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TELEPHONE NUMBERS/CONTACTS

  1. 1. MMU Practice Educator’s Handbook 2009-2010 Physiotherapy Programmes Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care Department of Health Professions 2009- 2010 Contents
  2. 2. Physiotherapy Programmes (BSc Hons and MSc Pre-registration) Contents Page Contents Page Number Telephone Numbers and contacts 3-4 University Background Information 4-7 Programme Design and Organisation 8-11 MSc Programme Structure 12 MSc Programme Units 13-27 Sequencing of Units 28 BSc Programme Structure 29 BSc Programme Units 30-57 Practice Education 58-73 Complaints Procedure 73-75 Health and Safety 76-78 Procedures for Sickness Reporting 79-82 Procedure for supporting disabled 83-84 students on practice placement Professional Dress 85-86 Development of Clinical Practice 87 Role of the Student 87-88 Role of the Practice Educator 88-89 Role of the Visiting Lecturer 89 Learning from Practice 90-91 Assessment of Clinical Practice 91-92 Appendix I Clinical Observation 93-98 Documentation Appendix II Practice Education Record 99-120 Book 1|Page
  3. 3. Practice Educator’s Handbook Appendix III BSc Common Assessment 121-157 Tool (Level 5) Appendix IV MSc Common Assessment 158-193 Tool (Level 6) Appendix V Elective Placement 194-199 Documentation Appendix VI Elective Placement 200-210 Assessment Appendix VII Case Review Guidance 210-213 Appendix VIII Assignment specification 214-224 BSc practice placement 4 Appendix IX Assignment specification 225-236 BSc practice placement 5 Appendix 10 Practice placement 237-238 proforma Appendix 11 New placement proforma 239-240 2|Page
  4. 4. Physiotherapy Programmes (BSc Hons and MSc Pre-registration) Telephone Numbers / Contacts General Enquiries via Louise Taylor 0161 247 2457 Placements Administrator Fax: 0161 247 6571 Email: physioplacements@mmu.ac.uk Clinical Education Team Sophie Taylor 0161 247 2930 Senior Lecturer BSc (Hons) Practice Placement Co-ordinator Email: s.taylor@mmu.ac.uk Jo Nicholson 0161 247 3057 Senior Lecturer BSc (Hons) Practice Placement Co-ordinator j.nicholson@mmu.ac.uk Jackie Hindle 0161 247 3055 Senior Lecturer MSc Pre-registration Practice Placement Coordinator Email: j.hindle@mmu.ac.uk Deborah O’Connor 0161 247 2598 Senior Lecturer Email: d.oconnor@mmu.ac.uk 3|Page
  5. 5. Practice Educator’s Handbook Rachel Stockley 0161 247 2971 Senior Lecturer Email: r.spearing@mmu.ac.uk Visiting tutors Jo Ashman 0161 247 2928 Jill Bailey 0161 247 3556 Jenny Caunt 0161 247 2967 Jenny Crampton 0161 247 2939 Daphne Dawson 0161 247 2919 Glenis Donaldson 0161 247 2908 Lynley Eason 0161 247 2579 Francis Fatoye 0161 247 2963 Peter Goodwin 0161 247 2941 Suzanne Gough 0161 247 2942 Claire Hamshire 0161 247 2940 Sally Hartley 0161 247 2946 Sandra Hartley 0161 247 2901 Kathryn Heathcote 0161 247 3056 Joyce Hughes 0161 247 2883 Kay Hurst 0161 247 2028 Ruth MacDonald 0161 247 2024 Lesley McLoughlin 0161 247 2956 Smarak Mishra 0161 247 2902 Janet Morrison 0161 247 2928 Jo Nicholson 0161 247 3057 Narayan Prabhu 0161 247 2954 Janet Rooney 0161 247 3575 Rajiv Sighamoney 0161 247 2916 Rachel Spearing 0161 247 2881 Sophie Taylor 0161 247 2930 Julie Wright 0161 247 2953 Gill Yeowell 0161 247 2961 Abebaw Yohannes 0161 247 2943 4|Page
  6. 6. Physiotherapy Programmes (BSc Hons and MSc Pre-registration) 5|Page
  7. 7. Practice Educator’s Handbook The Manchester Metropolitan University The University The Manchester Metropolitan University was established in 1992 when the then Manchester Polytechnic was granted University status. Established in 1970, Manchester Polytechnic was formed from the Manchester College of Art and Design, the Manchester College of Commerce and the John Dalton College of Technology. In 1977 it was enlarged by mergers with Didsbury College of Education and Hollings College. In 1983 it incorporated the former City of Manchester College of Higher Education. In 1992 it further incorporated Crewe and Alsager College of Higher Education which was re-branded as MMU Cheshire in 2003. The University occupies five sites in Manchester and two at Crewe and Alsager in Cheshire. It is presently organised into seven faculties: Faculty of Art and Design Business School Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care Faculty of Food, Clothing and Hospitality Management Faculty of Humanities, Law and Social Science Faculty of Science and Engineering MMU Cheshire In the current session, the University has over 30,000 students attending some 400 programmes in approximately 50 different subject areas. Its central campus stands to the South of Manchester’s City Centre alongside The Victoria University of Manchester, Manchester Business School, UMIST and the Royal Northern College of Music. This complex makes up the largest University campus in Western Europe. There are a further four campus locations situated in other parts of the City, together with a campus at Crewe and one at Alsager - both of which are in Cheshire. The University employs approximately 3,500 staff, comprising almost 1,100 full-time teaching staff, 600 part-time teaching staff, 700 manual staff and 1,048 administrative, professional, clerical and technical staff. The Vice-Chancellor of the University is Professor John Brooks. Reporting to him are twelve Directorate members. Seven of these are Deans of Faculty and five are responsible for support functions, comprising a Deputy Vice-Chancellor, an External Relations Director, a Financial Director, a Human Resources Director, and a Services Director. The University has a Board of Governors of twenty one members made up of well known senior executives and regional figures, together with elected members from the academics and non-academic staff and the student body. The Board of Governors is responsible for broad policy and the Vice-Chancellor discharges responsibility for its implementation and for the organisation, direction and management of the University. 6|Page
  8. 8. Manchester Metropolitan University The Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care The Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care consists of a School of Health, Psychology and Social Care. It is one of the largest faculties within MMU offering a broad spectrum of undergraduate, postgraduate and professional programmes which prepare students for their future professional lives. These programmes span a range of academic disciplines within the caring and enabling professions, including physiotherapy, speech and language therapy, psychology, nursing, social work and other health related subjects. The Faculty operates on 2 campuses. Health related and psychology programmes are based at the Elizabeth Gaskell campus and Social Care is located at Didsbury campus. The Faculty administration and the Dean are located at on the Elizabeth Gaskell site. Full library, computing support and audio-visual support is available on all sites, as are other student amenities. Although the disciplines within the Faculty cover a wide spectrum, they are linked by an ethos of participation in community services. All programmes place emphasis on the applied nature of the subject. The aim of the Faculty is to enable students to achieve their ambition by helping them to develop the knowledge, skills and values that will ensure their eligibility for professional registration and practice or to secure employment in related fields or access to other undergraduate/postgraduate professional education programmes, thus placing them on the first step of their professional career. A key feature of the Faculty’s philosophy is the recognition of the dynamic interface between theory and practice and the value of learning from sustained experience in practice settings. Physiotherapy constitutes a programme area in the Department of Health Professions a part of the Faculty of Health, Psychology and Social Care. Originally the Physiotherapy Programme area was called the Department of Physiotherapy which joined the University on 01 September 2003, having previously been part of the Central Manchester and Manchester Children’s University Hospitals NHS Trust. This Programme area is one of the largest and most successful of the UK providers of undergraduate and postgraduate physiotherapy education. It runs a range of programmes, including a three year undergraduate degree, the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy and a two year MSc Physiotherapy (Pre-registration), which confer eligibility to apply for registration with the Health Professions Council, and membership of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. In addition, the Continuing Professional Development and Postgraduate Studies Division offers two other Masters programmes; the MSc Physiotherapy (Post-registration) and the MSc Manual Therapy (Post-registration). The quality of the educational programmes is overseen by a number of external agencies, including the Quality Assurance Agency, the professional body (the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy) and the statutory body (the Health Professions Council). 7|Page
