Energy Efficient Glazing – FG0005
AIA CES Master – Energy Efficient Glazing FG005


    PPG Industries Inc. is a Registered Provider with The
    American I...
Copyright Materials

This presentation is protected by US and International copyright
      laws. Reproduction, distributi...
Learning Objectives
By the end of this presentation, you will
 understand:

• How low-e coatings work
• The differences be...
Energy Efficient Glazing
                             Solar Energy Spectrum
Percent
Transmittance
             UV   VISIBL...
Energy Efficient Glazing
Energy Efficient Glazing
                   Benefits:
                    Low infrared heat gain
                    Hig...
Energy Efficient Glazing

  Types of Coated Glass
   Passive Low-E (pyrolytic, hard coat and MSVD , soft coat)
   Solar ...
Energy Efficient Glazing

        Passive Low-E: Pyrolytic Coating Process
Energy Efficient Glazing


                 The Float Glass Process
Energy Efficient Glazing
Passive Low-E: Pyrolytic Coating Process
 Pyrolytic Coating (Chemical Vapor Deposition)
    Che...
Energy Efficient Glazing
Passive Low-E: Pyrolytic Coating Process
 Pyrolytic Coating (Chemical Vapor Deposition)
    Har...
Energy Efficient Glazing

       Solar Control Low-E: MSVD Coating Process
Energy Efficient Glazing
Solar Control Low-E: MSVD Coating Process

 Magnetic Sputtered Vacuum Deposition (MSVD)
    Off...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Visible Light Transmittance (VLT)
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC)
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Light to Solar Gain (LSG) Ratio:
VLT ÷ SHGC = LSG
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Winter Nighttime U-Value
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Summer Daytime U-Value
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Energy Efficient Glazing
DOE Funded LBNL Glazing Study On
                Spectrally Selective Glazings
“A well-proven win...
Low-E Coatings Role in
     Energy Efficient Glazing
    “Spectrally Selective” vs. Moderate Glazing
Energy Efficient Glas...
Low-E Coatings Role in
        Energy Efficient Glazing
         “Spectrally Selective” vs. Moderate Glazing
Lawrence Berk...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

Energy Efficient Glass Formula
 Spectrally selective glass – VLT  SHGC ...
Spectrally Selective Tinted
                          Glazing
Percent                    Solar Energy Transmittance
Transm...
“Moderate” Bronze/Gray Glazing
Percent                        Solar Energy Transmittance
Transmittance
                UV ...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

Energy and Environmental Performance Criteria for Glazing

              ...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

 Energy and Environmental Performance Criteria
                  Glass Ty...
Low-E Coatings Role in
        Energy Efficient Glazing
Energy and Environmental Performance
 Cradle to Cradle Certificat...
Industry Background

   In commercial buildings, up to 30% of electricity is used for interior
       lighting.
          ...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

• Most buildings in the country are not clad with the most efficient
glas...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

• If all existing buildings and new construction were to use the latest
 ...
Low-E Coatings Role in
         Energy Efficient Glazing
Daylighting and Energy Savings
  Performance glazings can signif...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

 Natural light has been shown to be psychologically beneficial, the
more...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Energy and Environmental Performance

   Energy Modeling
      Real Worl...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Energy and Environmental Performance

   Energy Modeling
      Two Major...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing


 Six Glazing Types

       New, Triple-Silver MSVD Solar Control Low-E
...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

 270,000 square-foot, eight-story   200,000 square-foot, one-story
      ...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing



  Office HVAC equipment    School HVAC equipment
  • VAV               ...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing



  Office internal peak loads   School internal peak loads
  • Square ft...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

   The Variables
  •   Total Electric Consumption (kWh)
  •   Total Natur...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
  •   Atlanta          Houston          Mexico City
  •   Boston        ...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

The Simulation Model
•   DOE 2.2
     – Calculates hour-by-hour energy co...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

The Simulation Model
 •   DOE 2.2 energy simulations were developed for e...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

The Simulation Model

 •   Calculating HVAC capital cooling costs
      –...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing

The Simulation Model
 •   Calculating carbon emissions
      – Derived us...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Energy and Environmental Performance

 Triple-Silver Coated MSVD vs. Dual...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Energy and Environmental Performance

