Designing Interactions: Lecture #01

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You will be introduced to course outline, Assessment criteria; you will also get an introductory discussion on Design Thinking

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Designing Interactions: Lecture #01

  1. 1. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Introduction » Learning Objectives and Outline Learning Objectives §  You will be introduced to course outline, Assessment criteria; §  Introductory discussion on Design Thinking Outline §  Self-Introductions §  Defining User Centered design §  Course Outline & Assessment Criteria §  Exercise Designing Interactions: Introduction
  2. 2. Let me introduce myself: Itamar Medeiros Graphic Designer Web Designer Photographer Interaction Designer Lecturer Designing Interactions: Introduction { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Introduction » Learning Objectives and Outline
  3. 3. 7 years in China (between 2005 and 2012) Untitled, Nanjing Road, Shanghai, 2007
  4. 4. 7 years in China (between 2005 and 2012) Medeiros, I., (2010), Shanghai Walking Tours: The Bund, retrieved 25 October 2011 from http://www.flickr.com/photos/china-designative/5061811354/in/photostream/
  5. 5. 7 years in China (between 2005 and 2012) with my wife, Fabiane Medeiros, I., (2010), Shanghai Walking Tours: The Bund, retrieved 25 October 2011 from http://www.flickr.com/photos/china-designative/5061198577/in/photostream/
  6. 6. First addition to the family: Caleb Peng Medeiros (2011)
  7. 7. First addition to the family: Esther Peng Medeiros (2014)
  8. 8. Local Coordinator for the Interaction Design Association (ixDA) in Shanghai IxDA, (2010), Facilitating Local Gathering for the Interaction Design Association (IxDA) in Shanghai in An evening of conversation about Design, Interaction, Work and Life with Marc Rettig, retrieved 25 October 2011 from http://www.ixda.org/local/event/25395
  9. 9. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I., (2006-2014), { design@tive } Thoughts on Design, Technology and Culture, retrieved 25 March 2014 from http://designative.info
  10. 10. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I. (2010), Visual Communication in China: “You are here” in { design@tive } thoughts on Design, Technology & Culture, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://designative.info/2010/11/18/visual-communication-in-china-you-are-here/
  11. 11. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I. (2010), Chinglish: Toilet Seats in China are “for weak only” in { design@tive } thoughts on Design, Technology & Culture, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://designative.info/2010/04/05/chinglish-toilet-seats-in-china-are-for-weak-only/
  12. 12. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I. (2009), Living in China: Shanghai’s Pajamas Sightings in { design@tive } thoughts on Design, Technology & Culture, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://designative.info/2010/03/25/living-in-china-shanghais-pajamas-sightings/
  13. 13. 7 years in China (between 2005 and 2012) Untitled, Nanjing Road, Shanghai, 2007
  14. 14. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I. (2012), Chinglish: “Take Away Me”? in { design@tive } thoughts on Design, Technology & Culture, retrieved May 13th, 2013 from http://designative.info/2010/07/14/chinglish-take-away-me/
  15. 15. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I. (2012), Chinglish: “Month Also Know Communications”? In { design@tive } thoughts on Design, Technology & Culture, retrieved May 15th, 2013 from http://designative.info/2012/04/16/chinglish-month-also-know-communications/
  16. 16. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I. (2012), Visual Communication in China: “Visitors, this way”? in { design@tive } thoughts on Design, Technology & Culture, retrieved May 15th, 2013 from http://designative.info/2010/05/10/visual-communication-in-china-visitors-this-way/
  17. 17. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I. (2012), Visual Communication in China: “This is a no-car bomb area”! In { design@tive } thoughts on Design, Technology & Culture, retrieved May 15th, 2013 from http://designative.info/2010/04/24/visual-communication-in-china-this-is-a-no-car-bomb-area/
  18. 18. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I. (2012), Advertising in China: “Can’t Touch This”! In { design@tive } thoughts on Design, Technology & Culture, retrieved May 15th, 2013 from http://designative.info/2010/05/31/advertising-in-china-cant-touch-this/
  19. 19. Chronicler of all things Design, Technology & Culture Medeiros, I. (2012), Only in China: High-tech Sandwich Men in { design@tive } thoughts on Design, Technology & Culture, retrieved May 15th, 2013 from http://designative.info/2008/12/17/only-in-china-high-tech-sandwich-men/
  20. 20. Medeiros, I. (2012), Untitled [Photograph; The Dubai Mall Courtesy Policy Notice, Dubai (UAE).]