  9. 9. Practice Educator’s Handbook The NHS Northwest (Strategic Health Authority) has a contract with the University for educational provision approved by the HPC and CSP which thus confers eligibility to apply for registration on the HPC and membership of CSP. It is the body which pays for the NHS bursary places for students. 8|Page
  10. 10. Programme Design and Organisation Programme Design and Organisation Programme Philosophy Physiotherapy is a changing and evolving profession which encompasses the concepts of health promotion and prophylaxis, the restoration of function and the achievement of optimal rehabilitation. The physiotherapist works within complex environments ranging from the community, industry, schools, hospitals and private practice. This work takes place against a climate of changing health needs and health care provision. The ultimate goal of physiotherapy education is to produce a competent practitioner with skills which will enable him/her to go on learning and developing throughout their professional career. A competent practitioner is someone who is able to demonstrate that they have reached the required level of ability which encompasses three main areas: 1. the award of either an MSc Physiotherapy (Pre-registration) or BSc (Hons) which fulfils the academic and professional requirements of the University, the HPC and the CSP. 2. the possession of a range and level of skills which enable them to carry out evaluative clinical practice appropriate to current health care needs. 3. the flexibility and capability to respond to changing health and service needs in the current clinical climate, this being one of the requirements of the service commissioners. The skills required to achieve this include the ability to critically analyse and evaluate his/her own practice and to adopt a research approach to current and future physiotherapy practice. Programme Structure MSc Pre-registration The Programme is a two year qualifying Masters Degree with a license to practise for candidates with first degrees in subjects other than Physiotherapy. Having been educated to degree level, students will be expected to have developed the ability to recognise and address their own learning needs, and have pre-learned core intellectual skills, such as problem solving, critical thinking and research skills, and co-operative and independent learning skills. An accelerated programme of study allows such candidates to work academically at Masters Level, whilst attaining the skills and knowledge necessary to fulfil the standards set by professional and statutory bodies. Such entrants to the profession are expected to become confident 9|Page
  11. 11. Practice Educator’s Handbook to challenge practices, and through research, initiate change where appropriate, thus contributing to the development of the profession (CSP, 2003). BSc(Hons) The programme is a three year qualifying honours degree with a license to practise in physiotherapy. Programme Delivery In order to achieve the aims of the programmes, a number of different teaching and learning strategies will be used. Programme delivery will incorporate student centred learning and a problem solving case-based approach. The selection of the different methods will be determined by various factors such as the aims of the session, the content of the session, the stage that the students are at within the programmes and the fact that within any group of students there will be a variety of preferred learning styles. Teaching and Learning Strategies Throughout the programmes there will be a strong emphasis on learning through reflection. Students will be encouraged to reflect on their experiences through the use of reflective logs/diaries and reflective writing assignments. These skills will also be used in the development of a Professional Development Portfolio. Evidence based practice (EBP) will be integrated throughout the units and students will be encouraged to explore and analyse how EBP underpins practice. Lead lectures Lead lectures will normally be delivered to the whole cohort. They will be used for a variety of purposes:  To introduce major/new topics  To summarise topics.  As an information resource.  To challenge thinking. Workbooks, directed and self directed study Study may be facilitated with the use of workbooks and self-study packages, or by the students being set a specific study task or problem to explore. The specific nature of study tasks may be discussed and defined with facilitation from a member of teaching staff, for example in a tutorial. It is, however anticipated that early in the programmes, students will be expected to generate their own study objectives, with reference to the appropriate learning outcomes; students will also be expected to read widely around the subject areas covered. Tutorials Students will participate in small group tutorials, where they will normally be required to have completed some independent or directed study prior to the session and then use the information in a different way to meet the specific session learning outcomes. The use of a problem-solving, case based approach will promote clinical reasoning. 10 | P a g e
  12. 12. Programme Design and Organisation Practical skills sessions As a reflection of the learning outcomes there will be a large number of practical skills sessions. These will normally involve demonstration of skills by the tutor followed by opportunities for supervised practice of the skill with plentiful formative feedback. Underpinning knowledge and problem solving clinical reasoning activities will also be included in these sessions. With facilitation, students will be encouraged to peer assess each other’s performances. Workshops Workshops will be used for a variety of purposes:  As a terminal activity in a unit to review and integrate a cross section of aspects of the unit.  To provide a structured opportunity to cover a range of practical or theoretical components, promoting clinical reasoning and often involving input from other disciplines.  As a formative assessment opportunity prior to undertaking summative assessment components. Case Based/Problem Based Learning Case based learning offers an opportunity for students to contextualise their knowledge and understanding and promotes clinical reasoning. The use of clinical cases will be central to each unit and provide the focus for learning about specific pathologies/conditions as well as related psycho-social issues. Cases will be developed and updated with the support of practitioners to ensure these core components reflect current practice. In some units the cases will be used to support a problem based approach and in others they will be used to draw together learning from the unit. Shared Learning Shared learning may be used to bring together students from different professional groups to achieve common learning outcomes for example in communication skills, or in exploring legal, moral and ethical issues. It will also be used to enable students from a variety of professions to share approaches to the management of patients with particular clinical problems for example, following Stroke. Reflective logs and diaries Learning logs will be used to enable students to record their own learning experiences. These logs will ensure that all students have records that they can utilise to engage in reflection activity. Students will produce examples of reflective writing throughout the programme that will be used to compile a Professional Development Portfolio. The nature of reflective writing, particularly when related to clinical experiences, promotes critical practice and clinical reasoning. Project work Will be used to promote team working skills, independent study skills and clinical reasoning. Small projects will also be undertaken as part of the delivery of the curriculum. These will provide opportunities for formative feedback. 11 | P a g e