 Double-Silver Coated Tinted MSVD v...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Energy and Environmental Performance: CO2 reductions
 Triple-Silver Coate...
Low-E Coatings Role in
Energy Efficient Glazing
Energy and Environmental Performance: CO2 reductions
 Double-Silver Tinte...
Low-E Coatings Role in
              Energy Efficient Glazing
                       2nd vs. 3rd Surface

“The general rec...
Low-E Coatings Role in
         Energy Efficient Glazing
                 2nd vs. 3rd Surface

 Coatings can be applied t...
Learning Objectives
This concludes the continuing education portion of the course.
Here is a quick review of the learning ...
Thank You


PPG is an industry leader in manufacturing architectural glass, metal coatings
and paint and was the first to ...
Close/Conclusion


  This concludes The American Institute of Architects Continuing
                   Education Systems P...
PPG Industries
• PPG is a global supplier of paints, coatings,
  optical products, specialty materials, glass and
  fiber ...
Products
Glass
    – Worlds Leader in Production of Commercial, Military and
      General Aviation Glass
Fiberglass
    –...
PPG Low-E and
Solar Control Low-E Glasses


   Triple-Silver MSVD Coated
         Solarban® 70XL Solar Control Low-E Gla...
PPG Low-E and
Solar Control Low-E Glasses



 Double-Silver MSVD Coated
        Solarban® 60 Solar Control Low-E Glasses...
PPG Low-E and
Solar Control Low-E Glasses

 Double-Silver MSVD Coated
          Solarban® 80 Solar Control Low-E Glasses...
PPG Low-E and
Solar Control Low-E Glasses


   Pyrolitic Low-E Glass (Passive Low-E)
               Sungate® 500 Passive...
PPG Low-E and
Solar Control Low-E Glasses

  Spectrally Selective Tinted Glasses
             Oceans of Color™ Spectrall...
PPG Low-E and
Solar Control Low-E Glasses



    PPG High-Performance Tinted Glass
        PPG Performance Tinted
      ...
The Right Information, Right Away
• Technical & Product Hotline: 888-PPG-IDEA (774-4332)
• Direct technical support
• Sour...
The Right Information, Right Away
•   All PPG architectural products
•   MSDS sheets and technical data
•   Download produ...
 A portfolio of proven products to help architects achieve sustainable design
goals.

 •   Solarban® Solar Control Low-E ...
Environmental Leadership
PPG is committed to environmental sustainability
 Our glass and coatings are used in the product...
FG0005 Energy Efficient Glazings HSW SD
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• How low-e coatings work• The differences between “passive” and “solar control” low-e coatings• How the energy, environmental and economic benefits of low-e glass have been quantified• The energy impact of various low-e coated glass through simulation modeling

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FG0005 Energy Efficient Glazings HSW SD

