2003 ANNUAL REPORT SUMMARY: COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY
                             PART I: CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ACADEMIC PLAN
 ...
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND TEACHING/LEARNING ENVIRONMENT - CONTINUED

INVESTMENTS IN      Need to renovate pre-clinic laborator...
RESEARCH – CONTINUED

                    1) World-Class Faculty: Nine open faculty lines. Recruited one DDS/PhD faculty m...
PART II: BUDGET RESTRUCTURING REPORT – CONTINUED

                   Continue to plan to cover the BR goals through funds ...
2004 ANNUAL REPORT SUMMARY: COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY

                             PART I: CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ACADEMIC PLAN
...
3) Our Director of Education meets with all new faculty individually shortly after hire to
                              r...
1) Seminar provided by Dramatic Diversity in SU and AU qtrs. 2002 for faculty, staff,
                       admin. and ne...
1) Remodel small lecture room #3123: 400 SF, cost: $20,780.
                     2) Student Lounge: 741 SF, cost: $22,320....
BARRIERS TO
CROSS-               No barriers encountered. Research collaborations with other units in health sciences
DISC...
2005 ANNUAL REPORT SUMMARY: COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY

                         PART I: CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ACADEMIC PLAN

   ...
ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND TEACHING/LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

                    1) DDS Curriculum: In October, 2002, College rece...
1) Undergrad: Academic quality of the undergrad students is very high. Five
                      students (14%) have GPAs...
1) DDS/Predoctoral Curriculum: Every year, two sections of the DDS curriculum
                      undergo a review proce...
RESEARCH

                   1) In 2004, the Dr. Rudy Melfi scholarship for research was established to support
          ...
While a new interdisciplinary center is not planned, two major interdisciplinary
                       programs are being...
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  1. 1. 2003 ANNUAL REPORT SUMMARY: COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY PART I: CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ACADEMIC PLAN FACULTY SENIOR FACULTY HIRED None. FHAP FUNDING REQUESTS None. 1) Huja: AAOF Faculty Development Award; American Academy of Implant Dentistry Research Foundation – Proposal 2) Mohammad: Faculty Award for Excellence in Community-Based Scholarship; American NATIONAL Academy of Oral Medicine Special Services Award AND 3) Marucha: Henry Guze Award INTERNATIONAL 4) Wee: American Assoc. of Dental Research Bloc Travel Grant to IADR; The Editorial AWARDS WON Council of The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry – Measurement of Color for Craniofacial Structures; American Academy of Fixed Prosthodontics – Fixed Prosthodontics Junior Faculty Award 5) Miller: ITI/Straumann Advance Prosthodontic Fellowship 1) Section chairs contribute through mentoring responsibilities RETENTION 2) Faculty development opportunities actively supported PROGRAMS 3) New faculty programs help with transition, including information on annual review process, professional development and mentoring, and teaching support. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND TEACHING/LEARNING ENVIRONMENT NEW INITIATIVES “Oral Health Improvement through Outreach” (OHIO) is a new program that addresses SUPPORTED serious issues in profession and is funded in part by a $1.5M grant from Robert Wood (disciplinary and multidisciplinary Johnson Foundation. Part of consortium of 9 other dental schools developing new programs) initiatives in dental education regarding outreach/access to care issues. 1) Dental Hygiene is the only undergraduate program. Open forum for discussion is INITIATIVES TO provided weekly with Program Director. IMPROVE 2) Students have direct access to Program’s Assistant Director to review academic UNDERGRADUATE concerns and progress. EDUCATION 3) Students are assigned a faculty advisor upon entering the program. 4) Entering students are assigned an upper-division student mentor. UNDERGRADUATE CLASS SIZES 1) Dental Hygiene course are already small and no class sizes have been decreased. REDUCED OR 2) College participates in survey course (Intro to Health Professions) taught in College of ACCESS Pharmacy that introduces students to the various health professions. INCREASED 1) Related to OHIO program, pre-doctoral program will be introducing a greater emphasis on cultural competency into curriculum. Pre-doctoral and Dental Hygiene students will have clinic rotations providing dental and preventive care to underserved population groups. NEW PROGRAMS 2) Recruitment efforts for minority students are being expanded, and a program to RELATED TO DIVERSITY enhance the academic preparedness of marginal candidates has been successful. 3) In Dental Hygiene, minority students participate in the recruitment and admissions committee for the Program, which has planned events and recruiting efforts. 4) Dental Hygiene is also involved in Professional Schools Recruitment Committee, which in part works to promote diversity in the health professions. 1