  13. 13. Practice Educator’s Handbook Presentations Presentations will be used throughout the programme. They will usually be linked to directed study periods and incorporated into tutorials, practical skills or workshop situations. Students will be expected to present (in groups or individually) information to their peers. Peer assessment opportunities will arise from these activities and the use of presentations in the programme will allow communication skills to be developed, enhanced and refined thereby supporting the development of key skills. Distance learning/ e-learning Distance learning / e-learning materials using WebCT will be used to allow flexibility in delivery of the programme therefore supporting the needs of the diverse student population. The flexibility offered by e-learning means that students are not constrained in their learning by time and place. E-learning also encourages active, self-directed learning and peer support through a virtual community. Practice Based Learning Practice based learning will be central to the programme delivery. Students will normally spend at least 1,000 hours in clinical practice during the programmes. Practice placements are skills based to facilitate the transfer of skills across clinical areas. The skills will be related to those covered in the preceding units. The range of practice settings/placements covered will offer students the opportunity to meet the learning outcomes. Application of skills and knowledge in a range of practice environments demands clinical reasoning. Placements will be supported by practice based clinical staff and visiting academic staff. These will provide unique learning opportunities and will be arranged to reflect current practice. Progression of learning across placements will be demonstrated by the increasing complexity and unpredictability of students’ caseloads. Case Reviews In the second year of the MSc pre-registration programme, students have to complete a project based on a case review. Students will be required to carry out a case review in all of the first three Practice Placements. The case review will then form the basis of an oral presentation plus a written project of 16,000 words, which may be: • An extended research proposal • A reliability / validity study of outcome measures used in the case review, or • A critical literature review of outcome measures or interventions referred to in the case review. A detailed specification for the Case Review can be found in appendices The following pages show a plan of the Programmes (Fig 1 & 2) and proformas that identify the learning outcomes for each section of the programme. 12 | P a g e
  14. 14. Programme Design and Organisation Fig 1 Programme Structure: MSc Physiotherapy (Pre-registration) Year 1 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Easter Xmas January February March April May June July August September October November December Health Care Delivery C A Health Care Delivery (cont...) A Health Care Delivery A (20 credits at M Level) l Theme 1: Introduction to M level E (cont…) I E n n E n Theme 1: Introduction to M level & i n & Foundations in Professional x n Theme 2: Health & Social n n x x Foundations in Professional Practice n u Practice a u Care u d a Practice Practice a i a m a a u m Placement 1 Placement 2 m c l l l c Patient Management 1 (20 practice (20 practice a Patient Management 2 W t (20 credits at M Level) W credits at Level credits at Level Patient Management 3 W l L (20 credits at M Level) e L L i Theme 1: Foundations in e 3) 3) (10 credits at M Level) e e Theme 1: Musculoskeletal 1 e e e o Physiotherapy Management e Theme: Musculoskeletal e O a Theme 2: Cardio-respiratory 1 k a a n Theme 2: Neurology k v v k v b s s e e e Year 2 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Easter Xmas January February March April May June July August September October November December Critical Thinking/Project A E A E A Critical Thinking/Project (cont...) x x (60 credits at M Level) n n n Practice n a Practice n Practice Evidence a Practice n u u u Placement 3 a m Placement 4 a Placement 5 Based m Placement 6 a (Elective) (20 practice The l (20 practice l (20 practice Practice l Patient (10 practice credits at Level Autonomous Patient Management 4 (cont…) W credits at Level credits at Level (20 credits W Management 4 L L credits at L 3) Practitioner Theme 1: Cardiorespespirstory 2 e 3) 3) at M Level) e (20 credits at M e e Level 3) e (10 credits at M Theme 2: Neurology 2 Level) a e a e a Level) v v v k k e e e Holiday Placements Assessment weeks 13 | P a g e
  15. 15. Programme Design and Organisation UNIT TITLE Health Care Delivery Theme 1 – Introduction to ‘M’ Level SUBJECT AREA Theme 2 – Health and Social Care Unless stated otherwise all the following learning outcomes UNIT LEARNING apply to all the unit themes. OUTCOMES The student will be able to: Knowledge and Understanding  Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of how professional, statutory and regulatory body requirements impact on their learning experience (Theme 1).  Critically evaluate models of reflection and justify the need for reflective practice (Theme 1).  Critically analyse the factors that contribute to evidence- based practice (Theme 1).  Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the range of environments in which health & social care is delivered.  Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the organisation of health and social care services in the United Kingdom (UK) (Theme 2).  Demonstrate a critical awareness of the key drivers of health and social care policy in the UK. Cognitive/Intellectual Skills  Justify the importance of lifelong learning and continuing professional development (Theme 1).  Justify the need for equity of healthcare provision to a diverse population.  Critique a variety of approaches to rehabilitation and apply their relevance to health (Theme 1).  Critically evaluate different models of health & social care.  Demonstrate a critical awareness of the relationship between healthcare services and social care services (Theme 3).  Apply their knowledge of teamwork to the delivery of healthcare provision. Key/transferable skills  Communicate effectively in a variety of settings to both specialist and non-specialist audiences.  Demonstrate the application of research skills in order to initiate and carry out projects (Theme 1).  Work effectively with others as a member or a leader of a group and meet obligations to others.  Demonstrate the application of clinical reasoning skills in order to make decisions for patient management.  Use appropriate study skills / information skills/ research methods skills / learning resources to support independent
  16. 16. Programme Design and Organisation learning, including: - Undertake a systematic search of the literature. - Critically appraise and evaluate research literature. - Critically analyse a range of research designs and methodologies appropriate to the health care field. - Identify and evaluate some of the available tools for measuring aspects of health and health care. - Within different research approaches, evaluate issues of validity and reliability or credibility and trustworthiness. - Examine ethical issues arising in research situations and clinical contexts (Theme 1).  Preparation for Practice Placements including: - Appreciation of the Philosophy of placements and the roles and responsibilities of all parties. - Exploration of practice placement learning outcomes and assessment procedures. - Reflection on clinical observation. - Gain insight into the experiences of other students’ first placements. 15 | P a g e