  1. 1. Energy Efficient Glazing – FG0005
  2. 2. AIA CES Master – Energy Efficient Glazing FG005 PPG Industries Inc. is a Registered Provider with The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems. Credit earned on completion of this program will be reported to CES Records for AIA members. Certificate of Completion for non-AIA members are available on request. This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.
  3. 3. Copyright Materials This presentation is protected by US and International copyright laws. Reproduction, distribution, display and use of the presentation without written permission of the speaker is prohibited. PPG Industries Inc. 2008
  4. 4. Learning Objectives By the end of this presentation, you will understand: • How low-e coatings work • The differences between “passive” and “solar control” low-e coatings • How the energy, environmental and economic benefits of low-e glass have been quantified • The energy impact of various low-e coated glass through simulation modeling
  5. 5. Energy Efficient Glazing Solar Energy Spectrum Percent Transmittance UV VISIBLE IR 100 90 Spectral distribution of solar energy 80 at the surface of the Earth 70 60 50 40 30 20 Infrared UV 10 Visible 53% 3% 44% 0 300 500 700 900 1100 1300 1500 1700 1900 2100 Wavelength (NM)
  6. 6. Energy Efficient Glazing
  7. 7. Energy Efficient Glazing Benefits:  Low infrared heat gain  High visible natural light transmittance  Less artificial lighting  Reduction of long wave heat gain/loss  Increased comfort/productivity Results:  Overall reduction in energy usage
  8. 8. Energy Efficient Glazing Types of Coated Glass  Passive Low-E (pyrolytic, hard coat and MSVD , soft coat)  Solar Control Low-E (mostly MSVD, soft coat)  Non Low-E Glass (coated for tints or reflectivity)
  9. 9. Energy Efficient Glazing Passive Low-E: Pyrolytic Coating Process
  10. 10. Energy Efficient Glazing The Float Glass Process
  11. 11. Energy Efficient Glazing Passive Low-E: Pyrolytic Coating Process  Pyrolytic Coating (Chemical Vapor Deposition)  Chemically applied or sprayed on hot glass during manufacturing process (on-line process)  Creates strong thermal bond
  12. 12. Energy Efficient Glazing Passive Low-E: Pyrolytic Coating Process  Pyrolytic Coating (Chemical Vapor Deposition)  Hard coat  Very durable  Withstands processing  Long shelf life prior to fabrication
  13. 13. Energy Efficient Glazing Solar Control Low-E: MSVD Coating Process
  14. 14. Energy Efficient Glazing Solar Control Low-E: MSVD Coating Process  Magnetic Sputtered Vacuum Deposition (MSVD)  Off-line coating process  Coating applied at room temperature  Most solar control low-e glasses are “soft coat”  Must be sealed in IG or laminated unit  Superior solar control performance
  15. 15. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Visible Light Transmittance (VLT)
  16. 16. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC)
  17. 17. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Light to Solar Gain (LSG) Ratio: VLT ÷ SHGC = LSG
  18. 18. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Winter Nighttime U-Value
  19. 19. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Summer Daytime U-Value
  20. 20. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing
  21. 21. Energy Efficient Glazing DOE Funded LBNL Glazing Study On Spectrally Selective Glazings “A well-proven window technology to reduce energy costs while enhancing daylight and view.”
  22. 22. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing “Spectrally Selective” vs. Moderate Glazing Energy Efficient Glass Formula “Spectrally Selective” = (LSG > 1.25) = Recommended “Moderate” = (LSG < 1.25) = Not Recommended
  23. 23. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing “Spectrally Selective” vs. Moderate Glazing Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories (LBNL) Glass is Spectrally Selective when: VLT  SHGC = Light to Solar Gain (LSG) > 1.25 Examples (Spectrally Selective Glass)  Triple-Silver Coated MSVD Coated Glass 64% (VLT) ÷ 0.27 (SHGC) = 2.37 (LSG)  Double-Silver Coated MSVD Glass 70% (VLT) ÷ 0.38 (SHGC) = 1.84 (LSG)  Spectrally Selective Tinted Glass 60% (VLT) ÷ 0.40 (SHGC) = 1.50 (LSG) Examples (Non-Spectrally Selective Glass)  Pyrolytic Low-E (Passive Low-E) Coated Glass 74% (VLT) ÷ 0.62 (SHGC) = 1.19 (LSG)
  24. 24. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy Efficient Glass Formula  Spectrally selective glass – VLT  SHGC  1.25 LSG  Greatest amount of natural light transmission  Solar heat gain limited  Less need for daytime electrical lighting, saving energy Percent Transmittance UV VISIBLE IR 100 90 80 Spectral distribution of solar energy at the surface of the Earth 70 Solar Energy 60 Spectrum 50 40 30 20 INFRARED UV VISIBLE 53% 3% 10 44% 0 300 500 700 900 1100 1300 1500 1700 1900 2100 Wavelength (NM)
