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Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick
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Coaching in the Classroom - More Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick

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This is a prototype of a learning experience intended to be assigned as online, self-study pre-work to regristrants for an upcoming instructor led experience incorporating skills practice. The intent …

This is a prototype of a learning experience intended to be assigned as online, self-study pre-work to regristrants for an upcoming instructor led experience incorporating skills practice. The intent is to bring learners to a greater understanding of the importance of delivering powerful feedback and a clearer understanding of what it is that makes feedback powerful.

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  • 1. COACHING IN THE CLASSROOMMore Good Stuff from the Learning Maverick © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 2. About this Booklet• Although I present this in the form of a PowerPoint presentation, this is really a booklet to be read and not something to be projected on a wall in a group setting. wrong right © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 3. About this Booklet• Although I present this in the form of a PowerPoint presentation, this is really a booklet to be read and not something to be projected on a wall in a group setting.• If you’d like others to read this, please send them a link via Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook, rather than distribute hard copies. I’m told that this will increase my ranking on Google and thus my chances of becoming rich and famous one day. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 4. About this Booklet• Although I present this in the form of a PowerPoint presentation, this is really a booklet to be read and not something to be projected on a wall in a group setting.• If you’d like others to read this, please send them a link via Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook, rather than distribute hard copies. I’m told that this will increase my ranking on Google and thus my chances of becoming rich and famous one day.• If you’d like to have a version of this booklet suitable to a group setting, or a cooler, more interactive version suitable for online self-study, just ask; you’ll find my contact info on the final slide. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 5. Point of View• Imagine that you have registered to participate in a day- long class on a soft-skills topic such as Dealing with Ridiculous Customers. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 6. Point of View• Imagine that you have registered to participate in a day- long class on a soft-skills topic such as Dealing with Ridiculous Customers.• Further imagine that a week out from the class date you receive an assignment to review this presentation and be prepared to teach back any section of it in class. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 7. Objectives• Your objectives in reviewing this presentation are two: © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 8. Objectives• Your objectives in reviewing this presentation are two: • To participate constructively in skills practice rounds during your upcoming class. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 9. Objectives• Your objectives in reviewing this presentation are two: • To participate constructively in skills practice rounds during your upcoming class. • To prepare yourself to ―teach back‖ to class participants any portion of this presentation. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 10. Skills Practice Roles• You will participate in several rounds of skills practice during your upcoming class. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 11. Skills Practice Roles• You will participate in several rounds of skills practice during your upcoming class.• During each ―round‖ you will play one of three roles: © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 12. Skills Practice Roles• You will participate in several rounds of skills practice during your upcoming class.• During each ―round‖ you will play one of three roles: • The ―actor,‖ who will play the part of an employee. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 13. Skills Practice Roles• You will participate in several rounds of skills practice during your upcoming class.• During each ―round‖ you will play one of three roles: • The ―actor,‖ who will play the part of an employee. • The ―partner,‖ who will play the part of an employee, customer, etc. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 14. Skills Practice Roles• You will participate in several rounds of skills practice during your upcoming class.• During each ―round‖ you will play one of three roles: • The ―actor,‖ who will play the part of an employee. • The ―partner,‖ who will play the part of an employee, customer, etc. • The ―moderator/coach,‖ who will moderate and observe the interaction, take notes and provide robust feedback to the actor. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 15. The Most Important Role• In this presentation, we’ll focus on your most important role—that of the MC—the moderator coach. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 16. The Most Important Role• In this presentation, we’ll focus on your most important role—that of the MC—the moderator coach.• Why is the MC and not the actor most important? © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 17. The Most Important Role• In this presentation, we’ll focus on your most important role—that of the MC—the moderator coach.• Why is the MC and not the actor most important?• The actor may perform their role well or poorly during the round. What really matters, of course, is whether the actor performs their role well in the ―real world.‖ © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 18. The Most Important Role• In this presentation, we’ll focus on your most important role—that of the MC—the moderator coach.• Why is the MC and not the actor most important?• The actor may perform their role well or poorly during the round. What really matters, of course, is whether the actor performs their role well in the ―real world.‖• Your robust feedback in the classroom will dramatically improve the odds that the actor will perform well after the class has ended. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 19. Moderating the Practice• In moderating a practice round, you will… © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 20. Moderating the Practice• In moderating a practice round, you will… • Launch the round when the time for preparation has expired. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 21. Moderating the Practice• In moderating a practice round, you will… • Launch the round when the time for preparation has expired. • Remain silent during the round unless… © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 22. Moderating the Practice• In moderating a practice round, you will… • Launch the round when the time for preparation has expired. • Remain silent during the round unless… • The actor freezes or takes off in a direction unrelated to the skills being practiced. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 23. Moderating the Practice• In moderating a practice round, you will… • Launch the round when the time for preparation has expired. • Remain silent during the round unless… • The actor freezes or takes off in a direction unrelated to the skills being practiced. • The partner steps outside their role or plays it in a silly way or in a way that makes it unrealistically difficult for the actor to play their role. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 24. Moderating the Practice• In moderating a practice round, you will… • Launch the round when the time for preparation has expired. • Remain silent during the round unless… • The actor freezes or takes off in a direction unrelated to the skills being practiced. • The partner steps outside their role or plays it in a silly way or in a way that makes it unrealistically difficult for the actor to play their role. • Call time. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 25. Moderator Challenges• One common cause for moderator intervention in a round arises when the actor and participant begin to discuss policies, procedures, products, etc. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 26. Moderator Challenges• One common cause for moderator intervention in a round arises when the actor and participant begin to discuss policies, procedures, products, etc.• Immediately intervene if this happens and ask the participants to return to the point where they abandoned the trail. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 27. Moderator Challenges• One common cause for moderator intervention in a round arises when the actor and participant begin to discuss policies, procedures, products, etc.• Immediately intervene if this happens and ask the participants to return to the point where they abandoned the trail.• Sometimes there will be a forth person in a group. That person should also take notes and provide feedback. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 28. Calling Time• Stop the participants in their tracks as soon as the allotted time has expired. This will ensure that there is sufficient time for the sharing of feedback with the actor. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 29. Calling Time• Stop the participants in their tracks as soon as the allotted time has expired. This will ensure that there is sufficient time for the sharing of feedback with the actor.• It is not important that the actor ―finish‖ an interaction; by getting even half-way through it, they’ll have furnished you with sufficient grist for the feedback mill. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 30. Taking Notes• Take lots of notes, so that you can use the actor’s own words to make your feedback clear and credible. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 31. Taking Notes• Take lots of notes, so that you can use the actor’s own words to make your feedback clear and credible.• Don’t wait to take a note until you have asked yourself, ―Gee, should I write that down?‖ Instead, take notes continually, just as you would if you were a court reporter. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 32. Taking Notes• Take lots of notes, so that you can use the actor’s own words to make your feedback clear and credible.• Don’t wait to take a note until you have asked yourself, ―Gee, should I write that down?‖ Instead, take notes continually, just as you would if you were a court reporter.• While non-verbals like facial expressions or body language are certainly important in the real world, it is the words we are focusing on in class. Ignore non-verbals and concentrate on taking down the words spoken by the actor and partner. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 33. Taking Notes• Take lots of notes, so that you can use the actor’s own words to make your feedback clear and credible.• Don’t wait to take a note until you have asked yourself, ―Gee, should I write that down?‖ Instead, take notes continually, just as you would if you were a court reporter.• While non-verbals like facial expressions or body language are certainly important in the real world, it is the words we are focusing on in class. Ignore non-verbals and concentrate on taking down the words spoken by the actor and partner. • You may find it helpful to keep your head down and not look at the actor and partner at all. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 34. Moderating Feedback• In moderating the exchange of feedback with the actor, you will: © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 35. Moderating Feedback• In moderating the exchange of feedback with the actor, you will: • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two specific things they would do differently in their real world interactions. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 36. Moderating Feedback• In moderating the exchange of feedback with the actor, you will: • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two specific things they would do differently in their real world interactions. • ―Be better prepared‖ doesn’t count; that’s a given. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 37. Moderating Feedback• In moderating the exchange of feedback with the actor, you will: • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two specific things they would do differently in their real world interactions. • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two things they would do again in their real world interactions. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 38. Moderating Feedback• In moderating the exchange of feedback with the actor, you will: • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two specific things they would do differently in their real world interactions. • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two things they would do again in their real world interactions. • Invite the partner to share one or two thoughts with the actor. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 39. Moderating Feedback• In moderating the exchange of feedback with the actor, you will: • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two specific things they would do differently in their real world interactions. • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two things they would do again in their real world interactions. • Invite the partner to share one or two thoughts with the actor. • Don’t hold the partner to the STAR model, which we’ll discuss shortly. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 40. Moderating Feedback• In moderating the exchange of feedback with the actor, you will: • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two specific things they would do differently in their real world interactions. • Invite the actor to cite one or, at most, two things they would do again in their real world interactions. • Invite the partner to share one or two thoughts with the actor. • Share two or three STAR-quality observations of your own. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 41. STAR-Quality Feedback• By drawing on your notes, you will be able to deliver powerful STAR-quality feedback. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 42. STAR-Quality Feedback• By drawing on your notes, you will be able to deliver powerful STAR-quality feedback.• Feedback is powerful when it expresses the… © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 43. STAR-Quality Feedback• By drawing on your notes, you will be able to deliver powerful STAR-quality feedback.• Feedback is powerful when it expresses the… • Situation the actor faced © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 44. STAR-Quality Feedback• By drawing on your notes, you will be able to deliver powerful STAR-quality feedback.• Feedback is powerful when it expresses the… • Situation the actor faced • Task in which the actor was engaged at a specific moment during the interaction. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 45. STAR-Quality Feedback• By drawing on your notes, you will be able to deliver powerful STAR-quality feedback.• Feedback is powerful when it expresses the… • Situation the actor faced • Task in which the actor was engaged at a specific moment during the interaction. • Action taken by the actor at that moment. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 46. STAR-Quality Feedback• By drawing on your notes, you will be able to deliver powerful STAR-quality feedback.• Feedback is powerful when it expresses the… • Situation the actor faced • Task in which the actor was engaged at a specific moment during the interaction. • Action taken by the actor at that moment. • The action is most often the words spoken by the actor. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 47. STAR-Quality Feedback• By drawing on your notes, you will be able to deliver powerful STAR-quality feedback.• Feedback is powerful when it expresses the… • Situation the actor faced • Task in which the actor was engaged at a specific moment during the interaction. • Action taken by the actor at that moment. • Result of the actor’s action. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 48. STAR-Quality Feedback• By drawing on your notes, you will be able to deliver powerful STAR-quality feedback.• Feedback is powerful when it expresses the… • Situation the actor faced • Task in which the actor was engaged at a specific moment during the interaction. • Action taken by the actor at that moment. • Result of the actor’s action. • The result is most often the partner’s reaction to the speaker’s words. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 49. An Example• Here is an example of STAR–quality feedback: • I overheard some of your discussion with Peter (situation) this morning, Cynthia—the part when you were cross-selling services (task) to complement his new checking account. When Peter said that he didn’t need another credit card, you responded by saying (action), ―You know, Peter, I felt exactly the same way when I came to work here, but then I realized our card would replace at least two of my former cards; my wallet got lighter instead of heavier.‖ Peter followed by saying, ―Okay, Cynthia, tell me why I should switch.‖ You got Peter to open his mind and, eventually, accept our card. (result) © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 50. Adjectives to Avoid• In delivering feedback, avoid using judgmental adjectives like good, bad, excellent, etc. These labels are too general and so are largely wasted words. Stick to the STAR model, which provides useful specifics. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 51. The Instructor’s Role• During the skills practice rounds, the instructor will ―table- hop.‖ They’ll be taking notes of their own—about your ―performance‖ as the moderator/coach—and will draw on these notes to provide you and/or the participants in general some STAR-quality feedback of your own. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 52. The Instructor’s Role• During the skills practice rounds, the instructor will ―table- hop.‖ They’ll be taking notes of their own—about your ―performance‖ as the moderator/coach—and will draw on these notes to provide you and/or the participants in general some STAR-quality feedback of your own. • This reflects our conviction that it is really the moderator who makes the practice rounds beneficial to all. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 53. The Uber-Objective• In laying such emphasis on the role of the moderator/coach, we are pursuing an objective we didn’t share at the start of this presentation. This is to build a legion of effective coaches throughout our organization. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 54. The Uber-Objective• In laying such emphasis on the role of the moderator/coach, we are pursuing an objective we didn’t share at the start of this presentation. This is to build a legion of effective coaches throughout our organization.• Managers simply don’t have enough time to observe and provide feedback to employees as often as would be desirable. The deficit must be made up by experienced individual contributors. Learn now to be a better coach in the classroom and you will be a better coach as opportunities arise in your real world outside the classroom door. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 55. And in Conclusion• You’ve learned here about the… © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 56. And in Conclusion• You’ve learned here about the… • Roles played during a practice round © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 57. And in Conclusion• You’ve learned here about the… • Roles played during a practice round • Responsibilities you will bear as the moderator © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 58. And in Conclusion• You’ve learned here about the… • Roles played during a practice round • Responsibilities you will bear as the moderator • Importance of note-taking © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 59. And in Conclusion• You’ve learned here about the… • Roles played during a practice round • Responsibilities you will bear as the moderator • Importance of note-taking • Components of STAR-quality feedback © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 60. And in Conclusion• You’ve learned here about the… • Roles played during a practice round • Responsibilities you will bear as the moderator • Importance of note-taking • Components of STAR-quality feedback • Instructor’s role during the practice rounds and after. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 61. And in Conclusion• You’ve learned here about the… • Roles played during a practice round • Responsibilities you will bear as the moderator • Importance of note-taking • Components of STAR-quality feedback • Instructor’s role during the practice rounds and after.• Be prepared to teach back these topics during your up- coming class. © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 62. Thanks!• Thanks for reading this little treatise. I’ve always liked visiting (your town) and spending a little time with you, (your name.)• If you’d like to provide feedback or tell a bit about your own experiences, I’d be delighted to hear from you. You can reach me through several channels: • dennisafahey@maverickld.com • Learningmaverick.com (WordPress) • @dennisafahey (Twitter) © 2012 Maverick Learning Designs
  • 63. Bye, now!

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