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    THE NEW BACK SURGERY: New Goals, New Thinking And Artificial ... THE NEW BACK SURGERY: New Goals, New Thinking And Artificial ... Document Transcript

    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com THE NEW BACK SURGERY: New Goals, New Thinking And Artificial Disc Replacement Artificial disc replacement was first introduced in the U.S. in 2004 with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the CHARITÉ™ Artificial Disc. Before then, the only option for patients who needed surgery for severe single-level degenerative disc disease (DDD) was spinal fusion surgery. Artificial disc replacement has brought a new goal to back surgery. Rather than fusing vertebrae together and immobilizing the spine, spine surgery may now replace a damaged disc with an artificial one that is designed to move. This “motion preservation technology” may usher in a new era of spine surgery. This is an interesting story to tell because motion preservation is still in its infancy and your surgeon and institution are among helping to pioneer this procedure in the U.S. Materials for media outreach on this topic are provided in template form so that you can customize the pieces to reflect the unique perspectives and experiences of your surgeons and patients and the role artificial disc replacement is playing in your practice and community. The following components are included to help you tell the story: • Telling the new back surgery story • Customizable press release, pitch letter, media advisory • Artificial disc replacement fact sheet • Suggested reporter questions • Information resources and glossary -1-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com TELLING THE NEW BACK SURGERY STORY: NEW GOALS, NEW THINKING AND ARTIFICIAL DISC REPLACEMENT Many institutions, companies and individuals constantly battle for media attention. Some will get it, most will not. However, people in your community need to know your institution is one of the few in the U.S. to currently offer the option of artificial disc replacement. So, how do you get your story about the first artificial disc to spark the interest of a reporter who sees hundreds of stories a day? How do you tell the story in such a way that you provide accurate and responsible information so that people who may benefit from artificial disc replacement will know to inquire about it? This section was developed to help you have additional background on artificial disc replacement and assist you in framing the story for the news media. Discussion topics include: • The Media Sensibility • Media Selection • Selecting Spokespersons • Preparing for Media Interviews • Pitching the Media • Media Follow Up These discussion topics are followed by actual press materials that you can customize to reflect the unique perspectives and experiences of your surgeons and patients. -2-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com THE MEDIA SENSIBILITY The media is always looking for great stories. However, there are several story elements they typically look for prior to deciding on whether to cover your story. When pitching the media about artificial disc replacement, the following fundamental questions will always come up: Is it new? While artificial disc replacement was first introduced in the U.S in 2004 with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the CHARITÉ™ Artificial Disc, it represents a whole new way to think about back surgery. Rather than spinal fusion surgery, which relieves pain and immobilizes the spine, the goals of artificial disc replacement are to relieve pain and restore or maintain motion. This is a dramatic departure from what back surgery has been over the last 40 years. Artificial disc replacement isn’t for everyone, but for carefully selected patients it may be the option they have been waiting for and your surgeon has patients who can tell how they benefitted and why they chose this newer option over traditional spinal fusion surgery. Has this story been covered before? Please review past media coverage to determine if media in your area has covered this story before. If they have, you need to figure out an angle of the story that they haven’t covered. If they have not, you have a great story to tell them. Your institution is one of a select few to offer artificial disc replacement and can provide unique insights on this technology and how it has affected back pain sufferers in your community. What makes it compelling? Many factors make this story compelling including: • Your institution is one of the select few in the country to offer the first artificial disc for low back pain • Artificial disc replacement represents new thinking and a new set of goals for back surgery • You have interesting patients who experienced a reduction in back pain while maintaining their range of motion and are now back to their everyday lives • Your surgeon can help inform patients who this procedure is most appropriate for and for whom it is not How many people does it affect? According to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), about 65 million Americans suffer from low back pain every year. Four out of five adults will experience significant low back pain sometime during their life, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Degenerative disc disease affects more than 12 million people. More than 200,000 lumbar spinal fusion surgeries are performed each year in