  21. 21. Medeiros, I. (2012), Untitled [Photograph; Pedestrian Crossing Button, Dubai (UAE).]
  22. 22. Introduction: Collect / Create / Relate / Donate Collect Learn from previous experiences ! Relate Consult with peers and mentors " # $ Create Explore, compose, and evaluate possible solutions Donate Disseminating results Shneiderman, B. (February 1999), Creating Creativity for Everyone: User Interfaces for Supporting Innovation, ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 7, 1 (March 2000), 114-138. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Introduction » Collect / Create / Relate / Donate
  23. 23. Dubberly, H. (2005), “how do you design?” retrieved on June 1st, 2010 http://www.dubberly.com/articles/how-do-you-design.html
  24. 24. Dubberly, H. (2005), “how do you design?” retrieved on June 1st, 2010 http://www.dubberly.com/articles/how-do-you-design.html
  25. 25. Dubberly, H. (2005), “how do you design?” retrieved on June 1st, 2010 http://www.dubberly.com/articles/how-do-you-design.html
  26. 26. Dubberly, H. (2005), “how do you design?” retrieved on June 1st, 2010 http://www.dubberly.com/articles/how-do-you-design.html
  27. 27. Dubberly, H. (2005), “how do you design?” retrieved on June 1st, 2010 http://www.dubberly.com/articles/how-do-you-design.html
  28. 28. Dubberly, H. (2005), “how do you design?” retrieved on June 1st, 2010 http://www.dubberly.com/articles/how-do-you-design.html
  29. 29. Clark Publishing. (2011), “Add Some Bunch to Your Playbook” retrieved on July 21st, 2011 http://www.gridironstrategies.com/articles.php?id=85
  30. 30. ISO (2010), “Human-centred design for interactive systems” in Ergonomics of human-system interaction -- Part 210, retrieved on July 21st, 2011 http://www.iso.org/iso/catalogue_detail.htm?csnumber=52075
  31. 31. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  32. 32. Brown, T. (2006), Innovation Through Design Thinking in MIT Sloan School of Management’s Innovative Leader Series, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://video.mit.edu/watch/innovation-through-design-thinking-9138/
  33. 33. Let’s spend some time discussing: §  How different is Design Thinking practice from what you’re currently practicing? { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Relate » “Traditional” Design & Design Thinking Relate: “Traditional” Design & Design Thinking
  34. 34. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  35. 35. Design Thinkers: §  Cannot have ideas in the abstract; §  Use the world as source of inspiration, not validation; Inspiration Brown, T. (2006), Innovation Through Design Thinking in MIT Sloan School of Management’s Innovative Leader Series, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/357 { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Relate » Inspiration
  36. 36. Kuniavsky, M. (2003), Observing the User Experience, Morgan Kaufmann; 1 edition (April 22, 2003)
  37. 37. Design Thinkers: §  Build to think; §  Learn by prototyping; §  Put their ideas through hundreds of iterations; Ideation Brown, T. (2006), Innovation Through Design Thinking in MIT Sloan School of Management’s Innovative Leader Series, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/357 { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Relate » Ideation
  38. 38. Warfel, T.Z., (2009), Prototyping: A Practitioner's Guide, Rosenfeld Media; 1st edition (November 16, 2009)
  39. 39. Design Thinkers: §  Use Storytelling as framework to generate ideas { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Relate » Implementation Implementation Brown, T. (2006), Innovation Through Design Thinking in MIT Sloan School of Management’s Innovative Leader Series, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/357
  40. 40. Quesenbery, W, (2010), Storytelling for User Experience: Crafting Stories for Better Design, Rosenfeld Media; 1st edition (April 15, 2010)
  41. 41. Design Thinkers: §  Help connect the dots Implementation Brown, T. (2006), Innovation Through Design Thinking in MIT Sloan School of Management’s Innovative Leader Series, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/357 { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Relate » Implementation
  42. 42. Brown, T, (2009), Change by Design: How Design Thinking Transforms Organizations and Inspires Innovation, HarperBusiness; First Edition edition (September 29, 2009)
  43. 43. Design Thinking: §  Is not just about methodology, is just as much about culture; §  Is about being inspired and inspiring. Culture Brown, T. (2006), Innovation Through Design Thinking in MIT Sloan School of Management’s Innovative Leader Series, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://mitworld.mit.edu/video/357 { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Relate » Implementation
  44. 44. Kelly, T, (2005), The Ten Faces of Innovation, Doubleday (October 18, 2005)
  45. 45. The design process is what puts Design Thinking into action. It’s a structured approach to generating and developing ideas. Design Thinking: Process IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/ { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Collect » Design Thinking » Process
  46. 46. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  47. 47. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  48. 48. “Design Thinking” “Information Design” “Interaction Design”
  49. 49. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Collect » Course Outline Course Outline Design Thinking (1/3 of the course) §  Week 01: Introduction §  Week 02: Discovery “Mode” §  Week 03: Interpretation “Mode” §  Week 04: Reflection in Action
  50. 50. Medeiros, I., (2010), People, Tools, Process & Artifacts in User Research retrieved 5 November 2013 from http://designative.info/project/user-research/
  51. 51. Contextual Inquiries Costumer Visit at an Electric Distribution Utility Company to understand the artifacts produced by Electric Distribution Designers in the Utility Design domain.