  2. 2. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND TEACHING/LEARNING ENVIRONMENT - CONTINUED INVESTMENTS IN Need to renovate pre-clinic laboratory. Although unsuccessful in obtaining funds from a TECHNOLOGY capital request, have raised over $1M from alumni for this project. NEW DISTANCE College does not currently have any exclusively web-based academic programs, although OR WEB-BASED web-based tool and instructional programs are significant components to many courses. COURSES Additional course web sites are developed each year. NEW SCHOLARS PROGRAMS None. Recommendations from G-QUE and I-QUE were not addressed. These initiatives respond to the QUE report: 1) Direct enrollment into Dental Hygiene is now in its second year. All freshmen and most NEW INITIATIVES transfer students are directly enrolled and advised. IN SUPPORT OF G- QUE OR I-QUE 2) Dental Hygiene Program now teaches Dental Hygiene 100 in Autumn Winter, & Spring qtrs. 3) Pre-Dental Hygiene students have more opportunities to interact with upperclassmen and observe in clinic. IMPROVEMENTS 1) New clinic for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery section. 3,000 sq ft. Cost: $1.3M. TO PHYSICAL 2) Small lecture/conference room completed for grad Periodontology program. 400 sq ft. SPACE Cost: $120K. Include complete audio-visual systems for lectures. RESEARCH PRIMARY Research strengths are in biomaterials, cancer biology, chemical senses, craniofacial FOCI OF RESEARCH muscle biology, microbial pathogenesis, psycho-neuro-immunology, and wound biology. Renovation of new research suite (#4010/4038) completed in May 2002. Includes 4 wet RESEARCH SPACE ACQUIRED labs, a tissue culture core lab, a FACS—RT-PCR core lab, equipment and infrastructure space, and 3 faculty offices, totaling 3996 sq ft. 1) 26 pre-doctoral dental students currently participating with faculty members in College- RESEARCH or NIH-funded research projects. Six received fellowship funding from NIH-NIDCR. OPPORTUNITIES 2) College received funding through the Comprehensive Training in Oral & Craniofacial FOR Science (CTOC) T-32 institutional training award, which offers training opportunities at all UNDERGRADS levels. Two fellowships will be made available to start in the combined DDS/PhD program in Summer 2003. COLLABORATIONS 1) College currently discussing collaboration opportunities with P&G, including possibly WITH PRIVATE using the College as a site for clinical trials. SECTOR 2) Collaborated with Battelle and other programs on a funding proposal to NIH-NIDCR. 2
  3. 3. RESEARCH – CONTINUED 1) World-Class Faculty: Nine open faculty lines. Recruited one DDS/PhD faculty member; in final negotiations with candidates for Chair of Oral Biology. Renovated research space has helped in search for Chair. Improvements to facilities will help with recruitment and retention. Faculty salary increases were ~3% above those of market peers this year. 2) High-Quality Academic Programs: The OHIO Project is a major new initiative. Students will have expanded extramural clinical instruction, will be engaged in clinical ADDITIONAL activity earlier in the curriculum, and will receive instruction in cultural competency. INFORMATION ON 3) Enhancing Quality of Teaching/Learning Environment: Renovation of Oral and HOW COLLEGE IS Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic is nearly complete. Began process of renovating pre-clinic ASSISTING labs, including raising over $1M so far and requesting proposals from vendors. UNIVERSITY IN 4) Better Serving Student Body: Average GPA of entering students continues to increase MEETING GOALS and to be above national average. OF ACADEMIC 5) Diverse University Community: Results can be found in Diversity Action Plan 2002-03. PLAN Two education sessions have been completed related to the OHIO project. The Diversity Committee has been established as a standing committee, and a new position of Director of Admissions and Diversity was created. Participated in conferences and events. Received $100K grant from Kellogg Foundation to support scholarships for minority students. 6) Build Ohio’s Future: Outlines on Outreach & Engagement website. Major accomplishment is new OHIO project. PART II: BUDGET RESTRUCTURING REPORT – COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 1. REVS. TO PRINCIPLES No revisions. GUIDING ALLOCATION 2. REVS. TO No revisions. DISTRIBUTION OF BASE BUDGET 3. REVS. TO DISTRIB. OF ANN. CHANGES IN No revisions. REVENUES/ COSTS 4. USE OF ANNUAL INCS. IN INDIRECT Increases in marginal indirect cost recoveries will be returned to the sections that COST generate them with a 10% portion held centrally for support of common research goals. RECOVERIES 5. REVS. TO MANAGING FEE No revisions. AUTHORIZATIONS 6. REVS. TO PLAN FOR HOLDING See #4 above. RESOURCES AT COLLEGE LEVEL 7. DESCRIPTION Risks associated with marginal changes in indirect cost recoveries will be managed OF PLAN FOR through the development of the 10% pool mentioned in #4 above. College will also hold MANAGING RISKS some cash in reserve. 3
