HS 6105 Men's Shirts India Trade Analysis
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HS 6105 Men's Shirts India Trade Analysis HS 6105 Men's Shirts India Trade Analysis Document Transcript

  • SUGGESTIONS ON INDIA’S EXPORT STRATEGY OF MEN’S AND BOY’S SHIRTS (HS CODE 6105) TO USA Devansh Doshi 16A Manasi Jain 23A Vidooshi Joshi 55A ITOD Guided by: Prof. Areej Aftab Siddiqui By
  • 1 CONTENTS Overview .......................................................................................................................................................................2 RMG Sector Worldwide............................................................................................................................................2 India’s RMG sector ...................................................................................................................................................2 Highlights of global exports of Readymade Garments (RMG) .................................................................................3 India’s exports of 6105 (Men’s Shirts) - Trends............................................................................................................3 Global treaties for exports of RMG (Readymade Garments) ........................................................................................3 The agreement on textiles and clothing (ATC)..........................................................................................................4 Imports of Men’s Shirts in USA....................................................................................................................................4 Export infrastructure and incentives in India for RMG .................................................................................................5 AEPC’s Vision 2015 .................................................................................................................................................5 Export Promotion Measures ......................................................................................................................................5 Major ports for export................................................................................................................................................7 Analysis of men’s shirts exports to usa .........................................................................................................................8 Strengths and Opportunities ......................................................................................................................................8 Challenges and Inefficiencies....................................................................................................................................9 Comments & Recommendations .................................................................................................................................10 Conclusion...................................................................................................................................................................11 Bibliography................................................................................................................................................................12
  • 2 OVERVIEW RMG (READYMADE GARMENTS) SECTOR WORLDWIDE RMGs industry is one of the most dynamic sectors of the world and is the best example of consumer driven market. The global business has been fragmented into two categories “the producers” and “the consumers”. In recent years USA has emerged as the largest consumer on the other side Asia has shown its dominance in global production and export. The countries contributing to Asia’s production are China, India, Bangladesh and few others. The Asian countries are facing competition among themselves with China dominating the Asian production & exports due to its advance technology, abundance of workforce and developed infrastructure. India is the second largest producer of textile and garments with 24% of world spindle capacity. INDIA’S RMG SECTOR India’s textiles and clothing industry is one of the mainstays of the national economy. It is also one of the largest contributing sectors of India’s exports worldwide. The report of Working Group constituted by the Planning commission on boosting India’s manufacturing exports during 12th Five Year Plan (2012-17), envisages India’s exports of Textiles and Clothing at USD 64.11 billion by the end of March 2017. The textiles industry accounts for 14% of industrial production, which is 4% of GDP; employs 45 million people and accounts for nearly 11% share of the country’s total exports basket. During the year 2012-13, Readymade Garments account for almost 39% of the total textiles exports. RMG and cotton textiles products together contribute nearly 74% of the total textiles exports. The Indian RMG sector is one of the largest contributing sectors of India’s exports worldwide, this sector contributes to 4% of India’s GDP. The Indian RMG exports have shown a robust growth in the past decade due to removal of quota export by the Government of India (GoI). The indian government has taken several initiatives to promote the textile and RMG industry with special attention for SME sector which contributes to more than half of the RMG industry. India’s textiles products, including handlooms and handicrafts, are exported to more than a hundred countries. However, the USA and the EU, account for about two-thirds of India’s textiles exports. The other major export destinations are China, U.A.E., Sri Lanka, Saudi Arabia, Republic of Korea, Bangladesh, Turkey, Pakistan, Brazil, Hong-Kong, Canada and Egypt etc. In the liberalized post-quota period, India has emerged as a major sourcing destination for buyers from all over the globe. As a measure of growing interest in the Indian textiles and clothing sector, a number of reputed houses opened their sourcing / liaison office in India. These include Marks and Spencer, Haggar Clothing, Kellwood, Little Label, Boules Trading Company, Castle, Alster International, Quest RMG Inc., etc. Commercially the buoyant retailers across the world are looking for options of increasing their sourcing from the Indian markets. Indian manufacturers are also pro-actively working towards enhancing their capacities to fulfil this increased demand. RMG constitutes nearly 40 per cent of India’s textile and clothing exports and almost 30 per cent of the Indian garment production is for the export market.
