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Kitchen for Elderly project report, spring 2013.

Kitchen for Elderly project report, spring 2013.

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Design & Engineering Kitchen for Elderly report Design & Engineering Kitchen for Elderly report Document Transcript

  • KITCHEN FOR ELDERLYProject of spring 2013www.design-engineering.ee
  • 3CONTENTSTeam ... 4Tutors ... 5Introduction ... 6Home user research ... 8Public space research ... 13Identifiying issue areas in the kitchen ... 10Existing kitchens for elderly ... 23Existing universal principles of design for aging in place ... 24Consideration for aging in place ... 25Technical research ... 30Motions of basic kitchen structures ... 32Opportunity space ... 36Personas ... 37Existing solutions research ... 16Kitchen layout types ... 17Ideation & trends ... 38Concept I ... 42Concept II ... 46Concept III ... 57Kitchen garden ... 74Structure & materials ... 76Technical drawings ... 82Cutting board concept I ... 100Merging 3 concepts into one ... 63Cutting board concept II ... 110Trolley ... 124
  • 4OURTEAMHelena Veidenbaum1st year D&E studentBA interior designKirill Andretshuk1st year D&E studentBSc mechanicalengineeringGuillaume Speurt1st year D&E studentMSc mechanicalengineeringAnfisa Bogomolova1st year D&E studentBA interior designLarissa Frosch2nd year D&E studentBA productionmanagementKerstin Oppe1st year D&E studentBA interior architectureChen Zhang1st year D&E studentBSc industrial designEnder Özgün1st year D&E studentBSc mechanicalengineeringTriin Kook1st year D&E studentBSc food technology,product developmentAfshin Hassani1st year D&E studentmechanical engineering
  • 5Meng Zhouexchange studentBSc Industrial DesignRebecca Mayexchange studentIndustrial DesignMadeline Callananexchange studentIndustrial DesignAlexis Terreeexchange studentErgonomics, IndustrialDesign and MechanicalEngineeringMartin PärnEstonian Academy ofArts, head of Design &EngineeringAivar Habakukkhead designer ofBaltecoHenrik HerranenTallinn University ofTechnologyJuhani Salovaararesearch,development, designOURTUTORS
  • 6INTRODUCTIONOur user-centered design project from this semester concentrates on the subject of Kitchen forelderly.We started our research to gather data from real-life experience by getting in contact with old peo-ple in their homes. We were divided into groups and each group had the task to research a differentfield in this subject matter: users in home and in public space, existing solutions, designs, construc-tions and materials. We gathered data of the market to understand what is currently offered to theusers and where is the market opportunity.After getting confirmation that there are several problems to work on, we were divided into newgroups to find different ideas for the concept proposals. We used different design tools and createduser journey maps and personas. Our work of generating ideas resulted in 3 different concept prop-ositions that you can examine on the following pages of this report.As this semester’s project is a cooperation project with the largest kitchen manufacturer in Estonia– company AS Arens Mööbel (http://www.arens.ee/), we presented our concepts to the company’srepresentatives, from whom we got the feedback to start the analysis of 3 different conceptualpropositions in finding the strengths and weaknesses of each concept. After the analysis and con-sultation with our professors, we took the best features from each concept and started to mergethem to create one kitchen solution for the elderly.
  • 7
  • 8In researching users in their home environment, thorough research into the health of elderly peopleaged 65-80 revealed physical and phycological behaviours such as:Physical behaviour:• Lack of movement• Slow movement• Slow reaction• Problem of balance• Lack of body control (Parkinsson)• Lack of energy• Joint paint• Lack of strength• Poor, lack movement of the fingers• Poor tactility of fingers• Weak grip• Loss of taste• Memory loss/poor memory• Can´t hear things clearly• Loss of hearing• Lack of vision• Sensitivity to colour• Sensitivity to bright lightAfter thourough research into the health and lifestyle of the elderly, further reasearch and brain-storming was undertaken and identified several design considerations.LIGHTING • Visible position of switches, strengths, cost of energy, type of switchesWORKTOP• Height and combination of adjustable heights• Texture, material, minimal to no pattern for ease in cleaning, colour• Spaces between sink and fridge, fridge and stove, sink and stove• Accessory or space/material for hot pots and pansBELOW THE WORKTOP• Cupboards with sliding shelves and baskets, pull out systems• Position of handles (vertical/horisontal), shape, measurements• Space for seating during food preparationABOVE THE WORKTOP• Dryer easily reachable• Reachable height between worktop and uppercupboards• Accessible and visible position of handlesWASTE BIN• Pull-out system• Appropriate height/positionPsychological behaviour:• Lonely• Fear of injury• Acceptance of aging/abilities• Independance as much as possible• Fear of failingHOME USER RESEARCH
  • 9FOOD PREPARATION• Knives, spoons (hanging on the wall)• Preparing meal near preparation areaEQUIPMENTS• One way understandable, turning buttons• Position of microwave - space beside to put plate or cup on it, not high, way of opening• Fridge - position of freezer• Oven not colose to the floor, pull out system of door or telescope rails• Dishwasher not close to the floor, not big amountSINK AREA• Sink with drying stainless area• Position of the mixer• Filter water tap• Washing liquid container, washing stuffACCESSORIES• Television• Radio• Telephone• Clock• Seating place• Reading• Stationary• Paper for notesMEDICATION• Placement• Visability• Easy to reach and rememberMATERIALS• Type• Contrast between edges and surface for individuals with poor vision• Colours - worktop not dark• Texture and shape for grip and supportSHAPE AND LAYOUT• Avoid sharp edges where possible• Use of window light as much as possible• Seating and window view• Interaction between preparation and eating area
  • Identifying issue areasin the kitchenTHE  KITCHEN  •   Can  forget  to  turn  hood  off  SINK  AREA  Extra  stainless  steel  surface  needed  for  dishes  Storage  for  cleaning  cloths  Tap  handle    -­‐difficult  to  grip  -­‐no  clear  hot/cold  signage  Tea  towels  need  to  be  easily  accessed  in  this  area    Waste  bin  -­‐too  low  to  access  -­‐difficult  to  empty  -­‐pull  out  system  needed  Difficult  to  grip  and  pour  dish  washing  liquid  boIle  Difficult  to  liJ  and  fill  keIle  10
  • CUPBOARDS  &  STORAGE    Hard  to  liJ  heavy  items  from  below  Hard  to  bend  and  reach  lower  cupboards  for  saucepans  Hard  to  reach  items  from  upper  shelves  Food  can  be  difficult  to  reach  and  can  fall  from  upper  cupboards  11STOVE  AREA  Sensor  switches  -­‐Hard  to  dis%nguish  between  sensors  -­‐not  enough  feedback  -­‐not  familiar/too  complex    Electric  dials  -­‐difficult  to  grip  and  turn  -­‐hard  to  see  the  numbers  Gas  dials/switches  -­‐difficult  to  co-­‐ordinate  push  and  rotate  ac%on  Important  to  have  a  tea  towel  near  this  area  for  hot  pots  Appropriate  material  to  place  hot  pots  on  (next  to  the  stove)  Stove  can’t  be  too  high  to  liJ  pots  onto  Important  to  have  space  on  either  side  for  prepara%on/pots  
  • 12MICROWAVE  &  REFRIDGERATOR    Posi%on  of  microwave  is  unsuitable-­‐  out  of  reach  -­‐Difficult  to    bend  to  access  low  shelves  in  the  fridge  -­‐Hard  to  reach  food  at  the  back  of  the  fridge  -­‐Strong  force  is  needed  to  open  fridge  and  freezer  Bench  space  beside  fridge  is  needed  to  place  items  -­‐Tea  towel  is  needed  near  this  area,  for  when  taking  hot  plates  out  of  microwave  KITCHEN  AND  DINING  SPACE  -­‐Space  between  kitchen  bench  and  table  is  too  far  -­‐Hard  to  carry  heavy  plates/  items  between  bench  and  table  
  • 13For the research we divided ourselves into 4 groups including home environment, public space, excit-ing solutions and materials and different technical issues regarding kitchen space and furniture.To start with we defined the public space users as retirement home inhabitants, where people usethe kitchen together with other users. To find out more about public space users we made calls intodifferent homes. Finally we were lucky to visit two of them, Villa Benita and Rannapere Sotsiaal-keskus. Here we would like to thank the staff and inhabitants, for welcoming us and explaining theentire system. We also involved 3 anthropology students into the research phase, who came with usto the visits and helped, to observe and make their own remarks.First two visits we made to Villa Benita. Benita nursing home provides around-the-clock high-levelnursing services, supports safe life arrangement for elderly and physically disabled customers, as itis essential for patients of the nursing hospital. They provide, according to the individual wishes andneeds, supported living care as well as day care.The home’s modern and homely cozy premises constitute a harmonious unit with the beautiful andpeaceful nature environment. Benita’s staff values a personal approach to every customer. The atti-tude is always caring, competent and highly service minded.We got really valuable information from these two visits. First, the elderly people in retirementhomes generally do not prepare their own food, so not what we initially hoped to see. Neverthelesswe had an opportunity to join them in the weekly cooking class and observe the few inhabitantsthere.Public space research
  • 14The elderly people with mental problems (e.g. Alzheimer) couldn’t/shouldn’t cook their food in thefirst place, because they could easily overcook their food or even start a fire. The ones with healthyminds, but with physical problems would want everything to be in ones hand reach, which might ruleout the high kitchen cabinets as we have seen in many places these higher selves are not oftenused. The same could be for the lower selves that are too low to reach and sometimes painful be-cause potential back problems.Another observation we did was that, elderly might need a handrail or a trolley that is in the kitchento help them move around or carry food etc. This might be a good accessory because of the poten-tial balance or strength issues. Elderly often need to use a cane or even a wheelchair. One lady inVilla Benita retirement home used a basket to carry food.
