ADEA Allied Dental Education Summit
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  • NADL is the national association representing dental laboratories. We have the ability to serve as a communication vehicle to the dental laboratory industry and relay the objectives and pathways to meeting the goals. We act as a liaison to organizations within organized dentistry, again, to relay the objectives and pathways for dental technology to be integrated into the goals established for the dental profession. We have established, reviewed, evolving Competency Standards that outline the specific skills and knowledge needed to assess a competent dental laboratory technician. These Standards can be used as a basis for curriculum for formal education for both dental technology and dentistry.
  • The biggest challenge that we face in implementing the Summit goals have to do with education. Education is not required to become a dental technician and therefore it is not valued. Currently, more emphasis is placed on (supervised) productivity than on formal education.
  • However, organized dental associations/societies lobby against technician certification and establishing a minimum criteria on a state level.
  • Because education is not mandatory and valued most dental technology programs do not have the maximum capacity of students. The programs are expensive to administer and are closing at a rapid rate.
  • As of the Fall of this year, there are only 21 ADA accredited dental laboratory technology programs remaining in the United States. Down from 34 just 8 years ago. Down from just over 50, 20 years ago.
  • Dentistry in the U.S. minimizes the importance of an educated and skilled dental technician and therefore it encourages the export of dental device manufacturing, which puts additional emphasis on price as the sole means of assessing value. From a global platform, many other countries have established criteria, either in the form of education or licensure, so the dental technicians in the U.S. does not have skills that are recognized and transferable. There are nearly 40 countries listed here, the U.S. isn’t among them.
  • What needs to happen to prepare professionals of the future? Laboratory technology education must be integrated back into the educational model for dental students. Dental technology students and dental students should share the same basis for knowledge on the subject of dental laboratory technology. Dental students and dental laboratory technology students should be introduced so that they can work together prior to graduation.

ADEA Allied Dental Education Summit Presentation Transcript

  • 1. ADEA Allied Dental Education Summit National Association of Dental Laboratories Ricki Braswell, CAE, Co-Executive Director
  • 2. NADL’s Role in the Process
    • Communication vehicle to relay the objectives and pathways
    • Liaison to organized dentistry
    • Competency Standards for skills and knowledge for Dental Technology
    • Curriculum for formal education for both dental technology and dentistry
  • 3. Challenges to Success
    • Current climate in Dental Laboratory Technology:
    • Emphasis is on productivity
    • Education is not required
    • Education is not valued
  • 4. Discrepancies
    • "Most dentists rely on the dental technician to choose the materials needed for the fabrication of the prosthesis. With lack of adequate information, all too often the design, fabrication, and completion of the case is left up to the technician. Therefore, our results indicate an apparent trend to which technicians are left to make crucial decisions for dentists." Journal of Prosthodontics Vol 15. No 2 March-April 2006 pgs 123-28 Z. Afsharzand,DMD; B. Rashedi, DMD MSEd, MS; V. Petropoulos, DMD,MS
  • 5. Discrepancies
    • “The (ADA) Council on Dental Education and Licensure believes that the examination and certification of dental laboratory technicians is necessary to provide the dental profession with an indication of those persons who have demonstrated their ability to fulfill the dental laboratory work authorization.”
    • 1998:92, 713
  • 6. Challenges to Success
    • There is a lack of support for formal education for dental technicians.
    • Formal educational programs are expensive to administer
    • Formal educational programs are closing at a rapid rate
  • 7. Number and Type of U.S. Allied Dental Programs: 1970 - 2006
  • 8. Global Challenges
    • Dentistry in the U.S. minimizes the importance of an educated and skilled dental technician.
    • Lack of standards encourages the export of dental device manufacturing.
  • 9. Countries that require formal education and technician licensure
    • Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungry, Latvia, Malta, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea, Luxembourg, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Saudi Arabia, Scotland, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Wales
  • 10. Progress in Education
    • DLT education must be integrated back into dental schools.
    • DLT students and dental students should share the same basis for knowledge on the subject of dental laboratory technology.
    • DLT students and dental students should be introduced so that they can work together prior to graduation.
  • 11. Integrated Education
    • “ Most dentists don’t meet a technician until after they graduate and that’s criminal. The pre-clinical students and dental laboratory technology students are able to learn from each other, which helps them hone the skills they have and build new ones.”
    • Journal of Dental Technology June/July 2006, Bob Schneider, DDS, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Professor
  • 12. National Association of Dental Laboratories
    • 325 John Knox Rd., L-103
    • Tallahassee, FL 32303
    • 800-950-1150 phone
    • www.nadl.org
    • Ricki Braswell, CAE, Co-Executive Director
    • [email_address]