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Howard Pollick (PowerPoint) Opens a New Window

  1. 1. California Children’s Dental Disease Prevention Program September 17, 2007 Double Tree Hotel, Sacramento, CA Current Science on Community Water Fluoridation Howard Pollick, BDS, MPH Health Sciences Clinical Professor School of Dentistry University of California San Francisco
  2. 2. Community Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits </li></ul>
  3. 3. Safety of Fluoride: all sources <ul><li>The main safety issue is chronic fluoride intake from all sources during tooth development years (less than 8 years of age) and enamel fluorosis </li></ul><ul><li>Recommendations </li></ul><ul><li>refine fluoridated toothpaste to lower the risk of fluorosis without significantly reducing its effectiveness in caries prevention. </li></ul><ul><li>encourage commencement of toothpaste use in the 19- to 30-month age period </li></ul><ul><li>use of 400- to 550-ppm fluoridated toothpaste when toothpaste use starts </li></ul><ul><li>encourage spitting after brushing </li></ul><ul><li>prevent an eating/licking toothpaste habit in young children. </li></ul>Do LG, Spencer AJ Risk-Benefit Balance in the Use of Fluoride among Young Children. J Dent Res. 2007 Aug;86(8):723-8.
  4. 4. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>National Fluoridation Symposium July, 2005 </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrating 60 Years of Water Fluoridation </li></ul><ul><li>Hosted by the American Dental Association </li></ul><ul><li>and </li></ul><ul><li>U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention </li></ul><ul><li>Chicago </li></ul>
  5. 5. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Production and delivery of the chemical compounds </li></ul><ul><li>Engineering safeguards and regulations </li></ul><ul><li>Actions taken in the event of equipment malfunctions </li></ul><ul><li>and human error </li></ul><ul><li>Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) </li></ul><ul><li>National guidelines on safety </li></ul><ul><ul><li>minimum basis for each State’s regulations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>applied to each local community, water district </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and water wholesaler </li></ul></ul>ISSUES
  6. 6. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Assurance of periodic review and updating of compliance with new guidelines and regulations </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate funding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The community shares the benefits of CWF </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost per person receiving fluoridated water is very small </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Governmental and voluntary agencies must regularly cooperate and review the science, guidelines and regulations of the safety of CWF. </li></ul>ISSUES
  7. 7. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Definition of Safety </li></ul><ul><li>The state of being certain that adverse effects will not be caused by some agent under defined conditions </li></ul><ul><li>Water is safe to drink if it meets regulatory standards </li></ul>
  8. 8. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Regulatory Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific Reviews </li></ul><ul><li>Health concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Cosmetic concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Total intake </li></ul>ISSUES
  9. 9. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Fluoridation Chemicals meet standards </li></ul><ul><li>Trace contaminants, such as heavy metals </li></ul><ul><li>Must not exceed the Maximum Allowable Level (MAL) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>one-tenth of the EPA’s regulated MCL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>when added to drinking water at its Maximum Use Level </li></ul></ul><ul><li>No detectable arsenic or lead in the majority of more than 100 samples of water fluoridated with fluorosilicic acid, tested by NSF International from 1992 to 2000 </li></ul><ul><li>The average concentration of arsenic and lead from all samples was less than 0.1 ppb (parts per billion) </li></ul><ul><li>Action Level Lead 15 ppb; </li></ul><ul><li>MCL arsenic 10 ppb (January 2006) </li></ul>Regulatory Standards
  10. 10. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>No credible evidence of increased Lead </li></ul><ul><li>Concerns have been raised about arsenic and lead in fluorosilicic acid-treated water (Masters and Coplan) </li></ul><ul><li>However there is no credible evidence to show that this is of concern (Urbansky and Schock) </li></ul>Regulatory Standards <ul><li>Masters RD, Coplan MJ, Hone BT, Dykes JE. Association of silicofluoride treated water with elevated blood lead. Neurotoxicology. 2000 Dec;21(6):1091-100. </li></ul><ul><li>Masters RD and Coplan M. Water Treatment with Silicofluorides and Lead Toxicity. Intern. J. Environmental Studies 1999:56, 435-449. </li></ul><ul><li>Urbansky ET and Schock MR. Can Fluoridation Affect Lead(II) in Potable Water? Hexafluorosilicate and Fluoride Equilibria in Aqueous Solution. International Journal of Environmental Studies (B), 2000:57:597-637. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Criticism of studies by Masters and Coplan </li></ul><ul><li>Urbansky and Schock conclude: </li></ul>Urbansky ET and Schock MR. Can Fluoridation Affect Lead(II) in Potable Water? Hexafluorosilicate and Fluoride Equilibria in Aqueous Solution. International Journal of Environmental Studies (B), 2000:57:597-637. <ul><li>“ the highly-promoted studies asserting enhanced lead uptake from drinking water and increased neurotoxicity still provide no credible evidence to suggest that the common practice of fluoridating drinking water has any untoward health impacts via effects on lead when done properly under established guidelines so as to maintain total water quality. </li></ul><ul><li>Our conclusion supports current EPA and PHS/CDC policies on water fluoridation .” </li></ul>
