Monitoring Nepal
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Brief ppt presentation about the monitoring system developed for Search for Common Ground Nepal

Brief ppt presentation about the monitoring system developed for Search for Common Ground Nepal

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Monitoring Nepal Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Monitoring System of SFCG Nepal Stefano D’Errico, Shiva Dhungana, Yamuna Shrestha, Michael Shipler.
  • 2.
    • SFCG is currently running nine programs in Nepal; involving 42 staff in 17 districts across the country; producing 11 radio shows a week (expanding to 16 by October), some of which reach all 75 districts; having contracts with over 20 partner organizations, including NGOs, radio and TV production houses, FM stations that produce programs, and youth-led organizations.
    Why Should We Monitor?
  • 3. Why Should We Monitor? . Without a comprehensive monitoring system where all staff and partners actively participate, we’ll never gain a realistic sense of the field nor measure the effect of our programs.
  • 4. Why Should We Monitor?
    • Reasons for Monitoring
    • To know which direction we are going in;
    • To be accountable;
    • To have a clear picture of our impact and results;
    • To learn from the past; and
    • To know whether our programmes are sustainable.
  • 5. then… how to monitor?
  • 6. The Monitoring System of SFCG Nepal From the Project Start-Up to the Monitoring Cycle
  • 7. The Monitoring System of SFCG Nepal The Monitoring Cycle
    • The Three Steps of the Project Start-Up
    • When starting a project, three steps are fundamental in order to track its progress:
    • Developing a log frame and choosing smart indicators;
    • Conducting a baseline study on the basis of the chosen indicators; and
    • Developing the monitoring framework.
  • 8. The Monitoring System of SFCG Nepal The Monitoring Cycle Once the log frame is developed and the baseline survey is conducted, then the monitoring cycle starts. The monitoring cycle is a process where everybody is accountable for monitoring. It’s also an information flow from the field to Kathmandu, headquarters and donors. Thanks to the cycle, everybody is aware of our results and outputs and can easily gain a sense of the field.
  • 9. The Monitoring System of SFCG Nepal The Monitoring Cycle
    • The Five Steps of the Monitoring Cycle
    • Develop monitoring forms according to indicators;
    • Collect and process data into the database. Compare and analyze them against previous performances, evaluation and baseline surveys;
    • Develop the Monitoring Bulletin and create map of activities on a monthly basis. Update the documentation website with digital material on a monthly basis;
    • Analyze monitoring bulletin with directors and programme managers;
    • Disseminate monitoring findings to all staff, partners and donors.
  • 10. The Monitoring System of SFCG Nepal The Monitoring Cycle 2. COLLECT DATA 1. DEVELOP FORMS 3. UPDATE DATABASE, ANALYZE DATA, ELABORATE MAP OF PROGRAMMES 4. DEVELOP AND DISCUSS MONITORING BULLETIN 5. MONITORING REVIEW, DISSEMINATION OF DATA
  • 11. The Monitoring System of SFCG Nepal Who is Doing What in the Cycle 1. DEVELOP FORMS DM&E 2. DATA COLLECTION PROG. TEAMS FIELD STAFF PARTNERS 3. UPDATE DATABASE, DATA ANALYSIS DM&E 4. DM&E BULLETIN: DM&E RESULTS MEETING DM&E – PROGRAM PERSONS 5 SPREAD DATA TO: HEADQUARTERS FIELD STAFF PARTNERS DONORS
  • 12. The Three Monitoring Challenges of SFCG Nepal
  • 13. The Three Monitoring Challenges of SFCG Nepal
    • Creating SMART indicators
    • Designing a system to collect and store data
    • Making data accessible and useful
  • 14. Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators Planning Well Makes Monitoring Possible
  • 15. Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
    • Planning is the basis of monitoring. Every SFCG Nepal project is part of a broader strategy to change society. We have established four major strategic objectives, and have five core output and 20 core outcome indicators. Each of our nine projects has its own objectives and output/outcome indicators as well, all of which contribute to the overall strategic objectives. In order to plan our intervention and establish indicators we use a mix of methodologies, incorporating the four levels of conflict transformation into the analytical log frame.
  • 16.
    • Planning Well Makes Monitoring Possible: Tools for Planning
    • OBJECTIVE TREE - to set up objectives with our stakeholders and see whether the chain of outputs-outcomes-objectives is coherent.
    • ANALYTICAL LOG FRAME - to set up indicators and means of verification.
    • THE FOUR LEVELS OF CONFLICT TRANSFORMATION - to see whether our project is changing all levels of society.
    Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
  • 17. Creating Indicators Using the Four Levels of Conflict Transformation Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
  • 18.
    • In order to choose smart indicators strongly related to our objectives and scope of action, we look at the four levels of conflict transformation. These describe how peacebuilding acts at different levels in society: personal, relational, structural and cultural. Our country strategy aims to achieve results at all levels. Having decided our strategic and specific objectives on this basis, we proceed to create indicators.
    Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
  • 19. Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
    • The Four Levels of Conflict Transformation
    • The Personal Level
      • Enhancing personal capacities, attitudes and behaviors;
    • The Relational Level
      • Creating relationships among different groups in society;
    • The Structural Level
      • Creating opportunities and space for potential facilitators;
    • The Cultural Level
      • Overcoming stereotypes and cultural constraints that led to conflict.
  • 20.
    • The Four Levels of Conflict Transformation
    Cultural Structural Relational Personal Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
  • 21.
    • Personal
    • What has changed? How do we know if participants have developed skills and positive attitudes toward cooperation?
    • What has changed? How do we know if they are applying our methods to foster peace?
    • Relational
    • What has changed? How do we know whether we are building relationships across dividing lines?
    • What has changed? How do we know if our beneficiaries are working together to foster peace and reconciliation?
    Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators The Four Levels of Conflict Transformation: Questions to think about in developing indicators
  • 22. Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
    • Structural
    • What has changed? How do we know whether we are creating spaces for all cross-sectors of society?
    • What has changed? How do we know whether we are working with key sectors of society?
    • Cultural
    • What has changed? How do we know whether we are working to overcome stereotypes which led to conflict?
    • What has changed? How do we know whether we are dealing with cultural issues in a sustainable manner?
    The Four Levels of Conflict Transformation: Questions to think about in developing indicators
  • 23. Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators We have developed specific indicators as well as five core output and 20 core outcome indicators for all nine programs. In the following slides you can find some examples of our core outcome indicators. We are still in the process of discussing and finalizing them. Programme staff, directors, partners and the DM&E Team are all involved into this effort in order to find best ways to track our progress and improve our analytical capacities.
  • 24. Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
    • Some Examples of Indicators from SFCG Nepal
    • Personal Objective:
      • To increase ownership and local participation in the transition to peace and democracy.
    • Indicators:
      • Increase the % of people trained who demonstrate knowledge in peacebuilding;
      • Increase the % of people trained who incorporate our methods in their activities;
      • The # of peacebuilding initiatives that result from our programs.
  • 25.
    • Some Examples of Indicators from SFCG Nepal
    • Relational Objective:
    • To strengthen inter-communal relations across ethnic, caste, and geographical lines.
    • Indicators:
      • Increase the % of citizens in target VDCs who report cooperation from across dividing lines;
      • The # of initiatives resulting from our programmes led by people from across dividing lines;
      • The # of projects initiated by participants which aim to break down dividing lines.
    Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
  • 26. Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
    • Some Examples of Indicators from SFCG Nepal
    • Structural Objective:
    • To involve multiple stakeholders, particularly those who have been traditionally marginalized, in democratic processes at local and national levels.
    • Indicators :
      • Increase the % of youth participants who report meaningful participation in the community decision-making body;
      • The # of projects initiated by youth participants in dialogues focusing on breaking down dividing lines;
      • Increase the % of marginalized community members who participate meaningfully in local clubs and networks.
  • 27. Monitoring Challenges 1. Creating SMART Indicators
    • Some Examples of Indicators from Search Nepal
    • Cultural Objective:
    • To promote reconciliation/reweave the fabric of society that has been torn apart by war.
    • Indicators :
      • Amazing reconciliation stories which emerge from our programme;
      • The # of initiatives organized as a result of our programming which bring people together who were or are members of groups which clash.
      • The # of stories reported about former combatants came back in their community as a result of our programmes
  • 28. Monitoring Challenges 2. Designing a System to Collect and Store Data The Dynamic Database
  • 29. Monitoring Challenges 2. Designing a System to Collect and Store Data
    • The monitoring system can function properly only if everyone perceives monitoring as part of their regular task. It’s fundamental to insert DM&E duties in the TOR of all SFCG staff, from managers to field personnel. Finally, all data collected should be stored in an ordered and user-friendly database.
  • 30.
    • The database stores all programmatic and DM&E information. The first step we undertook was to develop DM&E forms to track outcomes and outputs. All forms were developed on the basis of information needed to track the progress of our indicators. We first designed the hard copy of each form, then we developed the software version with Microsoft Access.
    Monitoring Challenges 2. Designing a System to Collect and Store Data
  • 31.
    • Monitoring forms to track outputs:
      • Media Monitoring Matrix is a system to track the broadcasting and productions of our partners. It includes broadcasting dates and times, guests and topics;
      • PSA tracking forms;
      • Participant list for all our training/coaching, workshops and meetings;
      • Form for local activities - a form to track the kind of activities developed independently by our partners. It’s mainly focused on how they put into practice the Common Ground Approach.
    Monitoring Challenges 2. Designing a System to Collect and Store Data
  • 32.
    • Monitoring forms to track outcomes:
      • FGD forms related to our media productions;
      • Listenership survey forms;
      • Pre- and post-tests for training/coaching;
      • Anecdote forms to collect successful stories;
      • Mini-survey questionnaires for folk events;
      • Evaluations and Baseline surveys.
