Speech acoustics

5,395 views
5,057 views

Published on

Published in: Education
2 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Thank you for such a good presentation. Would like to know resources/ reference materials on the slides you presented. Please write me at bangla018@gmail.com
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Hi Derek, Nice presentation. The informations are quite useful.Can you please share your contact details on radhakant@bedigital.co.id
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
5,395
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
138
Comments
2
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Start worse, get better.
  • SII = 64; SII = 45
  • SII = 64; SII = 45
  • Speech acoustics

    1. 1. Speech acoustics<br />Objectives: <br />Describe relative frequency and intensity of phonemes by voice, manner, and formant frequency.<br />Describe various phonemic cues.<br />Describe speech constraints.<br />
    2. 2. Average speech intensity<br />~65 dB SPL (~45 dB HL)<br />30 dB range<br />Any vowel has more power than any consonant<br />
    3. 3. Average speech frequency<br />~50 – 10,000 Hz<br />Most energy below 1000 Hz<br />Fundamental frequency<br />Men: 100 Hz<br />Women: 200 Hz<br />Children: 300 Hz<br />Crying babies: 500 Hz<br />Cues for talker identity<br />
    4. 4. Average speech duration<br />Vowels: 130 – 360 msec<br />Consonants: 20 – 150 msec<br />Rate: ~5 syllables/second; ~12 phonemes/second<br />
    5. 5. Vowel formants<br />Low F1<br />Low F2<br />Low F1<br />High F2<br />High F1<br />Low F2<br />High F1<br />High F2<br />
    6. 6. Vowel formants<br />
    7. 7. Consonants: place, manner, voicing<br />w<br />
    8. 8. Consonants: energy bands<br />
    9. 9. Phonemic cues - Stops<br />Closure<br />Voiceless stops – silent period<br />Voiced stops – low level energy<br />Burst<br />Wide-band energy ~40 msec<br />Greater intensity for voiceless stops<br />Frequency depends on place<br />Formant transition<br />First formant always rising<br />Second formant transition depends on place<br />
    10. 10. Phonemic cues - Stops<br />Voice easier to detect than place<br />For voiced stops<br />Voice-onset time is earlier<br />Energy present at fundamental frequency<br />Burst energy is lower in amplitude <br />Vowels are longer in duration before voiced final stops (“eyes” v. “ice”)<br />
    11. 11. Phonemic cues - Nasals<br />Always voiced<br />Continuant<br />Nasal resonance<br />highest for /m/<br />lowest for /n/<br />Second formant (frequency and transition) gives place information<br />
    12. 12. Phonemic cues - Fricatives<br />Hissing quality<br />Voiced fricatives<br />Periodic<br />Lower frequency<br />Lower amplitude<br />Greater overall energy (from fundamental)<br />Sibilants (s, z, sh, zh)<br />Higher amplitude than other fricatives<br />
    13. 13. -f- -θ- -s- -S-<br />
    14. 14. Suprasegmental cues<br />Stress<br />changes in fundamental frequency, intensity, duration<br />Intonation<br />changes in fundamental frequency, pitch pattern<br />expresses attitudes, feeling, meaning (command, request, statement)<br />Duration<br />variations in speech sounds due to context of other sounds<br />
    15. 15. Speech constraints<br />Syntactic<br />S = NP (Aux) VP<br />NP = (Det) (AP) N (PP) <br />“the naughty boy in the daycare…”<br />VP = V (NP) (PP) (Adv) <br />“…took the toy away brusquely”<br />
    16. 16. Speech constraints<br />Syntactic<br />S = NP (Aux) VP<br />NP = (Det) (AP) N (PP)<br />“the naughty boy in the daycare…”<br />VP = V (NP) (PP) (Adv)<br />“…took the toy away brusquely”<br />
    17. 17. Speech constraints<br />Syntactic<br />The question “What should you eat”<br />Answer is a noun phrase<br />The question “How should you eat”<br />Answer is an adverbial phrase<br />
    18. 18. Speech constraints<br />Semantic<br />Words in a sentence are related meaningfully<br />“Plug the mouse into the computer”<br />Situational<br />Conversation usually refers to the context of the environment<br />“I like that oat!”<br />Mall vs. Farm<br />
    19. 19. Overlapping cues help protect the signal from noise<br />Speech predictability helps protect the signal from noise<br />Noise can come from<br />the speaker (poor intelligibility, etc)<br />the environment (distractions, etc)<br />the listener (ESL, etc)<br />
    20. 20. Effects of hearing loss on speech perception<br />Objectives: <br />Describe speech characteristics that are lost and that are preserved for hearing losses of various degree, type and configuration.<br />
    21. 21. Auditory Response Area<br />
    22. 22. Auditory Response Area<br />
    23. 23. Auditory Response Area<br />
    24. 24. Speech audiogram<br />
    25. 25. Speech audiogram<br />X X X X X X<br />
    26. 26. Speech audiogram<br />
    27. 27. Consonants: energy bands<br />
    28. 28. Consonants: energy bands<br />
    29. 29. Consonants: energy bands<br />
    30. 30. Speech audiogram<br />
    31. 31. Speech audiogram<br />
    32. 32.
    33. 33.
    34. 34.
    35. 35. 34 dots<br />
    36. 36. Correlating SII to speech<br />Adult values (children would be worse)<br />Digits easy<br />Words hard<br />
    37. 37. X X X X X X<br />
    38. 38. Correlating SII to speech<br />
    39. 39.
    40. 40.
    41. 41.
    42. 42. Deafness<br />No access to average speech<br />
    43. 43. Severe<br />Access to only loudest components of speech<br />Speech production<br />High airflow rate<br />Speech initiation at low lung volumes<br />Poor velar control (nasality)<br />High fundamental frequency<br />Slow speech rate<br />
    44. 44. Moderate<br />Access to louder half of speech, or to loud speech<br />Speech production<br />Substitutions and distortions<br />Errors in affricate, fricatives and blends<br />
    45. 45. Slight to Mild<br />Access to all but the quietest components of speech<br />Speech production<br />Fewer distortions/substitutions<br />Good intelligibility<br />
    46. 46. Rising v. Sloping loss<br />
    47. 47. Rising v. Sloping loss<br />SII = 64<br />SII = 45<br />

    ×