  17. 17. UNIT TITLE Patient Management 1 Physiotherapy Rehabilitation: SUBJECT Practice Educator’s Handbook1 – Foundations in Physiotherapy Management Theme AREA Theme 2 – Neurology Unless otherwise stated all the following learning outcomes UNIT apply to both unit themes. The student will be able to: LEARNING OUTCOMES Knowledge and Understanding  Demonstrate a comprehensive and systematic understanding of how the structure and function of the major systems of the body contribute to human movement (Theme 1).  Explain the neuromuscular control of normal movement, the structure and function of the nervous system and apply these to explain the clinical features of selected predictable neurological deficits (Theme 2).  Interpret, reflect upon and evaluate the evidence base behind rehabilitation approaches for patients with neurological dysfunction (Theme 2). Cognitive/intellectual skills  Apply in depth knowledge of biomechanics to analyse normal human movement (Theme 1).  Discuss and evaluate the contribution of the major systems of the body to normal human movement (Theme 1).  Systematically apply an in-depth knowledge of histology and physiology to explain soft tissue damage and repair (Theme 1).  Apply understanding of the principles of normal movement and the structure and function of the nervous system to select, plan, justify and discuss appropriate assessment and treatment techniques for patients with predictable neurological deficits (Theme 2).  Critically appraise the evidence base for treatment approaches to movement control (Theme 2).  Evaluate and select appropriate outcome measures for patients with predictable neurological deficits (Theme 2). Key/transferable skills  Apply knowledge of biomechanics and current legislation in order to demonstrate safe and effective moving and handling in line with current legislation.  Use clinical reasoning and problem solving to plan and discuss assessment and treatment approaches for patients with predictable neurological deficits (Theme 2).  Access and critically appraise a comprehensive range of available evidence that underpins possible assessment and patient management choices (Theme 2).  Demonstrate an ability to reflect and be self-critical in the identification of appropriate learning needs and independently take responsibility for academic action planning.  Assist others in the identification of their learning needs.  Communicate their learning through a variety of media and engage confidently in academic and professional 16 | P a g e communication with others.  Work as part of a team to discuss plans for patient focused, achievable and realistic treatment goals that take into account patients’ psychological and socio-economic needs (Theme 2).
  18. 18. Programme Design and Organisation 17 | P a g e
  19. 19. Programme Design and Organisation UNIT TITLE Patient Management 2 SUBJECT Physiotherapy Rehabilitation: AREA Theme 1 – Musculoskeletal Theme 2 – Cardio-Respiratory UNIT Unless stated all the following Learning Outcomes apply to both LEARNING themes. The student will be able to: OUTCOMES Knowledge and Understanding  Demonstrate a comprehensive and systematic understanding of the structure and functions of the lower quadrant and of the changes that occur due to pathology (Theme 1).  Demonstrate a comprehensive and systematic understanding of normal respiration and the cardiac cycle and of the changes that occur due to pathology (Theme 2).  Analyse the role of the physiotherapist within the health care team related to a range of musculoskeletal and cardio- respiratory conditions. Cognitive/Intellectual Skills  Analyse the pathology and clinical features of selected, predictable pathologies and relate these to the structure and function of the lower quadrant (Theme 1).  Analyse the pathology and clinical features of selected, predictable pathologies of the cardio-respiratory system and relate these to the structure and function of the cardio- respiratory system (Theme 2).  Critically apply and synthesise their knowledge in order to select, plan, explain and evaluate appropriate assessment techniques for patients with selected, predictable pathologies of the lower quadrant and for patients with selected, predictable pathologies of the cardio-respiratory system and use clinical reasoning in order to interpret the findings.  Apply knowledge, problem solving and clinical reasoning skills in order to select, plan, explain, evaluate and apply a range of appropriate physiotherapy management techniques for patients with selected, predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant and for patients with selected, predictable pathologies of the cardio-respiratory system.  Critically evaluate and justify a range of outcome measures for used to monitor patients with pathologies of the lower quadrant and the cardio-respiratory system.  Work effectively as part of a team to suggest patient focused, achievable and realistic goals of treatment that take into account patients’ psychological and socio-economic needs. Key/transferable skills  Use clinical reasoning and problem solving to select, plan, explain and evaluate the assessment and treatment of patients with selected, predictable pathologies of the lower
  20. 20. Programme Design and Organisation quadrant and for patients with selected, predictable pathologies of the cardio-respiratory system.  Critically apply knowledge learnt in previous units to selected, predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant and the cardio-respiratory system.  Access, critically appraise and evaluate a range of evidence that underpins their assessment and patient management choices.  Demonstrate an ability to reflect and be self-critical in the identification of appropriate learning needs and independently take responsibility for academic action planning.  Assist others in the identification of learning needs. Practical Skills  Demonstrate and document appropriate, safe and accurate assessment and physiotherapy management techniques suitable for patients with selected, predictable pathologies of the lower quadrant and for patients with selected, predictable pathologies of the cardio-respiratory system.  Apply a range of inclusive, non-discriminatory rehabilitation approaches in order to plan holistic, patient focused care to patients presenting with selected, predictable pathologies of the lower quadrant and for patients with selected, predictable pathologies of the cardio-respiratory system.  Demonstrate and practise teaching self-management techniques for selected, predictable pathologies of the lower quadrant and the cardio-respiratory system. 19 | P a g e
  21. 21. Programme Design and Organisation UNIT TITLE Patient Management 3 SUBJECT Physiotherapy Rehabilitation – Musculoskeletal (Upper quadrant) AREA
  22. 22. Programme Design and Organisation UNIT Unless otherwise stated all the following learning outcomes apply LEARNING to both unit themes. The student will be able t OUTCOMES Knowledge and Understanding  Explain the structure and functions of the upper quadrant  Explain the pathophysiology, aetiology and clinical features of complex, less predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant and.  Discuss the role of physiotherapy and work effectively as part of a team to suggest patient focused, achievable and realistic goals of treatment that take into account patients with complex psychological and socio-economic needs. Cognitive/Intellectual Skills  Analyse the pathology and clinical features of patients with selected complex, less predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant and relate this to the relevant structure and function.  Critically apply and synthesise their knowledge in order to select, plan, explain and evaluate appropriate assessment techniques for patients with complex, less predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant and use clinical reasoning in order to interpret the findings.  Apply their knowledge in order to enable a high level of clinical reasoning and problem solving in order to select, plan, justify and evaluate a range of appropriate physiotherapy management techniques for patients with complex, less predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant.  Critically evaluate a range of outcome measures and select and justify appropriate outcome measures for patients with complex, less predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant. Key/transferable skills  Use clinical reasoning and problem solving to select, plan, explain and evaluate the assessment and treatment of patients with complex, less predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant.  Critically apply knowledge learnt in previous units to complex, less predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant.  Access, critically appraise and evaluate a range of evidence that underpins their assessment and patient management choices.  Demonstrate an ability to reflect and be self-critical in the identification of appropriate learning needs and independently take responsibility for academic action planning and manage own requirements for continuing professional development.  Assist others in the identification of their learning needs. Practical Skills  Demonstrate and document appropriate, safe and accurate assessment and physiotherapy management techniques for patients with complex, less predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant. 21 | P a g e  Apply a range of inclusive, non-discriminatory rehabilitation approaches in order to deliver holistic, patient focused care to a patients presenting with complex, less predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant
  23. 23. Practice Educator’s Handbook 22 | P a g e
  24. 24. Programme Design and Organisation UNIT TITLE The Autonomous Practitioner SUBJECT Professional Practice AREA The student will be able to: UNIT LEARNING Cognitive/intellectual skills OUTCOMES  Demonstrate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of factors underpinning professional autonomy and accountability.  Demonstrate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of factors underpinning effective professional relationships.  Demonstrate a systematic understanding and critical awareness of factors that contribute to the development of effective personal and professional skills.  Articulate the responsibilities of a registered professional within the wider health and social care context.  Critically reflect upon previous experience of practice placements using a variety of methods.  Demonstrate the ability to use clinical reasoning and systematic evaluation of evidence-based practice in order to justify all decision making in practice.  Critically appraise the relevance of professional, statutory and government requirements on their practice Key transferable skills  Reflect on their own and others working in order to prioritise learning needs and develop future practice.  Work effectively with others, as a member or a leader of a group, towards a common goal and meet obligations to others. UNIT TITLE Critical Thinking / Project SUBJECT AREA Research 23 | P a g e
  25. 25. Practice Educator’s Handbook The student will be able to: UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES  Apply and integrate relevant aspects of knowledge, understanding, skills and experiences developed in previous units of the programme.  Systematically search for, analyse and critically appraise the findings and writing of others relevant to the research being undertaken. Select, synthesise and manage information in order to undertake their research task.  Use logical and reasoned argument to support their project and discuss the diversity of arguments and contradictions in the evidence base.  Design and discuss an appropriate and realistic research methodology to effectively address the objectives of their project.  Discuss the importance of ethical issues related to the proposed research.  Discuss and apply appropriate statistical methods.  Produce a scholarly piece of work. 24 | P a g e
  26. 26. UNIT TITLE Patient Management 4 SUBJECT Physiotherapy Rehabilitation: Theme 1 – Neurology Programme Design and Organisation AREA Theme 2 – Cardio-respiratory UNIT Unless otherwise stated all the following learning outcomes apply to LEARNING both unit themes. The student will be able to: Knowledge and Understanding OUTCOMES  Explain the pathophysiology, aetiology and clinical features of complex, less predictable pathologies the cardio-respiratory system.  Discuss the structure of the cardio-respiratory system in relation to its function and analyse how dysfunction in this system influences others, specifically the renal and pulmonary systems (Theme 2).  Demonstrate an in depth understanding of exercise physiology in order to prescribe, justify and evaluate prescription for the respiratory patient (Theme 2).  Discuss the role of physiotherapy and work effectively as part of a team to suggest patient focused, achievable and realistic goals of treatment that take into account patients with complex psychological and socio-economic needs.  Critically apply their knowledge of the neuromuscular control of normal movement and the structure and function of the nervous system to explain the clinical features of complex and less predictable neurological deficits. Cognitive/Intellectual Skills  Analyse the pathology and clinical features of patients with selected complex, less predictable pathologies of patients with selected complex, less predictable pathologies of the cardio- respiratory system and relate this to the relevant structure and function.  Critically apply and synthesise their knowledge in order to select, plan, explain and evaluate appropriate assessment techniques for patients with complex, less predictable pathologies of the cardio- respiratory system and use clinical reasoning in order to interpret the findings.  Apply their knowledge in order to enable a high level of clinical reasoning and problem solving in order to select, plan, justify and evaluate a range of appropriate physiotherapy management techniques for patients with complex, less predictable pathologies of the cardio-respiratory system.  Critically evaluate a range of outcome measures and select and justify appropriate outcome measures for patients with complex, less predictable pathologies of the cardio-respiratory system.  Apply their understanding of the principles of normal movement and the structure and function of the nervous system to select, plan, justify and evaluate appropriate assessment and treatment techniques for patients with complex and less predictable neurological deficits.  Evaluate, critically appraise and select appropriate outcome measures from a range of outcome measures suitable for patients with complex and less predictable neurological deficits. Key/transferable skills  Use clinical reasoning and problem solving to select, plan, explain and evaluate the assessment and treatment of patients with complex, less predictable pathologies of the cardio-respiratory 25 | P a g e system.  Critically apply knowledge learnt in previous units to complex, less predictable pathologies of cardio-respiratory system.  Access, critically appraise and evaluate a range of evidence that
  27. 27. Practice Educator’s Handbook UNIT TITLE Evidence Based Practice SUBJECT AREA Evidence based practice in physiotherapy The student will reflect on prior learning in order to select topics UNIT LEARNING for further study from a range of topics offered. OUTCOMES The student will be able to apply existing knowledge in order to:  Systematically and critically evaluate relevant literature to include Government policy initiatives underpinning evidence- based practice.  Synthesise and analyse research findings in order to make value judgements about their contribution to the clinical evidence base.  Develop reasoned arguments in order to evaluate clinical decisions.  Engage effectively in debate, arguing and evaluating a variety of viewpoints in a professional manner to produce detailed and coherent arguments.  Critically examine and reflect on their own practice and their own implementation of best available evidence and develop an understanding of some of the problems of implementing research findings into clinical practice. UNIT TITLE Clinical Observation SUBJECT Professional Practice AREA The student will have: UNIT LEARNING  developed basic interpersonal skills in a clinical setting; OUTCOMES  had an opportunity to observe physiotherapists working in a variety of health care settings;  reflected upon their learning experiences. 26 | P a g e
  28. 28. Programme Design and Organisation UNIT TITLE Practice Placements 1 to 5 SUBJECT Professional Practice AREA There are 17 learning outcomes, which are divided into 5 UNIT categories. These reflect the aspects of practice that are LEARNING assessed in the Practice Placement Common Assessment Tool, OUTCOMES and were formulated with reference to the HPC Standards of Proficiency: Interpersonal skills The student will: 1. demonstrate effective and appropriate skills in communication in order to collaborate and work effectively in partnership with others (professionals, support staff, patients/clients, carers, relatives and external agencies) to the benefit of the client/patient and maximise health outcomes. 2. contribute effectively to work undertaken as part of a team. 3. recognise the scope of practice of other professionals. 4. acknowledge cross professional boundaries. 5. make appropriate referrals to others. Management of self The student will: 6. demonstrate effective self management of workload. 7. know the limits of their own practice and when to seek advice. 8. independently manage their own learning. Management of patient The student will: 9. gather appropriate information relating to the patient. 10. plan and carry out an appropriate objective examination. 11. analyse examination findings and formulate a written treatment plan in partnership with the patient. 12. implement and critically evaluate the impact of, or response to, treatment interventions. Documentation The student will: 27 | P a g e