  52. 52. Contextual Inquiries Costumer Visit at an Electric Distribution Utility Company to understand the artifacts produced by Electric Distribution Designers in the Utility Design domain.
  53. 53. Contextual Inquiries Costumer Visit at an Electric Distribution Utility Company to understand the artifacts produced by Electric Distribution Designers in the Utility Design domain.
  54. 54. Young, Indi. 2008. Contextual Inquiry notes in Mental Models: Aligning Design Strategy with Human Behavior. New York: Rosenfeld Media.
  55. 55. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  56. 56. Austin Center for Design (2009-2011), Interpretation Session in Starting to think about the boys on the row, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.ac4d.com/2010/10/13/starting-to-think-about-the-boys-on-the-row/
  57. 57. Young, Indi. 2008. Affinity Diagrams in Mental Models: Aligning Design Strategy with Human Behavior. New York: Rosenfeld Media.
  58. 58. Ulaszek, J., Winters, B. (2013) ‘Setting Course – Design Research to Experience Roadmap.’ Presentation at IxDA’s Interaction’13 Conference, Toronto – Canada, 28 February 2013.
  59. 59. PhotoDev (2013), Affinity Diagrams in Contextual Inquiry, retrieved November 26th, 2013 from http://www.adamatorres.com/gallery-project/?page_id=106
  60. 60. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Collect » Course Outline Information Design (1/3 of the course) §  Week 05: Visualizing Data / Processes §  Week 06: Diagrams ( Swimlane / System Boundaries) and Models (Mental / Work / Artifact) §  Week 07: Story Telling (Storyboarding / Customer Journey Maps / Personas & Scenarios) §  Week 08: Reflection in Action Course Outline
  61. 61. Medeiros, I. (2007-2013), Swimlane Diagrams in Data Visualization, retrieved November 27th, 2013 from http://designative.info/project/data-visualization/#Swimlane_Diagrams
  62. 62. Kolko, J. (2008), Workflow Model of Getting a Tattoo in INF385T | Methods of Design Synthesis, Lecture 2: Ethnography, Contextual Inquiry, and Work Flow Modeling, UT Austin: School of Information
  63. 63. Holtzblatt, K., (2001). Artifact Model of a Car in Beyond the Tower of Babel., retrieved September 21st, 2011 from http://incontextdesign.com/articles/beyond-the-tower-of-babel/
  64. 64. Huang, K. H., & Deng, Y. S. (2008). Chinese Tradition of Tea Drinking Cultural Model in Social interaction design in cultural context: A case study of a traditional social activity. International Journal of Design, 2(2), 81-96.