  • 15The second retirement home we visited was the Rannapere Hooldekodu in Viimsi.The place was different from Villa Benita. Rannapere can be used as a temporary solution, as well asongoing maintenance problems. They provide a dignified and secure environment for older people,whose daily survival is significantly worse, with no efforts on self-moving and self-care.The boarding house offers a client-centered and need-based care, given the possibility to rechargetheir energy. Elderly people are taken care for with dignity and long-term skilled and experiencednurses, caregivers, cooks and waitresses.We found the conformation to the already observed facts, that elderly in retirement homes don’tcook anything themselves. In fact in Rannapere there was also no kitchen for that purpose, becausemost of them have mental illnesses, Parkinson’s disease or Alzheimer’s disease and they can’t copeby themselves.This gave us valuable insight that the people in retirement homes are not the target group for ourproject because they cannot cope with themselves and need special care.The visit clearly showed, that we can not concentrate on people’s health problems, because peoplewith mental illnesses doesn’t cope themselves at all (hence they don’t use kitchen and prepare foodnever by themselves). The solution should be universal and equally usable here and anywhere else.To sum up the observational remarks, we found out that the elderly who want to make their ownfood, essentially want the same things from a kitchen as all the other people, but today’s modernkitchen can’t change with person’s lifestyle. The main issues are the unintuitive workspace, unsuit-able heights of storage and heavy and complex kitchen supplies. Not to be forgotten that kitchenalso is more than just the room or area for cooking.
  • 16Existing solutionsresearchMany typical flat layouts were viewed to develop a greater understanding of how the kitchen influ-enced a layout plan within the home or vice versa. Space constraints and flow dictates what kitchenconfiguration will be the most space efficient and accessible. After viewing these plans it becameapparent that the target persona would most likely be situated in the smallest of apartments, whichbecame a guiding design decision later in the conceptual design process.Typical 1 bedroom layout.Single wall kitchen U shape kitchenTypical 2 bedroom layout.Gallery kitchen U- shaped kitchenTypical 3 bedroom layout.Gallery kitchen Gallery kitchenypical 2 bedroom layout.llery kitchen U- shaped kitchenTypical 3 bedroom layout.Gallery kitchen Gallery kitchenTypical 1 bedroom layout.L- shaped kitchen with island Single wall kitchenTypical 2 bedroom layout.Single wall kitchen Single wall kitchenTypical 1 bedroom layout.L- shaped kitchen with island Single wall kitchenTypical 2 bedroom layout.Single wall kitchen Single wall kitchen
  • 17Single-line kitchen/One wall kitchen:Where space is scarce, a single-line kitchen in which the working triangle is reduced to a straight line,can be the most practical solution. It’s also pleasing to look at.Pros• Ideal for small and narrow spaces.• Ideally for walls without windows or doors, efficient use of space.Cons• Working space inefficient if bench line is too long.• Space between the stove and sink restricted as it is the most used space during food prepara-tion.Single-line with island:This single-line kitchen includes an island. An island provides plenty of storage as well as extra worksurfaces, but it requires at least 120 cm of free space around to work well.One wall kitchen.Pros• Ideal for small and narrow spaces.• Ideally for walls without win-dows or doors, efficient use of space.Cons• working space inefficient if bench line is too long.• Space between the stove and sink restricted as it is the most used space during food prepa-ration. Kitchen layout types
  • 18L-shaped kitchen:The L-shaped kitchen is ideal when you want to add a small dining table or kitchen island.It’s also a good way to make the most out of a corner, as well as integrating the kitcheninto a dining area.Pros• Working triangle well established enabling efficient food preparation for more than one person• Multiple work zones can be adapted easily with additional space for dinning options.Cons• Sink, range hood and refrigerator are separate from the preparation area.• Corner spaces can sometimes be wasted space and hard to reach however.L- shaped kitchen.Pros• Working triangle well established enabling efficient food preparation for more than one person.• Multiple work zones can be adapt-ed easily with additional space for dinning options.Cons• Sink, rangehood and refrigerator are seperate from the preparation area.• Corner spaces can sometimes be wasted space and hard to reach however.
  • 19U-shaped kitchen:If you have a large room the U-shaped layout is ideal. It gives you maximum space and plenty ofstorage options – ensuring that everything is within easy reach. If the room is very large, it’simportant to ensure that the points of the working triangle (see explanation above) are not toofar from one another.Pros• Refrigerator, range hood and sink can be spaced out for total efficiency and convenience.• Enables an efficient workflow triangle with minimal distances between activities in differentworkspaces within the kitchen.Cons• Corner spaces can sometimes be wasted space and hard to reach however.U-shaped kitchen.Pros• Refrigerator, rangehood and sink can be spaced out for total effi-ciency and convenience.• Enables an efficient workflow tri-angle with minimal distances be-tween activities in different work-spaces within the kitchen.Cons• Corner spaces can sometimes be wasted space and hard to reach however.IP••
  • 20Parallel kitchen/Gallery kitchen:You don’t need to have a huge amount of space for this layout. It’s geared for food preparationand provides two great work and storage areas on opposite sides. In fact, it’s favorite of manyprofessional chefs.Pros• Efficient use of space for smaller homes or apartments.• Allow ease in moving between activity areas.Cons• Can cause traffic congestion during food preparation if corridor is open at both ends.• Needs enough room for opposite drawers to be open at the same time.Gallery kitchen.Pros• Efficient use of space for smaller homes or apartments.• Allow ease in moving between activity areas.Cons• Can cause traffic congestion during food preparation if cor-ridor is open at both ends.• Needs enough room for oppo-site drawers to be open at the same time.