  29. 29. Practice Educator’s Handbook 13. maintain accurate patient records. Professional practice The student will 14. promote patient centred care. 15. comply with the CSP Rules of Professional Conduct. 16. practise in line with relevant health and safety policy. 17. work independently and as part of a team as appropriate. UNIT TITLE Practice Placement 6 (Elective) SUBJECT AREA Professional Practice UNIT LEARNING The learning outcomes were formulated with reference to OUTCOMES the HPC Standards of Proficiency, CSP Core Standards of Physiotherapy Practice and CSP Rules of Professional Conduct. The student will: • demonstrate effective and appropriate skills in communication in order to collaborate and work effectively in partnership with others (professionals, support staff, patients/clients, carers, relatives and external agencies) to the benefit of the client/patient and to maximise health outcomes. • contribute effectively to work undertaken as part of a team. • acknowledge cross professional boundaries. • make appropriate referrals to others. • demonstrate effective self management of workload. • demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the limits of their own practice and work within their own scope of practice. • recognise the scope of practice of other professionals. • independently manage their own learning. • gather appropriate information relating to the patient. • plan and carry out appropriate objective examinations. • analyse examination findings and formulate written treatment plans in partnership with the client/patient. • implement and critically evaluate the impact of, or response to, treatment interventions. • maintain accurate patient records. • promote patient centred care. • comply with the CSP Rules of Professional Conduct. • practice in line with relevant health and safety policy. 28 | P a g e
  30. 30. Programme Design and Organisation Sequencing of Units The curriculum is structured around the theme of rehabilitation and various approaches are considered: preventative, maintenance, restorative and palliative, all within case-based clinical scenarios. Units have been sequenced to enable students to apply learning from one unit to another and / or to allow students to build on knowledge gained in earlier units by tackling similar but more complex themes at later stages. For example, Health Care Delivery includes research methods, which will be essential in ensuring that students acquire critical appraisal skills and are able to evaluate research findings. These skills are essential at Masters Level and will be integral to the teaching and learning within all programme units, preparing students for the project phase of the programme. Health Care Delivery and Patient Management 1 and 2 are sequenced so that all students will have studied the management of patients with a range of conditions from all three core areas of practice (musculoskeletal, cardio-respiratory and neurological), and will have considered the implications of clinical contexts and the legal and professional requirements of practice prior to Practice Placement 1. Health Care Delivery and Patient Management 1 and 2 will also include sessions to prepare students for Practice Placements:  Health Care Delivery will include sessions on: the philosophy of placements; roles and responsibilities of all parties; placement learning outcomes and assessment procedures; discussions with more experienced pre-registration students about their placement experiences; an introduction to Learning Development Plans and development of a Professional Development Portfolio.  Patient Management 1 and 2 will include role plays to explore issues of conflict; skills sessions linked to simulated practice scenarios; a meeting with the Visiting Lecturer to discuss roles and responsibilities of all parties and plan the Visiting Lecturer’s first clinical visit. In order to ensure students are fully prepared for the clinical environment, students will not be allowed to commence Practice Placement 1 until they have successfully completed the assessments for Patient Management 1 and 2. They will thus be prepared to practice, apply and develop appropriate physiotherapy theory and practice in a variety of practice locations, and develop interpersonal and management skills. Patient Management 3 and 4 will build on the knowledge gained in Patient Management 1 and 2 by using case studies that are more complex and less predictable than those seen in the earlier units. Debrief sessions will be incorporated into the Health Care Delivery and Autonomous Practitioner units, to encourage reflection, conclusion and planning for future clinical experiences.
  31. 31. Programme Design and Organisation Year 1 (Level 1) 12 3 45 67 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 X-MAS August September October November December January February March April May June July Foundations in Professional Practice Induction PP0 Physiotherapy Health & Socail Patient Patient Management HSC Human Movement Easter Management 2 Care (HSC) Management 3 1 Year 2 (Level 2) 12 3 45 67 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 X-MAS August September October November December January February March April May June July Management Physiotherap Physiotherapy Physiotherapy Practice Practice Placement Practice PM4 4 y Management 5 Management 6 Placement 1 2 Easter Placement 3 Year 3 (Level 3) 12 3 45 67 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 # 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 X-MAS August September October November December January February March April May June July Ref. Reflective Transition to Practice EBP 1 Practice Practice & Professional EBP 1 EBP 2 Practice Practice Placement Practice Placement 6 & Clinical Clinical Easter Placement 4 5 (Elective Reason Reasoning Critical Placement) (a) (b) Critical thinking/enquiry thinking/enquiry
  32. 32. Programme Design and Organisation UNIT TITLE Foundations in Professional Practice UNIT CODE NUMBER HOME PROGRAMME BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy HOME DEPARTMENT Physiotherapy SUBJECT AREA Physiotherapy UNIT LEADER(S) Janet Morrison CREDIT VALUE 20 CREDITS AT LEVEL: 4 AMOUNT OF STUDENT EFFORT CLASS CONTACT TIME 65 (HOURS) 200 (HOURS) UNIT STATUS Mandatory Core PRE-REQUISITES None CO-REQUISITES None The student will be able to UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES Knowledge and Understanding • Describe how professional, statutory and regulatory body requirements impact on their learning experience. • Describe models of reflection and explain the need for reflective practice • Explain with guidance the factors that contribute to evidence-based practice. Cognitive/Intellectual Skills • Demonstrate an awareness of the importance of lifelong learning and continuing professional development. • Demonstrate an awareness of the need for equity of healthcare provision to a diverse population. • Describe a variety of approaches to rehabilitation and explain their relevance to health. Key/transferable skills • Communicate effectively using methods appropriate to physiotherapy practice. • Demonstrate the application of research skills • Work effectively with others as a member of a group and meet obligations to others. • Use appropriate study skills / information skills to support and enhance their learning. Study skills – information skills (retrieval & analytical skills), reading, writing, note taking, etc. CURRICULUM OUTLINE Roles and functions of professional, statutory and regulatory bodies. Rules of Professional Conduct Continuing professional development, life long learning agenda. Diversity & cultural competence, promoting equality & people’s rights / responsibilities Rehabilitation – social, medical models; preventative (including introduction to health promotion), restorative, maintenance, palliative approaches of rehabilitation, major approaches to psychology and their relevance to health; psychological factors affecting health. Evidence based practice, guidelines, protocols, and integrated care pathways. Research skills – critical appraisal, reliability, validity, research questions/hypotheses, qualitative and quantitative research methods, statistical analysis, the research process. Outcome measures. Introduction to research & practice ethics, patient confidentiality. Research / audit and how it underpins practice. Reflective practice, models of reflection, reflective writing and introduction to portfolio development. A variety of approaches will be used including lead lectures, self & directed study, tutorials, TEACHING & LEARNING seminars, presentations, e-learning. Ref part time route STRATEGIES Info Skills Workbook – formative but compulsory completion ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES Reflective log/diary – formative Reflective writing evidencing intended learning outcomes (2000 words – summative). The students will demonstrate: ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR • an understanding of the unit content UNIT/ELEMENTS OF • an ability to use and record in a written format simple reflection on a topic/situation ASSESSMENT • a basic understanding of the models of reflection and the need to include reflection in professional practice • an ability to recognise the role of reflection in the development of lifelong learning skills 31