the U.S., making it the most common treatment for degenerative disc disease. A percentage of these 200,000 will now choose artificial disc replacement over spinal fusion surgery. -3-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com Who else is doing it? Be aware of other institutions in the U.S. performing artificial disc replacement with the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc and know where you stand in the community and what uniquely you offer that others cannot. Why should I cover it now? Because back pain sufferers in your community have a compelling story to share. They may have recently had the surgery or they may have had it a while ago and are accomplishing things now that they thought they never could when they were in such terrible pain. Your surgeon can also provide an update on artificial disc replacement in your community. -4-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com MEDIA SELECTION While the media generally welcomes health care story ideas, television, radio and print reporters have different approaches and perspectives that make the story right or wrong for them and their audiences. Making it Right Television: When you think television, you have to think visually. When you pitch a television reporter, you must vividly describe the kinds of pictures that can be made available to him or her. For example, you can make special arrangements for a reporter to bring a television camera inside the operating room during an artificial disc replacement surgery. Your doctor must get permission from the patient for this to happen and all the appropriate hospital clearances must be obtained. If permission is granted, brief the reporter on what they can do in the operating room, including the limited or non-use of lights, not showing the patient’s face and staying outside the sterile field. In addition, describe what the reporter can expect to see during the operation so the reporter and crew are mentally prepared for viewing surgical incisions, blood and the operating room environment. Arrange a time before the operation for the reporter to talk to the surgeon. During an interview, your surgeon can provide a description of the surgery and point out significant moments in surgery. Your surgeon should also demonstrate how the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc works so they can see the device before it is used in an actual operation. The surgeon can also put into context what the goals of artificial disc replacement are and set appropriate expectations. In addition, an interview prior to the surgery will help establish a rapport between the surgeon and the reporter so things run smoothly once inside the operating room. Also arrange for the reporter to talk to a patient who has successfully undergone the procedure. This patient can provide real-life insights about their experience and decision to have the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc versus spinal fusion surgery. This patient can come to the hospital for the interview or the television crew can visit them at their home. Another option for a reporter is to follow a patient before, during and after artificial disc replacement surgery. The patient must be willing to allow a camera crew to follow them through their daily activities and struggles with back pain and then for several weeks after surgery. Selection of the right patient for this is crucial. Radio: Most radio stations throughout the country do not have a reporter dedicated exclusively to medical stories. In many cases however, there are opportunities to get medical stories covered through other means. If you can get the news director or assignment editor interested in the story, he or she will assign it to a general assignment reporter. Additionally, many radio stations have public affairs and community service programs that welcome guest experts like your doctor. You need to convince the station that your doctor can maintain a listener’s interest for the length of the program and is well-spoken and articulate who can not only discuss the artificial disc but also other back pain related issues. You can also offer patients to provide additional perspectives. Provide the station with the list of suggested reporter questions to show the range of questions they can pose to the doctor and patient. -5-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com Print: Print reporters generally cover health stories in more depth than radio and television reporters. When you pitch the print media be prepared to provide them with comprehensive information about the artificial disc and back pain that are included in the fact sheets in the kit. You can also give them the opportunity to observe an actual procedure and talk to other medical experts at your hospital including other spine surgeons and appropriate health care professionals. You can also provide clinical study reprints about a two-year clinical study of patients implanted with the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc. This study was part of the data that was reviewed by the FDA prior to approval. -6-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com SELECTING SPOKESPERSONS The spine surgeon spokesperson you choose for the media relations campaign about artificial disc replacement becomes the face of your institution. The surgeon should be comfortable speaking to the media in layman’s terms and should be reminded that he or she should use