  12. 12. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><ul><li>Regulatory Standards </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scientific Reviews </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Health concerns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cosmetic concerns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Environmental concerns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Total intake </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><ul><li>National Research Council, U.S.A. (1993, 2006) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>World Health Organization (1994, 1996, 2006) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>U.S. Public Health Service (2003) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>International Programme on Chemical Safety, W.H.O. (2002) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Forum on Fluoridation. Ireland (2002) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Medical Research Council, U.K. (2002) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>University of York, U.K. (2000) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Institute of Medicine, U.S.A. (1999) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Locker: Health Canada (1999) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>City of Calgary,Calgary Regional Health Authority (1998) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>U.S. Public Health Service (1991) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kaminsky et al. New York State Dept. of Health (1990) </li></ul></ul>Scientific Reviews
  14. 14. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>A subcommittee of the National Research Council's (NRC) Committee on Toxicology (COT) reviewed toxicologic, epidemiologic, and clinical data, particularly data published since 1993, and exposure data on orally ingested fluoride from drinking water and other sources (e.g., food, toothpaste, dental rinses). </li></ul><ul><li>The purpose of this report is to provide recommendations to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on whether the current maximum contaminant level goal (MCLG) of 4 mg/L protects children and others from adverse health effects. </li></ul><ul><li>The NRC committee did not examine health risks or benefits of water at the levels recommended for fluoridation of water to prevent tooth decay. </li></ul><ul><li>The current range for water fluoridation of community water systems is 0.7 to 1.2 ppm (equivalent to 0.7-1.2 mg/L). </li></ul><ul><li>Water that has fluoride at these levels is safe and effective for preventing tooth decay. </li></ul><ul><li> http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safety/nrc_report.htm </li></ul>National Research Council, U.S.A. (2006) Fluoride in Drinking Water: A Scientific Review of EPA ’s Standard
  15. 15. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>The NRC Committee evaluated many health effects that have the potential to be associated with fluoride in drinking water. </li></ul><ul><li>The NRC concluded that only three adverse health effects warranted consideration in developing regulatory standards for high levels of fluoride in drinking water </li></ul><ul><ul><li>s evere enamel fluorosis from exposure to these high levels between birth to 8 years of age, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the potential risk for </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>bone fractures and </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>the more severe forms of skeletal fluorosis after lifetime exposure. Severe skeletal fluorosis is a rare condition in the United States. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li> http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safety/nrc_report.htm </li></ul>National Research Council, U.S.A. (2006) Fluoride in Drinking Water: A Scientific Review of EPA ’s Standard
  16. 16. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Important for people living in areas with natural fluoride greater than 2 ppm (mg/L) . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>about 0.5% of the U.S. population (1.5 million) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>About 220,000 Americans receive water from public water systems with fluoride levels that are equal to or exceed 4 mg/L. </li></ul><ul><li>People who consume water with ≥4 mg/L fluoride over a lifetime, when compared to people consuming water with 1 mg/L , are likely to be at increased risk for bone fractures . </li></ul><ul><li>Water at ≥2 mg/L fluoride may put children 8 years old and younger at increased risk for severe enamel fluorosis , a condition that causes staining and pitting of the enamel </li></ul><ul><li>Where fluoride levels are greater than 2 mg/L , CDC recommends that parents and caregivers of children 8 years and younger should provide children with drinking water from an alternative water source . </li></ul><ul><li>At levels less than 2 mg/L, the committee found that the prevalence of severe enamel fluorosis was very low ( near zero ). </li></ul><ul><li> http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safety/nrc_report.htm </li></ul>National Research Council, U.S.A. (2006) Fluoride in Drinking Water: A Scientific Review of EPA ’s Standard
  17. 17. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>CDC Statement on the 2006 National Research Council (NRC) Report on Fluoride in Drinking Water </li></ul><ul><li>The findings of the NRC report are consistent with CDC’ s assessment that water is safe and healthy at the levels used for water fluoridation (0.7 - 1 .2 mg/L). CDC reviews the latest scientific literature on an ongoing basis and maintains an active national community water fluoridation quality assurance program. CDC promotes research on the topic of fluoride and its effect on the public’ s health. CDC’ s recommendation remains the same; t hat community water fluoridation is safe and effective for preventing tooth decay. </li></ul><ul><li>Water fluoridation should be continued in communities currently fluoridating and extended to those without fluoridation. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Prevalence of severe enamel fluorosis and water fluoride concentration MCLG SMCL Guideline Value WHO, Canada, EU Fluoridation
  19. 19. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Trace elements in human nutrition and health. W.H.O. 1996. </li></ul><ul><li>An expert consultation of the WHO on trace elements in human nutrition and health categorized fluoride among &quot;potentially toxic elements, some of which may nevertheless have some essential functions at low levels.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Fluoride was regarded as &quot;essential,&quot; since the consultation &quot;considered resistance to dental caries to be a physiologically important function.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>The consultation indicated that total intakes at 1, 2 and 3 years of age &quot;should, if possible, be limited to 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/day, respectively,&quot; with not more than 75% coming in the form of soluble fluorides from drinking-water. </li></ul><ul><li>It was also noted that &quot;adult intakes exceeding 5 mg of fluoride per day from all sources probably pose a significant risk of skeletal fluorosis.&quot; </li></ul>