  25. 25. Spectrally Selective Tinted Glazing Percent Solar Energy Transmittance Transmittance UV VISIBLE IR 100 90 80 70 Ideal Glass 60 50 Blue/Green 40 Light Green Emerald Green 30 20 Aqua Blue/Aqua Green 10 0 300 500 700 900 1100 1300 1500 1700 1900 2100 Wavelength (NM)
  26. 26. “Moderate” Bronze/Gray Glazing Percent Solar Energy Transmittance Transmittance UV VISIBLE IR 100 90 80 Ideal 70 Bronze 60 Gray 50 Dark Gray 40 Medium Gray 30 20 Darker Gray 10 0 300 500 700 900 1100 1300 1500 1700 1900 2100 Wavelength (NM)
  27. 27. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy and Environmental Performance Criteria for Glazing Glass Winter VLT SHGC LSG Ratio U-Value Pyrolytic Low-E on Coated 0.35 74% 0.62 1.19 Clear (Passive Low-E) MSVD Double- Silver 0.29 70% 0.38 1.84 Coated (Solar Control Low-E) MSVD Triple-Silver Coated 0.28 64% 0.27 2.37 (Next-Gen Solar Control Low-E) Spectrally Selective Tinted 0.47 69% 0.49 1.41 Glass
  28. 28. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy and Environmental Performance Criteria Glass Type Winter VLT SHGC LSG U-Value Uncoated Glasses Clear Glass 0.47 79% 0.70 1.13 Ultra-Clear Glass (Low-iron glass) 0.47 84% 0.82 1.02 Blue/Green (Spectrally Selective) Tinted 0.47 69% 0.49 1.41 Glass Coated Glasses Pyrolytic Low-E (Passive Low-E) Glass 0.35 74% 0.62 1.19 Triple Silver Solar Control Low-E 0.28 64% 0.27 2.37 Tinted Solar Control Low-E 0.29 51% 0.31 1.64 Subtly Reflective Tinted 0.47 47% 0.34 1.39 Blue/Green Reflective Tinted 0.48 27% 0.31 0.87
  29. 29. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy and Environmental Performance  Cradle to Cradle Certification, MBDC  The U.S. Green Building Council  Promote energy efficiency and sustainable design  LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) program  LEED credits influenced by glass selection  Energy and Atmosphere (Energy Savings)  Materials and Resources (Recyclability)  Indoor Environmental Quality (Daylighting)  Cradle to Cradle™ Certification
  30. 30. Industry Background In commercial buildings, up to 30% of electricity is used for interior lighting. Estimated Electricity Usage in Commercial Buildings HVAC Interior Light Office Equipment Exterior Light Water Refrigeration & Cooking Misc. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Percentage of Electricity Used
  31. 31. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing
  32. 32. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing • Most buildings in the country are not clad with the most efficient glass available. • There are approximately 77.2 billion square feet of built environment in the U.S. • This figure is expected to climb by another 7 billion square feet (an additional 536,000 buildings) in the next five years. • If this new development incorporates the most efficient glass technology available, significant upfront and long-term savings will result.
  33. 33. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing • If all existing buildings and new construction were to use the latest glazing advancement – triple-silver Low-E glass – 2,134 trillion BTU’s would be saved annually. – This is 2% of the total US energy consumption per year. – This would save $38 Billion (gas and electric) per year. – CO2 emissions would be reduced by 123 million tons/year. While that is the best-case scenario, the impact triple-silver Low-E glass can have on energy consumption, economic savings and the environment is vast.
  34. 34. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Daylighting and Energy Savings  Performance glazings can significantly affect the heating, lighting, and cooling costs of a building Average savings 44% Average savings 52% $200 per employee $68 per employee
  35. 35. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing  Natural light has been shown to be psychologically beneficial, the more light, the better  Recent studies link natural light with improved work environments and increased productivity Average savings 5.5% $2,475 per employee
  36. 36. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy and Environmental Performance  Energy Modeling  Real World Energy Savings  Real World Equipment Savings  Real World CO2 Emissions  Energy Simulations  DOE 2.2 Building Energy Analysis Simulation  Developed by Lawrence Berkeley and Los Alamos National Labs  Hour-by-Hour Energy Consumption for One Year (8,760 hours)
  37. 37. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy and Environmental Performance  Energy Modeling  Two Major Building Types  Single-Story Middle School  Eight-Story Office Building  12 North American Cities  Five High-Performance Glazing Types  Window Walls or Punch Windows