  33. 33. Practice Educator’s Handbook 32 | P a g e
  34. 34. Programme Design and Organisation UNIT TITLE Human Movement UNIT CODE NUMBER HOME PROGRAMME BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy HOME DEPARTMENT Physiotherapy SUBJECT AREA Physiotherapy – Human Movement UNIT LEADER Glenis Donaldson CREDIT VALUE 20 CREDITS AT LEVEL: 4 AMOUNT OF STUDENT EFFORT CLASS CONTACT TIME (HOURS) 200 (HOURS) 65 UNIT STATUS Mandatory Core PRE-REQUISITES None CO-REQUISITES None The student will be able to: UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES Knowledge and Understanding • Explain the basic structure and function of the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and nervous systems Cognitive/Intellectual Skills • Apply a knowledge of biomechanics to the analysis of normal human movement • Explain how the major systems of the body contribute to normal human movement • Use a knowledge of histology and physiology to explain soft tissue damage and repair Practical Skills • Demonstrate safe and effective moving and handling in line with current legislation The students will explore the structure and function of major systems of the body and relate their CURRICULUM OUTLINE structure and function to human movement. This unit will cover biomechanics, histology and tissue repair and physiology. The specific systems for consideration will be the cardio-vascular system, the musculo-skeletal system and the nervous system. TEACHING AND LEARNING Makes strong use of student centred learning strategies with tutors creating both a challenging STRATEGIES and supportive environment using a variety of delivery methods in conjunction with both indicative reading and material accessed by the students themselves. A variety of strategies are used including theatre events, practical demonstrations, group work, skills sessions and tutorials. Tutors will be drawn from both academic and clinical backgrounds. The teaching and learning will be case-based and will use a problem solving approach. • Analysis of movement workshops - Formative ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES • Analysis of movement 2000 word written report – summative The students will demonstrate: ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR UNIT/ • an understanding of how the structure and function of the major systems of the body ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT contribute to human movement • an understanding of the principles of movement analysis • an ability to carry out a basic analysis of movement • an ability to record an analysis of movement in a written report • an ability to write in an appropriate academic format Formative assessment procedures will be assessed by peer assessment using self evaluation checklists linked to the unit learning outcomes with personal tutor support/academic action planning. 33
  35. 35. Practice Educator’s Handbook UNIT TITLE Physiotherapy Management 1 UNIT CODE NUMBER BSc. (Hons) Physiotherapy HOME PROGRAMME Physiotherapy HOME DEPARTMENT Physiotherapy SUBJECT AREA Rehabilitation - Neurological Rachel Stockley UNIT LEADER 20 4 CREDIT VALUE CREDITS AT LEVEL: 200 65 AMOUNT OF STUDENT EFFORT CLASS CONTACT TIME (HOURS) (HOURS) Mandatory Core UNIT STATUS Human Movement PRE-REQUISITES Foundations in Professional Practice CO-REQUISITES UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES The student will be able to: Development of Knowledge and Understanding • Use their knowledge of the neuromuscular control of normal movement and the structure and function of the nervous system to explain the clinical features of selected predictable neurological deficits • Work as part of a team to suggest patient focussed, achievable and realistic goals of treatment that take into account the patients psycho-socio-economic needs • Identify the members of the multi-disciplinary team involved in the management of selected predictable neurological deficits and the role of the physiotherapist in this team Cognitive/Intellectual Skills • Apply their knowledge of the principles of normal movement and the structure and function of the nervous system to select, plan, explain and with guidance evaluate appropriate assessment and treatment techniques for patients with predictable neurological deficits • Evaluate, with guidance, appropriate outcome measures for patients with predictable neurological deficits Key/transferable skills • Use basic clinical reasoning and problem solving to plan, explain and with guidance evaluate the assessment and treatment of patients with predictable neurological deficits • Apply knowledge learnt in previous units to predictable neurological deficits • Access and with guidance appraise the available evidence that underpins their assessment and patient management choices • Demonstrate an ability to identify appropriate learning needs and with guidance take responsibility for academic action planning. • Communicate their learning in a written format that fulfils the requirements of academic writing Practical Skills • Use their knowledge of patients with predictable neurological deficits to execute and document safe, accurate assessment and treatment techniques that are appropriate for this group of patients. • Apply a specified range of inclusive, non-discriminatory rehabilitation approaches in order to deliver holistic, patient focussed care to a specified population suffering from predictable neurological deficits. This unit is intended to develop the student’s attitudes, skills and knowledge related to the CURRICULUM OUTLINE physiotherapy assessment and management of the patient with the neurological deficits considered during the unit. Principles will be based on the Bobath concept, Carr and Shepherd’s Motor relearning approach and the application of anatomical and physiological knowledge of the CNS Functional outcome measures. The structure of the unit will allow the student to develop the clinical reasoning skills that will underpin physiotherapy practice 34 | P a g e
  36. 36. Programme Design and Organisation Makes strong use of student centred learning strategies with tutors creating both a challenging TEACHING AND LEARNING and supportive environment using a variety of delivery methods in conjunction with indicative STRATEGIES reading. A variety of strategies are used including theatre events, practical demonstrations, group work/role play, skills sessions and tutorials. Tutors will be drawn from both academic and clinical backgrounds. The teaching and learning will be case-based and use a problem solving approach. • Self evaluation questionnaire linked to unit and session learning outcomes - Formative ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES • Case based pathology and physiotherapy management 2000 word written assignment – summative The students will demonstrate: ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR UNIT/ ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT • an ability to relate the structure and function of the nervous system to the pathology and clinical features of selected neurological deficits and their physiotherapy management • basic clinical reasoning and problem solving skills • an ability to select relevant information and use appropriately to support their answers • an ability to structure their ideas in a logical and organized manner • an ability to present their answer in an appropriate academic format Formative assessment procedures will be assessed by self evaluation questionnaire linked to the unit/session learning outcomes with personal tutor support/academic action planning. Summative assessment procedures will be assessed through generic level 1 assessment criteria combined with assignment specific criteria that are linked overtly to the unit learning outcomes. 35