  20. 20. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Evidence to date suggests that fluoride has no effect on hip fractures </li></ul><ul><li>There is currently no firm evidence linking water fluoridation to cancer in general, or to specific cancers </li></ul><ul><li>The group considered suggestions that fluoride may be implicated in various other health effects and concluded that there was no evidence for these suggestions </li></ul>Scientific Reviews <ul><ul><li>Medical Research Council (U.K.) working group report: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Water fluoridation and health. 2002 </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. Total Fluoride Intake <ul><li>Tolerable Upper Intake levels </li></ul><ul><li>0.1 mg/kg/day for children (birth - 8 years) </li></ul><ul><li>10 mg/day for children over 8 years and adults </li></ul><ul><li>LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse-effect level) </li></ul><ul><li>Based on moderate enamel fluorosis for young children </li></ul><ul><li>Based on skeletal fluorosis for older children and adults </li></ul>Scientific Reviews <ul><ul><li>Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dietary reference intakes for calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin D, and fluoride. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1999. </li></ul></ul>
  22. 22. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Regulatory Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific Reviews </li></ul><ul><li>Health concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Cosmetic concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Total intake </li></ul>
  23. 23. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Erickson (1978) </li></ul><ul><li>Residents of 24 cities with fluoridation and 22 cities without </li></ul><ul><li>Death rates were similar </li></ul><ul><ul><li>after adjustment for differences in age, sex, race, education and population density </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1,123.9 per 100,000 person-years (fluoridated) </li></ul><ul><li>1,137.1 per 100,000 person-years (non-fluoridated) </li></ul>Health concerns No effect on Mortality <ul><ul><li>Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>U.S. Public Health Service (2003) </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Seven studies of osteosarcoma, presenting 12 analyses were included </li></ul><ul><li>Of these, the direction of association between water fluoridation and osteosarcoma incidence or mortality was found to be: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>positive (fewer cancers) in seven, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>negative (more cancers) in three and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>no association (two found no relationship) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Of the six studies that presented variance data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Only one (Cohn 1992) found a statistically significant association between fluoridation and increased prevalence of osteosarcoma in males. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This study however, also had the lowest validity score, 2.5 out of 8. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Importance of not establishing or changing public policy based on a single study </li></ul>Health concerns No evidence of Bone Cancer or Osteosarcoma York Review* *NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York. U.K. A Systematic Review of Public Water Fluoridation. 2000.
  25. 25. Fluoridation: Bassin Study <ul><ul><li>“ Our exploratory analysis found an association between fluoride exposure in drinking water during childhood and the incidence of osteosarcoma among males but not consistently among females. Further research is required to confirm or refute this observation .” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bassin EB, Wypij D, Davis RB, Mittleman MA. Age-specific fluoride exposure in drinking water and osteosarcoma (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2006 May;17(4):421-8. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“… preliminary findings from the overall analysis of the second set of cases (1993 -2 000) do not appear to replicate the overall findings from the first part of the study. Our findings currently being prepared for publication, do not suggest an overall association between fluoride and osteosarcoma .” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Douglass CW, Joshipura K. Caution needed in fluoride and osteosarcoma study. Cancer Causes Control. 2006 May;17(4):481-2. </li></ul></ul>Safety: New Study Cancer Causes & Control: Editorial Board at Harvard, Boston, MA
  26. 26. Fluoridation: Bassin Study <ul><li>A fter reviewing a recently published paper on a possible association between fluoride in water and osteosarcoma (a rare form of bone cancer), the ADA remains confident that community water fluoridation is a safe, effective public health measure for preventing tooth decay. </li></ul><ul><li>The ADA agrees with the paper’ s authors that their work constitutes an e xploratory analysis that will require scientific confirmation to confirm or refute the findings . </li></ul><ul><li>The data in this paper is simply one piece of a much more comprehensive 15-year study by the Harvard School of Dental Medicine scheduled for publication later this summer. </li></ul><ul><li>The principal investigator of the larger Harvard study has advised against drawing conclusions before seeing the full study, which will not suggest an overall association between fluoride and osteosarcoma, he states. </li></ul><ul><li>Further, an a ssociation found in one, limited study, falls far below any scientific standard needed to establish a cause-and-effect relationship. In fact, after more than 60 years of rigorous scientific study of water fluoridation, the overwhelming weight of scientific evidences does not show an association with osteosarcoma . </li></ul>Safety: New Study http://www.ada.org/public/media/releases/0604_release02.asp http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safety/osteosarcoma.htm ADA Reaffirms Support of Water Fluoridation Chicago, April 7, 2006
  27. 27. Fluorine is the most electronegative and reactive of all elements; fluoride is the ionic form of fluorine.