  65. 65. Design for Service (2009), Thinkpublic Comic, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://designforservice.wordpress.com/2009/01/20/thinkpublic-comic/
  66. 66. Tassi, R., (2009), “Customer Journey Maps” in Service Design Tools, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.servicedesigntools.org/tools/8
  67. 67. Xavier Llusá Architect Medeiros, I., (2014), Personas & Scenarios, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://designative.info/portfolio/design-management/personas-scenarios/
  68. 68. Xavier Llusá Background > 48 years-old, married, male > Received a BA at Escuela Superior de Arquitetura de Barcelona and a masters in architecture at Universidad de Bilbao > Owns a 20-person architecture studio in Manhattan > Intermediate Internet user, has fast connection to PC at work and average cable connection on an IMac at home Costumer Needs > Planning tools > Proactive communication > Monitor progress of projects > Validation of decisions Scenario Xavier just finished the design of a new upscale resort hotel to be constructed in Dubai, and he wants to be able to manage the construction of it remotely. Xavier wants to keep the client informed and happy about the progress of construction and keep the contractor on track to budgets/ schedules Since the project needs the clients approval for each stage, Xavier has to confirm by each milestone of the project for a position to proceed Needs > Planning tools > Proactive communication > Monitor progress of projects > validation of decision > Proactive communication Features > Create New Project > Select files > Add person to project > Assign role to project > Customize reports > add milestone > request approval confirmation Behavior Xavier login to his Architecture PROJECT TRAACKING account and creates a new online project. He selects which files will be associated with the project from file browser. Xavier then adds 2 (two) people to the project: Stephanie Powers and Malba Tahir. He assigns the role of CLIENT to Stephanie and the role of CONTRACTOR to Malba. Xavier, then, limits Stephanie’s reports to BUDGET/SCHEDULE and sets Malba’s reports to BUDGET/SCHEDULE/ SPECIFICATIONS Xavier sets the milestones of the project over the PROJECT TIMELINE: Malba will only get a permission to proceed to the next step after Stephanie’s approval of the previous one. Medeiros, I., (2014), Personas & Scenarios, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://designative.info/portfolio/design-management/personas-scenarios/
  69. 69. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Collect » Course Outline User Experience Design (1/3 of the course) §  Week 09: Turning Insights into Action §  Week 10: Concept Design, Wireframing, Prototyping §  Week 11: User Validation §  Week 12: Reflection in Action Course Outline
  70. 70. Medeiros, I., (2014), In-App Purchase Conceptual Design, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/app-purchase-concept-design/
  71. 71. Medeiros, I., (2014), In-App Purchase Conceptual Design, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/app-purchase-concept-design/
  72. 72. Medeiros, I., (2014), In-App Purchase Conceptual Design, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/app-purchase-concept-design/
  73. 73. Medeiros, I., (2014), In-App Purchase Conceptual Design, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/app-purchase-concept-design/
  74. 74. Chiu, D., Hilhorst, D., (2006), RentAThing, retrieved January 23, 2014 from http://www.rentathing.org/
  75. 75. Chiu, D., Hilhorst, D., (2006), RentAThing, retrieved January 23, 2014 from http://www.rentathing.org/
  76. 76. Chiu, D., Hilhorst, D., (2006), RentAThing, retrieved January 23, 2014 from http://www.rentathing.org/
  77. 77. Chiu, D., Hilhorst, D., (2006), RentAThing, retrieved January 23, 2014 from http://www.rentathing.org/
  78. 78. Medeiros, I., (2014), Project Collaboration & Tracking App, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/project- collaboration-tracking-app/
  79. 79. ProtoIO Inc, (2014), Wack-A-Monster, retrieved June 12th, 2014 from https://showcase.proto.io/share/?id=ea5c5bec-9589-465f-86bd-937b6d982d26&v=1
  80. 80. Medeiros, I., (2014), Cruising & Navigation App for iOS, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/ cruising-navigation-app-ios/
  81. 81. Medeiros, I., (2014), Cruising & Navigation App for iOS, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/ cruising-navigation-app-ios/
  82. 82. Medeiros, I., (2014), Cruising & Navigation App for iOS, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/ cruising-navigation-app-ios/
  83. 83. Medeiros, I., (2014), Cruising & Navigation App for iOS, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/ cruising-navigation-app-ios/
  84. 84. Medeiros, I., (2014), Workflow for AutoCAD Map3D, retrieved January 9, 2014 from http://www.designative.info/portfolio/user-experience/workflow-autocad-map3d/
  85. 85. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Collect » Assessment Criteria Assessment Criteria §  Weekly Research: 40% §  Reflection-in-Action: 20% (x3) = 60% Course Outline
  86. 86. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Collect » Course Outline Design Thinking (1/3 of the course) §  Week 01: Design “vs” Design Thinking §  Week 02: Discovery “Mode” §  Week 03: Interpretation “Mode” §  Week 04: Reflection in Action Course Outline
  87. 87. “Design Thinking” “Information Design” “Interaction Design”
  88. 88. “Design Thinking”
  89. 89. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  90. 90. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  91. 91. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Collect » Discovery Discovery builds a solid foundation for your ideas, opening up to new opportunities, and getting inspired to create new ideas. Discovery IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  92. 92. TED Conferences, LLC, 2011, “Paul Bennett finds design in the details”, retrieved on July 5th, 2011, http://www.ted.com/talks/paul_bennett_finds_design_in_the_details.html