  • 3 HIGHLIGHTS OF GLOBAL EXPORTS OF READYMADE GARMENTS (RMG)  Global exports of RMG during 2011-12 were of the order of US$ 13.07 billion, which recorded a decrease to touch US$ 12.39 billion during 2012-13. Of this, Men’s shirts formed 2.4% contributing about US$ 2.99 million in the year 2012-13.  During 2012-13, exports of textiles & clothing were of the order of USD 31.71 billion as against USD 33.31 billion in 2011-12, recording a negative growth 4.82%.  USA, Arab Emirates and Panama Republic were the major importers of Men’s Shirts from India accounting for almost 40% of exports to the amount of US$ 1.55 million in the year 2013. INDIA’S EXPORTS OF 6105 (MEN’S SHIRTS) - TRENDS Source: DGFT GLOBAL TREATIES FOR EXPORTS OF RMG (READYMADE GARMENTS) For more than 40 years, developed countries, including the United States and the European Union, sought to protect their textile and RMG sectors from developing countries’ exports through two multilateral agreements, the Multi- Fiber Arrangement (MFA) and the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing (ATC). Quotas on imports from more than 70 countries limited the quantities of textiles (such as cotton yarns and synthetic fabrics) and particular garments (such as shirts and sweaters) that could enter the United States and the European Union each year. This system made it necessary for buyers of textile and RMG products to source from countries for which quotas for particular products were available. This spread manufacturing to an ever-increasing number of countries, instead of concentrating it where production was cheapest. 26% 18% 8%6% 6% 36% Major importers of Men's Shirts from India in 2013 1 U S A 2 U ARAB EMTS 3 PANAMA REPUBLIC 4 U K 5 GERMANY 143 OTHERS
  • 4 THE AGREEMENT ON TEXTILES AND CLOTHING (ATC) ATC is a transitory regime between the MFA and the integration of trading in textiles and clothing in the multilateral trading system. The ATC provided for a stage-wise integration process to be completed within a period of ten years (1995-2004), divided into four stages starting with the implementation of the agreement in 1995. The product groups from which products were to be integrated at each stage of the integration included (i) tops and yarns; (ii) fabrics; (iii) made-up textile products; and (iv)clothing. The ATC mandated that importing countries must integrate a specified minimum portion of their textile and garment exports based on total volume of trade in 1990, at the start of each phase of integration. In the first stage, each country was required to integrate 16 percent of the total volume of imports of 1990, followed by a further 17 percent at the end of first three year and another 18 percent at the end of third stage. The fourth stage would see the final integration of the remaining 49 percent of trade. The expiry of the ATC on January 1, 2005, eliminated all textile and RMG quotas for members of the World Trade Organization (WTO). Since then, buyers have been able to source from any WTO member country, subject only to tariffs. However, U.S. tariffs on textile and RMG imports vary considerably from country to country, governed by bilateral and regional arrangements discussed in greater detail below. The average U.S. tariff rate in 2012 was 7.9% for textiles and 11.4% for clothing, but rates on particular products ranged as high as 32%. According to the WTO, China was by far the world’s largest exporter of textiles in 2013, with about a 19% global market share at $30.94 million per month on an average. China has been a major force in textiles for decades, but its export growth accelerated following its 2001 accession to the WTO and the expiration of the ATC. Now more than 50,000 textile mills operate in China. China’s textile exports have more than quadrupled since 2000. IMPORTS OF MEN’S SHIRTS IN USA Source: www.panjiva.com 19% 17% 10% 7% 6% 41% Major exporters to USA of Men's Shirts (6105) in 2013 China Vietnam India Indonesia Pakistan Others
  • 5 In USA, RMG trade is more diversified than textile trade, as many nations have been able to develop export-oriented RMG industries on the basis of imported fabrics, without having large domestic textile production. China, Vietnam, India, Indonesia and Pakistan ranked as the top men’s shirts exporters in December 2013. Central America, the Caribbean, and Africa, and countries throughout Asia, including Malaysia, also export large quantities of RMG. EXPORT INFRASTRUCTURE AND INCENTIVES IN INDIA FOR RMG AEPC’S VISION 2015 The world RMG market was worth US$ 345 bn in 2007. The market has grown at a rate of 8% during this decade. However, post quota the rate of growth has increased and for the last two years it has grown at a rate of 12%. AEPC (RMG Export Promotion Council) aims at 5.3 per cent share for India in the global RMG market by 2015. EXPORT PROMOTION MEASURES  2% Interest Subvention Scheme on rupee export credit is available to certain specific export sectors. These are (i) Handicrafts, (ii) Carpets, (iii) Handloom, (iv) Ready-made Garments, (v) Processed Agriculture Products, (vi) Sports Goods and (vii) Toys. In addition Small and Medium Enterprises (SME) in all sectors enjoy this benefit. Currently the scheme ends on 31st March, 2013. Now this scheme of 2% interest subvention to these specific sectors will be extended by one more year, i.e., up to 31st March, 2014.  