  28. 28. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Regulatory Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific Reviews </li></ul><ul><li>Health concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Cosmetic concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Total intake </li></ul>
  29. 29. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Extensive epidemiological research conducted in the United States during the 1930s and 1940s (Dean, 1942) established, with a high degree of certainty </li></ul><ul><li>Chronic fluoride intake of less than 0.10 mg/kg/day by children at risk of enamel fluorosis (under 8 years of age) associated with a low prevalence (approximately 10%) of the milder forms of the condition </li></ul><ul><li>Institute of Medicine 1999 </li></ul>Cosmetic Concerns Enamel fluorosis
  30. 30. Fluoride in water: Caries and Fluorosis <ul><li>Pre-1945 data; 12-14 year-olds </li></ul><ul><li>21 US cities; hundreds of children </li></ul><ul><li>Caries Experience </li></ul><ul><li>Number of decayed, missing and filled teeth per child (DMFT) </li></ul><ul><li>Enamel Fluorosis </li></ul><ul><li>Dean’s index: normal, questionable, very mild, mild, moderate, severe </li></ul><ul><li>Community Fluorosis Index </li></ul><ul><li>0.6 - Public Health Significance </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum Caries/ Minimum Fluorosis </li></ul><ul><li>1 ppm Fluoride in water </li></ul>
  31. 31. Dean’s Classification of Fluorosis Photographs from Forum on Water Fluoridation in Ireland, 2002
  32. 32. Moderate and Severe Fluorosis and ‘Moderate/Severe’ Caries Photographs from Forum on Water Fluoridation in Ireland, 2002 “ Moderate/Severe Caries” “ Moderate/Severe Caries”
  33. 33. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Regulatory Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific Reviews </li></ul><ul><li>Health concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Cosmetic concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Total intake </li></ul>
  34. 34. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Environmental concerns have been investigated in literature reviews </li></ul><ul><li>Tacoma Pierce County Health Department, Washington State (August 2002) </li></ul><ul><li>City of Port Angeles, Washington State (October 2003) </li></ul><ul><li>no negative impact of water fluoridation on the environment has been established </li></ul><ul><li>Pollick HF. Water fluoridation and the environment: current perspective in the United States. </li></ul><ul><li>Int J Occup Environ Health. 2004 Jul-Sep;10(3):343-50 </li></ul>Environmental concerns Fluoridation is safe for the environment
  35. 35. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>There is no negative effect on the health of plants, animals, or humans </li></ul><ul><li>There is no effect on corrosion of pipes. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no measurable increase in lead and arsenic. </li></ul><ul><li>There are no emissions of fluoride into the air outside the well houses. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no release of toxic or hazardous substances. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no noise production. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no measurable increase in the fluoride concentrations in rivers downstream of the discharges due to adding fluoride to the water supply system. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no concentration of fluoride in groundwater. </li></ul>Environmental concerns Fluoridation is safe for the environment Pollick HF. Water fluoridation and the environment: current perspective in the United States. Int J Occup Environ Health. 2004 Jul-Sep;10(3):343-50
  36. 36. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Regulatory Standards </li></ul><ul><li>Scientific Reviews </li></ul><ul><li>Health concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Cosmetic concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Environmental concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Total intake </li></ul>
  37. 37. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Extensive reviews of the scientific literature revealed no adverse effects unless fluoride intakes were greater than 10 mg/day for 10 or more years (Kaminsky et al., 1990; NRC, 1993; USPHS, 1991). </li></ul><ul><li>At these high, chronic intake levels, the risk of skeletal changes consistent with preclinical or stage 1 skeletal fluorosis increases. </li></ul><ul><li>Institute of Medicine 1999 </li></ul>Total Intake Fluoride Intake and Skeletal Fluorosis
  38. 38. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>The Tolerable Upper Intake Level for children under 8 years of age (0.1 mg/kg/day) is exceeded by approximately 1 in 100 children in areas where the water fluoride concentration is 1.0 mg/liter or slightly higher </li></ul><ul><li>In the 1930s and 1940s, no moderate or severe cases of enamel fluorosis were recorded in these areas </li></ul><ul><li>Fluoride intake from water and the diet appears not to have increased since that time </li></ul><ul><li>Additional intake by children at risk of enamel fluorosis almost certainly derives from the use of fluoride-containing dental products ( toothpaste, prescription supplements ) </li></ul><ul><li>Institute of Medicine 1999 </li></ul>Total Intake Total Intake and Enamel Fluorosis