  38. 38. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Six Glazing Types  New, Triple-Silver MSVD Solar Control Low-E  Two, Double-Silver MSVD Solar Control Low-E  One, Pyrolytic Passive Low-E  One, (standard) Dual-Pane, Spectrally Selective Tint
  39. 39. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing 270,000 square-foot, eight-story 200,000 square-foot, one-story office building school Punched window Punched window Total window area: 33,418 ft2 Total window area:18,863 ft2 Total wall area: 56,640 ft2 Total wall area: 63,520 ft2 Window to wall ratio: 59% glass Window to wall ratio: 30% glass Window wall Window wall Total window area: 50,976 ft2 Total window area: 45,027 ft2 Total wall area: 56,640 ft2 Total wall area: 63,520 ft2 Window to wall ratio: 90% glass Window to wall ratio: 71% glass
  40. 40. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Office HVAC equipment School HVAC equipment • VAV • Packaged VAV • Centrifugal chiller • DX coils • Hot water boilers • Hot water heating • Gas water heater
  41. 41. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Office internal peak loads School internal peak loads • Square ft/occupant: 448 • Square ft/occupant: 123 • Lighting: W/sq.ft.: 1.3 • Lighting: W/sq.ft.: 1.1 • Equipment: W/sq.ft: 0.75 • Equipment: W/sq.ft: 0.45
  42. 42. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing The Variables • Total Electric Consumption (kWh) • Total Natural Gas Consumption (therms) • Peak Cooling Load (tons) • Peak Heating Loads (kBtu/hr) • Total Supply Airflow (cfm) • Total Electric Cost ($) • Total Natural Gas Cost ($) • Total Building Energy Consumption Cost ($) • Cooling Equipment Capital Cost ($) • HVAC Equipment Capital Cost ($) • Total Cooling HVAC Capital Cost ($)
  43. 43. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing • Atlanta  Houston  Mexico City • Boston  Los Angeles  Ottawa • Chicago  St. Louis  Philadelphia • Denver  Seattle  Phoenix
  44. 44. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing The Simulation Model • DOE 2.2 – Calculates hour-by-hour energy consumption of the prototype facility over an entire year (8,760 hours) – Uses hourly climate data for any location – Detailed input provides accurate simulation of building features such as shading, fenestration, interior building mass, envelope building mass, and dynamic response of heating and air conditioning systems.
  45. 45. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing The Simulation Model • DOE 2.2 energy simulations were developed for each glazing scenario according to their unique characteristics • The model ran a simulation for both building types, in all 12 locations, and for both architectural scenarios (punched windows and window walls) • The model calculated the effect of each glazing based on the following: – Building loads – Cooling equipment size – Building energy costs – HVAC Cooling costs • based on cooling size in tons and total air supply flow into the building
  46. 46. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing The Simulation Model • Calculating HVAC capital cooling costs – Calculations were based on peak cooling loads, in tons, for total air supply into the building. – Cooling costs were estimated at $1,200 per ton. – HVAC equipment costs were estimated at $3.50 per cfm airflow. • Utility rate calculations – Utility companies for each of the 12 cities provided the latest rate tariffs for electricity and natural gas.
  47. 47. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing The Simulation Model • Calculating carbon emissions – Derived using Carbon Dioxide Emissions for the Generation of Electric Power in the United States, a report published in 2000 by the U.S. Department of Energy. *Estimates were used to simplify the model and meta calculations.
  48. 48. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy and Environmental Performance  Triple-Silver Coated MSVD vs. Dual Pane-Tinted Glass City Annual HVAC Operating Annual Total HVAC Equipment Costs Immediate 1st Year Expenses Savings Equipment Savings Savings Dual-Pane Triple Silver Dual-Pane Triple Silver Tinted Tinted Atlanta $680,456 $597,772 $82,684 $2,115,464 $1,697,686 $417,597 $500,281 Boston $853,450 $756,001 $97,539 $2,326,967 $1,928,086 $398,881 $496,420 Based on eight-story glass-walled office building Total Glass Area: 50,967 ft2 Total Floor Area: 270,000 ft2