Under the Focus Product Scheme, more than 100 new products have been added from sectors including Engineering, Textiles, Chemicals, Drugs, Pharmaceuticals, Paper, Books, Publication and Printed Material. The products will be benefitted by 2 per cent Duty Credit. Further, the scrips issued under different schemes namely FPS, FMS, VKGUY, SHIS, MLFPS, SFIS, AIIS, for import of goods, will now be permitted to be utilised for payment of Excise Duty for domestic procurement, to encourage manufacturing, value addition and employment.  Technology Up gradation Fund Scheme (TUFS) to continue in 12th Plan with an investment target of Rs. 1,51,000 crore. The major focus would be on modernization of the powerloom sector. It is proposed to provide Rs. 2,400 crore in 2013-14 for the purpose.  Allocation of Rs. 50 crore to Ministry of Textile to incentivize setting up RMG Parks within the SITPs to house RMG manufacturing units with an additional grant of up to Rs.10 crore to each Park.  A new scheme with an outlay of Rs. 500 crore called the Integrated Processing Development Scheme has been proposed to be implemented in the 12th Plan to address the environmental concerns of the textile industry, including improving the effluent treatment infrastructure. It is proposed to provide Rs. 50 crore in 2013-14 for the scheme. EXCISE DUTY It has been accepted that the readymade garment industry is in the throes of a crisis and needs a lifeline. There was a demand to restore the ‘zero excise duty route’ for cotton and manmade sector (spun yarn) at the yarn, fabric and garment stages. Zero excise duty route, as existed prior to Budget 2011-12, has been restored on readymade garments and made ups. The zero excise duty route will now be available in addition to the CENVAT route under which manufactures can pay excise duty on the final product and avail of credit of duty paid on inputs.
  • 6 ZERO DUTY EXPORT PROMOTION CAPITAL GOODS (EPCG) SCHEME FTP has two variants under this scheme, namely, Zero Duty EPCG for few sectors and 3% Duty EPCG for all sectors. During the last announcement on 5th June, 2012, a new Post Export EPCG Scheme was announced and was notified on 18 February, 2013 by the CBEC. Now it has been decided to harmonize Zero Duty EPCG and 3% EPCG Scheme into one scheme which will be a Zero Duty EPCG Scheme covering all sectors. Authorization holders will have export obligation of 6 times the duty saved amount. The export obligation has to be completed in a period of 6 years. The period for import under the Scheme would be 18 months. Export obligation discharge by export of alternate products as well as accounting of exports of group companies will not be allowed. The exporters who have availed benefits under Technology Upgradation Fund Scheme (TUFS) administered by Ministry of Textiles, can also avail the benefit of Zero duty EPCG Scheme. INTEREST SUBVENTION SCHEME At present, 2% interest subvention scheme is available to certain specific sectors like Handicrafts, Handlooms, Carpets, Readymade Garments, Processed Agricultural Products, Sports Goods and Toys. The benefit of this scheme of 2% interest subvention has been extended upto 31.03.2014. UTILIZATION OF DUTY CREDIT SCRIP Holder of the Duty Credit Scrips issued under Focus Market Schemes, Focus Product Scheme and Vishesh Krishi Gramin Udyog Yojana (VKGUY) shall be entitled to avail drawback or CENVAT credit of the service tax debited in the scrips as per Department of Revenue rules. All duty credit scrips issued under Chapter 3 can be utilized for payment of application fee to DGFT for obtaining any authorization under Foreign Trade Policy. This benefit shall be available only to the original duty credit scrip holders. MARKET AND PRODUCT DIVERSIFICATION MLFPS is being extended from 01.04.2013 to 31.03.2014 for exports to USA and EU in respect of items falling in Chapter 61 and Chapter 62 of ITC (HS). In the recent notification from DGFT dated 27.04.2014, the 2% duty scrip under MLFPS for RMG sector to EU and USA for exports has been extended from 01.04.2014 onwards until further orders. The town of Gurgaon (Haryana) has been added to the existing list of towns of export excellence for RMG exports. Norway has been added under Focus Market Scheme and Venezuela has been added under Special Focus Market Scheme. Approximately, 126 new products have been added under Focus Product Scheme including some products for textiles sector. Brunei and Yemen have been added as new markets under MLFPS. Approximately, 126 new products have been added under Focus Product Scheme including some products for textiles sector. INCREMENTAL EXPORTS INCENTIVISATION SCHEME Incremental Export Incentivization Scheme was announced on 26.12.12 for the exports made during January 2013 to March 2013. This scheme is available for exports made to USA, EU and Asia. This scheme has now been extended for the year 2013-14. Fifty three countries of Latin America and Africa have been added with the objective to increase India’s share in these markets.