language that they would use with patients, not other doctors or health professionals – though they will be watching too! It is important to conduct your own interview with the physician to hear firsthand how the doctor discusses the topic. Take on the role of reporter and use the suggested reporter questions to help the doctor prepare for media interviews and refine his/her message. Choose patient spokespersons carefully. The patient is being asked to discuss their personal experience suffering from back pain, their treatment and recovery. During an interview, determine if the patient is comfortable relating their story and that they remember important details of their experience. If you sense that the patient is uncomfortable or reluctant to speak to the media, thank the patient for their time and identify another patient. If they are uncomfortable relating their story to you, they will be even more uncomfortable with a reporter. When choosing physician-spokespersons consider these key questions: • Can he/she talk in layman’s terms about low back pain and artificial disc replacement? • Is he/she familiar with key stats on back pain and the artificial disc? • Can he/she clearly compare the disc implantation with spinal fusion surgery? • Can he/she talk about the hospital overall? • Have they done media interviews before? • Do they know what to expect? • How do they feel about the media? • Do they need media training? • What is their availability for media interviews? When choosing patient-spokespersons, consider these questions: • Can he/she talk about their low back pain problems? • Can he/she clearly discuss his/her experience with artificial disc replacement? • What led to his/her decision to have the procedure? • What are/were their thoughts about spinal fusion surgery? • Did they experience an improvement in their back pain and range of motion? • Did they have a positive experience with the hospital overall? -7-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com • Are they comfortable allowing a tv crew to videotape them at home or at work? • Are they comfortable with the public knowing they had surgery? • What is his/her availability for media interviews? -8-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com PREPARING FOR THE INTERVIEW Prior to the interview Once the spokespersons are in place, prepare them for the media interviews. Here are a few things to keep in mind prior to the interview: • Get as much information from the reporter as possible. • What angle will the reporter take? • How much time do they anticipate is needed from the physician and the patient? • Where will the interview take place and in what kind of setting? • What medical stories has the reporter covered in the past? • Have they covered artificial disc replacement or back surgery before? • Have they interviewed other doctors at your institution? • Is the reporter interviewing anyone else for the story? Knowing all these details in advance will help you prepare your spokespersons appropriately. -9-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com PITCHING THE MEDIA The Initial Telephone Pitch Get to the Point: Producers and reporters receive scores of story ideas each week and many of them face tight daily deadlines. Between the e-mails, faxes and phone calls, time is precious. Many will decide if they want to cover your story within the first minute or so of your pitch. Be able to articulate the essence of your story within the first minute of the call. If you can get them interested in less than a minute, they will listen further or schedule time later to get more information. Grab Them with Key Points! • New goals and thinking on back surgery: pain relief and preserving motion • Artificial disc technology and techniques • Alternative to spinal fusion surgery which limits flexibility of the spine • Designed to relieve pain and maintain motion • Quickly describe your patient, before and after surgery • Describe your surgeon’s credentials Follow up with a brief pitch letter or media alert that references your discussion on the phone. Also, include the press release and fact sheets in your correspondence. Your discussion on the phone increases the likelihood of the reporter being more receptive to the information you sent. If you have not heard back from the reporter in a few days, call them back to follow up and keep the story top of mind. Maintain Contact: You may not be able to get reporters to do the story on the first, second or even third phone call. However, keep in contact with them on an intermittent basis to maintain a good working relationship. This will increase the chances that at some point, they will cover the story. In addition, look for opportunities to find local angles in national medical stories. For example, many national television and print media will cover new studies on back pain and back surgery. Leverage this opportunity when speaking with a local medical reporter by referencing the national news coverage and that you can offer a surgeon at your institution that can provide a local perspective on back pain for patients in your community. -10-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com MEDIA FOLLOW-UP After The Story Is Aired or Published Review the story with your doctor and institution. Was it accurate? Was it fair? Did it set up appropriate expectations for the procedure? Was it missing anything? You can follow up with reporters to correct any misinformation or