  4. 4. PART II: BUDGET RESTRUCTURING REPORT – CONTINUED Continue to plan to cover the BR goals through funds derived from the GME marginal 8/9. HOW FUNDS increases. Requesting to return additional $250K this year and keep difference (~$150K) WILL BE USED OR HOW REDUCTION to help cover anticipated loss in adult Medicaid proposed in governor’s 2004 budget. Will WILL BE MADE then accelerate the rate of transfer of funds as offset by additional GME revenue for future years. 10. HOW COLLEGE IS INVESTING IN QUALITY AND Demonstrated by implementation of OHIO program. INTERDISCIP. ACTIVITY 11. DESCRIPTION Will include enhanced research activity that will generate additional indirect cost recovery OF REVENUE- GENERATION dollars, enhanced clinical productivity and development efforts. This year, research ACTIVITIES support, patient visits, and development funds are all up over last year. 12. EXPLANATION OF PROCESS FOR budget issues and plans discussed at faculty meetings and executive committee ENSURING meetings. Also had special retreat of executive committee including elected faculty MEANINGFUL representatives, and met with student government leaders. FACULTY INPUT 13. UPDATE ON IMPACT OF Anticipate that budget cuts and reallocations for salaries will slow progress. COLLEGE BUDGET PLAN PART III: REALLOCATION PLAN – COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 1. PRINCIPLES GUIDING PRIORITIZATION Principles followed were those used for developing priorities for budget restructuring. OF SOURCES OF FUNDS 2. PROCESS FOR ENSURING MEANINGFUL Process used for consultation with faculty was the same as that described above. CONSULTATION W/ FACULTY 3. SOURCES AND USES OF FUNDS Reallocation plan based upon predicted 2.5% cut that will translate to a ~1.5% cut from TO MEET GOALS College PBA. Have assumed a 4% increase in faculty/staff salaries/benefits. Included a AND A POSS. 12% tuition increase for DDS students (9% increase for dental hygiene students and 9% BUDGET increase in instrument management fees). Will freeze open faculty lines to cover shortfall. REDUCTION 4. REL'SHIP BTWN COMPENSATION INCS. & IMPRVMT Estimate that market increase will be ~2%. IN COMPETITIVE POSITION 5. UPDATE ON IMPACT OF These reallocations will allow for maintaining existing programs but will slow overall PROPOSED progress. CHANGES 4
  5. 5. 2004 ANNUAL REPORT SUMMARY: COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY PART I: CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ACADEMIC PLAN FACULTY SENIOR FACULTY Dr. Sudha Agarwal (Head of the Section of Oral Biology), from the Univ. of Pittsburgh, HIRED/ INSTITUTION where she had served as Head of the Division of Oral Biology and Chair of the Dept. of RECRUITED FROM/ Microbiology and Biochemistry. P.I. on four NIH grants that she has transferred to OSU; ACCOMPLISHMENTS served on numerous NIH Study Sections. 1) Griffen: Apptd. member of NIH Study Section on Behavioral Medicine Interventions and Outcomes. 2) Stevenson: Rec’d notice from J. of Prosthetic Dentistry Editorial Council of his appointment as Abstract Consultant for the Journal, which includes an annual NATIONAL honorarium. Also has one year left on Editorial Council as representative from the AND INTERNATIONAL Carl O. Boucher Prosthodontic Conference. AWARDS WON 3) Mohammed: Rec’d American Academy of Oral Medicine “Special Service Award.” 4) Weaver: Rec’d Leon M. Monheim Award (highest award) from the American Society of Dentist Anesthesiologists for outstanding contributions to field. 5) Fields: Honored Advocate for Senate Bill 51 by Ohio Dental Assoc. Also rec’d Ohio Distinguished Award, Pierre Fauchard Society. 1) Casamassimo: Interim editor, J. of Dentistry for Children. JOURNALS EDITED 2) Griffen: Pediatric oral health editor, UpToDate.com, a resource available on the AND NAME OF internet to physicians. FACULTY MEMBER (new question for 3) Weaver: Editor, Anesthesia Progress. 2004) 4) Larsen: Completed term in August as Editor-in-Chief of Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics. 1) Annual reviews of performance are linked to salary increases approx. 1.5-2% above the avg. increase for peer institutions. 2) College recognizes outstanding faculty each year through numerous awards. 3) Retention offers (including proactive retention offers) made to productive faculty. FACULTY RETENTION PROGRAMS •From last year: 1) Section chairs contribute through mentoring responsibilities 2) Faculty development opportunities actively supported 3) New faculty programs help with transition, including information on annual review process, professional development and mentoring, and teaching support. 1) The existing Peer Evaluation of Teaching program was revised, with two separate initiatives being identified and delineated. Faculty development has been FACULTY incorporated into our annual review process and is an ongoing process for all faculty DEVELOPMENT (details of process are in Appx. A). College has a separate Faculty Teaching PROGRAMS Development Process and Peer Review of Teaching (in Appx. B), primarily for (new question for provisional faculty. Importance of section head role in these activities has been 2004) emphasized. (cont. on next page) 2) In addition to encouraging new faculty to attend the Univ. orientation program and participate in the Roads Scholar Tour, the College has a separate yearly orientation program for new faculty. 5
  6. 6. 3) Our Director of Education meets with all new faculty individually shortly after hire to review issues related to faculty development and instruction, and works closely with them when they are assigned their first course directorship. FACULTY 4) Our Office of Academic Affairs sponsors a quarterly lunch meeting for all new faculty DEVELOPMENT hired within the last 2 years. Provides opportunity for collegial fellowship, discussion PROGRAMS of relevant topics, and asking questions/raising issues of concern. (cont. from prev. page) 5) Office of Academic Affairs has developed a website for instructional and development resources for faculty which continues to be expanded. 6) College has begun providing support for faculty hired within the last two years to attend the American Dental Assoc. annual meeting. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND TEACHING/LEARNING ENVIRONMENT NEW INITIATIVES College continues to develop its outreach programs that are intended to fundamentally SUPPORTED change the model for dental education to rely on significant portions of the curriculum (disciplinary and devoted to extramural training in community settings. Revisions to the curriculum have multidisciplinary been designed and are being implemented this year to support this major change to programs) clinical education of our students. 1) Recently renovated College computer lab and planning for a renovation of the student study area for the summer quarter 2004. 2) Continued to work with College faculty to make course materials accessible on course websites. Planning to introduce an interactive web-based teaching tool to be integrated into lecture sessions in these courses during 2004-2005. 3) Admin. meets regularly with student leaders and students serve on College committees. Issues raised are referred to Dean or Section head, providing a INITIATIVES TO feedback loop for resolution. IMPROVE 4) This past year, the above process promulgated the College’s participation in a UNDERGRADUATE recently developed integrated regional board format as well as the incorporation of EDUCATION some significant changes in the formalized board preparation programs for pre- doctoral students. 5) College has increased efforts to integrate interactions between dental hygiene and senior dental students, esp. opportunities to interact in an environment that simulates private practice experiences. 6) Pre-dental hygiene students who are enrolled in the College take DHY 100 during their first qtr. at OSU. Enhancements to this course give these pre-major students opportunities to interact with each other and with majors, and to observe in the clinic. 1) No reduction in class size for any undergrad dental hygiene or pre-doctoral dental classes. 2) Dental Hygiene courses are small and would not benefit from decreasing class size. UNDERGRADUATE Increased access available for non-dental hygiene majors to enroll in program’s CLASS SIZES survey courses, which attract a relatively small number of students. REDUCED OR 3) Not possible to reduce size of pre-doctoral classes (100+ students), but small groups ACCESS INCREASED used where possible. Class also split in half for some early clinical teaching activities. Lab courses for clinical skills taught with 10:1 student/faculty ratio. 4) Dentistry and Dental Hygiene students continue to participate in ASC 694 (Intro. to the Health Professions), offered through College of Pharmacy. [also noted last year] 6
  7. 7. 1) Seminar provided by Dramatic Diversity in SU and AU qtrs. 2002 for faculty, staff, admin. and new pre-doctoral students, using theatrical-based presentation model. 2) Course material on cultural competency included in curriculum for Dent I pre- doctoral students, and curriculum committee currently planning for a new courses and additional materials in other courses, esp. pre-doctoral clinical curriculum. 3) Several College faculty participated in a Dental Education Cultural Competency NEW PROGRAMS Workshop held in Chicago in Autumn 2003, and will assist in educating other faculty. RELATED TO DIVERSITY 4) Dental Hygiene students can petition Curriculum Committee for individual area of specialization; several have been approved for specialization in cultural diversity. 5) Faculty, students and staff are represented on College Diversity Committee. 6) As part of the “OHIO project” (Robert Wood Johnson grant), students have opportunity to provide dental care for underserved populations. The program will continue to expand over next four years, when finally all eligible pre-doctoral and dental hygiene students will participate. 1) College has no courses that are exclusively distance or web-based, but many courses and programs have significant web-based components. Increasing numbers of faculty put lecture slides and handouts on the web. 2) In past year, a faculty member (in conjunction with Office of Academic Affairs) developed a major learning object focusing on complete dentures, which included streaming video technology. Faculty in Section of Restorative and Prosthetic NEW DISTANCE OR Dentistry have worked this year on recording lab procedures for ultimate se in web- WEB-BASED based instructional resources. One faculty member also working on development of COURSES “virtual reality” tooth images in QuickTime. 3) Dental Hygiene program is in process of enhancing access to Bachelor Degree Completion Program by offering major courses via distance format beginning AU 2004. 4) We continue to discuss and identify potential all programs that could benefit from use of web-based technology, including instruction in Dental Hygiene program and Continuing Ed. courses. NEW SCHOLARS PROGRAMS No new programs. College still active in Health Sciences Scholars Program. 1) Graduate students primarily involved in teaching pre-doctoral students in clinical setting. These students are encouraged to attend relevant sections of FTAD program. Also. College offers a special Orientation program, in which (beginning July 2004) our Director of Education will discuss information related to instructional responsibilities and good teaching practices. DESCRIPTION OF TA 2) Web-based (managed in WebCT) instructional program related to clinical teaching TRAINING PROGRAM (dev. by Office of Academic Affairs, mentioned previously) includes information (INCLUDES FTAD) (new question for about policies and procedures, evaluation of teaching, etc. Also have posted 2004) sections of a text (in formal agreement with publisher) providing information on developing helpful teaching relationships, observing learners and providing feedback, etc. Grad students will be required to pass an on-line exam related to this material. 3) GTAs’ instructional performance is evaluated by students each year; results are discussed with them and used to improve any areas of weakness. 7