  39. 39. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>On November 9, 2006, the ADA issued interim guidance on fluoride intake for infants and young children. Sound science was the driving force behind the release of the guidance. It was issued so parents, caregivers and health care professionals, who may be concerned about a possible increased risk of fluorosis, have some simple and effective advice on ways to reduce fluoride intake from reconstituted infant formula. </li></ul><ul><li>For infants who get most of their nutrition from formula during their first 12 months, ready-to-feed formula is preferred to help ensure that they do not exceed the optimal amount of fluoride intake. </li></ul><ul><li>If liquid concentrate or powdered infant formula is the primary source of nutrition, it can be mixed with water that is fluoride free or contains low levels of fluoride to reduce the risk of fluorosis. Examples are water that is labeled purified, demineralized, deionized, distilled or reverse osmosis filtered water. Many grocery stores sell these types of drinking water for less than $1 per gallon. </li></ul><ul><li>Breast milk is widely acknowledged as the most complete form of nutrition for infants. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends human milk for all infants (except for the few for whom breastfeeding is determined to be harmful). </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ada.org/public/topics/fluoride/infantsformula.asp </li></ul>Total Intake Infant Formula and Enamel Fluorosis - ADA
  40. 40. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Recent studies have raised the possibility that mixing infant formula with fluoridated water, particularly for infants exclusively on a formula diet during the first year of life, may play a more important role in enamel fluorosis development than was previously understood. </li></ul><ul><li>Ready to feed (no-mix) infant formula typically has little fluoride and may be preferred for use at least some of the time. </li></ul><ul><li>For decades, parents have been mixing infant formula with optimally fluoridated tap water (a level determined by the U.S. Public Health Service between 0.7 mg/L fluoride and 1.2 mg/L fluoride and maintained by your water utility to maximize decay prevention and limit fluorosis potential) and no association has been observed between infant formula use and an increased risk for moderate or severe fluorosis. </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safety/infant_formula.htm </li></ul>Total Intake Infant Formula and Enamel Fluorosis - CDC
  41. 41. Safety of Water Fluoridation <ul><li>where concentration is 1.0 ppm F in water </li></ul><ul><ul><li>range from 1.4 to 3.4 mg fluoride per day </li></ul></ul><ul><li>where concentration is less than 0.3 ppm F </li></ul><ul><ul><li>range from 0.3 to 1.0 mg/day </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Institute of Medicine 1999 </li></ul>Total Intake Dietary fluoride intakes by adults from food, water and beverages
  42. 42. Total Fluoride Intake Institute of Medicine, 1999 Table from http://www.ada.org - Dietary Reference Intakes for Fluoride
  43. 43. Safety of Water Fluoridation *Concerns with compliance with Rx F Supplements, Toothpaste supervision for children under 8 years of age, mixing infant formula Water fluoridation: OK * Total intake No negative effect Environmental concerns Cosmetic benefit Caries / Enamel fluorosis * Cosmetic concerns No health concerns Health concerns 15 reviews in past 17 years Scientific Reviews Meets the standards Regulatory Standards
  44. 44. Community Water Fluoridation <ul><li>Safety </li></ul><ul><li>Benefits </li></ul>
  45. 45. <ul><li>Promoting Oral Health: Interventions for Preventing Dental Caries, Oral and Pharyngeal Cancers, and Sports-Related Craniofacial Injuries </li></ul><ul><li>A Report on Recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services </li></ul>CDC’s MMWR Recommendations and Reports (RR-21) November 30, 2001
  46. 46. Recommendations <ul><li>Preventing dental caries </li></ul><ul><li>Community water fluoridation </li></ul><ul><li>(strongly recommended) </li></ul><ul><li>School-based sealant programs </li></ul><ul><li>(strongly recommended) </li></ul>
  47. 47. Community Water Fluoridation <ul><li>21 studies (good to fair quality) </li></ul><ul><li>Median decrease in dental caries: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>29.1% (before-and-after measures) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>50.7% (after measures only) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Children (4-17 years) of varying levels of baseline caries and socioeconomic status </li></ul><ul><li>Evidence of effectiveness: strong </li></ul>
  48. 48. Fluoride in water: Caries and Fluorosis: Pre-1945 data The Scientific Foundation for fluoridation Historical Background <ul><li>12-14-year-olds </li></ul><ul><li>Midwest US </li></ul><ul><li>21 cities </li></ul>Dean,H.T. in Dental caries and Fluorine, Washington, American Association Advancement Science, pp. 5-31, 1946