to comment on the accuracy and thoroughness of their work. Make a point of reaching out to the reporter to maintain a good working relationship on this story and future stories. -11-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com ARTIFICIAL DISC REPLACEMENT PRESS MATERIALS Sample Press Release Fact Sheet Sample Pitch Letter Sample Media Advisory Suggested Reporter Questions Artificial Disc Replacement Resources Artificial Disc Replacement Glossary -12-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com ON YOUR LETTERHEAD FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: (((Name of Hospital Contact))) (((Phone Number))) NEW GOALS FOR BACK SURGERY: PAIN RELIEF AND MOTION Artificial Disc Replacement Offers Alternative Approach To Treating Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) (((INSERT NAME OF YOUR CITY))) (((RELEASE DATE))) – Artificial disc replacement or lumbar arthroplasty for severe degenerative disc disease (DDD) began in the U.S. in 2004 when the CHARITÉ® Artificial Disc, became the first artificial disc approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). While this new approach to back surgery has not replaced spinal fusion surgery, the most common back operation, carefully selected patients can benefit from the relatively new procedure that replaces a damaged or worn out disc with an artificial one. The goals of this operation are to relieve pain and allow for a range of motion. Spinal fusion surgery relieves pain but is designed to limit the range of motion after surgery. Since its approval more than 7,500 patients have received the CHARITE Artificial Disc in the U.S. including many (((CHARACTERIZE USAGE))) in (((INSERT YOUR CITY))). Some patients, like (((INSERT AGE)))- year-old (((INSERT NAME))), put off having back surgery until artificial disc replacement became available. “I considered spinal fusion surgery but I didn’t feel it was right for me,” said (((NAME OF PATIENT))). “If I was going to have back surgery, it was important that there at least be the potential to have some flexibility after the surgery.” -13-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com “The pain was constant and intense. It felt like I was constantly being stabbed in my back with a hot knife. On a scale of one to ten, it was between eight and ten every day,” added (((SAMPLE QUOTE FROM NAME OF PATIENT))), who suffered with DDD at one level of the spine for (((INSERT NUMBER))) years. -more- -14-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com -2- After a thorough medical evaluation, (((INSERT NAME))) met all the criteria for artificial disc replacement. So instead of spinal fusion, doctors led by spine surgeon, (((NAME OF LEAD DOCTOR))), at (((NAME OF INSTITUTION OR PRACTICE))) removed the damaged disc and replaced it with the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc, a high-tech device made of two metallic endplates and a movable high-density plastic center that, once implanted, is intended to perform and move like the body’s own spinal disc. “The operation gave me back all the things that most people take for granted. I couldn’t carry groceries before this surgery or play with my kids. Now I don’t feel 20 years older than I am,” said (((NAME OF PATIENT, INSERT ACTUAL QUOTE))), shown (((LENGTH OF TIME))) post-surgery. Typically in artificial disc replacement, two surgeons work together in the operation. A general surgeon approaches the spine through an incision in the abdomen and carefully moves blood vessels and internal organs out of the way to provide access to the spine. A spine surgeon then uses special tools to remove the damaged disc and creates a space between two vertebrae for the implantation of the artificial disc. The procedure generally takes about 60 to 90 minutes. In clinical trials comparing artificial disc replacement to spinal fusion surgery, CHARITÉ Artificial Disc patients maintained their range of motion, experienced improvement in pain relief and function, had a quicker recovery and were more satisfied with the procedure. There were no significant differences in complications. “We are committed to providing patients with the best care possible for a devastating and debilitating condition,” said (((NAME OF SPINE SURGEON, TITLE, NAME OF HOSPITAL OR PRACTICE))). “Our center is able to offer patients options for back pain based on the individual needs and circumstances of our patients and if -15-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com artificial disc replacement is appropriate, this center has the ability to do it.. It’s important to offer patients options.” Patients receiving the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc should have failed at least six months of conservative treatment prior to implantation. -more- -16-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com -3- For more information about the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc, visit www.charitedisc.com. Artificial disc replacement is not for everyone. As with any major surgery, there are possible complications that can occur including pain, allergic reactions, bladder problems and/or infection. Patients should ask their doctors if artificial disc replacement is appropriate for them. About 65 million Americans suffer from low back pain every year, according to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS). Americans spend about $50 billion each year on low back pain, the most common cause of