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Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
Agile Teaching with Technology
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Agile Teaching with Technology

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Guest presentation given for a graduate course on technology and assessment at Hamline University

Guest presentation given for a graduate course on technology and assessment at Hamline University

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  • “Drew & Katie” by TheNickster
  • “nose slide” by B.A.D.
  • Now’s a good time to talk about distribution options. At some schools, students purchase clickers at the bookstore like textbooks and use them for multiple courses. In these cases, students typically register their clicker through a course management system like Blackboard or WebCT. Instructors can then download that registration info so they can link clicker responses with students for grading purposes.At other schools, departments or schools purchase sets of clickers that instructors borrow on a per-class or per-semester basis. Students pick up clickers on the way into class and return them at the end of class. In these cases, students can be instructed to pick up the same clicker each time, allowing instructors to link clicker responses with students for grading purposes.
  • For example, Philippa Levine uses opinion questions to learn about the students in her course, “The Evolution Debates,” at the University of Southern California. Given the topic of the course, she sometimes finds it surprisingly easy to say something that seems harmless to her but off-putting to some of her students. By knowing where her students stand on sensitive topics, she is better able to avoid this. The question in Example 4.14, for instance, provides her with insight into her students’ religious beliefs. She finds that her students think it important that an instructor respect the beliefs of students. By asking questions such as this, she is demonstrating that respect, and her students respond positively. The ability to answer anonymously is an important ingredient here.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Agile Teaching with Technology: Clickers, Blogs, and More<br />Derek Bruff<br />Asst. Director, Center for Teaching<br />Sr. Lecturer, Mathematics<br />Vanderbilt University<br />
    • 2.
    • 3.
    • 4. An Example – Clickers &Agile Teaching<br />
    • 5. Your sister-in-law calls to say that she's having twins.Which of the following is more likely?(Assume that she’s not having identical twins.)<br />Twin boys<br />Twin girls<br />One boy and one girl<br />All are equally likely<br />0 of 5<br />
    • 6. Peer Instruction<br />
    • 7. Your sister-in-law calls to say that she's having twins.Which of the following is more likely?(Assume that she’s not having identical twins.)<br />
    • 8. Your sister-in-law calls to say that she's having twins.Which of the following is more likely?(Assume that she’s not having identical twins.)<br />
    • 9. Formative Assessment &Agile Teaching<br />
    • 10. Formative Assessment<br />
    • 11.
    • 12.
    • 13.
    • 14. Agile Teaching<br />
    • 15. Which of the following (would) make agile teaching with clickers challenging for you? Mark all that apply.<br />It’s too chaotic. I prefer to have my lessons well planned.<br />I worry I won’t have time to cover what I need to.<br />My students would prefer to take notes and figure things out later.<br />I worry I’ll find out my great explanations aren’t so great.<br />None of the above. I  agile teaching.<br />0 of 5<br />
    • 16. Teaching with Clickers<br />
    • 17. A Few Clicker Vendors<br />Turning Technologies<br />i>clicker<br />Qwizdom<br />InterWrite PRS<br />eInstruction<br />
    • 18. Next Generation Clickers<br />Cell Phones as ClickersExample – Poll Everywhere(www.polleverywhere.com) <br />
    • 19. Next Generation Clickers<br />Smart Phones as Clickers<br />Example – ACU’s iPhone Initiative (www.acu.edu/connected)<br />
    • 20. Factual Recall Question<br />Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of Romanticism?<br />Attention to “the natural”<br />Valued “folk” literature, such as fairy tales<br />Had a strong geographical center in Düsseldorf<br />Referred to “the blue flower” as a central symbol for longing<br />Valued medieval literature and art<br />„Der Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer“<br />Caspar David Friedrich<br />Source: Briggs & Keyek-Franssen (2010)<br />
    • 21. Conceptual Questions<br />Imagine holding two identical bricks under water. Brick A is just beneath the surface of the water, while Brick B is at a greater depth. The force needed to hold Brick B in place is…<br />Larger than<br />The same as <br />Smaller than<br />the force required to hold Brick A in place.<br />Eric Mazur, Physics, Harvard University<br />
    • 22. Application Question<br />Christine Bombaro, Library, Dickinson College<br />
    • 23. Critical Thinking Questions<br />Hamlet’s lines following the death of Ophelia suggest that:<br />Hamlet really loved Ophelia, and is so distraught to learn of her death that he proposes to eat a crocodile.<br />Hamlet thinks that Laertes’s grief is mere posturing, and mocks it by exaggeration.<br />Hamlet cares little for Ophelia, but is eager to enter into a rhetorical chest-thumping competition with her brother.<br />Elizabeth Cullingford, English, University of Texas-Austin<br />
    • 24. Student Perspective Questions<br />Which of the following statements most closely matches what you think?<br />Humans evolved from other life forms with divine assistance.<br />Humans evolved from other life forms without divine assistance.<br />Humans were created directly by a divine being within the past 10,000 years.<br />Philippa Levine, History, University of Southern California<br />
    • 25. Confidence Levels<br />Is it possible for the standard matrix of a linear transformation not to have an eigenvalue?<br />Yes – High Confidence<br />Yes – Low Confidence<br />No – Low Confidence<br />No – High Confidence<br />
    • 26. Confidence Levels<br />Is it possible for the standard matrix of a linear transformation not to have an eigenvalue?<br />Yes – High Confidence<br />Yes – Low Confidence<br />No – Low Confidence<br />No – High Confidence<br />
    • 27. Which of these question types would be most useful in your teaching?<br />Factual Recall Questions<br />Conceptual Questions<br />Application Questions<br />Critical Thinking Questions<br />Student Perspective Questions<br />Confidence-Level Questions<br />
    • 28. Opening Up the Backchannel<br />
    • 29. Presentation<br />
    • 30. Presentation with Q&A<br />
    • 31. Presentation with Backchannel Type 1(Student-Student Conversations)<br />
    • 32. Presentation with Backchannel Type 2(Feedback from All Students)<br />
    • 33. Presentation with Backchannel Type 3(Conversations with People Not Physically Present)<br />Classroom Walls<br />
    • 34. All That Plus Google Jockeys<br />Classroom Walls<br />
    • 35. Twitter + Small-Group Discussions<br />“The Twitter Experiment”<br />Monica Rankin, History, University of Texas-Dallas<br />
    • 36. Twitter + A Librarian<br />Gardner Campbell, Literature & New Media, Baylor University<br />Ellen FilgoE-Learning Librarian<br />
    • 37. Google Moderator + Q&A<br />
    • 38. Just-in-Time Teachingwith Blogs<br />
    • 39. First Exposure<br />Walvoord & Anderson (1998)<br />
    • 40. 30%<br />of students will “do the reading” on their own<br />Hobson (2004)<br />
    • 41.
    • 42.
    • 43.
    • 44. Just-in-Time Teaching<br />Novak (1999)<br />
    • 45. Questions?<br />
    • 46. Derek Bruff<br />derek.bruff@vanderbilt.edu<br />derekbruff.com<br />Flickr Photo Credits<br /><ul><li>“Drew & Katie” by TheNickster
    • 47. “Macbook X-Ray” by Pipeapple
    • 48. “nose slide” by B.A.D.
    • 49. “Super 8” by eqqman
    • 50. “Stop Watch 6031” by Yukon White Light
    • 51. “Questions” by Oberazzi</li>

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