  49. 49. CDC: Fluoridation protects teeth in two ways <ul><li>When delivered through the water supply to children during the tooth forming years. </li></ul><ul><li>Through direct contact with teeth throughout life . </li></ul>http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/benefits.htm
  50. 50. Systemic and Topical Effects: or pre- and post-eruptive effects of fluoridation on caries prevention
  51. 51. Experiment to determine topical and systemic effects of fluoride on caries prevention Effect of fluoride administered by stomach tube or orally (5 ppm) on smooth surface & sulcal (fissure) caries in rat molars Larson RH, Mellberg JR, Senning R. Experiments on local and systemic action of fluoride in caries inhibition in the rat. Archives of Oral Biology. 1977;22(7):437-9 * p <0.01 10.6 * 0.6 * 22 F - orally (water) 23.1 9.0 * 24 F - Stomach Tube 27.4 30.2 24 Control - No F Sulcal Smooth All Molars : Mean number of carious areas Number of animals Group
  52. 52. Experiment to determine pre- and post-eruptive effects of fluoride on caries prevention Effect of fluoride administered by stomach tube or orally on smooth surface & sulcal (fissure) caries in rat: 3 rd molars only (>2 weeks pre-eruptive effect) Larson RH, Mellberg JR, Senning R. Experiments on local and systemic action of fluoride in caries inhibition in the rat. Archives of Oral Biology. 1977;22(7):437-9 * p <0.01 65 % 0.8 * 100 % 0.0 * F - orally (water) 30 % 1.6 * 93 % 0.5 * F - stomach tube 2.3 7.0 Control: no F % Reduction Caries score Sulcal surfaces % Reduction Caries score Smooth surfaces Group
  53. 53. Tiel-Culemborg Netherlands <ul><li>Cross-sectional study of dentinal caries based on standardized bite-wing x-rays of permanent teeth </li></ul><ul><li>Tiel , Netherlands, began fluoridating water at 1 ppm in 1953 and stopped Dec 1973 under court order. Culemborg served as non-fluoridated control </li></ul><ul><li>Data collected in 1961, 1973, and 1979-86 </li></ul><ul><li>In all categories of surfaces (proximal, smooth, pit & fissure) the use of fluoridated water only post-eruptively shows less effect than the use only pre-eruptively . </li></ul><ul><li>“ In order to obtain maximal reduction in all surfaces the use of fluoridated water must be started at onset of calcification of a tooth.” </li></ul>Groeneveld A, Van Eck AA, Backer Dirks O. Fluoride in caries prevention: is the effect pre- or post-eruptive? J Dent Res. 1990 Feb;69 Spec No:751-5; discussion 820-3
  54. 54. Fluoride effect: Pre- and Post-eruptive Fluoride has an important pre-eruptive effect on subsequent caries experience; % reduction depends on site Groeneveld A, Van Eck AA, Backer Dirks O. Fluoride in caries prevention: is the effect pre- or post-eruptive? J Dent Res. 1990 Feb;69 Spec No:751-5; discussion 820-3 75% 25% Smooth surfaces 50% 50% Approximal 33% 66% Pit & Fissure Post- Pre- Site
  55. 55. Conclusions from recent Australian studies <ul><li>Confirm earlier findings: higher pre- than post-eruptive exposure more beneficial for overall caries experience and for pit & fissure surfaces caries reduction </li></ul><ul><li>Children with optimum exposure to fluoridated water both pre- & post-eruption had lowest caries in all surface types </li></ul><ul><li>There was an exposure-response relationship between pre-eruptive exposure and caries. </li></ul><ul><li>Singh KA, Spencer AJ, Brennan DS. Effects of water fluoride exposure at crown completion and maturation on caries of permanent first molars.Caries Res. 2007;41(1):34-42. </li></ul><ul><li>Singh KA, Spencer AJ. Relative effects of pre- and post-eruption water fluoride on caries experience by surface type of permanent first molars.Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2004 Dec;32(6):435-46 </li></ul><ul><li>Singh KA, Spencer AJ, Armfield JM. Relative effects of pre- and posteruption water fluoride on caries experience of permanent first molars.J Public Health Dent. 2003 Winter;63(1):11-9. </li></ul>
  56. 56. Exposure to fluoridated water since birth produces the maximum benefit. <ul><li>The strongest caries-preventive effect was produced by a high exposure to fluoridated water at crown completion </li></ul><ul><li>supplemented by a high exposure at </li></ul><ul><ul><li>maturation and/or </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>post-eruption </li></ul></ul><ul><li>but the latter two phases could not produce a significant caries-preventive effect on their own. </li></ul><ul><li>findings relate mainly to pit and fissure surfaces </li></ul>Singh KA, Spencer AJ, Brennan DS. Effects of water fluoride exposure at crown completion and maturation on caries of permanent first molars. Caries Res. 2007;41(1):34-42
  57. 57. Effectiveness of water fluoridation Difference in Caries Prevalence by U. S. Region according to % on fluoridated water. (1987-88) Children 5-17 year-olds <ul><li>Explained by </li></ul><ul><li>Halo or diffusion effect </li></ul><ul><li>The more fluoridation in a region, the less difference between fluoridated and non-fluoridated areas </li></ul>Newbrun E. Current regulations and recommendations concerning water fluoridation, fluoride supplements, and topical fluoride agents. J Dent Res. 1992 May;71(5):1255-65 (data from: Brunelle JA, Carlos JP Recent Trends in Dental Caries in U.S. Children and the Effect of Water Fluoridation Journal of Dental Research. 1990 Feb; 69 (Special Issue); 723-727.