job-related disability and lost work days. More than 12 million people are reported to have DDD. (((INSERT BACKGROUND INFORMATION ABOUT THE SURGEON))) (((INSERT DESCRIPTION OF HOSPITAL OR PRACTICE))) ### -17-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com ON YOUR LETTERHEAD FACT SHEET CONTACT: ARTIFICIAL DISC REPLACEMENT WITH CHARITÉ® ARTIFICIAL DISC OVERVIEW • First FDA approved artificial spinal disc to treat patients with single-level degenerative disc disease (DDD) at levels L4–5 or L5–S1 in the spine • High-technology device made of metal and a movable high-density plastic center that, once implanted, is designed to help align the spine and preserve its ability to move • Available since 1987 outside the U.S.; more than 7,500 implants in the U.S. since 2004 PATIENT BENEFITS • Alternative to lumbar spinal fusion surgery. Spinal fusion is a common surgical treatment for low back pain performed on more than 200,000 people each year in the U.S. • Reduce back pain and maintain flexibility and range of motion (forward and backward, side-to-side and rotation) ARTIFICIAL DISC SPINE PROCEDURE: HOW PERFORMED • Surgeons create an incision the lower abdomen (anterior approach) and carefully move blood vessels and internal organs out of the way to provide access to the spine to replace the damaged spinal disc • Once damaged disc is removed, two adjacent vertebrae are spread apart and artificial disc is implanted to take its place • Procedure generally takes one to two hours CLINICAL STUDIES • Results from a two-year clinical study of 375 patients (276 CHARITÉ Artificial Disc + 99 controls) comparing artificial disc replacement to spinal fusion surgery showed those implanted with the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc maintained their range of motion and experienced improvement in pain and function. • On average, patients treated with the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc discharged from hospital half-day sooner than fusion patients • No significant differences in complications between CHARITÉ Artificial Disc patient group and spinal fusion patient group -18-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com • Radiographic findings showed an average range of motion of 6.9 and 7.5degrees at 12 months and 24 months; average disc space height of 5.7 mm preoperatively to 13.0 mm at 12 months and 12.9 mm at 24 months ### -19-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com ON YOUR LETTERHEAD SAMPLE PITCH LETTER ((DATE)) ((NAME))((TITLE)) ((MEDIA OUTLET)) ((ADDRESS)) ((CITY, STATE, ZIP CODE)) Dear ((NAME)): Artificial disc replacement or lumbar arthroplasty for severe degenerative disc disease (DDD) began in the U.S. in 2004 when the CHARITÉ® Artificial Disc, became the first artificial disc approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). While this new approach to back surgery hasn’t replaced spinal fusion surgery, the most common back operation, carefully selected patients are benefiting from the relatively new procedure that replaces a damaged or worn out disc with an artificial one. For the first time in this country, there is a new goal for back surgery: treat back pain caused by DDD while at the same time preserve or maintain range of motion in the affected spinal area. Traditional spinal fusion surgery has a different goal: relieve pain by limiting motion. (((NAME))), MD, is a leader in spine surgery and is offering artificial disc replacement to a select group of patients who meet carefully established criteria and want an alternative to spinal fusion surgery. Many ((INSERT CITY))) residents have benefited from this relatively new procedure including ((INSERT AGE)))-year-old (((INSERT NAME))), a (((INSERT OCCUPATION OR OTHER DESCRIPTOR))) who suffered with back pain for (((INSERT LENGTH OF TIME))) and waited until artificial disc replacement became available before deciding to have surgery. Dr. (((INSERT NAME))) is available to discuss: • The new goals of back surgery • Who are the best candidates for artificial disc replacement • What the surgical options are for DDD and when to first consider surgery • The new thinking on back surgery and the latest data on treatments -20-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com (((INSERT PATIENT NAME))) is available to discuss (((HIS/HER))) personal experience with back pain and what led (((HIM/HER))) to surgery and how he/she feels now. I will give you a call later to follow up on this important story, or feel free to contact me at (((INSERT PR CONTACT PHONE NUMBER))). Sincerely, (((INSERT PR CONTACT INFO))) -21-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com ON YOUR LETTERHEAD SAMPLE MEDIA ADVISORY NEW GOAL FOR BACK SURGERY: TREAT PAIN, MAINTAIN ABILITY TO MOVE THE STORY: New goal for back surgery: reduce pain and maintain or restore range of motion. The CHARITÉ® Artificial Disc, the first artificial disc replacement for the treatment of low back pain caused by a damaged spinal disc, is now available to patients in (((CITY))) WHAT: Artificial disc replacement with the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc, a relatively new procedure in the U.S., was approved by the FDA in 2004 as an alternative to spinal fusion surgery, the most common back surgery in America The CHARITÉ Artificial Disc is made of two metallic endplates and a movable high-density plastic center that, once implanted, is intended to perform and move like the body’s own spinal disc. Spinal fusion