    Monitoring Challenges 2. Designing a System to Collect and Store Data
  • 33.
    • The Dynamic Database
    • The database is developed in Microsoft Access and consists of two main interfaces:
    • Entry data – contains all the information about our programmes. All DM&E forms and programmatic documents are stored here.
    • Reporting System – one of the main tool for our internal information flow. Here all staff can find information about programmes and disaggregate them according to our programmatic needs.
    Monitoring Challenges 2. Designing a System to Collect and Store Data
  • 34.
    • The Dynamic Database
    • The database is a dynamic tool which automatically generates the compilation of monitoring data, producing quantitative report in the reporting interface.
    • Report includes:
    • Media productions and broadcasting;
    • Number of activities undertaken;
    • Number of participants in training/coaching etc…
    • Activities run by partners as a result of our programmes
    • Survey figures
    Monitoring Challenges 2. Designing a System to Collect and Store Data REPORTING SYSTEM ENTRY DATA
  • 35. Monitoring Challenges 3. Making Data Accessible and Useful The Information Flow
  • 36.
    • Monitoring is pointless without a proper system of information flow. Once the information is received, the DM&E team analyze the data and update the database accordingly; produce a monitoring bulletin on a monthly basis and survey reports quarterly; and organize meetings with program managers, directors and partners to discuss results and spaces for improvement.
    Monitoring Challenges 3. Making Data Accessible and Useful
  • 37.
    • The Information Flow
    • Steps to ease the information flow:
      • Update the user-friendly database with analysis.
      • Produce the monitoring bulletin on monthly basis and survey reports quarterly.
      • Organize meetings with programme managers, directors and partners to discuss results and spaces for improvement.
    Monitoring Challenges 3. Making Data Accessible and Useful
  • 38.
    • The Dynamic Database
    • All analysis and disaggregated data developed according to programmatic needs will be available for all staff in the reporting system of the database.
    Download!!! Monitoring Challenges 3. Making Data Accessible and Useful REPORTING SYSTEM ENTRY DATA
  • 39.
    • Quantitative and qualitative information is constantly analyzed and reported by the DM&E team through the monitoring bulletin and survey reports, which are distributed to staff, donors partners and headquarters.
    Monitoring Challenges 3. Making Data Accessible and Useful
  • 40. Introduction The monitoring bulletin for the month of April 2009 consists of the information analysis received by the three partner organizations of the Pathways to Peace (P2P) Project. Civic Leadership School (CLS) Three CLS have been organized to date. A total of 72 participants took part in the training conducted in Pokhara and Borderlands in Sindhupalchowk. The CLS has been able to bring participants from diverse professions and occupations throughout Nepali society. The following figure shows the distribution of participants in three CLS according to their profession. Etc… The Monitoring Bulletin (Extract) Monitoring Challenges 3. Making Data Accessible and Useful
  • 41. Monitoring bulletins and DM&E reports are discussed in a joint session by directors, programme staff and the DM&E team. As a result of the joint meeting, binding decisions are taken to move forward. Monitoring Challenges 3. Making Data Accessible and Useful DM&E and Programme Meeting – Joint Session
  • 42. Planning and Monitoring Matter! Results of SFCG Nepal System
  • 43.
    • Thanks to this systematic approach, we were able to demonstrate our results, plan new interventions at all levels of Nepali society, and find spaces for improvement within our programmes.
    Planning and Monitoring Matter!
  • 44.
    • Results of SFCG Nepal
    • Thanks to this systematic approach we have been able to demonstrate that:
    • SFCG Nepal has created a broad network of almost 900 peacebuilders who are actively involved in fostering the peace process in the most conflict-affected areas of the country;
    • Our programmes are widely listened to and have sparked broad discussions around peace, inspiring good attitudes and behaviors;
    • The Dohori festivals played a major role in reintegrating children associated with armed forces and armed groups back into their communities, and were deeply appreciated by spectators.
    Planning and Monitoring Matter!
  • 45.
    • Spaces of Improvement for SFCG Nepal
    • We also found several spaces for improvement such as:
    • Nepali is not the language of preference in Eastern Nepal. As a result, we decided to broadcast the new soap in both Maithali and Nepali.
    • Peace festivals that incorporated both music and drama were much more powerful in delivering the message.
    • Listeners of our radio soap opera hardly absorbed the message about marginalized communities.
    Planning and Monitoring Matter!
  • 46.
    • In 2008-2009 monitoring data of our performance was inserted into all reports and proposals delivered to donors, together with a clear explanation of our country strategy. From January to June 2009 five out of five SFCG Nepal proposals were accepted for a total of US $1.4 million.
    Planning and Monitoring Matter!
  • 47. All feedback and suggestions to foster our programmatic approach based on results is more than welcome!