  8. 8. 1) Remodel small lecture room #3123: 400 SF, cost: $20,780. 2) Student Lounge: 741 SF, cost: $22,320. 3) College Canteen: 2,424 SF, cost: $43,323. 4) Student Computer Room: 410 SF, cost: $43,369. IMPROVEMENTS TO 5) 20 new dental chairs in clinics: cost: $198,900. PHYSICAL SPACE 6) New clinic sinks, 1st & 2nd floor: cost: $45,000. 7) Upgrade patient restrooms, 1st & 2nd floor: cost: $22,000. 8) Upgrade Medical Gas Manifold: cost: $17,605. 9) Remodel Business Office & Clinic Dean Office: 1,839 SF, cost: $45,523. Totals: 5,813 SF, cost: $458,820. RESEARCH LOCATION/ASSIGN- ABLE SQ. FT. OF 1) New Research Lab, Dr. Huja: 510 SF, cost: $72,250. NEW RESEARCH 2) New Microscope Room: 100 SF, cost: $2,000. SPACE AND PROJECTS Totals: 610 SF, cost: $74,250. HOUSED THERE 1) 23 pre-doctoral dentistry and dental hygiene students currently participating with faculty on research projects. [26 students noted last year.] Funded by both extra- and intramural sources. Extramural funding provided by Comprehensive Training in Oral & Craniofacial Sciences (CTOC) T-32 institutional training award (NIDCR-supported program). 2) Five students currently enrolled in 7-year combined DDS/PhD program. RESEARCH [Last year: noted that two fellowships will be made available to start in the combined OPPORTUNITIES DDS/PhD program in Summer 2003.] FOR UNDERGRADS AND # 3) Six students received individual fellowships from NIH-NIDCR during past year. PARTICIPATING 4) Intramural support provided by number of student research scholarships/fellowships. College provides 20-25 research awards per year to encouraged student research participation. A number of Barlow Fellowships available to students demonstrating outstanding academics and participation in research. Students also encouraged to and funded to present findings at nat’l meetings and at College Research Day, and encouraged to participate at research competitions locally, nationally, and internationally. 1) Leadership Agenda this year included establishment of Dr. Rudy Melfi Scholarship to PLANS TO ENHANCE increase participation of undergrads in research. This new scholarship will support a RESEARCH research stipend for one student engaged in research per year. Also available to EXPERIENCES FOR UNDERGRADS (new undergrads not enrolled in college. question for 2004) 2) Research page of college website has been redesigned to provide more direct access about research interests and availability of faculty mentors to students. 1) Increased research productivity encouraged through establishment of individual research goals in discussions between faculty and Section Heads at beginning of academic year, and reviewed during annual review process. STRATEGIES TO 2) Accomplishments recognized in merit salary increases and research awards given INCREASE FACULTY each year. RESEARCH PRODUCTIVITY (new 3) Faculty receive a portion of funds from salary release dollars to use in direct support question for 2004) of new research efforts. 4) College plans to return a majority of marginal indirects to the units that generate them. 5) Assignments of research space are consistent with research needs and productivity. 8
  9. 9. BARRIERS TO CROSS- No barriers encountered. Research collaborations with other units in health sciences DISCIPLINARY and elsewhere on campus are strong and productive; add’l collaborations encouraged; RESEARCH AND TEACHING (new teaching collaborations exist in multidisciplinary graduate programs. question for 2004) STEPS TAKEN TO ELIMINATE Not answered. BARRIERS (new question for 2004) College in process (under leadership of Drs. Sheridan and Sen) of developing interdisciplinary center to study biology of wound healing and tissue repair. New PLANS FOR NEW proposal being developed as an extension of existing Mind/Body Center, which will INTERDISC. bring together senior scientists from Dentistry, COMPH, and Davis Institute. New CENTERS (new center will expand research vision to include basic, clinical, and translational studies in question for 2004) wound biology. Proposal initially funded by seed grant program from Office of Vice President for Research; grant application for Center for Biology of Wound Healing and Tissue Repair is targeted for submission on June 1, 2004. Awards from private corporations contribute a relatively small percentage of College’s COLLABORATIONS total extramural research funding. Several faculty members engaged in research WITH PRIVATE collaborations with businesses related to development and evaluation of dental SECTOR products. Include Dana Corp. Fdtn., Haliburton Energy Fdtn., Implant Innovations, Sterioss, Stryker, Sulzer Calcitek Inc., Collagenex, Kellog, Ivoclar and Vivadent. PART II: BUDGET RESTRUCTURING REPORT – COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY UPDATE ON IMPACT Previous rebasing resulted in freezing of some faculty positions. While we have OF COLLEGE covered self-funded salary increases and budget cuts with tuition increases, we have BUDGET PLAN not had sufficient marginal revenues to open all of these faculty positions. USE OF ANNUAL Marginal changes in indirect cost recoveries will be returned to the sections in a 90/10 INCS. IN INDIRECT COST RECOVERIES split (90% to the sections). REVS. TO MANAGING FEE No changes. AUTHORIZATIONS PART III: REALLOCATION/COMPENSATION PLANS – COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY Compensation increases for the past two years have been greater than the avg. salary COMPENSATION PLAN increases of our peers, and we anticipate making further progress in catching up. [Last year: estimated that market increase would be ~2%.] 9