  58. 58. HALO (or diffusion) Effect <ul><li>12-year-old children living in states where more than half of the communities have fluoridated water will have 26% fewer decayed tooth surfaces per year than 12-year-old children living in states where less than one-quarter of the communities are fluoridated. </li></ul>A 12-year-old child who has lived in a non-fluoridated community in a highly fluoridated state would typically have one fewer cavity than a child in a low-fluoridated state Griffin SO, Gooch BF, Lockwood SA, Tomar SL. Quantifying the diffused benefit from water fluoridation in the United States. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol 2001. Apr;29(2):120-9.
  59. 59. The Percentage of the U.S. Population on Public Water Supply Systems Receiving Fluoridated Water is 67.3%, but varies from State to State http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/fact_sheets/us_stats2002.htm California: 27.6%
  60. 60. Caries Status in California: High School Students in fluoridated areas have far fewer urgent treatment needs Pollick HF, Isman R, Fine JI, Wellman J, Kipnis P, Ellison J. Report of the California Oral Health Needs Assessment of Children, 1993-94: Background, Methodology, Findings. The Dental Health Foundation, Oakland, California. 1999
  61. 61. Fluoride is cost-effective <ul><li>Every dollar spent on community water fluoridation saves from $7 to $42 in treatment costs depending on the size of the community. Savings are greatest in large communities. </li></ul><ul><li>At least 60% of the U.S. population on public water systems has received fluoridated water since 1990, translating to savings in dental treatment costs of over $25.7 billion in the past decade . </li></ul>http://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/factsheets/dental_caries.htm
  62. 62. Griffin SO, Jones K, Tomar SL. An economic evaluation of community water fluoridation. Journal Public Health Dentistry 2001;61(2):78 -8 6 <ul><ul><li>Annual per person cost savings resulting from fluoridation ranged from $15.95 in very small communities to $18.62 in large communities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On the basis of the most current data available on the effectiveness and cost of fluoridation, caries increment, and the cost and longevity of dental restorations, we find that water fluoridation offers significant cost savings . </li></ul></ul>
  63. 63. Fluoridation: Recent Evidence <ul><li>Mean number of teeth affected by dental caries </li></ul><ul><li>Fluoridated Republic of Ireland ; Non-fluoridated Northern Ireland </li></ul>Australia Subjects with a lifetime exposure to fluoridated drinking water had a lower level of caries experience than those with no exposure to fluoridated drinking water, and this was more noticeable in approximal surfaces than occlusal surfaces. Hopcraft MS, Morgan MV. Pattern of dental caries experience on tooth surfaces in an adult population. Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 2006 Jun;34(3):174-83. Whelton H, Crowley E, O'Mullane D, Donaldson M, Cronin M, Kelleher V. Dental caries and enamel fluorosis among the fluoridated population in the Republic of Ireland and non fluoridated population in Northern Ireland in 2002. Community Dent Health. 2006 Mar;23(1):37-43 Benefits - New Studies 3.6 1.8 Non-Fluoridated 2.1 1.0 Fluoridated 15-year-olds 5-year-olds
  64. 64. Water fluoridation and Sealants <ul><li>Prospective (mean 2 years) cohort study of children in Australia </li></ul><ul><li>789 children (mean age = 10.5 years) with one sealed permanent first molar at baseline, while the paired surface was diagnosed as sound. </li></ul><ul><li>The caries incidence of the fissure sealed occlusal surfaces was 5.6% compared to 11.1% for sound surfaces (p < 0.001); a 50% reduction in caries incidence for sealed vs non-sealed surfaces. </li></ul><ul><li>The reduction in caries increment attributable to sealants increased across fluoridated water exposure categories </li></ul><ul><li>36.4% reduction was found for children with 0% exposure (p > 0.05) </li></ul><ul><li>55.0% reduction for children with intermediate exposure (p < 0.01) </li></ul><ul><li>82.4% reduction for children with 100% lifetime exposure to fluoridated water (p < 0.001). </li></ul>Armfield JM, Spencer AJ. Community effectiveness of fissure sealants and the effect of fluoridated water consumption. Community Dent Health. 2007 Mar;24(1):4-11