  49. 49. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy and Environmental Performance  Double-Silver Coated Tinted MSVD vs. Dual Pane-Tinted Glass City Annual HVAC Operating Annual Total HVAC Equipment Costs Immediate 1st Year Expenses Savings Equipment Savings Savings Dual-Pane Triple Dual-Pane Triple Silver Tinted Silver Tinted Atlanta $681,456 $610,900 $70,556 $2,115,464 $1,772,350 $343,114 $413,680 Boston $853,540 $770,241 $83,299 $2,326,967 $2,003,328 $323,639 $406,938 Based on eight-story glass-walled office building Total Glass Area: 50,967 ft2 Total Floor Area: 270,000 ft2
  50. 50. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy and Environmental Performance: CO2 reductions  Triple-Silver Coated MSVD vs. Dual Pane-Tinted Glass City Electricity Gas Annual CO2 40-Year CO2 Acres of Pine (KwH Savings) (Therm Reductions Reductions Forest Preserved Savings) (Tons) (Tons) Atlanta 455,841 18,829 417 16,699 124 Boston 432,301 26,618 354 14,163 105 Chicago 434,777 29,644 502 20,087 149 Houston 473,971 14,199 422 16,889 126 Phoenix 469,246 6,170 411 16,451 122 Seattle 328,567 29,588 250 10,018 74 Based on eight-story glass-walled office building Total Glass Area: 50,967 ft2 Total Floor Area: 270,000 ft2
  51. 51. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing Energy and Environmental Performance: CO2 reductions  Double-Silver Tinted MSVD vs. Dual Pane-Tinted Glass City Electricity Gas Annual CO2 40-Year CO2 Acres of Pine (KwH Savings) (Therm Reductions Reductions Forest Preserved Savings) (Tons) (Tons) Atlanta 377,043 17,176 353 14,138 105 Boston 356,143 24,455 306 12,220 91 Chicago 360,903 27,073 431 17,227 128 Houston 390,425 12,516 352 14,093 105 Phoenix 387,284 5,708 343 13,713 102 Seattle 271,799 26,627 219 8,670 64 Based on eight-story glass-walled office building Total Glass Area: 50,967 ft2 Total Floor Area: 270,000 ft2
  52. 52. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing 2nd vs. 3rd Surface “The general recommendation from the glass industry for commercial buildings is to leave the choice (coating on either #2 or #3 surface) to the glass manufacturer.” (Source: MasterSpec Evaluation Section, Coated Glass.) “For most commercial buildings, regardless of climate, in which the primary concern is reducing the solar heat gain, the location (coated surface) is of less concern, and placing it on either the second or third surface should remain an option.”
  53. 53. Low-E Coatings Role in Energy Efficient Glazing 2nd vs. 3rd Surface  Coatings can be applied to the #2 or #3 surface of an insulating glass unit (IGU)  Having the flexibility to coat either the #2 or # 3 surface of an IGU allows for more competitive pricing without dramatically impacting its solar control performance  In some cases, (such as a tinted outdoor lite and a clear indoor lite) applying coatings to the #3 surface instead of the #2 surface permits accelerated product delivery
  54. 54. Learning Objectives This concludes the continuing education portion of the course. Here is a quick review of the learning objectives. • How low-e coatings work • The differences between “passive” and “solar control” low-e coatings • How the energy, environmental and economic benefits of low-e glass are quantified • The energy impact of various low-e coated glass through simulation modeling
  55. 55. Thank You PPG is an industry leader in manufacturing architectural glass, metal coatings and paint and was the first to provide triple-silver MSVD solar-control Low-E glass. For more information on the study and its results you can contact PPG by visiting www.ppgideascapes.com or by calling 1-888-ppg-idea (774-4332).
  56. 56. Close/Conclusion This concludes The American Institute of Architects Continuing Education Systems Program Questions? Thank you for your time.
  57. 57. PPG Industries • PPG is a global supplier of paints, coatings, optical products, specialty materials, glass and fiber glass • PPG has manufacturing facilities in 23 countries. The company has operations and equity affiliates in more than 60 countries • PPG generated revenues of $11.2 billion and invested more than $330 million in research & development Australia • Argentina • Belgium • Brazil • Canada • China • England • France • Germany Ireland • Italy • Japan • Mexico • Netherlands • Philippines • South Korea • Spain Taiwan • Thailand • Turkey • United States • Venezuela
  58. 58. Products Glass – Worlds Leader in Production of Commercial, Military and General Aviation Glass Fiberglass – Electronic Circuit Boards, Recreational Boat Hulls, Tub and Shower Units. Chemicals – Pharmaceutical, Agricultural, Plastics, Water Purification, Pulp/paper Manufacturing, Oil Drilling, Aluminum Production Plastic Photo Chromic Lenses – Transitions Transportation Coatings – World’s Number 1 Producer of Transportation Coatings. – Two of Every Three New Cars on the Road Today in North America Contain PPG Coatings Industrial Coatings – Agricultural and Construction Equipment, Automotive Parts and Accessories, Appliance, Coil, Aluminum Extrusion, Wood Flooring, Recreation and Others Packaging Coatings – Beverage Can Linings, Packaging Inks