  • 21Island bench kitchen:Pros• Allows cook to socialize while preparing meals.• Independent island unit can face a dining or living area and can be mobile.Cons• Distance between bench and main kitchen line needs to be able to account for wheelchairmobility.Island bench kitchen.Pros• Allows cook to socialize while preparing meals.• Independent island unit can face a dining or living area and can be mobile.Cons• Distance between bench and main kitchen line needs to be able to account for wheelchair mobility.
  • 22Peninsula kitchen:Pros• The layout offers similar versatile options to the island bench but offers more clearancein the kitchen.• Can consist of freestanding units, which allow for flexible layoutsCons• Distance between bench and main kitchen line needs to be able to account for wheelchairmobility.• Corner spaces can sometimes be wasted space and hard to reach however.Peninsula kitchen.Pros• The layout offers similar versa-tile options to the island bench but offers more clearance in the kitchen.• Can consist of freestanding units which allow for flexibile layoutsCons• Distance between bench and main kitchen line needs to be able to account for wheelchair mobility.• Corner spaces can sometimes be wasted space and hard to reach however.
  • 23Many existing concepts were evaluated, however many of these concepts were yet to be devel-oped into an actual marketed product. Key areas where significant modifications existed or usabilityproblems could be identified were factored into the next conceptual design process and criticallyevaluated to improve.Existing kitchens forelderly
  • 24Respecting the needs and requirements of older adults to maintain autonomy and independence withequal desires for safety and security. Aging in place is more than being in an environment of choiceas one gets older, it means home; a place for emotional and functional needs to be met. A founda-tion where family histories are created and rich memories have been woven from shared experienc-es.“Place attachment” is the preference for home caused by a bond developed through experiencesover time. The deeper meaning of home is built from:• Home as a social center for family and friends to gather• Home as a source of pride in ownership, social status, joy, and feelings of “rootedness”• Home as a source of independence and stability in the midst of loss and change related to agingIncorporating Aging-in-place and universal design principles into new construction (which can savemoney and insure house is safe and comfortable for years to come). Universal design is the creationof environments and products, which are meant to be usable by all people to that greatest extentpossible, without the need for adaptation or specialization. The intent is to enhance the quality oflife for all of us, regardless of age or ability. The elegance of Universal Design is that it’s invisibleand non-stigmatizing. The design is so intuitive the experience is often effortless. It is about accessand inclusion as well as an added margin of safety, which is why universal and aging-in-place design isso closely matched. The stigma is no longer ‘hospital-like’ as grab bars and bath seats are now takingon a new look.Universal design not only helps family members with limited mobility, hearing or vision but also anyfamily member not only limited to those with physical disabilities.Existing universalprinciples of design foraging in place
  • 25Consideration for aging in place could involve more extensive modifications, such as:• Grading entry points to create zero-step entrances.• Stacking closets for future elevators• Universal design kitchens• Adjustable kitchen cabinets and adjustable heights for the kitchen sink (motorized versions exist that rise and lower at the touch of a button)• Movable kitchen cabinets• Cook top set into a counter with open knee space• Non-slip tiles or wood flooring• Open knee space under sinks.• Various height or adjustable height kitchen counters• Few wall cabinets• Appliances placed at comfortable heights ( It is interesting to note that while the original reasoning behind a raised dishwasher or right-height oven was for use by a person in a wheel chair, today it is more often a benefit to a standing person who would choose not to bend.)• Doors that go away, fold to the side, swing up, recess areas.• Contrasting trim color on countertops for sight-impaired users• Elevated refrigerator• Front loading dishwasher• Open space under the kitchen and bathroom sinks as well as slide-out boards to accommo date a seated person• Pull out chopping boards to accommodate a seated person• Antibacterial materials and finishes• Cleaner lines• Appliances that report trouble back to the manufacturer• Self-regulating ventilation• Self-regulating lighting• as grading entry points to create zero-step entrances.• Stacking closets for future elevators• Universal design kitchens• Replacing knobs with levers on doors and faucets.• Additional handrails/grab bars.• Modifying existing housing/ Do it yourself• Materials and kits that can be purchased at national home improvement stores which carry items from mobility to bath and safety products.Consideration foraging in place
  • 26Activities - Food preparation:‘Pour thing’ – A design product designed with all ages in mind from the very young that lack co-ordi-nation and strength, people experiencing hand or finger injury, people suffering from arthritis to theelderly. People often buy items in larger amounts but for people of these situations the sheer sizeand weight of large containers presents a problem. With the use of only two fingers this pouring aidis easily manipulated.Rubbermaid Vertical Lid and Pan Organizer is universal design at its smartest; perfect for storinglids, frying pans, cutting boards e.t.c and designed to eliminate clutter and save space by utilizingthe vertical space in cabinets. With a contoured draw feature to facilitate ease of use and hold pansupright for ease of access. Powder-coated finish for durability.Eating:The Good Grips spoon has a special twist in the shaft that allows the teaspoon to be bent to anyangle. This feature is helpful for people with limited hand to mouth reach. The large soft rubber,latex free handle is easier and more comfortable for people with poor hand strength and limited gripstrength to hold. Super grip bendable utensils- the cutlery feature twists in a metal shaft that pro-vides easy bending to any angle to accommodate a reduced range of motion. They can be bent tothe right or left to the position providing the greatest comfort.Features:• Oversized soft rubber handles to cushion weak and painful hands.• Bendable metal shaft for custom angle teaspoon.• Dishwasher safe• Great for people with weak grasp.
  • 27Freedom Dinnerware Snack Bowl with Suction Pad Base non-skid bowls were designed for peoplewith hand tremors, paralysis, Parkinson’s disease, arthritis, uncontrolled movement and disabilitiesthat restrict hand movement necessary for eating independently. Extended rims, built in dividers,special scoop angles and the no slip patented suction pad base provide the solution to the problem.Features:• Perfect for flat tabletops, wheelchair trays and over-bed tables.• Sticks solidly to any smooth table or work surface• The pad can be simply washed and dried by hand.• The bowls can be microwavedThe Drinking Straw Holder clips to the lip of glasses and cups. The straw angle can be adjusted byusing the different holes. Accepts all straw sizes. Package consists of the Stainless steel springclamp and holder.Features:• Clips to the lip of glasses and cups.• Eliminates the need to hold the straw.• Stainless steel.• Will hold small or large diameter straws.
  • 28Dignity Ware – Utensils and crockery aimed at facilitating and maintaining the independence of eat-ing. The shape, sizes and weight of each product has been designed for ease of use e.g. two handleson a mug, edges on a plate to hold on to and bright colors for people with sight hardships. Returnhuman dignity.Dignity Mug is a specially designed ceramic mug that provides additional stability for shaky handsfrom hand tremors. The secure grip is good for those with limited hand strength, flexibility or motorskill problems. The two extra-large handles are intended for those who no longer have the strengthor dexterity to hold a mug with one hand.Features:• Unique two handled mug.• Allows multiple grip positions.• Microwave and dishwasher safe.Plate Guard helps prevent food from being pushed off the edge of your plate. The guard is securedto your plate with three spring action clips and is easily removed for cleaning.Features:• Solid stainless steel food bumper for durability and sanitation.• Three spring action clips hold it on the plate.• Helps prevent food from being pushed off the edge of the plateThe utensil holder is ideal for anyone with limited or decreased grip strength. Makes eating, writingand other activities easier. Utensil Holder is designed to slip on and off comfortably and adjusts tofit. Can be used with utensils, toothbrushes, razors and thin combs.
