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HEATING AND CHANGING BEHAVIOUR, By Angela Murphy and Charlie Acton, Camden Council
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HEATING AND CHANGING BEHAVIOUR, By Angela Murphy and Charlie Acton, Camden Council

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  • Keeping heat in – insulation
    More effective heat provision– better systems, improved controls, more efficient
  • Project Development
    Heat (and Gas) Metering
    £3.5M won from GLA Mayor’s Targeted fund for individual gas and heat metering
    Liaison with Heat Meter providers (Vital Energi, Hildebrand) to install meters and supply detailed, accurate and real time data via Wi-Fi on energy consumption, enabling detection of system inefficiencies and…
  • Flat rate –depends on size of dwelling, tenants across the pool charged – so some residents subsidise other residents and some estates subsidise others
    Residents have no control over what they pay –and may end up paying/subsidising others (bath parties) and cant manage budgets effectively as a result
  • Point out the dip in consumption for heating season 2, despite similarly low external temperatures
  • Conventional behaviour change research
    People behave rationally x
    People are influenced to change behaviour by relevant factors (e.g information, pricing) x
    People are not influenced by theoretically irrelevant factors (e.g. what other people do or think)
    Behavioral economics – influence of other factors
    social, emotional, psychological - on decision making, such as the influence of priming, social norms and defaults.
    e.g. Nudge (Thaler and Sunstein 2008), MINDSPACE (Institute for Government)
    Natural Field Experiment – participants are randomly selected (avoiding selection bias) from relevant group, and are not explicitly aware of their participation (avoiding the placebo effect
    Social Norms - Descriptive (the scale of energy use), injunctive (smiley face)
  • Natural Field Experiment – participants are randomly selected (avoiding selection bias) from relevant group, and are not explicitly aware of their participation (avoiding the placebo effect
    6% reduction in energy use for the social norms groups over 15 month period
    Effect of information on impact of norms
    Variations in impact by household size, wealth
    Larger households more responsive
    Wealthier households less responsive
  • Shortcomings- Realising the full potential- Understanding of the technology & what we can do with it
    Managing to do this, OTOBOS – on time, on budget, on scope
  • Barriers: Introducing change: Trying to get people to ‘get’ what is happening –residents being suspicious of our motives, staff being used to a particular way of doing things and not understanding the technology; the whole idea of behaviour change interventions and social norms – all sounds a bit big brother to some or as if we are trying to experiment on residents rather than make our communications with them more effective
    Public arena -Implementing a new technological application and ‘learning from experience’ ‘out there’ – and not in a lab environment
    -Managing resources and agendas - it is resource consuming and sometimes the needs of academic research do not chime with the service delivery required within Camden be it timescales, wording or nature of communication, scientific analysis versus social needs…
    Time, people, doing it well – simply not having the resources to do this as well as BAU

Transcript

  • 1. Heating and Changing Behaviour Angela Murphy/Charlie Acton HASC Sustainability Strategy Team
  • 2. Heating and Changing Behaviour Camden Housing Sustainability • Make housing stock energy efficient • Reduce carbon emissions By: • Keeping heat in (insulation) • More effective heat provision • Changing behaviour for energy efficiency So that we: • Make warmth affordable for our residents- to safeguard their health and welfare
  • 3. Organisations involved…
  • 4. Heating and Changing Behaviour Camden Housing Heating Pool • Camden bulk buys gas • 12,000 residents • Charged a flat rate Problem • No incentive to save energy • Windows open = heat waste • 30% higher consumption • Residents have no control over what they pay
  • 5. Heating and Changing Behaviour Heat Meters •Measure individual consumption for heat and hot water •Pay for what you use •Residents have more control of their budgets • Camden get better information on heat use • Researchers can calculate the effectiveness of behavioural interventions
  • 6. What’s on the screen?
  • 7. The techy bit Energy consumption data transmitted to heat meter and screen in “real time” Resident turns heating on Data transmitted wirelessly to the Energy Hive & back Resident can see monitor their energy consumption
  • 8. Heating and Changing Behaviour Heat (and Gas) Metering • Combination of individual charging and metering can result in energy use reductions of up to 30% CO2 emissions from Kiln Place CO2 emissions 08 09 Heating Degree Days 600 450 400 350 400 300 250 300 200 200 150 100 100 50 0 0 Nov-08 Dec-08 Jan-09 Feb-09 Mar-09 Apr-09 May-09 Jun-09 Jul-09 Month Aug-09 Sep-09 Oct-09 Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10 Feb-10 Degree Days Tonnes of CO2 500
  • 9. Behaviour Change Research – Impact of Social Norms Conventional behaviour change research – assumes: • People behave rationally x • People are influenced to change behaviour by relevant factors (like information) only x However… Behavioural economics: • Studies impacts of other factors on decision making • Social, cognitive, emotional • Social norms, priming, defaults…
  • 10. Behaviour Change Research – Impact of Social Norms • Research conducted at Camden over 15 months • Looked at the effect of social norms on the energy consumption of residents in 569 metered households • Result - 6% reduction in energy use for the social norms groups over the 15 month period
  • 11. Successes : • • • • 6% cut in consumption for £3 per resident cost Collaborative work with academic institutions Invested interest of EU – the Internet of Things Understanding of behaviours & more knowledge of heating diagnostics Shortcomings: • What next ? Utilising the data –who ? • Resources required • Strategic fit – making connections
  • 12. Barriers: •Introducing change •Doing this in the public arena •Time, people, doing it well •Problems with existing heating systems Enablers : •Camden council - forward thinking •GLA – the Mayor’s funding •Academic investment / support Future: •Continue to explore opportunities •Opportunities for research (IoT, behaviour change)