  10. 10. 2005 ANNUAL REPORT SUMMARY: COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY PART I: CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE ACADEMIC PLAN FACULTY SENIOR FACULTY Negotiating with finalists for 2 positions: Finalist for Head of Section of Oral and HIRED/ INSTITUTION Maxillofacial Surgery has D.D.S., M.D., and Ph.D. and is a trained plastic surgeon. The RECRUITED FROM/ finalist for Assoc. Dean for Research is an int’l expert in craniofacial growth and ACCOMPLISHMENTS development and has been continuously funded through NIH for many years. NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL Eleven awards received. [Last year: 6 awards received.] AWARDS 1) College has an official Faculty Development document that requires section heads to discuss faculty development activities with individual faculty annually. 2) College also has Peer Review of Teaching document, and sponsors a quarterly luncheon for all faculty hired in past 2 years. 3) College helps sponsor faculty hired in past 2 years to attend American Dental Education Assoc. conference. 4) Twice a year College administration sponsors a faculty development luncheon programs for all faculty. 5) College has web site with instructional resources and another for new course directors. 6) Acting Assoc. Dean for Research notifies faculty of programs related to research FACULTY development, and is available for consultation with faculty. DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS Last year:  Existing Peer Evaluation of Teaching program revised; faculty development incorporated into annual review process.  College has a separate yearly orientation program for new faculty.  Director of Education meets with all new faculty to review issues related to faculty development and instruction, and works with them when they are assigned their first course directorship.  Quarterly lunch meeting for all new faculty hired within the last 2 years.  Website for instructional and development resources for faculty which continues to be expanded.  College has begun providing support for faculty hired within the last two years to attend the American Dental Assoc. annual meeting. 1) College uses merit-based compensation model consistent with univ. policy. 2) We assess faculty needs through annual review process and provide support for section heads to retain faculty including retention offers. 3) We are developing a new research incentive plan and a new clinic productivity FACULTY incentive plan. RETENTION PROGRAMS Last year:  Annual reviews of performance are linked to salary increases approx. 1.5-2% above the avg. increase for peer institutions.  College recognizes outstanding faculty each year through numerous awards.  Retention offers (including proactive retention offers) made to productive faculty. JOURNALS Two journals edited (one ended Sept. 2004). [Last year: 4 journals edited.] EDITED 10
  11. 11. ACADEMIC PROGRAMS AND TEACHING/LEARNING ENVIRONMENT 1) DDS Curriculum: In October, 2002, College received a 5 year, $1.5 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to develop collaborative relationships with dental clinics in underserved areas of Ohio where senior dental students will spend 60 days in practice and includes cultural competency. 2) The DDS Curriculum Committee has also been working towards incorporating more early clinical experiences in the first two years of the curriculum based on feedback from students, alumni and faculty. 3) Graduate Curriculum: In the past year the Core Curriculum for grad students was re-evaluated and the options for the selective component of that curriculum were NEW AND UNIQUE expanded to create more flexibility and enhancement in the course selection. PROGRAMS/ 4) Undergraduate Dental Hygiene Curriculum -- Baccalaureate Degree Completion COURSES, MAJORS/ Program: The curriculum for the degree completion program was reviewed and MINORS substantially revised. Each of the required dental hygiene courses in the degree completion program are now being offered via distance. 5) New Dental Hygiene Education Courses: Three new dental hygiene education courses that will meet the area of specialization requirements for students who choose the Dental Hygiene Education specialization are being developed. Last year:  Revisions to the curriculum have been designed and are being implemented this year to support having significant extramural training in community settings be part of the clinical education. 1) We have improved some facilities used by the graduate, pre-doctoral and undergrad students in the College: pre-doctoral and undergrad study area has been renovated and new study cubicles installed; graduate student study area is being renovated. 2) We continue to meet with students regularly for feedback/input into the curriculum. 3) We are continuing our fund raising toward the goal of a new pre-clinic laboratory. 4) Orientation Program for pre-doctoral and graduate students was modified this year in an ongoing effort to provide timely, useful information to entering students. 5) A clinical teaching tutorial was developed to assist graduate teaching associates. INITIATIVES TO Last year: IMPROVE  Renovated College computer lab and planning for a renovation of the student study EDUCATIONAL area for the summer quarter 2004. ENVIRONMENT  Worked with College faculty to make course materials accessible on course websites. Planning to introduce an interactive web-based teaching tool to be integrated into lecture sessions in these courses during 2004-2005.  Admin. meets regularly with student leaders and students serve on College committees.  Participated in a recently developed integrated regional board format as well as the incorporation of some significant changes in the formalized board preparation programs for pre-doctoral students.  College has increased efforts to integrate interactions between dental hygiene and senior dental students. 11