  • 7 EASE OF DOCUMENTATION AND PROCEDURAL SIMPLIFICATION Submission of physical copies of IEC and Registration-cum-Membership Certificate (RCMC) with individual application has been dispensed with. It has been decided to dispense with submission of hard copy of EP copy of shipping bills in case of (a) advance authorization, (b) duty free import authorization for grant of Export Obligation Discharge Certificate (EODC) if exports are made through EDI ports ELECTRONIC DATA INTERCHANGE INITIATIVES e-BRC system allows Transmission of realization of export proceeds details from banks to DGFT in electronically secured format. The system will lead to substantial reduction of transaction cost and time. DUTY DRAWBACKS HS Code Item Description Unit Drawback when Cenvat facility has not been availed Drawback when Cenvat facility has been availed Drawback Rate Drawback cap per unit in Rs Drawback Rate Drawback cap per unit in Rs 610501 Of Cotton Piece 7.60% 49.2 1.70% 11 610503 Of Man Made Fibres Piece 8.90% 51.3 2.20% 12.7 610504 Of Silk (other than containing Noil silk) Piece 10.20% 53.4 2.60% 13.6 610506 Of Wool Piece 7.80% 82.5 4.00% 42.3 610507 Of Blend containing Wool and Man Made Fibre Piece 8.90% 53 2.20% 13.1 610508 Of Cotton containing 1% or more by weight of spandex/lycra/ elastane Piece 7.90% 52.9 1.80% 12.1 610599 Of Others Piece 7.60% 31.5 1.70% 7 Duties on Cotton and Manmade fibers have been reduced in the new duty drawback rates announced by Central Board of Excise & Customs. MAJOR PORTS FOR EXPORT India exports RMG from more than 110 ports like JNPT, Bombay Air and Sea, Chennai Air & Sea, Delhi IGI Air, Delhi Tughlakhabad ICD, Delhi Patparganj, Kolkata Air and Sea, Bangalore Air and many more. Of these, major ports exporting Men’s Shirts (Knitted or Crocheted) are Delhi TKD ICD, JNPT, Madras Sea, Tuticorin ICD and Delhi PPG ICD.