  • 29Washing:Touchless hands-free infrared automatic Faucet adapter – to render any existing bathroom sink orfaucet completely hands free and automatic. Attaches to the existing faucet to instantly becomesensor activated with adjustable temperature and pressure. Enables that ability to turn it off and onwith a simple touch even if hands are full or messy, pull down wand also allows flexibility for cleaning.Storage:Pull-down shelving system – Another universal design product, which enables items to become befully accessible to individuals in wheelchairs and/or with mobility challenges reaching. Gas assistedlifting/lowering mechanisms provide stability and ease of use.
  • 30Technical researchAs an initial step, we were assigned to make a general research about the technical ideals, struc-tures and materials about the existing kitchens on use/ in the market.Furthermore we decided to start with the materials that were used back in the days and also are be-ing used nowadays with modern technology approaches and opportunities. Firstly, we have tried togive value to the materials from different perspectives such as being traditional or innovative, cheapor expensive, durable or non-durable and according to the matter of being sustainable or not.Sorting out the mechanical, thermal, chemical properties and making market and use friendliness re-search took the following phase. As a sum up of all those researches, we focused on specific groupof materials which has been decided finally on progress with the cooperation of experienced kitchendesigners.
  • 31Independently from their appearance, materials can be sorted out according to:Mechanical properties:• Material should be strong enough (especially fixation)• Upper element may use light materialsChemical properties:• Prefer non-oxide material (for steel)• Wooden must be prevented from humidityThermal properties:• Avoid metallic material near heating/cooling areas• Wooden must be prevented from humidityOther properties:• Durable• Aesthetic and warm touch feeling• Don’t forget magnetic propertiesWe continued to list the physical elements (focusing mostly on storage elements) which form thewhole kitchen, such as:• Cupboard• Shelf• Drawer• Fridge• Oven• Fridge, etc.
  • 32Motions of Basic KitchenStructuresAt this reserach phase, we tried to understand how the existing parts move or placed and how canbe conceptual ideas coped in an either futuristic or realistic motion principles.ROTATIONAL:
  • 33SLIDING, SWEEPING MOTION:PLANAR MOTION:Also examined the “outside of the box” ideas and structures about kitchens to have an inspirationfor innovative touches about the technology and user friendly approach.
  • 34KITCHEN IN A BOX (KITCHEN IN DISGUISE):
  • SPACE SAVING KITCHEN (KITCHEN IN DISGUISE):TIME SAVING KITCHEN (X-RAY KITCHEN):35
  • 36Currently, there is massive amount of different kitchen furniture available. To find an opportuni-ty space in the market, we managed to do an extensive research, for the time period we had. Wefound out that the variables available are generally more traditional and not fulfilling the needs ofactive elderly people. There is a change of eating habits, increase of self and health awareness andthis progress is limited by today’s static kitchen. To live healthier and active life, the kitchen shouldadapt to a person’s needs. And with this reason we found an opportunity space for more dynamickitchen.OPPORTUNITY SPACEPopulation65  +  (2012)  65  +  (2020)  0-­‐65  Elderly people in developed countrieson average 17% and growing yearly
  • 373 personas were created in order to create context and scenarios of elderly people of differentages. Their physical health and living environments created were based on factual information andthe outcome of the previous research. Using these personas allowed us into further explorationof how the kitchen could be used to identify problem areas. The persona ‘Wolfgang’ most appealedto the group, as he was seen to be the most likely target for our project - an individual looking toinvest in a well designed kitchen for his aging in place.PERSONASBetty75 years oldRecently widowed, now lives alone(moved from house to flat in a smallertown). Adapting to be aloneHas siblings children, who visit whennecessaryFew friends, who visit each other - knitting,reading books, preparing lunch for friendsCurrently 15 years old kitchen furniture -wants changes in kitchen - easy livingPhysical:-Arthritis-Poor visionPsychological:-Needs social interaction-Fear of injury-Active social lifeWolfgang60 years oldSingle, lives alone (new flat in a bigger city)Didn’t own his apartement due to constanttravelling, now has settled downHas 3 children aged 30+ (meet 2 times peryear)Works 3 days a week as a professorAbout to choose a new kitchen for hisnew flatVegetarian for 1 yearActive in sports: nordic walking, cyclingPhysical:-Joint pain - stiffness-Previous diagnose: high cholestorolPsychological:-Needs social interaction and do sportsAlbert and Elizabeth80 year old coupleLive together in private house(countryside)Childred and grandchildren - big family -visiting weekendsRenovated kitchen one year ago with thehelp of the children.Kitchen used by kids, growups, elderly -cooking together during weekends. Duringweek the use of kitchen is less active.Kitchen is more used for sitting, reading,listening radio - heart of the house.Deepening sicknesses.Physical:Albert-Joint pain in theback and kneesElizabeth-Poor strength inthe armsElizabeth-Poor strength inthe armsPERSONA 1 PERSONA 2 PERSONA 3
  • In their design activities, designers must ensure that they stay on track with their objectives. It isadmitted that personas should stay in the designer’s mind to keep the target user included in theideation process. It might also appear important to demarcate the ideation path by defining themainstream ideas and trends to get inspired of. At the end of our design research phase the teambrainstormed to define the inspirations for the future kitchen for elderly.IDEATION & TRENDS38
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  • CONCEPT ITeam: Kerstin Oppe, Rebecca May, Madeline Callanan, Alexis Terree42
  • 43We grouped up with Alexis, Rebecca and Madeline to create a kitchen that we thought should be ab-solutely modular and recomposable. This so that it could expand and contract according to the fami-ly’s size and aging. This way this kitchen actually becomes usable for every size of family and can bepurchased during younger age. The activities in the kitchen are more frequent within the ``goldenyears´´ so from there, the big kitchen will start getting smaller. This is where the modularity comesin handy. You can make your kitchen more compact and change the heights of your workspace. Thecompact kitchen is universal and can also be used for in studio apartments and dormitories, it willgrow abnd contract with the user’s needs.The modules can be made up from a minimal of 2 pieces, and can go up to 6. They can collectively beeasily used for a worktop but also a dinner table, when the shelves are intruded.Another aspect for the kitchen was for all the equipment to be completely integrated. We anted itto fully accomandate everything neccesarry for a kitchen, but all at the heights, to which an elderlyperson would not have to stretch up or bend down. The modules had to contain a fridge, oven andstove for it to be a unified concept. Because of this, we researched the new comfortable systems ofFischer&Pykel, that fit perfectly in our modules, were a convenient height for the elderly people.
  • 44We were equally as interested in the possibilities of a kitchen garden as traditional way of producingand consuming fresh herbs that are healthy and always available without going to the store. Besidescomfortability mini-gardens are also a growing trend with the maturing and increasing sustainablelifestyle community. This shows a growing market for health-wise kitchen users. From this, we alsoconsidered a recycling system within the kitchen and rethought the way to use apertures for dif-ferent types of waste. A colour code was developed to a rough point, how to sort trash in differentbags and according to the frequency of recycling and emptying the bags, the arrangements in thedrawers were made.