  37. 37. Practice Educator’s Handbook UNIT TITLE Physiotherapy Management 2 UNIT CODE NUMBER HOME PROGRAMME BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy HOME DEPARTMENT Physiotherapy SUBJECT AREA Physiotherapy Rehabilitation - musculoskeletal Sally Hartley UNIT LEADER(S) CREDIT VALUE 20 credits CREDITS AT LEVEL: 4 AMOUNT OF STUDENT EFFORT 200 CLASS CONTACT TIME 65 hours (HOURS) (HOURS) UNIT STATUS Mandatory Core PRE-REQUISITES Human Movement CO-REQUISITES Foundations in Professional Practice The student will be able to: UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES Development of Knowledge and Understanding • Describe and explain the structure and function of the upper quadrant • Work as part of a team to suggest patient focussed, achievable and realistic goals of treatment that take into account the patients psycho-socio-economic needs Cognitive/Intellectual Skills • Relate the pathology and clinical features of selected, predictable pathologies to the structure and function of the upper quadrant • Apply their knowledge in order to select, plan, explain and with guidance evaluate appropriate assessment techniques for patients with predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant and with guidance interpret the findings. • Apply their knowledge in order to select, plan, explain and with guidance evaluate appropriate physiotherapy management techniques for patients with predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant • Evaluate, with guidance appropriate outcome measures for patients with predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant Key/transferable skills • Use basic clinical reasoning and problem solving to select, plan, explain and with guidance evaluate the assessment and treatment of patients with predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant • Apply knowledge learnt in previous units to predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant • Access and with guidance appraise the available evidence that underpins their assessment and patient management choices • Demonstrate an ability to identify appropriate learning needs and with guidance take responsibility for academic action planning. Practical Skills • Demonstrate and document appropriate, safe and accurate assessment and physiotherapy management techniques for patients with predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant • Apply a specified range of inclusive, non-discriminatory rehabilitation approaches in order to deliver holistic, patient focussed care to a specified population suffering from predictable pathologies of the upper quadrant This unit is intended to develop both cognitive and psychomotor skills in the undergraduate CURRICULUM OUTLINE physiotherapist. The main principles are the integration and application of anatomical knowledge to selected pathologies of the upper quadrant which will enable the student to clinically reason and explain their clinical decisions. This unit covers functional anatomy, biomechanics, surface marking, differential diagnosis and treatment of pathologies in the following regions; Cervical spine, thoracic spine, shoulder, elbow, forearm, wrist and hand. Makes strong use of student centred learning strategies with lecturers creating both a challenging TEACHING AND LEARNING and supportive learning environment using a variety of delivery methods in conjunction with STRATEGIES indicative reading. A variety of strategies are used including; illustrated lectures, practical demonstrations, tutorials, e-learning, group work, role play and case based problem solving. 36 | P a g e
  38. 38. Programme Design and Organisation • Oral practical workshops / group work assessment /treatment skills - Formative ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES • Oral practical Examination (assessment and treatment skills) 30 minutes – summative The students will demonstrate: ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR • an ability to relate the structure and function of the upper quadrant to the pathology and UNIT/ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT clinical features of selected musculoskeletal pathologies and their physiotherapy management • an ability to plan, discuss and explain the assessment, treatment and rehabilitation approach for patients with selected musculoskeletal pathologies • an ability to safely and accurately demonstrate physiotherapy assessment and management techniques for the selected pathologies • an ability to practice within the rules of professional conduct • an ability to communicate clearly, coherently and using appropriate terminology with both patients and colleagues. Formative assessment procedures will assessed by peer/self evaluation checklists linked to the unit/session learning outcomes with personal tutor support/academic action planning. Summative assessment procedures will be assessed through generic level 1 assessment criteria combined with assignment specific criteria that are linked overtly to the unit learning outcomes. 37
  39. 39. Practice Educator’s Handbook UNIT TITLE Health & Social Care UNIT CODE NUMBER BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy HOME PROGRAMME Physiotherapy HOME DEPARTMENT SUBJECT AREA Health and Social Care Jill Bailey UNIT LEADER(S) CREDIT VALUE 20 credits CREDITS AT LEVEL: 4 AMOUNT OF STUDENT EFFORT 200 CLASS CONTACT TIME 65 hours (HOURS) (HOURS) UNIT STATUS Mandatory Core PRE-REQUISITES None CO-REQUISITES Foundations in Professional Practice The student will be able to UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES Knowledge and Understanding • Describe the range of environments in which health & social care is delivered. • Describe the organisation of health and social care services in the UK. • Identify the key drivers of health and social care policy in the UK. Cognitive/Intellectual Skills • Compare different models of health & social care. • Identify the relationship between healthcare services and social care services. • Apply their knowledge of teamwork to the delivery of healthcare provision. Key characteristics of primary care, secondary care, intermediate care, tertiary care, residential CURRICULUM OUTLINE care, private health care, voluntary care, respite care, non traditional healthcare environments, educational & occupational settings. The multi-agency perspective including the role of carers Current health, social & educational policy relevant to the delivery of physiotherapy services – NSF’s, evidence based practice, clinical governance, guidelines, protocols, inclusion, reducing inequalities, making a difference in schools, Health inequalities Diversity Person centred / patient centred / patient focussed care Teamwork – inter disciplinary, uni-disciplinary, skills of team working Ethical practice A variety of approaches will be used including lead lectures, self & directed study, tutorials, TEACHING AND LEARNING seminars, presentations, e learning, group discussion. STRATEGIES ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES • Group presentation & peer evaluation of group work - Formative • Group presentation followed by group question & answers (70% of unit) – summative • 750 word written reflection on the group activity (30% of unit) - summative The students will demonstrate: ASSESSMENT CRITERIA FOR • an understanding of the unit content UNIT/ELEMENTS OF ASSESSMENT • an ability to work within a group to develop and deliver an oral presentation • an ability to communicate information both visually and orally • an ability to answer questions related to information presented • an ability to analyse their own and the contribution of others to a team task • an ability to give and receive peer feedback • an ability to use and record in a written format a reflection on group activity Formative assessment procedures will assessed by : • formative written feedback from academic staff related to presentation skills • oral peer evaluation of presentation skills and teamwork 38 | P a g e

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