  • 8 GARMENTS CLUSTERS IN INDIA Under PPP and other initiatives taken by Ministry of Micro Small and Medium Enterprises, India has the following clusters for Readymade garments. Here we notice that although the major porducers of cotton are Maharashtra, Gujarat, Punjab and Andhra Pradesh. However, the presence of readymade garment clusters are not present in these areas. Sr.No. State District Location 1 Andhra Pradesh Anantpur Rayadurg 2 Delhi South & North east Okhla & Shahdara 3 Gujarat Ahmedabad Ahmedabad 4 Haryana Gurgaon Gurgaon 5 Karnataka Bangalore Bangalore 6 Maharashtra Mumbai Mumbai 7 Maharashtra Nagpur Butibori 8 Maharashtra Pune Pune 9 Madhya Pradesh Indore Indore 10 Madhya Pradesh Jabalpur Jabalpur 11 Tamil Nadu Madurai Madurai 12 Tamil Nadu Salem Salem 13 West Bengal Kolkata Metiaburuj ANALYSIS OF MEN’S SHIRTS EXPORTS TO USA In 2008, Garment industry accounted for 43% of India’s total T&C export earnings with exports worth US $ 9.7 billion. USA was the second largest export market for Indian garments, accounting for 28% of India’s total garment export value. EU27 was the major export market for Indian garments accounting for 47% of the export value. UK used to be the key export destination in EU27 accounting for 12.3% of India’s total garment export value. Japan accounted for only 1% of India’s total garment export value. The slowdown in garment exports from India started in the mid-2008 when retail orders from advanced economies in North America and Europe began to feel the pinch of the most devastating economic meltdown worldwide causing a widespread of unemployment and altering consumer spending behaviour. Exports of readymade garments from India tumbled 6.59 per cent in September over the same period last year as a direct consequence of global economic slowdown. STRENGTHS AND OPPORTUNITIES After a couple of years of challenging times, the readymade garments industry has reasons to cheer now, due to the following reasons:
  • 9  Demand has revived both in the overseas and domestic markets giving a fillip to garment production and exports during the last eight months.  Revival of the U.S. and the European Union markets  Rupee depreciation  Higher production cost in China. During the last two years Chinese labour and production costs have increased multi-fold. India’s labour costs are also going up, but they are still not as high as China’s.  Bangladesh still enjoys a price advantage over compared to India. However, recent incidents such as the collapse of the building that housed a garment factory have turned the focus on statutory issues. Several international buyers are now looking at suppliers in other countries and India, Vietnam, Cambodia and Indonesia are benefiting.  Domestic availability of the raw materials — cotton and yarn (India is the second largest producer of cotton in th world) — is an advantage.  Almost 80 to 90 per cent of the textile processing sector has taken measures for the pollution problems. The Government is supporting value addition and vertical integration of production facilities.  Support from Government in terms of incentives and duty scrips for exporters of Readymade Garments. CHALLENGES AND INEFFICIENCIES Current issues are arising because of the economic slowdown resulting in decline of demand in the global markets and secondly the liquidity crisis. Other issues which are affecting the long term growth of the industry are as follows:  The global scenario today is pushing manufacturing cost perpetually upward and no sourcing destination is immune to the changes.  Majority of T&C manufacturers reported to have an order book status of 15 days to a month.  There has been on an average one year backlog in the disbursement of interest compensation resulting in compounding of the current working capital problems of the industry. Thus, Delay in disbursement of TUFS (Technology Upgradation Fund scheme) assistance has been a deterrent, though TUFS has supported modernization and expansion in T&C industry.  Intensifying competition and Increase in raw material cost in light of diminishing demand resulted in increase in working capital requirement for cotton procurement, thus, a hike in cotton prices, resulting in a significant increase in the cost of various textile products.  Unlike China, polyester prices in India are higher than cotton prices, which is one of the reasons for the preference in consumption of cotton.  Anomaly in excise duty and import duty structure of manmade fibres/filaments is adversely affecting the domestic consumption. The taxes and duties charged by the State Government and the local bodies are not refunded to the T&C manufacturers and exporters.  As compared to China, Bangladesh, Vietnam, and Sri Lanka, Indian T&C products lacks by cost competitiveness.  High working capital has been observed causing India to lose its competitiveness  Poor market diversification concept.  There is a lack of skilled labour availability.  Indian T&C industry is highly dependent on US and EU markets.