  • One importand point for as was the accessbility for wheelchairs and support trolleys. This deter-mined the shape of the kitchen and the open space under the counters to leave room for the trol-leys and wheels. Considering the limited possibilities of the aged population, we reconsidered all theheights, new depths and lengths for more comfortable and effortless working spaces. To gain moreworkspace, the shelves were integrated into the surface, so they could be extruded when needed,and intruded, when the worktops are collectively used for a dinner table.45
  • CONCEPT IITeam: Anfisa Bogomolova, Larissa Frosch, Meng Zhou, Ender Özgün, Guillaume SpeurtN0PYG - “No Pain Yes Gain: An Innovative kitchen designed for elderly “46
  • 47Background & our persona:WolfgangFacts:Nice German man, 67 years oldLiving alone in small flatHas one wall kitchen with tableWorking 3 days a week as teacherHas 2 children and 2 grand childrenComportment:Active personGood self-organizationLike to host peopleWakes up at 7amListen radio/TV while eatingForgets to take medicineWhat Wolfgang likes:Receiving guests (family, friends)Tea, preparing many kinds of teaFeeling independentPreparing meal with childrenWhat Wolfgang doesn’t like:Too many things in kitchenCooking, food preparationTaking pillsFeel oldProcess:Thinking of the project we wanted:• Accessibility everything under the hand• Comfort easy-to-see elements• Simplicity, no complex construction• Durability, strong and last longer• Give autonomy - trolley• Design conservative yet modern look• Evolutive basic form fit with everything• Imagined for one & fit everyoneThe concept should have:• Efficient space organization• Interaction between preparation and eating areas• Safety, minimal effort, easy to clean• Storage without bending down and up• Defined area for tools, clear organization• Options to change working and eating area bigger• Options for easy and minimum effort needed for dish washing
  • 48Structure and details:As a concept for kitchen layers which can be reachable in an easier way, in the outcome we have 2main areas to cover and define:• Vertical as a depth• Horizontal as a lengthAnd the whole structure is visually divided into 3 main activities parts:• Washing• Cooking• Coffee zoneVertical consist of shelf system, which is located in the back side of worktop and fulfill the functionas a shelf. There is everything needed during preparing is located.Generally talking; vertical part intended to replace upper and lower storage parts. Because of thatreason on vertical part, most of all accessories in the kitchen located on it. According to the wholestructure, it is divided into :• Dishes + drying shelf’s• Cooking accessories• Coffee facilities.It has:Movable containers, which are inserted inside on the holes of carcass and can be easily replaces orput out for cleaning. By this function we add values for shelf and go abroad the box, bringing addi-tional storage space for vertical part.Back part, which consist of described containers are visually divided according to the concept: onthe washing area, cooking area and coffee area. Which means that it is planned to put the dishwasher on the left side and washing fluids, drying tableware’s. On the cooking area inside containersplanned to put cooking fluids (oil, vinegar) spices, salt, sugar and also cooking ware. And coffee areaintended for coffee or tea packs.Also on the vertical inner part there is sliding boxes for corns or other supplies, which are for easyaccess can slide out for pouring missing ingredients.Also on this area located conceptual hood, which are 300mm length. All the mechanisms placed in-side the horizontal part and on the vertical – is extraction part.Horizontal:Horizontal department designed to be a main working area on the top and below heavy cookwarestorage.To be more precise about horizontal top. Sink system consist of:• Sink itself• Sliding container for washing products inside the sink• Removable basket for accessories behind sink• Chopping area on the sliding door, which cover bio-wastes garbage• Dryer for platesWork place for preparing food (chopping, melting, grinding, pouring etc.) are 650mm length and nextto it for easy transition processes products located electric stove for 2 burners.After the cooking area is the smallest part of 350mm for additional electrical appliances.
  • 49Horizontal below:Under the worktop on the left side under the sink is a place, which used as usual for washing fluids,cleaning accessories.Next to it is an ecological garbage zone. Garbage department include bio-wastes container, which isfixed on the top. But exactly below there are general, paper and bottles basket.In the middle, where you’re expecting to cook under countertop - sliding niche with towel, foil andpaper cutters and below that there is a trolley. So after you prepared your dish – without move-ments you just bring out trolley, put dish on it and go to other place for eating.On the right located main storage zone: upper for forks, spoons and knifes and under it heavy cook-ware drawer.EQUIPMENTS:Assumed technical appliances are: conceptual hood , 2burners electrical stove, and plug-ins for addi-tional electrical equipments: as toaster, teapot, blender, mixer and so on.LIGHTING:20mm LED strip are located on the whole perimeter of upper shelf’s and on the top and inside thestorage drawers.SHAPE AND LAYOUT:
  • 50Conceptual:• Countertop as a sink, dish drainer, insight shelf’s = One composite material (stone)• Refuse of using bottom and upper part of kitchen. Max use of hand reach area.• Using depth instead of length. But depth is mostly consist of modular parts and can change it’s placesNowadays:• Laminated worktop / price + inside integrated sink + shelf’s as a frame (if it’s laminated worktop,sink should be at least 150mm from the edge)• Shelving system: material 16mm melanine, 6mm of plastic• Fixing: standard holdersBenefits:• Hand reachable• In the minimum space located 3 basically main areas: washing area, cooking area, coffee side• Everything located in the most comfortable way• You can cook without any step. Everything thought over so that you don’t need to move, tobend or go somewhere for something.The conclusion:• In a minimum space are three specific areas: Washing, cooking, coffee side• Everything located in the most comfortable way: Refuse of using bottom and upper part ofkitchen and optimal use of hand reach area• Using depth instead of length: A front shelf is the center of the kitchen element• A trolley allows to bring the food anywhere
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  • CONCEPT IIITeam: Triin Kook, Helena Veidenbaum, Chen Zhang, Kirill Andreitsuk, Afshin Hassani57
  • After the research phase, in the group of 5, we started to think about different ideas what could bedone in order to create a concept for the elderly. We brainstormed and sketched lots of ideas; forexample idea to create this kind of a stove-oven with removable upper plate of the stove so theusers could see inside of the oven from the top (and they don’t have to bend and look down insidethe oven from the side).The second idea was to create flat surface cooking area, where the “wok-pan-alike” cooking areawould be merged inside the worktop and heated equally from each side of the pan. The “wok-pan-alike” containers could be taken out from the worktop and put with the stand to the table. It couldbe possible to make these areas with different sizes for cooking or heating several dishes at thesame time. It would also keep the food warm for longer and if it could be combined with refrigeratingcapabilities and self cleaning ability, then you didn’t have to move the food away from the area at all.Just cook it, eat it, freeze it and when the container is empty, it cleanses itself.The third idea we had was about the movable part of the dining table. With this, you could make thedining table bigger for more guests and also move food you have made in the kitchen area on topof it to the eating area. The handlebar would have 2 options: if you press the handlebar down, thenthe wheels are free to move and if you release the handlebar, it locks the wheels from moving. Thiscould be also considered to be helpful accessory for the elderly when moving around their house andlooking for a help to keep their balance and help them while walking around the house/appartement.The fourth idea was about garbage throw-away system with a trash bag fixture that locks the trashbag between the fixture and doesn’t let it get loose. You could throw away garbage straight awayfrom the worktop by lifting the cover of the trash container.And last but not least, we had an idea about creating the expandable table with drawers and/or evenseats inside which open up with easy user action that everyone can manage to do (young and elder-ly).58
  • 59For our concept, we created personas of Albert and Elizabeth, who are a couple and both are 75years old, living in a private countryside house in Otepää. They live in their main house and theyhave guesthouses for relatives to stay over. Their children and grandchildren are visiting themon the weekends and then they are cooking together their meals. During the week the use of thekitchen is less active, then it is more used for sitting, reading and listening the radio by the elderly,so it is definitely the heart of the house. They renovated the kitchen 1 year ago with the help ofthe children. The kitchen is used by 3 generations – kids, grownups and elderly. Albert and Elizabethhave both joint pain in the back and knees and poor strength in the arms, so we created our conceptaccording to their deepening health condition which lots of elderly people have.Based on our personas, we created kitchen concept with a layout that has corners to lean to andmoving chopping board that helps the elderly with less hand strength to move the prepared foodeasily to the stove. The wooden chopping board has the sieve holes for washing fresh ingredi-ents. We came up with the idea of magnetic and heated wall (2 in 1 solution) for drying washed forks,knives and etc and keeping them in hands reach at all times. We also came up with the idea of thecorner cabinet that is rising and revealing it’s inside, so the corner could be usefully used by stor-ing dry ingredients that can be reached when the inside is rising to the top of the workbench. Wethought of the freezer and the fridge with different temperatures in different fridge sections tostore food with different temperature necessities.
