Feeding the agile beast agile 2010
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Feeding the agile beast agile 2010

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Agile delivers improved fit, throughput, visibility and transparency, and collaboration. But the need within most organizations is not just improved software development – it is to improve the ...

Agile delivers improved fit, throughput, visibility and transparency, and collaboration. But the need within most organizations is not just improved software development – it is to improve the ability to deliver value. Software development organizations must focus on the initiatives where there is the greatest potential return. This is an introduction to Capability Analysis - a proven method of maximizing economic outcomes by laser focusing development on delivery of business value. Unlike many Business Analysis techniques, it matches the cadence and needs of the Agile team.

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  • So, before we get started, a little about me. My name is Mike Cottmeyer, I am an agile transformation coach with Pillar technology. Before I joined Pillar I was a trainer and consultant with VersionOne. Before that I ran a pretty large agile portfolio of projects for CheckFree (now Fiserv). Pillar Technology has been around for about 13 years and is just about 100 people strong. Pillar specializes in agile transformation and project delivery. We can bring in agile coaches on the leadership and project management side. We can bring in coaches to help you with TDD. We can spin up teams and help you deliver projects.
  • One Saturday, during the college football season, when I first got married my wife called downstairs and said, “Dennis, take out the trash.” I thought about her request. It was after half-time of the current game, I was going to my friend Steve’s house for the later game, I would have time to run the trash down to the curb when I went out to the card to drive to Steve’s house. So, I answered okay – promising to taking the trash out. It turns out that my promise wasn’t aligned with her expectation. By take out the trash she meant, “Not just down to the curb - from every room in the house, replacing the trash can liners.”By the nature of her request she meant now to demonstrate that she was more valuable to you than a football game.
  • I was working for a client to rationalize the portfolio of improvements requested from the business. One of the challenges I identified was that they were working on too many projects at the same time for each team. This resulted in a delay in delivery across the board. I built a spreadsheet that showed when projects would get finished based on when we started them if they focused their resources. In the final workshop I showed them the 10 they could finish if focused on them. One of the senior executives asked me to add 10 more projects to the model and show what the impact. So I did this and told him. In the first model if you work on these 10, you will finish all ten. If we work on twenty, you will have to prioritize the 5 that we want to finish.
  • We don’t get what intend: My daughter was in a writing class in the fifth grade. We got called into a parent teacher meeting at the middle of the year. The teacher told us about Brittany’s journal. Brittany had been writing a store about a group of characters going through this adventure. Each day for the first half of the year she had written about them. She had been very creative in developing different characters – and creating crises that they would creatively work their way out of. The teacher had met with Brittany and said she appreciated Brittany’s story – but wanted Brittany to branch out in her writing. Brittany said she understood and committed to branching out in her writing. The next week the teacher read Brittany’s journal and felt really bad – so she called us for a meeting. Brittany had written about all of her characters falling into a lake and drowning. This is common on software. We commit to getting something done – and we don’t always have a clarity on the outcome. Additionally most teams don’t increment with intention today. We put a story in the backlog – we commit to develop it – and so we push forward
  • In a fashion that is easy to update and supports progressive definition based on learning and feedback
  • #1 Inadequate shared understanding Make Business Value Assumptions Explicit#2 Lack of focus Focus on highest business value opportunity#3 Lack of clarity on the outcome Increment with intention
  • We don’t get what intend: My daughter was in a writing class in the fifth grade. We got called into a parent teacher meeting at the middle of the year. The teacher told us about Brittany’s journal. Brittany had been writing a store about a group of characters going through this adventure. Each day for the first half of the year she had written about them. She had been very creative in developing different characters – and creating crises that they would creatively work their way out of. The teacher had met with Brittany and said she appreciated Brittany’s story – but wanted Brittany to branch out in her writing. Brittany said she understood and committed to branching out in her writing. The next week the teacher read Brittany’s journal and felt really bad – so she called us for a meeting. Brittany had written about all of her characters falling into a lake and drowning. This is common on software. We commit to getting something done – and we don’t always have a clarity on the outcome. Additionally most teams don’t increment with intention today. We put a story in the backlog – we commit to develop it – and so we push forward
  • The goal is not just to be committed. It is to be focused on delivering the business value expected with the least investment possible
  • When building product releases we often focus on reducing risk first – then building business value.
  • I have already done the capability breakdown for the exerciseReview the Assessment Framework from the previous exercise.
  • We don’t get what intend: My daughter was in a writing class in the fifth grade. We got called into a parent teacher meeting at the middle of the year. The teacher told us about Brittany’s journal. Brittany had been writing a store about a group of characters going through this adventure. Each day for the first half of the year she had written about them. She had been very creative in developing different characters – and creating crises that they would creatively work their way out of. The teacher had met with Brittany and said she appreciated Brittany’s story – but wanted Brittany to branch out in her writing. Brittany said she understood and committed to branching out in her writing. The next week the teacher read Brittany’s journal and felt really bad – so she called us for a meeting. Brittany had written about all of her characters falling into a lake and drowning. This is common on software. We commit to getting something done – and we don’t always have a clarity on the outcome. Additionally most teams don’t increment with intention today. We put a story in the backlog – we commit to develop it – and so we push forward

Feeding the agile beast agile 2010 Feeding the agile beast agile 2010 Presentation Transcript