joins vertebrae using bone grafts and metal screws so that motion no longer occurs between them. Most patients report pain relief but motion is not preserved. WHO: (((INSERT NAME OF DOCTOR, TITLE, SPECIALTY))) and XX-year- old patient who had artificial disc replacement after considering all the options WHY: Lots of conflicting information about back pain and its treatments. Back pain sufferers are looking for answers and new options. Dr. (((INSERT NAME))) is a leading spine surgeon treating many back pain sufferers in (((CITY))) and could help people understand how they view their options and when, or if, surgery should even be considered. Dr. (((INSERT NAME)) is also one of the leading spine surgeons in the U.S. performing artificial disc replacement. WHERE: (((INSERT NAME OF INSTITUTION))) CONTACT: (((INSERT PR CONTACT INFO))) ### -22-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com ON YOUR LETTERHEAD CONTACT: (((HOSPITAL PR CONTACT))) (((PHONE NUMBER))) SUGGESTED REPORTER QUESTIONS ARTIFICIAL DISC REPLACEMENT For Doctor:  Why do so many people suffer from back pain?  What is degenerative disc disease? How is it caused?  Describe a typical chronic back pain sufferer.  When does one consider surgery for back pain?  What is the CHARITÉ® Artificial Disc and how does it work?  Describe how artificial disc replacement surgery is performed?  How does artificial disc replacement surgery compare to spinal fusion surgery? What are the pros and cons of each? How do the range of motion and recovery times compare?  How effective is the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc in treating back pain?  What types of surgeons perform artificial disc replacement?  Who is an appropriate candidate?  What are the other treatment options for back pain?  How can patients find out more about the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc? For Patient:  How long did you suffer from back pain?  What types of physical limitations did your back pain cause?  Describe the pain. How painful was it on a scale from one to 10? -23-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com  What other treatments did you receive prior to artificial disc replacement surgery?  Why did you choose the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc over traditional spinal fusion?  What was your range of motion like after receiving the CHARITÉ Artificial Disc?  How long did you stay in the hospital?  What activities did you resume or take up after surgery?  How long was your recovery? How long did it take before you went back to work? What was your first physical activity?  What advice would you give others patients suffering from low back pain? ### -24-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com ARTIFICIAL DISC REPLACEMENT RESOURCES American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) 5550 Meadowbrook Drive Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 www.aans.org American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) 6300 North River Road Rosemont, Illinois 60018-4262 www.aaos.org DePuy Spine, Inc. 325 Paramount Drive Raynham, MA 02767 www.allaboutbackandneckpain.com National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) National Institutes of Health (NIH) Bldg. 31, Room 4C02 31 Center Dr. - MSC 2350 Bethesda, MD 20892-2350 www.niams.nih.gov National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NIH) NIH Neurological Institute P.O. Box 5801 Bethesda, MD 20824 www.ninds.nih.gov North American Spine Society (NASS) 22 Calendar Court, 2nd Floor LaGrange, IL USA 60525 www.spine.org Spine-Health.com 123 West Madison St. Suite 1450 Chicago, IL 60602 www.spine-health.com ### -25-
    • Public Relations for ADR www.spinepracticetoolbox.com ARTIFICIAL DISC REPLACEMENT GLOSSARY Bone Graft – Small pieces of bone placed in a porous box-like structure between two vertebrae that stabilizes the bone and promotes tissue growth during spinal fusion surgery. Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) – Gradual deterioration of a spinal disc that may be associated with wear and tear, aging, and/or injury. Herniated Disc (Also called slipped disc) – Displacement of the “gel-like” center of a disc through a crack on the outer layer. Displaced material can press on the nerves in the spine causing pain, numbness, tingling or weakness of the leg. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) – A radiology technique which uses magnetism, radio waves, and a computer to produce images of an internal organ or structure, especially the brain and spinal cord. Motion Preservation Technology – Surgical treatment for degenerative disc disease that aims to stabilize the spine and also retain some degree of movement and flexibility. Spinal Disc (Also known as vertebral discs) – Cartilage located between each pair of vertebrae that act as “shock absorbers” for the spine; allows spine to flex, bend, and twist. Spinal Fusion Surgery – Procedure used to remove a damaged disc, joins vertebrae together with a bone graft to stabilize the spine and help reduce back pain. Total Disc Replacement (also known as artificial disc replacement) – Procedure used to replace a damaged disc with an artificial one that is intended to reduce back pain while maintaining movement in the spine. Vertebrae – Twenty-four small bones in the back that make up the spine and protect the spinal cord. X-ray – A type of radiation used in diagnostic imaging to help diagnose diseases. ### -26-