  • This concept proposal makes preparing food more enjoyable for everyone. Kitchen corners andextended worktop offers the users to fit well into the kitchen area, so more than one person canbe the “cook” in the kitchen simultaneously. The co-operation between 2 persons preparing a mealin the kitchen is more fluent and people can bypass each other more easily when compared with theregular straight-lined kitchen frontline. Cutting board aid system gives the user an easier handling ofthe cutting board, so they don’t need to lift the heavy cutting board with all of the prepared ingre-dients on top of it themselves to the pot or pan, but the cutting board moves to the stove with aneasy hand movement itself.ept layout60
  • 6143001000100600 600 600 600 600900250200800600100 100200 2004004005006001500The keywords for this concept proposal were the following:• Extended worktop – more room for keeping and storing things on the worktop.• Co-operation – easy bypass, communication and not colliding with each other, when 2 personsare preparing meal in the kitchen.• Easier to make a meal – comfort – leaning on the corner and resting one’s feet/knee/hip whilestanding near the kitchen counter for longer periods of time.• Cutting board aid system with wooden chopping board moving easily to the stove and pot/patwith food on it’s top.• Easy cleaning of the floor – cabinets hanging on the wall.• Easy reachability – sink, cutting board, garbage and the stove are close to each other.
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  • 63After all 3 concepts had been analysed, we started merge all of those 3 concepts into one. For that,everyone came in the same team to enrich the future end-product with their individual views to theproject. It was the starting point of compromises and legitimate choices.To facilitate this process, the students have been mixed and separated in smaller teams which hadto manage specific aspects of the kitchen:• General structure and lengths• The sink and cutting board area• Trolley• Herbs garden• We had to keep the spirit of each concept while proposing an seamles cooking experience forour new kitchen.• Corners have been kept to emphasize the team cooking experience and the extra support byleaning on it• Modularity has been reduced to the oven and fridge parts to fit in different apartment layouts• The shelving system and the trolley have been kept by reducing the depth as much as possibleOur task was to merge 3 concepts into one, offer solutions for cutting board sliding system andwork out final concept of the trolley.On the following pages you can examine concept development process that included analysing,sketching, prototyping and 3D modelling.MERGING 3 CONCEPTS INTO 1
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  • 66Prototyping of the trolley
  • 673D modeling of architectural proportionsClose up of the sink & tap area
  • 683D model of the final concept proposalCutting board moving to the stove
  • 69Doors opened, lighting inside the shelves and bottom drawersAdditional possibility for open shelves
  • 70Appliances and kitchen gardenWorktop overviewMotions of basic kitchen structuresPlugs rising from inside the worktop
  • 71Sink & tap area, bio waste system that is hidden under the cutting board (in low position)Spices container inside the upper shelf door, lighting inside that respons to the opening of the door
  • 72Prototyping of the kitchen
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  • 74830 mm180 mm1 mm peforated holes line the interiorin three rows on both sides to allowslow release of water to seap into soil.20 mm diamter reservoirhole.Side viewExterior timberframe box.140mm100% recycledpolypropylene.40 mm10 mmMoulded planterinterior.KITCHEN GARDEN
  • 75150mm850 mm200mm10mmside viewGarden box, slides forward onunderneith rails by 250mm(same width of kitchen shelves)* A stopper will be used toensure it only extends 250mmMaterials:250mm250mm300mmSame material used in kitchen cabinetryKitchen garden box structure250mmFittings:underside rails
  • 76Structure:Structure deviation by main working areas:Pinciple: Composition of levels, synergy.Down level as storage under the worktop and worktop area: • Sink and chopping board area as a preparation area in the center.• Following right hand role - direction of chopping board motion - to the right, forward the stove on the right hand of the sink area.• Additional working area and space for small electrical kitchen appliances - on the left hand of the sink area.Deviation of upper level storage above worktop as a shelf system on the worktop, follows se-quence and logic of down level of module:• In the center, behind the sink and chopping board area: dryer and storage of dishes• Right side: Extractor for stove and depend on extractor principle and measurements, optional space for keeping spices• Left side additional storage of kitchen small accessories, small appliances and electrical con nection. Deviation of bottom level of module, close to floor, with an angular design as a space for users feet.• Optional dividing by two symmetrical drawers.Structure deviation by minimum modules:Principle: Following worked out ergonomical needs of elderlies and integrational options of systemsand equipments.• Basic module consists: Sink and chopping board area, stove, area for small kitchen appliances and additional worktop.• Module for integrated oven, positioned to the height of worktop.• Module of kitchen garden.Structure main proportions and measurementsPrinciples of basic module:Length:• Non-changeable: sink and chopping board, cupboard area, minimum length of cupboard understove: 600/450 and 600 mm.Height:• Usage of standard ergonomic kitchen worktop height :850-910 mm.• Height of upper level – shelf following ergonomical comfort of reaching and cleaning, optimal space for storage, optimal ergonomical height of lighting: 600 mm.• Height of down cupboard area devisions worked out by analyses of prototype (from floor up to the worktop): 450/420mm.STRUCTURE & MATERIALS
  • 77Depth:• Depth of sink and chopping board area as optimal minimum, following measurements of worked out sink and chooping board area: up to 400mm.• Worktop depth of right and left side of sink and chopping board area follow the integrated measurements of stove and length of drawer system: up to 600mm.• Depth of upper level shelf as an optional to reach and clean, integration of moving up door mechanisms (decided as a result of analyses of prepared prototype - 200mm as a pure inside depth).• Depth of the bottom of corner drawers which are close to the floor was changed during the process, following results of protoyping and production possibilities it has to be controlled and checked at the end: 450mm.Principles of oven tall cupboard:Length:• Standard length for integrated oven cupboard: 600mm.Height:• Equal height to total height of basic module and kitchen garden module.• Oven is positioned on the height of worktop: 850-910m.Depth :• Following the depth of basic module which fits integrated requirements of oven.Principles of kitchen garden module:Length: Follows the length of inside boxes.Height: Equal height to the height of basic module.Depth: Equal depth to depth of basic module.Structure principle of modularity:Basic and oven models can stay separately. Kitchen garden module can be attached to the basicmodule. Possible needed modularity by different kitchen layouts can be achieved by additional unitsof cupboards with same profile measurements.Length of basic module can be changed as longer or shorter only by changing length of boarderlinedown cupboard and upper shelf. Altough it can not be less then it is allowed by stove and extractorintegration measurements, and by changing possible length of corner cupboards straight after sinkand garbage cupboards, but only by following production options and possibilities.Structure assembly principle:• Bottom structure (under worktop) stays on the floor with additional fixing to the wall, if it is needed.• Upper level shelf is supported by the worktop, fixed to the worktop and wall.• Modules should be possible to be balanced by the floor.• Cupboards are manufactured as separated units, installation at the kitchen.Principles of systems and appliances should be integrated:• Sink, chopping board and garbage system - conceptual, as a new models• Drawer system 100 % pull out, soft close• Extractor as existing in the market for integration into the worktop• Area for stove allows to integrate 2 -4 positioned stove, as gas, as electrical• It is possible to integrate oven of two heights: 600 and 450mm• Kitchen garden boxes - conceptual, as a new model
  • 78Materials:Frame:16mm melamine and veneered chipboard as a standard material used in kitchen furniture production.Worktop:• Concept as a composite stone with molded sink, drainer for dishesBenefits:• Water and heat resistance - safe comfortDisadvantages:• Price level• Purchasing time• Technological time
  • 79Existing Solutions:• Existing options of high-pressure laminate and stoneBenefits:• Price level• Purchasing and production time• Less installation complexDisadvantages:• Not water and heat resistance• Week part of edge area- could be damaged and less water resistance then worktop in totalDoors:Structure of modules allowed to use almost all standard door materials, used in the kitchen furniture.Nevertheless with the focus to elderlies’ needs, it should be resistant to water and damage as muchas possible.