  59. 59. PPG Low-E and Solar Control Low-E Glasses  Triple-Silver MSVD Coated  Solarban® 70XL Solar Control Low-E Glass  Next-generation Solar Control Low-E Glass  Clear glass appearance  Can be combined with tints for enhanced performance  2006 Architectural Record “Green Product of the Year”  Shades of Green Award, Green Building Alliance  LSG of 2.37, highest in the industry All PPG glasses are Cradle to Cradle Certified
  60. 60. PPG Low-E and Solar Control Low-E Glasses Double-Silver MSVD Coated  Solarban® 60 Solar Control Low-E Glasses  Clear glass appearance  Can be combined with tints for enhanced performance  LSG ratio of 1.84 combined with clear glass in a 1” IGU All PPG glasses are Cradle to Cradle Certified
  61. 61. PPG Low-E and Solar Control Low-E Glasses Double-Silver MSVD Coated  Solarban® 80 Solar Control Low-E Glasses  Steel jade exterior appearance  LSG ratio of 1.96 combined with clear glass in a 1” IGU  Can be combined with Optiblue glass  Solarban® z50 Solar Control Low-E Glasses  Variety of tints: steel blue-gray to aqua blue  LSG ratios of up to 1.64  30% better performance than competitive products  Low interior reflectance  Clear, natural outdoor views Optiblue glass is available only with select Solarban products through PPG Certified Fabricators. All PPG glasses are Cradle to Cradle Certified
  62. 62. PPG Low-E and Solar Control Low-E Glasses Pyrolitic Low-E Glass (Passive Low-E)  Sungate® 500 Passive Low-E Glass  Clear glass appearance  Almost two decades of proven performance  More than 200 million square feet shipped in last decade  LSG of 1.19 with clear glass in a 1” IGU*  Can be combined with tints for LSG ratios of up to 1.66 * Without tints, this glass does not meet the U.S. DOE criteria for spectrally selectivity All PPG glasses are Cradle to Cradle Certified
  63. 63. PPG Low-E and Solar Control Low-E Glasses Spectrally Selective Tinted Glasses  Oceans of Color™ Spectrally Selective Glass  Atlantica™ Glass (1.50 LSG ratio)  Azuria™ Glass (1.56 LSG ratio)  Caribia® Glass (1.55 LSG ratio)  Solexia™ Glass (1.41 LSG ratio)  Vistacool® Subtly Reflective, Color-Enriched Glasses  Vistacool Azuria (1.61 LSG ratio)  Vistacool Caribia (1.66 LSG ratio)  Vistacool Solargray (1.13 LSG ratio)* * This glass does not meet the U.S. DOE criteria for spectrally selectivity All PPG glasses are Cradle to Cradle Certified
  64. 64. PPG Low-E and Solar Control Low-E Glasses PPG High-Performance Tinted Glass  PPG Performance Tinted  Optigray® 23 Glass  Graylite® Glass  Solarbronze® Glass  Solargray ® Glass  Solarcool ® Reflective Tinted Glasses All PPG glasses are Cradle to Cradle Certified
  65. 65. The Right Information, Right Away • Technical & Product Hotline: 888-PPG-IDEA (774-4332) • Direct technical support • Sourcing Assistance  PPG’s reliable network of applicators, contractors and certified fabricators
  66. 66. The Right Information, Right Away • All PPG architectural products • MSDS sheets and technical data • Download product literature • Order samples 24/7 • Order literature 24/7 • Read case studies • Visit photo galleries
  67. 67.  A portfolio of proven products to help architects achieve sustainable design goals. • Solarban® Solar Control Low-E Glasses • Sungate® Passive Low-E Glass • Starphire® Highly-Transmittive Glass • Oceans of Color™ Spectrally Selective Tinted Glasses • Vistacool® Subtly Reflective Color Enriched Glass • Duranar® Fluoropolymer Coatings • Duranar® ULTRA-Cool® Fluoropolymer Coatings • Duranar® VARI-CoolTM Fluoropolymer Coatings • Superl® II ULTRA-Cool® Siliconized Polyester Coatings • Pittsburgh® Paints Zero-VOC Pure Performance Paint • Speedhide®, Manor Hall® & Porter® Paints • MegaSeal® Flooring Systems
  68. 68. Environmental Leadership PPG is committed to environmental sustainability  Our glass and coatings are used in the production of wind and solar power, and we do extensive research and development to make these technologies more commercially viable  PPG helped automakers eliminate lead from primer coatings, purge chrome from rinses, cut VOC emissions, stifle the corrosion of metal, and save energy by lowering curing temperatures for automotive paints and coatings.  We actively manage our own manufacturing processes to improve air quality, and reduce water and energy consumption  Corporate Goals:  Reduce energy use by 25% by 2016  Reduce green house gas emissions by 10%

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