  65. 65. Water fluoridation and Sealants <ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>The effectiveness of fissure sealants in community-based programs may be further improved when coupled with increased lifetime exposure to optimally fluoridated water. </li></ul>Armfield JM, Spencer AJ. Community effectiveness of fissure sealants and the effect of fluoridated water consumption. Community Dent Health. 2007 Mar;24(1):4-11
  66. 66. Annual incremental benefit of water fluoridation <ul><li>An annual incremental benefit of fluoridation of 0.19 tooth surfaces (range 0.04 to 0.34). </li></ul><ul><li>This equates to 1.9 tooth surfaces every decade , or </li></ul><ul><li>9.5 tooth surfaces over 50 years. </li></ul><ul><li>Griffin SO, Jones K, Tomar SL. Economic Evaluation of Community Water Fluoridation. J Publ Health Dent 2001;61(2):78-86 </li></ul>Difference in mean Decayed, Missing due to caries and Filled Permanent Tooth Surfaces (DMFS) between children with continuous exposure to water fluoridation and those with no such exposure. Data from Table 6 of Brunelle & Carlos. Brunelle JA, Carlos JP. Recent trends in dental caries in U.S. children and the effect of water fluoridation. J Dent Res. 1990;69 Spec No:723-7; discussion 820-3. Pollick HF. Scientific evidence continues to support fluoridation of public water supplies. Int J Occup Environ Health. 2005 Jul-Sep;11(3):322-6.
  67. 67. Benefit for adults from water fluoridation <ul><li>Review of adult studies after 1980 </li></ul><ul><li>Any fluoride, whether self-applied, professionally applied or water fluoridation, or combination </li></ul><ul><li>averted 0.29 (95%CI: 0.16-0.42) carious coronal tooth surfaces per year </li></ul><ul><li>and averted 0.22 (95%CI: 0.08-0.37) carious root surfaces per year. </li></ul><ul><li>Total averted 0.51 carious surfaces /year </li></ul><ul><li>Griffin SO, Regnier E, Griffin PM, Huntley V. Effectiveness of fluoride in preventing caries in adults. J Dent Res. 2007 May;86(5):410-5. </li></ul><ul><li>The prevented fraction for water fluoridation was 27% (95%CI: 19%-34%) </li></ul><ul><li>Prevents 0.14 carious surfaces / year </li></ul><ul><li>Slightly less than 0.19 for all ages from the 2001 review </li></ul>
  68. 68. Benefit for adults from water fluoridation <ul><li>Water fluoridation , all adults, coronal caries </li></ul><ul><li>Including only lifelong residents of control or fluoridated-water communities </li></ul><ul><li>7 studies </li></ul><ul><li>5409 participants </li></ul><ul><li>Griffin SO, Regnier E, Griffin PM, Huntley V. Effectiveness of fluoride in preventing caries in adults. J Dent Res. 2007 May;86(5):410-5. </li></ul><ul><li>equivalent to a prevented fraction of 34.6% (95%CI: 12.6%-51.0%). </li></ul><ul><li>Prevents 0.18 carious surfaces / year </li></ul><ul><li>Slightly less than 0.19 for all ages from the 2001 review </li></ul>
  69. 69. <ul><li>A lthough adults are as likely to experience new caries as children , certain segments of the U.S. adult population - t hose with low incomes and the elderly - m ay have little or no access to restorative or preventive clinical care . </li></ul><ul><li>A t present, approximately 15% of state Medicaid programs provide no adult dental benefits at all, and approximately 45% cover only tooth extraction and emergency services (Oral Health America, 2003). Routine dental care is one of the few health areas not covered by Medicare . </li></ul><ul><li>L imited access to restorative care increases the need for effective prevention; complications and pain and suffering are more likely if caries remains untreated . </li></ul><ul><li>T he proportion of the U.S. population comprised of older adults is increasing , most of these persons are likely to be dentate and at risk for dental caries , and many lower-income adults lack access to timely restorative care. </li></ul><ul><li>O ur finding that fluoride is effective among all adults supports the development and implementation of fluoride programs to serve this population. </li></ul>Griffin SO, Regnier E, Griffin PM, Huntley V. Effectiveness of fluoride in preventing caries in adults. J Dent Res. 2007 May;86(5):410-5. CONCLUSION
  70. 70. Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? Questions? [email_address]

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