  93. 93. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  94. 94. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  95. 95. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Collect » Discovery » Understand the Challenge A clearly defined challenge will guide your questions and help you stay on track throughout the process. Discovery: Understand the Challenge IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  96. 96. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Collect » Discovery » Understand the Challenge A good challenge is phrased with a sense of possibility. Make it broad enough to allow you to discover areas of unexpected value, and narrow enough to make the topic manageable. Discovery: Understand the Challenge IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  97. 97. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Create » Discovery » Understand the Challenge Discovery: Understand the Challenge 1.  Brainstorming Start with a broad view: ask yourself why people might need, want, or engage with your topic. 2.  Establish constraints Make a list of criteria and constraints for the challenge. 3.  Framing the Challenge Based on the thoughts you have collected, frame the challenge as one sentence starting with an action verb, such as: “create,” “define,” or “adapt.” 4.  Create a Visible Reminder Post the challenge in a place that everyone can see, to be reminded of your focus throughout the process;
  98. 98. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Create » Discovery » Understand the Challenge Discovery: Understand the Challenge 1.  Brainstorming Start with a broad view: ask yourself why people might need, want, or engage with your topic. 2.  Establish constraints Make a list of criteria and constraints for the challenge. 3.  Framing the Challenge Based on the thoughts you have collected, frame the challenge as one sentence starting with an action verb, such as: “create,” “define,” or “adapt.” 4.  Create a Visible Reminder Post the challenge in a place that everyone can see, to be reminded of your focus throughout the process;
  99. 99. Drawing Change (2013), Embracing Diversity – Graphic recording and dialogue , retrieved November 7th 2013 from http://drawingchange.com/embracing-diversity-with-graphic-recording/
  100. 100. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Create » Discovery » Define Your Audience Discovery: Define Your Audience A deep understanding of peoples’ motivations and needs is the best foundation for any design solution. Engage with the broad spectrum of people who will be touched by what you design. IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  101. 101. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Create » Discovery » Define Your Audience Discovery: Define Your Audience 1.  List contacts Collect and write down the people or groups that are directly involved in or reached by your topic. 2.  Think More Broadly Add people or groups who are peripherally relevant, or are associated with your direct audience. 3.  Build an Overview Think about the connections these people have with your topic. Create a visual overview of those who you consider to be your main audience, as opposed to more peripheral contacts. 4.  Create a Visible Reminder Keep a map of the people involved in a visible place for you to revisit over the course of the project.
  102. 102. Chances are good that you already have some knowledge about the topic. Share and document this knowledge, so you can build on it and are free to focus on discovering what you don’t yet know. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Donate » Discovery » Share What You Know Discovery: Share What You Know IDEO (2011), Design Thinking Process in Design Thinking Toolkit for Educators, retrieved September 1st , 2011 from http://www.designthinkingforeducators.com/
  103. 103. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Donate » Discovery » Share What You Know Discovery: Share What You Know 1.  Share What you Know Write down what you know about the topic. Use one piece of information per Post- it Note, and post them under the design challenge. Ask others for feedback and discuss any of the assumptions that come up. 2.  Define What You Don’t Know Write down and share what you don’t know or yet understand about the challenge. Post these questions in a different area. 3.  Build on your knowledge and fill in the gaps Group the Post-it Notes into themes and use them to plan your research. Write down questions you want to explore.
  104. 104. { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Create » Design Thinking » Exercise Define the Challenge: Exercise Let’s start preparation of our research: §  A refined Design Challenge §  A clear Definition of Your Audience §  A list of your research questions and Assumptions
  105. 105. Drawing Change (2013), Embracing Diversity – Graphic recording and dialogue , retrieved November 7th 2013 from http://drawingchange.com/embracing-diversity-with-graphic-recording/
  106. 106. Go to our KISD Space for this course and add the information related to the challenge you’ve chosen: 1.  A refined Design Challenge 2.  A clear Definition of Your Audience 3.  A list of your research questions and Assumptions Itamar Medeiros http://designative.info/ http://twitter.com/designative itamar.medeiros@designative.info { Designing Interactions: Introduction } Youareat: Donate » Disseminating Results Donate: Disseminating Results

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