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Tropical Living In Sun And Rain – Panama
Tropical Living In Sun And Rain – Panama
Tropical Living In Sun And Rain – Panama
Tropical Living In Sun And Rain – Panama
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Tropical Living In Sun And Rain – Panama

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Weathering it Out in Panama …

Weathering it Out in Panama
Congratulations! You have finally decided to leave the oppressive financial situation, overbearing regulations, and perhaps a lot of snow and cold behind. The Expat life or Tropical Living beckons, at least part time, and the tropics are the place you need to be. Due to a lot of factors, you see Panama at the top of the list.

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  • 1. Tropical Living in Sun and Rain – Panama Published by PanamaSimple, August 27, 2013 | By Dennis Smith Weathering it Out in Panama Congratulations! You have finally decided to leave the oppressive financial situation, overbearing regulations, and perhaps a lot of snow and cold behind. The Expat life or Tropical Living beckons, at least part time, and the tropics are the place you need to be. Due to a lot of factors, you see Panama at the top of the list. Yes, Panama is the small country with Caribbean and Pacific beaches, small mountains, islandsand more. And to be honest, this is a great place to learn tropical living, especially if you have not tried it before. But, before immersion, you should, consider,doing a bit of research so your survival kit is stocked (mentally and physically). And once you are here with the rest of us, maybe seek out and consider using some good advice? Before we get to the advice, which will be covered later in this post, it is beneficial to define the climate and or weather you are getting yourself into.
  • 2. Seasons and Average Temperatures There are only two seasons in Panama. The rainy season (Winter) in Panama is from late May to early December, and the dry season (Summer) is from late December to early May. Average temperatures year round in Panama City (Pacific coast), in Fahrenheit, are highs in the low 90s to lows in the 70s. Temperatures on the Caribbean side are about the same. In the mountains, the range is 70 to 55. Humidity averages around 80+% throughout the year. We Have to Talk About the Rain Factor Get used to the fact that it rains for about 9 months annually in Panama. (a good Panamanian friend once told me that if you don’t like a little rain, leave.) The good news is that there are no Asian
  • 3. monsoons here. Expect a couple of hours of rain in the late afternoon or early morning hours. (Nice for sleeping and keeping the country green.) The exception to the rule is if a hurricane is trying to wipe out the land from Mexico upward to the States bordering the Gulf. That might bring 2 to 3 days of constant rain at a time (great lightning shows too). It also rains a little more on the Pacific side than on the Caribbean side of Panama. Another point is that generally if it is raining on one Coast, it will be clear and delightful on the other, and vice versa. Now Its Time to Consider Some Comfort Factors in Tropical Panama Sunshine and heat. Panama is tropical because it is located 8 degrees above the Equator. That means that the sun is direct and potentially harmful to the skin of Expat ‘great white wonders”. So protect yourself from sunburn or sun stroke until you get acclimated. Use your sun block for awhile. Don’t be afraid of wearing a big, floppy straw hat. (Panamanians think this is absolutely acceptable and makes a foreigner one of the gang.) Same goes for walking around under an umbrella. If you get tired from exposure, do like the locals do and find a shaded hammock and take a short siesta (nap). Humidity will make you sweat so don’t be afraid to take multiple showers daily. The Big H can also dehydrate you in a heartbeat so between sipping those rums and cokes, or martinis, drink water, a lot of it. Combined with heat and humidity, dust can be a nuisance in Panama. It gets into everything, your body, clothes, home and sticks there. If you have allergies or other respiratory problems, take proper precautions. Tropical Pests Sorry but tropical life brings insects that just love to make your acquaintance and take a pint or 2. In Panama, the biggest concerns are mosquitos and gnats (chitras). Some mosquitos in Panama carry the Dengue virus. It can be fatal if not diagnosed properly. Fortunately, the Panamanian medical professionals are well versed in treating this rare problem. Now to the second pest. Everyone hates Chitras. They are invisible to the naked eye and inject an acid into your skin through a hollow proboscis. This stings, itches, and can raise welts that make you look like you lost a battle with an Italian chef whose favorite weapon is tomato sauce. These little pests and swarm for about an hour at sunrise or sundown. For dissuasion, most people use “Off” or other insect sprays. Some of the locals boil down coconuts until they have a thick, brown oil that the snouts of the Chitras can’t penetrate. (Smells good and is good for the skin too.) The Bottom Line
  • 4. Now you have some pros and cons about living in tropical Panama. Do with them what you will or will not. As a former Iowa boy, I find the advantages of the lifestyle to be just fine. So do many Expat transplants from around the world. Come join us. Trust me, it beats snow any day.

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