  12. 12. 1) Undergrad: Academic quality of the undergrad students is very high. Five students (14%) have GPAs above 3.5 and are designated as university honors. Among the 91 Dental Hygiene Professional Program undergrads, average GPA is 3.33. Among the 8 continuing Baccalaureate Degree Completion Program undergrads (of 11 total), average GPA is 3.67. 2) DDS Predoctoral Students (Admissions – Class of 2008): OSU National Avg Mean Total GPA 3.6 3.25 ASSESSMENT OF ACADEMIC QUALITY Mean Science GPA 3.4 3.13 OF STUDENTS DAT Academic Avg 18.9 17.53 DAT PAT Avg 17.5 16.49 DAT Total Science 18.4 17.36 Average entering GPA was the highest in 30 years. Scores on both Part I and Part II of the National Board have improved this past year, moving the College further above the National mean on both exams. 3) Graduate Students: The College hosts nine advanced education programs. Students matriculating into the College programs this past year had an average GPA of 3.36 and scored 88 on Part I of the National Board. 1) The College hosts all recognized specialty programs in dentistry; all programs either require a Master’s degree or strongly recommend it as a requirement for completion. Each Program continued to fill their respective classes with qualified applicants; overall applicant pool is sizeable and competitive. 2) Students participate in significant scholarly activity culminating in publishable research; this year approximately 24% of the graduating seniors have submitted a manuscript for publication at the time of this report. ASSESSMENT OF 3) Program Directors report that 100% of their students upon graduation indicate they ACADEMIC QUALITY OF ACADEMIC are satisfied with the educational experience they received in their program. PROGRAMS 4) The quality of the Dental Hygiene Program has consistently been very high as demonstrated by exit and employment surveys completed by graduates. 5) National Board Dental Hygiene Examination scores for the program have been average. In 2004 our school average was 85.5 compared to the national average of 88.4. The program’s pass rate for NERB in 2004 was 94% for the clinical examination and 84% for the computer simulated examination. The clinical pass rate is comparable to benchmarks yet the computer examination is uncharacteristically below. Plans are being made to address this situation. 1) This past autumn, we used the AADSAS AClient database to sort for the top academic performers in the country, invited them to complete a supplemental INITIATIVES FOR application to OSU and then to interview with our College. ATTRACTING HIGH- 2) A new admissions event was implemented this autumn to include a marketing of the QUALITY STUDENTS College, the Health Sciences Center, OSU, Columbus and its surrounding communities. Six admissions events were held from September through January and a total of 220 applicants were interviewed. 12
  13. 13. 1) DDS/Predoctoral Curriculum: Every year, two sections of the DDS curriculum undergo a review process directed by the Curriculum Committee. A subcommittee reports on strengths and makes recommendations, and the Committee takes any necessary actions. 2) The Graduate Studies Committee monitors the core graduate curriculum and CURRICULA REVIEW PROCESS recommends changes, with approval and comment from the College Graduate Faculty at large. 3) The Advanced Education Programs are responsible for their curricula but must meet program accreditation standards of the ADA Commission on Dental Accreditation. 4) The Dental Hygiene Curriculum Committee is charged with ongoing review of the curriculum. 1) DDS/Predoctoral Program: College conducts annual survey of seniors graduating from the DDS program, covering topics related to: curriculum, competency statements, student services, experiences with faculty, general satisfaction and post graduation plans. Also, every 2 years the College surveys alumni of the DDS program who are 3 and 6 years post graduation. 2) The College sends an annual survey to all of the Directors of Advanced Education OUTCOME Programs that our previous years’ graduates indicated they would be attending. The ASSESSMENT College also regularly monitors student performance on national and regional boards. PROCESS FOR 3) All outcomes data is reported annually to the College Outcomes Committee and GRADUATES DDS Curriculum Committee. 4) Graduate Program: The Office of Graduate Studies coordinates the collection of outcomes data for each of the Advanced Education Programs. A report is provided to the Outcomes Committee of the College for review and comment annually. 5) Dental Hygiene/Undergraduate Program: Dental Hygiene conducts an annual telephone survey of graduates from the past 2 years. The survey includes questions about employment and continuing education. NEW Interaction between faculty and dental hygiene students is continuously encouraged. FACULTY/STUDENT There are numerous research opportunities for students beyond the formalized summer INTERACTION OPPORTUNITIES student research program in which dental hygiene students actively participate. 13