  • 10  Transaction costs including documentary procedures are troublesome to the exporters.  India, amongst the key competing countries, rank highest on the ‘Difficulty of Firing index’ and also ranks high on “Rigidity of Employment index” on account of stringent labour laws.  Lack of focused approach by the policy makers.  Lack of power as the most severe business constraint to the majority of the domestic manufacturers ranked, thus severely interrupted the smooth flow of chain. COMMENTS & RECOMMENDATIONS  Expenditure and fiscal discipline has been maintained, but there is a need to provide a short-term or long-term roadmap for the growth of labour-intensive RMG industry.  Union Budget 2012-13 provided nothing for the textiles exporters for their sustenance and development.  The funds allocation needs to be increased under the Technology Upgradation Fund (TUF) scheme.  Existing support measures available to textile garments manufacturers and traders for attending, showcasing and publicizing Indian textile and garments at the international trade fares and exhibitions needs to be strengthened.  Regulatory function of the concerned government Ministries, Departments, State Government need to be focused on controlling raw material exports with a view to ensure stable yarn prices in the country and to make the sector more competitive and productive. Also, import duty on cotton yarn be reduced from 12% and that export incentive for export of cotton yarn be removed.  Internal transportation costs from one state to another sometimes costs more than sending the cotton yarn outside the country. Hence, transportation infrastructure needs to be improved in order to reduce input costs for Garment manufacturers and increase the competitiveness of India’s exports.  Skill development scheme: The proposals in Budget 2010-11 included launch of an extensive skill-development programme in the textile and garment sector, and a one-time grant of Rs 200 crore to the Government of Tamil Nadu for the installation of a zero liquid discharge system at Tirupur, to sustain its textile cluster for knitwear. By incentivizing training through an outcome-based approach the resources of the private sector should also be harnessed. Through these instruments around 30 lakh persons were to be trained over 5 years.  Cluster Development Schemes: Additional interest subvention can be provided for building manufacturing units around textile industry clusters such as Punjab and Gujarat.  Cost competitiveness of the sector need to be addressed by the Government, as the higher prices of petrol and diesel are having an impact on the overall costs.  As the current refund mechanisms are cumbersome, so there is a need of exemption of service tax on export-related services which in the best interest of the Indian exporters.  High labour cost is faced by other countries too. Only by scaling up production capacities Indian manufacturers can cater to high volume orders. Since production costs will go up in India too over a period of time, the manufacturers will have to improve efficiency and productivity levels to control costs. This has to be done by vertical integration.  RMG exporters should also strategically focus on the product segment where they can offer competitive prices compared to Bangladesh or Vietnam. The country’s textile industry base is comparatively larger but the fabric sector needs to be strengthened to add to the competitiveness of the garment units.  Credit ratings of importers from USA should be promoted. This would allow exporters to avail ECGC’s short term pre-shipment and post-shipment export finance causing lower premium and faster clearances.
  • 11  Promotion of SMEs – Redefining MSMEs with a focus on trade would go a long way to boost India’s exports not only in Garments sector but also overall. We suggest the following approach towards redefining the basis for establishing MSMEs. Type Micro Small Medium Employees Capital (in Rupees) Employees Capital (in Rupees) Employees Capital (in Rupees) Production < 25 <50 lakhs 25-200 50 lakhs to 5 crores 201-350 5 crores to 10 crores Service <20 <40 lakhs 21-150 40 lakhs to 4 crores 151-300 4 crores to 8 crores Trade <20 < 40 lakhs 21-40 40 lakhs to 3 crores 41-100 3 crores to 7crores CONCLUSION It emerges from the above that Indian readymade garments (including men’s and boy’s shirts) industry is a mix of issues and prospects and contributes 40% to the total exports of T&C sector. Collectively, this sector is also the second largest employer after the agriculture. The export earnings from the garments industry were estimated to increase to US $ 17 billion in 2013. India’s strength lies in its low cost skilled and unskilled labour, creative skills, variety, value addition, and the flexibility of operations, thus leading to the greater global market access. The global RMG industry is at a crossroad today with both the retailer and manufacturer looking at new options to stay competitive while meeting evolving needs of fashion on one hand and increasing consumer demand on the other hand. The fact that the industry has passed through a slowdown phase has made the things worse. Most of the garment exporters or their trade bodies are expecting fiscal relief or reform in the coming financial budget as the new Government will take over. Also, Indian players are confident about their potential and are hoping that the improper mix of politics and economics and with the impact of on-going economic slowdown does not create disaster on the performance of the garments industry. This requires certain positive steps towards the sustained growth and development from the new Government and Trade Policy.
  • 12 BIBLIOGRAPHY  Ministry of Textiles, Government of India  www.infodriveindia.com  www.bharattextile.com  www.panjiva.com  World Economic Forum  Economic Times (http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2012-10-10/news/34363404_1_apparel-exports- textile-and-apparel-cent-of-world-trade)  The Hindu (http://www.thehindu.com/business/Industry/stitching-a-new-story/article5460161.ece)  Working paper no. 94 export competitiveness of Indian Textile and Garment Industry by Samar Verma (http://www.icrier.org/pdf/wp%2094.pdf)  International Journal of Business and Management  AEPC (Apparel Export Promotion Council) India  The Textile Industry Report by Dun & Bradstreet  DGFT (Directorate General of Foreign Trade)