Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Cameron's introduction to secondary school
Cameron's introduction to secondary school
Cameron's introduction to secondary school
Cameron's introduction to secondary school
Cameron's introduction to secondary school
Cameron's introduction to secondary school
Cameron's introduction to secondary school
Cameron's introduction to secondary school
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Cameron's introduction to secondary school

53

Published on

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
53
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. A wee bit about me. • My name is Cameron and I'm just about to go into S1 from Strath of Appin Primary • I'm from Glasgow originally but have lived in Appin for 4 years now. • I live with my parents, brother Max and our two cats - Lucy and one eyed, deaf Betty. • I love all sports but especially football.
  • 2. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Some of you might already know me but for those who don't, I have a condition called Osteogenesis Imperfecta (which sounds a bit fancy!) but it means I have brittle bones so spend a lot of time like this! I've had in the region of 100 bone breaks since I was born. It also means that I'm really small for my age but don't worry, I make up for that :)
  • 3. Why a presentation about me? I'm not different or any more special than anyone else so why are you watching a slideshow about me? Having OI means that I break bones a lot and have to use a wheelchair to get around. It also means that I need a little bit more help than most people. And it means that there's a few things you'll have to be a bit careful about around me. Sometimes people feel a bit awkward around someone in a wheelchair. They don't know if it's rude to ask questions about why they use the chair or they don't know if I'm going to be just like them, like the same things and do the same things. Of course, I'm just the same as you and like all the same things (unless that's tomatoes and a certain football team) and I'm more than happy for you to ask me questions. Just incase, though, I'll try to answer some of them here.
  • 4. What is OI? • OI isn't an illness and isn't something you can "catch". • The main symptoms of OI are breaking bones easily, sometimes even without trauma or something causing the break. • There are lots of different types of OI but I have a severe type which means that as well as breaking bones, it affects my muscles, joints, ligaments, teeth and makes me bruise like a peach! • It also means that sometimes I can get tired and suffer pain.
  • 5. What does it mean for me at school? • Having OI means that I have to be careful in school, especially as it's so busy. • I'll have to leave classes a minute or two after everyone else, just so I don't get crushed in the crowds. • I'll do the same as everyone else but sometimes will just have to do it a little bit differently. • In some classes I might have to use a computer or tablet as my brain works faster than I can write! • I'll have someone to help me get around school/transfer out of my wheelchair/reach things I can't quite reach!
  • 6. Could you do me a favour? I hope you don't mind if sometimes I ask you to help me. Maybe move some chairs out of the way or fetch something that is out of my reach or difficult for me to get to. I'll join in with the same things as everyone else and enjoy breaktimes etc but could I just ask you to be a little bit careful around me. Heavy swinging bags could break my arm, as could a person falling into me. I'd be grateful if you could allow a bit of extra room around me to manouevre my wheelchair. It'll make things easier for me and save you having your toes run over by a 100kg chair! The most important thing to ask you is to please not pull, push, grab or twist my limbs as that'll definitely mean a trip to A&E!
  • 7. The really important stuff I hate breaking bones but it's something that does and will happen to me. Hopefully it won't happen in school but chances are.... If I do break something this is what to do: • Please don't in any cicumstances touch me, move me or try to see where the break is. Even if you know first aid. • Fetch a member of staff straight away. • Don't crowd around me. Just one or two people will be enough to keep me company until help arrives. • Listen to me and what I'd like you to do to help me.
  • 8. Thank you Thank you for taking a few minutes to watch my slideshow. I know I'm prone to breaking my bones but please don't worry about spending time with me incase you "cause" a break. Breaks happen to me all the time, sometimes when I'm sitting doing nothing so I'm not going to blame anyone if I hurt myself. I'd much rather have fun, take part in everything that I can and spend time with people and maybe have the odd broken bone than being sat alone because people are worried they might hurt me.

×