  • Vertical Lift-Up Flap Fitting Door for shelvesMaterialLift-Up MechanismTechnical Drawings80
  • Material of Door- MDFLift- up Mechanism- Vertical lift-up flap fitting- Adjustable length for different cabinet width- With 2 gas pressure spring- Steel, white plastic coated or aluminium finish- Weight for inside cabinet width of 450/870- Max 5kg81
  • ?4?Part No Part Name Material Quantity Drawing No1 Bottom BackSurface MDF 1 KFETP.00.00.022 Bottom Surface A MDF 4 KFETP.00.00.013 Bottom Surface B MDF 6 KFETP.00.00.014 Worktop Korean Stone 1 KFETP.00.00.02
  • 1ISO 2768 1:10ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateEnder Özgün TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberMDFBottom AssemblyKFETP 00.01.01K. Andreitshuk1/1
  • 76630516166001184181625827501216181619822582600A 355?
  • 128369002365402521030210600184D68DETAIL ASCALE 1:508R12820214242429ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:Checked ByDateEnder Özgün TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberGeneral LayoutKFETP.00.01.00K. Andreitshuk1/2ISO 2768DETAIL DSCALE 1:501:10
  • 540870400870 6204201Technical NOTESAll the Surfaces will be joined with Joint Piins or DIN 79•Surfaces are going to be drilled from suitable places•Surface panels can be cut into final shape before/d•Other Shelf Bottom Surfaces Dimensions :600*234*16•386*234*16734*234*16
  • 8204206122206002 x 6 818425t:16 mm3220734t:16 mm4ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukTitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing Number983 Flat Head Screws.s for housing the pins.during the installation.Surface PanelsKFETP.00.00.01Ender ÖzgünISO 2768 1:51/1MDFPART NO PART NAME MATERIAL QUANTITY1 BOTTOM SURFACE B MDF 82 BOTTOM SURFACE A MDF 63 SHELF SIDE SURFACE MDF 84 SHELF BOTTOM SURFACE MDF 1
  • 2582t:16 mm22582t:16 mm32582t:16 mm4
  • 236900600 820637198225827871837620t:30 mm5ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukTitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheetMDF,KOREANSurface PanelsKFETP.00.00.02Drawing Number1/1Ender ÖzgünISO 2768 1:10Part No. Part Name Material Quantity1 Top Cover A MDF 12 Top Cover B MDF 13 Bottom Back Surface MDF 14 Upper Back Surface MDF 15 Worktop KOREAN STONE 1
  • 5305124506001820240055121039ASide Sliding Rails : Hettich Catalogue Order No: 9 079 638•Attachement of the Rails to Surface: Ø6.3*14 Flat Head Screws Hettic•Catalogue Order No: 0 051 565Attachement of the Surfaces: Ø6*25 ST8.8 Flat Head Tapping Screw -•DIN 7983Technical NOTES
  • 4841406625BDETAIL ASCALE 2 : 5Drawer Rail PinWill be used Ø6,3*14DETAIL BSCALE 2 : 5DIN 7983 Surface AttachementScrewISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukTitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberchDrawer AKFETP.00.00.031/1Ender ÖzgünISO 2768 1:5
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  • R130ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukTitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberMDF OR STEELAssembly PinKFETP.00.00.05Ender Özgün1/1ISO 2768 5:1
  • 816512122 2Stainless SteelPlasticPlastic
  • 4620R1ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateEnder Özgün TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberShelf SupportPlastic S.SteelKFETP.00.00.04Hettich CatalogueOrder No:0 022 5321/1K. AndreitshukISO 2768 5:1
  • 4501441022181113445448CUTTING BOARD CONCEPT I
  • 264Hard PlasticISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDate1/1TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberK. AndreitshukEnder ÖzgünISO 2768 1:222.05.2013KFTP.00.03.02Bottom Surface
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  • 23475°ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDate1/1TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberChopping Board GeneralStructureK. AndreitshukEnder ÖzgünISO 2768 1:222.05.2013MDFKFTP.00.03.01
  • 272 27442183063202
  • 23475°ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDate1/1TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberK. AndreitshukEnder ÖzgünISO 2768 1:222.05.2013KFTP.00.03.02Stainless SteelChopping BoardSupport CoverTechnical Note:Slots will be drilled according to holes•poisiton on the slides.
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  • ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDate1/2TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberGeneral Layout BOMK. AndreitshukEnder ÖzgünÖĞE NO. PARÇA NUMARASI TANIM MİKT.1 1 12 2 13 ISO 4035 /DIN 439M24 Nut 14 User Library-LinearSlides 25 newAssem2 26 5 1
  • 3642241222
  • 3521ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDate1/1TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberK. AndreitshukEnder ÖzgünISO 2768 1:222.05.2013KFTP.00.03.03Stainless SteelLock Pin and Nut
  • CUTTING BOARD CONCEPT II
  • №ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK.Andreitshuk20.05.2013TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing Number1/1 KFETP.00.02.00Chopping board1 : 2.5ISO2768E.Özgün
  • 1354233640 140M10 (2x)35631820...25504404117°379
  • ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukE.Özgün22-05-2013TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberISO2768mKItemNumberDocument Number Title Material Quantity Mass1 KFETP.02.01.00 Chopping Board 1 4,280 kg2 KFETP.02.00.02 Sliding Support AISI304 1 0,413 kg3 KFETP.02.00.01 Lock AISI304 2 0,109 kg4 Round bar D10x560 AISI304 2 0,205 kg5 DIN2098 Compression Spring 14x14x1 A4 2 0,001 kg1 / 1Sliding Mechanism1 : 51132524221KFETP.02.00.005.3 kg
  • 70255M103030R 4R 5R 5153551515
  • ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukE.Özgün22-05-2013TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberISO2768mK1 / 1Lock2 : 1KFETP.02.00.010.1 kgAISI304Unspecified R=5 mm10
  • 256484823A AA-A12142324
  • ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukE.Özgün22-05-2013TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberISO2768mK1 / 1Sliding Support1 : 2KFETP.02.00.020.4 kgAISI304 S=2Flat patternBending Radius R=2 mmUnspecified R=2 mm10241211027722313914212232501,3
  • 30832277 15493862012 3
  • ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukE.Özgün22-05-2013TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberISO2768mK1 / 1Chopping Board1 : 5KFETP.02.01.004.8 kg204ItemNumberDocument Number Title Material Quantity Mass1 KFETP.02.01.01 Board, down Wood, Oak 1 0,677 kg2 Board, up 320x307 Wood, Oak 1 1,116 kg3 Bolt DIN97 M6x38 A4 2 0,008 kg4 KFETP.02.01.02 Frame AISI304 1 2,474 kg
  • 307,5300220
  • ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukE.Özgün22-05-2013TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberISO2768mK1 / 1Board, down1 : 2KFETP.02.01.010.7 kg11050Wood, Oak S=18
  • 307,532222011050Flat pattern307,518,33048328450496515299328608441842202286252898M10 (2x)
  • ISO drawing method "E"Material Tolerance Scale WeightDrawn:SupervisorDateK. AndreitshukE.Özgün22-05-2013TitleTallinn University of TechnologyDepartment of Mechanical EnginneringSheet Drawing NumberISO2768mK1 / 1Frame1 : 5KFETP.02.01.022.5 kgAISI304 S=220282222028222Bending Radius R=2 mm
