Fresno county board of supervisors

625 views
552 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
625
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Fresno county board of supervisors

  1. 1. Fresno County Board of Supervisors By Daren Arthur Matthew Esqueda
  2. 2. Supervisor Susan Anderson District 2 • Fresno County Board of Supervisors, District 2 is located in the Northern central area of Fresno County and is primarily metropolitan: All areas are located in Fresno (North) and include: • Fig Garden • River Park • Fashion Fair • Pinedale • Manchester • Woodward Park • Fresno State
  3. 3. As an intern for District 2 I serve on many boards including: Ambulance Authority Audit Committee Children & Families Commission of Fresno County California State Association of Counties (CSAC) Association Council of Fresno County Governments (alternate) Debt Advisory Committee Facilities Planning Committee Foreign Trade Zone Advisory Board (alternate) Foster Care Oversight Committee Fresno Convention/Visitors Bureau Fresno Madera Area Agency on Aging – Governing Board & Foundation Board (alternate) Interagency Council for Children & Families (alternate) Local Agency Formation Commission San Joaquin River Conservancy San Joaquin Valley Supervisors Association Southeast Regional Solid Waste (alternate) Selma-Kingsburg-Fowler County Sanitation District (alternate)
  4. 4. Board of Supervisors Statement The Board of Supervisors is the governing body of the County and a number of special districts within the limits of state law and county charter, the Board is empowered to adopt ordinances, establish programs, levy taxes, appropriate funds, and appoint certain officials. In addition, members of the Board represent the County on numerous intergovernmental bodies. The cities and unincorporated areas in the Fresno County are divided into five Supervisorial Districts. Although the districts vary in physical size, their populations are approximately the same. The five members of the Board are elected on a non-partisan basis to serve four-year terms each is elected from one of the five supervisorial districts of the County Supervisors from Districts 1 and 4 are elected in gubernatorial election years (2002, 2006, 2010, etc.) while supervisors from Districts 2, 3, and 5 are elected in presidential election years (2000, 2004, 2008, etc. ) District boundaries are adjusted after every federal census to equalize district population. Every year, the Board elects two of its members to serve as Chairman and Vice Chairman. The Chairman presides at Board meetings and signs documents in the name of the County. The Vice-Chairman substitutes when the Chairman is absent.
  5. 5. Public Meetings/ Decision Making Process The Board of Supervisors convenes on scheduled Tuesdays, the dates which have been approved at a regularly scheduled board meeting. With the exception of holidays and other planned recesses. The meetings are located at Fresno County Hall of Records 2281 Tulare Street, Room 301 Fresno, CA 93721 The meeting’s morning session begins at 9:00 A.M. and the afternoon session at 2:00 P.M. on Tuesdays, unless otherwise stated in posted agenda. The agenda is posted on the east entrance doors on first floor in the Hall of Records building and on the internet 72 hours prior to the Board of Supervisors meeting. The meetings are open and the public is invited to attend. Matters to be presented at Board meetings are listed in an agenda prepared, in advance, by the Clerk to the Board. To place an item on the agenda, you should contact the County Administrative Office at 559-600-1710.
  6. 6. Agency Daily Schedule The day begins at 8:00a.m. looking over proposals and responding to constituent needs and inquiries. Then the assistants and interns begin to work on their own personal tasks to be implemented into possible legislation.
  7. 7. Structure • When elections occur for the county citizens vote on whom they want to represent them which includes a representative within his or her own district. A district is a boundary dividing up residents into equal groups and the representative is called a Supervisor.
  8. 8. • Together five (5) district representatives, or Supervisors, form the Board of Supervisors. The Supervisors direct the work of the county manager who runs Fresno, California based off of Supervisors’ policies.
  9. 9. Significance of the Agency Fresno Board of Supervisors serves the many diverse communities within Fresno, California and works with businesses, schools, and organizations to promote social justice in the micro and macro levels.
  10. 10. Who We Serve County supervisors rule on many kinds of local laws, often called ordinances. A county supervisor might vote on an issue that affects the local residents. This might be anything from noise and pollution from an industrial site, to issues between neighbors such as leaf burning or barking dogs. Another common item for a county supervisor to consider is new building. A board of supervisors will often rule on whether a homeowner can modify his or her property. The board will also rule on whether a business or other party can modify its property. In looking at property issues, the board of supervisors will generally consider zoning laws that might be set by a separate zoning board. They may look at stormwater issues or other public impact of a project. The board of county supervisors will generally cite some of these items when issuing a formal vote on a project. A county supervisor may also vote on budget issues. The board will commonly look at the developing budget, set up an annual budgeting overview, and keep track of revenues versus expenditures to help provide the best use of taxpayer money. A county board of supervisors may get input from a local school district or other board to see how projects will affect the local education system. In Fresno, California a major issue is dealing with job loss and tax increases within the local economy.

×