscriber growth, earnings, revenues, or other financial items and any statements regarding strategies or plans of management for future operations, statements of belief, any statements concerning new, planned, or upgraded services or technology developments and customer contracts or use of our services. The risks and uncertainties referred to above include – but are not limited to – risks associated with developing and delivering new functionality for our service, new products and services, our new business model, our past operating losses, possible fluctuations in our operating results and rate of growth, interruptions or delays in our Web hosting, breach of our security measures, the outcome of intellectual property and other litigation, risks associated with possible mergers and acquisitions, the immature market in which we operate, our relatively limited operating history, our ability to expand, retain, and motivate our employees and manage our growth, new releases of our service and successful customer deployment, our limited history reselling non-salesforce.com products, and utilization and selling to larger enterprise customers. Further information on potential factors that could affect the financial results of salesforce.com, inc. is included in our annual report on Form 10-Q for the most recent fiscal quarter ended July 31, 2012. This documents and others containing important disclosures are available on the SEC Filings section of the Investor Information section of our Web site. Any unreleased services or features referenced in this or other presentations, press releases or public statements are not currently available and may not be delivered on time or at all. Customers who purchase our services should make the purchase decisions based upon features that are currently available. Salesforce.com, inc. assumes no obligation and does not intend to update these forward- looking statements.
  3. 3. Red ArgyleAll About Force.com development and consulting shop in Upstate New York. We specialize in custom apps, portal development, product development and admin support.  Founded by Tom Patros (@tompatros) in 2010  Partnership with Garry Polmateer (@darthgarry) in 2011  Staff in Buffalo, Rochester, Albany and Corning, NY  www.redargyle.com
  4. 4. Goals For This SessionTeamsOrg TopologiesSource Control IntegrationDeployment Approaches
  5. 5. Your TurnWhat are you hoping to get out of this session?
  6. 6. Teams : The Lone Ranger90% custom development. Works insandbox (hopefully).Source Control =Sandbox. Deploys to production (ChangeSet / Eclipse).Benefits?Challenges?
  7. 7. Teams : The Dynamic Duo (or Trio)Custom or product development. Multipledevelopers in one sandbox. SourceControl = Sandbox and backups. Deployto production (Change Set /Eclipse).Benefits?Challenges?
  8. 8. Teams : Those Dudes From 300Custom or product development. Multipledevs in multiple dev orgs. Source Control= Git / SVN.Automated deployments(Ant).Benefits?Challenges?
  9. 9. Your TurnWhat does your current Force.com development team look like?
  10. 10. Org Topologies"The collection of SF orgs, theirrelationships and purposes to supportForce.com development".In other words...Dev Orgs, Sandboxes and Production
  11. 11. Team-Driven Org Topologies 1 org. Challenges with scaling beyond one dev. Overwritten code. “Refresh from Server” is your new job.
  12. 12. Team-Driven Org Topologies 1 org / team. Scaling still an issue, but delayed, manageable in some cases.
  13. 13. Team-Driven Org Topologies1 org / developer. Developers have the most flexibility. Source control, deployment management become important.
  14. 14. Project-Driven Org Topologies 1 org. Similar to team-driven scenario. Scale will become a challenge. Naming conventions and / or namespaces become important.
  15. 15. Project-Driven Org Topologies 1 org / project. Most-flexible development approach. Again, naming conventions. Source control, deployment management become important.
  16. 16. Purpose-Driven Org Topologies1 org to dev, test and Difficult to know when / how to test. stage. Client access for review is sketchy. You can’t deal with issues anywhere else. Most of us probably work this way.
  17. 17. Purpose-Driven Org Topologies1 org to dev and test, Dev and internal testing happen together. 1 org to stage. Client can be directed to staging. You can exercise your deployments.
  18. 18. Purpose-Driven Org Topologies1 org to dev, 1 org to Dev and internal testing are isolated. test, 1 org to stage. Client can be directed to staging. You can exercise your deployments. Automation options.
  19. 19. Combining Org Topologies Lone Ranger Dynamic Duo Dudes from 300
  20. 20. Adopting Org TopologiesDecide on the smallest, most helpful change.Don’t forget about Admins.I repeat. Do not forget about Admins.Source control can help.
  21. 21. Your TurnWhat recent or recurring challenges do you face with teamdevelopment on Force.com?
  22. 22. Source Control ManagementFormal SCM - Git, SVN, etc.Dropbox, Google Drive, etc.Backups.Sandbox.None.
  23. 23. “Git is a free and open source distributed version control systemdesigned to handle everything from small to very large projectswith speed and efficiency.”http://git-scm.com/aboutIt’s source control that (mostly) makes sense.
  24. 24. “Github helps people build software together.”http://github.com/aboutIt’s a Git service provider to manage teams and projects.
  25. 25. Git Commands and ClientsCommands tells Git what to do (clone / commit / push / pull / etc)Clients make those commands easier.  Github App (Win / Mac)  Gitbox (Mac)  Git for Windows (Win)  TortoiseGit (Win)Try them all out, find the right fit for features and metaphor
  26. 26. Your TurnWhat source control approaches are you using in yourdevelopment?
  27. 27. Source Control DemoUsing Github for a project with multiple developers.
  28. 28. What Just Happened?1. Created a Git repository in Github.2. Push to repository with Force.com IDE files.3. Permission sets help remove (some) profile requirements.4. Developers pull from repository, align to their own dev orgs.5. Configure (profiles, permission sets, etc).6. Do work.7. Repeat from Step #2.
  29. 29. Deployment ToolsSetup Audit Log.Change Sets.Permission Sets.Eclipse.Force.com Migration Tool.
  30. 30. Deployment ApproachesSetup Audit Log + Change Sets = Admins in sandbox.Permission Sets > Profiles.Eclipse = tried and true.Force.com Migration Tool = automation.
  31. 31. “Apache Ant is a Java library and command-line tool whosemission is to drive processes described in build files as targets andextension points dependent upon each other.”http://ant.apache.orgTom says: “it automates stuff.”
  32. 32. Deployment DemoAutomated deployment using Github and the Force.comMigration Tool.
  33. 33. What Just Happened?1. Developer pushes to Github repository.2. Github sends a message to the build server.3. Build server pulls from the Github repository.4. Build server deploys to Salesforce org with Migration Tool.
  34. 34. ConclusionThere are lots of moving parts (including many we didn’t cover).There is more than one way to do it.There is no right answer, but there might be a better answer.Try multiple dev orgs - it’s a big step but has big potential.Try source control - it will help bring order to your projects.Try the migration tool - it’s efficient and can be automated.
  35. 35. ResourcesGit - http://git-scm.com/aboutGithub - http://github.com/aboutAnt - http://ant.apache.orgForce.com IDE -http://wiki.developerforce.com/page/Force.com_IDEForce.com Migration Tool -http://www.salesforce.com/us/developer/docs/daas/index.htm
  36. 36. Creditshttp://claytonmoore.tripod.com/lr_silv8.jpghttp://www.lebasketbawl.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/BatmanAndRobin.jpghttp://scottthong.files.wordpress.com/2008/02/300phalanx1.jpg

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