  • 124Function:The trolley is one of the main design idea initially imagined for the second kitchen concept. It isresulting from our conclusion about the elderly’s habits and abilities according to our observations inthe real life and reading of previous dedicated studies.It appears that for this particular target group, most of the individuals live alone and use a differentplace to eat than where they cook. They need to carry the meal and different things around theirhome and that can be hurting and painful.Working on a kitchen centred on the elderly comfort, we have imaged a trolley that will be used tocarry the meal and several other accessories. Comparing to other similar products already producedand sold we wanted to go further and provide a unique user experience.To reach this aim our product should satisfy several functions. They also guarantee that our productwill be accepted by the target group:• The trolley can carry food from one place to another• The trolley is ergonomic• The trolley is high enough to not have to bend and to simplify the placement of heavy plate on it• The trolley can support the weight and help the elderly person to move• The trolley looks simple, light and attractiveBased on these consideration we could start the design research and real size modelling.TROLLEYPreliminary design:We have spent several days to look for aninteresting concept that can satisfy all of ourcriteria’s.The first idea was to have a modular trolleythat can be used in two configurations: an upperlevel to fit the kitchen work desk, and a lowerlevel to be used as autonomous table. Aftermany trys and research that didn’t bring a solu-tion that fully satisfied us, we move to a simplerconcept in which only one level will be.Here you can see the first view of what thetrolley could look like. Despite being a firstprojection of our conclusion it already includefeature that will stay in the final design:• A height superior than classic trolley• A unique front storage element• Large wheels to pass everywhere• Handle place at an ergonomic height
  • 125Here you can see the first view of what the trolley could look like. Despite being a first projectionof our conclusion it already include feature that will stay in the final design:• A height superior than classic trolley• A unique front storage element• Large wheels to pass everywhere• Handle place at an ergonomic heightFinal design:We have early oriented our work on a tube based structure which holds the functional elements. Themain frame uses a circular steel tube bended to provide a rigid and aesthetic base. The wheels areconnected to it within two support pieces: one is placed in the tube and the other is melded withthe structure.The front support – melded – is drilled to let the wheel screw axis pass thought to be fix by a nutand the back support insert in the tube is threaded.
  • The storage shelf is made from fabric craft that is hold on the structure thanks to folds and pres-sure buttons. This type of fixation allow a quick and easy positioning. The storage can also be takenoff for washing individually (note: not used in the prototype, too costly).The salver is made from plastic and can be separate from the trolley. It makes the disposition ofplates and tools easier. It has two handles and the positioning is made directly by the tubes.126
  • In addition of the fabric storage, a quick and easy access box is placed behind the trolley and ishandily reachable. This box is also made from plastic melding. It shape is oriented to the back tomake things put inside stable. Also a special location from bottle is form at its bottom.The two handles are made from a rubber that provides grip and comfortable feeling.Fabrication:Contrary to the kitchen block, the trolley hasn’t been realised in the Arens factory. The tubularstructure was made by a supplier and the fabric storage by the students. The assembly have takenplace inside the University walls.127
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  • REF QT. NAME NOTES1 1 Tubular structure Steal2 1 Rack and shelfs Craft3 1 Slawer Plastic4 1 Back box Plastic5 2 Washer Aluminium/Steal6 2 HandleAngle >90° : ±1°Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:CREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013PROJECTTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYDESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SPRING 2013TITLESCALE 1:6SHEET 1 / 1A3Trolley Assembly
  • TubeTube59°AAa239750097,6822148151Rod Ø5mma2 a237552733520SECTION A-ASCALE 2 : 5a560°VDETAIL BSCALE 1 : 5
  • Tube 6Tube 3Tube 5Tube 6e 4e 1Tube 42DETAIL B375478a2a2a2a280°80°581ASupport front wheela2Steal tube Ø22x1,5Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:CREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013PROJECTTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYDESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SPRING 2013TITLESCALE 1:8SHEET 1 / 1A3Tubular structure
  • 375R3950440,4120°50R39Steal tube Ø22x1,5Internal bending radius 39mmTube 1A4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 1:5TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°Angle >90° : ±1° Finish Ra
  • 170°51,5120°141°151°701296,997,6Steal tube Ø22x1,5Internal bending radius 39mmTube 2A4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 1:5TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5° A4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 1:5TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°Angle >90° : ±1° Finish Ra
  • 51,5170°701141°151°97,6120°296,9Steal tube Ø22x1,5Internal bending radius 39mmTube 3A4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 1:5TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°
  • 9°5080°R39149808,8544,8BB143°2251,522COUPE B-BECHELLE 1 : 3Steal tube Ø22x1,5Internal bending radius 39mmTube 4A4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 1:6TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°
  • 9°5080°149R39544,8808,8CC143°2251,522COUPE C-CECHELLE 1 : 3Steal tube Ø22x1,5Internal bending radius 39mmTube 5A4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 1:6TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°
  • 2x 22375Steal tube Ø22x1,5Internal bending radius 39mmTube 6A4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 1:3TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°
  • 606020208Steal plate, thickness 3 to 5mmSupport Front WheelA4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 1:1TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°
  • M8*19225202 X 45°* Depending to the chosen wheel0.2 AAWasherA4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 3:1TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 20/5/2013LAST EDITION:UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°
  • 20015121597442018580°R4095742200*150*200*20,5 20,580°95225100°200B1B2B3A1A2A3 C3C1C2
  • 90200 4001010mm band oneach sideBxAx CxD3x SHELFFor The edges mark "D" fabric must be sew to itselfto pass the igid stick intoAll other edges must be sew to obtain a shelf.There are three shelf, A1 with A1, A2 with A2, etc...Pressure buttons are put all arroundAngle >90° : ±1°Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:CREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 20/05/2013PROJECTTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYDESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SPRING 2013TITLESCALE 1:5SHEET 1 / 1A3Patron shelf
  • PatronA4SHEET 1 / 1SCALE 1:5TITLESPRING 2013DESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGYTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYPROJECTCREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 20/05/2013UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°Angle >90° : ±1°
  • 3
  • 420210R4045°BBACCOUPE B-B
  • 365182,5205R3R170°20°DÉTAIL AECHELLE 1 : 1R5R15R10R5DÉTAIL CECHELLE 1 : 1Plastic tickness 5mmAngle >90° : ±1° Finish Ra3,2Dimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:CREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013PROJECTTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYDESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SPRING 2013TITLESCALE 1:3SHEET 1 / 1A3Salver
  • 200102°12°120B64R20R9R580COUPE A-A25604x R101030DÉTAIL BECHELLE 2 : 3
  • 2003502°115AA22Radius R=20mmPlastic tickhness 4mmDimension <50mm : ±0,1mmDimension 50 to 100mm : ±0,15mmDimension >100mm : ±0,2mmAngle <90° : ±0,5°UNLESS OTHERWISE SPECIFIED TOLERANCES:CREATION: 02/5/2013LAST EDITION: 13/05/2013PROJECTTROLLEY FOR ELDERLYDESIGN & ENGINEERING - TALLINN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY SPRING 2013TITLESCALE 1:3SHEET 1 / 1A3Back Box
  • THANK YOU!Mihkel ArensMartin PärnAivar HabakukkMarek KüünarpuuThe entire team of AS Arens MööbelJuhani SalovaaraHealth Centre and Hotel Benita in NiitväljaRannapere retirement home in ViimsiHenrik Herranen150Anthropology students from Tallinn University:Liis Laumets, Piret Pajula, Johan Erik Kopli