  14. 14. RESEARCH 1) In 2004, the Dr. Rudy Melfi scholarship for research was established to support undergraduate student research during the summer. Many other opportunities exist for undergraduate students to participate in research. 2) During this year, twenty-nine students completed research funded by the College (Barlow scholarships and CTOC funded research program). They presented their projects at the College Research Day and at several national meetings, and participated in research competitions locally and nationally. Last year:  23 pre-doctoral dentistry and dental hygiene students currently participating with faculty on research projects funded by both extra- and intramural sources. NEW RESEARCH  Five students currently enrolled in 7-year combined DDS/PhD program. OPPORTUNITIES  Six students received individual fellowships from NIH-NIDCR during past year. FOR UNDERGRADS/ # PARTICIPATING  Intramural support provided by number of student research scholarships/ fellowships. College provides 20-25 research awards per year to encouraged student research participation. A number of Barlow Fellowships available; students also encouraged/funded to present findings at nat’l meetings and at College Research Day, and encouraged to participate in research competitions locally, nationally, and internationally. Plans to enhance:  Leadership Agenda this year included establishment of Dr. Rudy Melfi Scholarship which will support a research stipend for one student engaged in research per year.  Research page of college website has been redesigned to provide more direct access about research interests and availability of faculty mentors to students. ASSESSMENT OF Faculty research activity has steadily increased over the past years, as reflected by an FACULTY increase in the number of publications per faculty and research funding secured. An RESEARCH increase of 0.37 publications per full time faculty and a 23% increase in research PRODUCTIVITY funding were noted in the year 2004. 1) Improvements in infrastructure: renovations were made in ~500 sq. ft. of space on the 3rd floor for establishment of a bone biology laboratory, in 4174 for a microscope room, and needed modifications in 4010. 2) Equipment purchases for faculty. 3) Seed monies for faculty members are allocated to support their research program. 4) Special research assignments: Drs. Huja and Wee spent 3 months exclusively for the development of their research programs. STRATEGIES TO INCREASE FACULTY Last year: RESEARCH  Increased research productivity encouraged through establishment of individual PRODUCTIVITY research goals in discussions between faculty and Section Heads at beginning of academic year, and reviewed during annual review process.  Accomplishments recognized in merit salary increases and research awards given each year.  Faculty receive a portion of funds from salary release dollars to use in direct support of new research efforts.  College plans to return a majority of marginal indirects to units generating them.  Assignments of research space consistent with research needs and productivity. 14
  15. 15. While a new interdisciplinary center is not planned, two major interdisciplinary programs are being developed in the following areas: 1) Mind, body and health: Faculty from Dentistry collaborate with the Colleges of Medicine and SBS to understand the psychological control of nerve and immune functions. 2) Tissue engineering: Faculty in Dentistry will collaborate with Colleges of Medicine PLANS FOR NEW and Engineering to develop ways for surgical reconstruction of bone and cartilage INTERDISCIPLINARY CENTERS by tissue engineered grafts. Last year:  College in process of developing interdisciplinary center to study biology of wound healing and tissue repair. Proposal initially funded by seed grant program from Office of Vice President for Research; grant application for Center for Biology of Wound Healing and Tissue Repair is targeted for submission on June 1, 2004. IDENTIFIED RESEARCH The college has identified two major areas of research emphasis: mind, body and EMPHASIS/EXPLICIT health initiative and bone biology and tissue engineering. PRIORITIES PART II: FY05 BUDGET DISTRIBUTION AND FY06 COMPENSATION GOALS/PLAN – COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY 1) Support research: The College invested in the development of two oral biology laboratories and the remodel of offices in that research group. 2) Improve program quality: Clinical training in our professional program was further enhanced with additional outreach clinical training days for our senior students through the OHIO project and the establishment of a mobile clinic to reach children in the Columbus Public Schools. INVESTMENT OF FY05 RESOURCES 3) Increase credit hour generation: The dental hygiene program has increased its distance learning opportunities and is generating additional credit hour activity. 4) Increase external funding: We have generated an additional ~$750,000 to support our outreach programs this year through funding from the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation and the Access Health Columbus for the mobile clinic and an interdisciplinary clinic with optometry and internal medicine at the South High Street Clinic. We estimate that our benchmark institutions will provide increments equal to ~ 2% for this coming year. We are planning for a 3% increase. COMPENSATION GOALS AND PLAN Last year:  Compensation increases for the past two years have been greater than avg. salary increases of our peers, and we anticipate making further progress in catching up. 15

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