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Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
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Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves

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  • 1. Special Education Staff Development Created by Chris Graves
  • 2. In-Service Topics for Special Education
    • Common Disorders
    • The IEP
    • Teaching Tips
    • End (Click end to get print out documentation
    • form to give to your principal.)
    (Click on topic for detailed information) Main Menu
  • 3. Common Disorders
    • Emotional Disabilities (ED)
    • -Bipolar Disorder
    • -Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
    • Learning Disabilities (LD)
    • Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • -Autism/Asperger’s Sysdrome
    • Attention Deficit Disorder (with/without hyperacitivity )
    • Blind/Deaf
    • Tourette Syndrome
    • Traumatic Brain Injury
    Main Menu
  • 4. Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • Autism Menu
    • Asperger’s Syndrome Menu
    • Other Information:
    • - What is the relation of  "Pervasive Developmental
    • Disorder"(PDD) to autism?
    • - PDD Not Otherwise Specified
    Common Disorders
  • 5. The Individualized Education Plan (IEP) Menu
    • General information
    • Tips on reading an IEP (for general education teachers)
    • Tips on following an IEP (for general education teachers)
    • References and Resources
    Main Menu
  • 6. Teaching Tips Menu
    • Autism
    • Asperger’s Syndrome
    • ADD/ADHD
    • Blind/Deaf
    • Emotional Disabilities (ED)
    Main Menu
    • Learning Disabilities (LD)
    • Tourette Syndrome
    • Traumatic Brain Inquiry
  • 7. Autism Menu
    • General Information
    • Characteristics
    • Teaching Tips
    • References and Resources
    A therapist works with an autistic boy in a public school. Autism severely impairs a child's ability to learn, communicate,and interact with others . Photo: Will and Deni McIntyre/Photo Researchers, Inc .
  • 8. Autism: General Information
    • “ Autism is a life-long, low incidence developmental disability which occurs the first three years of life. It is a behaviorally defined syndrome characterized by an uneven developmental profile and disturbances in:
    • 1) Social interaction
    • 2) Communication
    • 3) Perceptual organization”
    • (Rudrud, Elizabeth, “Autism”, National Association of School Psychologist )
  • 9. Autism: Characteristics (A typical autistic child’s behavior may include some of the following:)
    • Insistence on sameness; resistance to change
    • Difficulty in expressing needs; uses gestures or pointing instead of words
    • Repeating words or phrases in place of normal, responsive language
    • Laughing, crying, showing distress for reasons not apparent to others
    • Prefers to be alone; aloof manner
    • Tantrums
    • Difficulty in mixing with others
    • May not want to cuddle or be cuddled
    • (Continue to next slide for more characteristics.)
  • 10. Autism: Characteristics (A typical autistic child’s behavior may include some of the following:)
    • Little or no eye contact
    • Unresponsive to normal teaching methods
    • Sustained odd play
    • Spins objects
    • Inappropriate attachments to objects
    • Apparent over-sensitivity or under-sensitivity to pain
    • No real fears of danger 
    • Noticeable physical over-activity or extreme under-activity
    • Uneven gross/fine motor skills
    • Not responsive to verbal cues; acts as if deaf although
    • hearing tests in normal range.
    • (Autism Society of America)
  • 11. Autism: Teaching Tips
    • Encourage the child to interact with peers
    • Break down directions to simple terms
    • Reduce the level of distraction around the child
    • Involve child in turn-taking activities
    • Use picture systems to represent daily tasks
    Autism Menu Tips Menu (Elizabeth Rudrud, NASP)
  • 12. Autism: References and Resources
    • Information from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
      • - Autism
      • - Unraveling Autism,
      • Autism Research at the National Institute of Mental Health
    • ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education
      • Autism
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
  • 13. Autism: References and Resources
    • Autism Society of America
    • Indiana Resource Center for Autism
    • Autism Resource Team
    • Hamilton County Co-op
    • Autism/PDD Resources Network
    • Future Horizons
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program) Autism Menu
  • 14. Asperger’s Syndrome Menu
    • General Information
    • Characteristics
    • Teaching Tips
    • References and Resources
    Asperger’s syndrome makes fitting in a complicated challenge. Pictured above,Chad Mearhoff’s obsesses over trains. Obsessive behaviors are a typical symptom of a child with the disorder. Photo: ABCNEWS.com
  • 15. Asperger’s Syndrome: General Information
    • “ Asperger Syndrome or (Asperger's Disorder) is a neurobiological disorder named for a Viennese physician, Hans Asperger, who in 1944 published a paper which described a pattern of behaviors in several young boys who had normal intelligence and language development, but who also exhibited autistic-like behaviors and marked deficiencies in social and communication skills.” Barbara L. Kirby of O.A.S.I.S.
    • (For more information click on the following website: http://www.udel.edu/bkirby/asperger/ )
  • 16. Asperger’s Syndrome: Characteristics (A typical Asperger’s syndrome child’s behavior may include some of the following:)
    • Inability to understand social interactions
    • Clumsy & uncoordinated motor movements
    • Obtuseness
    • Limited interests or unusual preoccupations
    • Repetitive routines or rituals speech
    • Non-verbal communication problems
    • The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke National Institutes of Health Bethesda, MD 20892 Website: NINDS Asperger Syndrome Information Page   
  • 17. Asperger’s Syndrome: Teaching Tips
    • Be as concrete as possible
    • Break down directions into simple steps
    • Teach students to seek assistance
    • Help the student with organization
    • Unusual behaviors usually indicates an increase in stress
    • Avoid verbal overload
    • Use a buddy system to assist the student
    (continue to next slide)
  • 18. Asperger’s Syndrome: Teaching Tips (continued)
    • Frequent teacher feedback and redirection
    • Set clear expectations of behavior
    • Prepare the student for potential changes in classroom procedures
    • Use nonverbal cues to get attention
    • (For a more complete list of teaching tips click on the following website:
    • Educating The Student With Asperger's Syndrome Canadian Web Site)
    Asperger Menu Tips Menu
  • 19. Asperger’s Syndrome: References & Resources
    • Autism Society of America
      • Asperger’s Syndrome: (Choose “Asperger’s Syndrome” under information packages on the website.)
    • ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education
      • Asperger’s Syndrome
    • Other resources
    • - Asperger’s Syndrome
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
  • 20. Asperger’s Syndrome: References & Resources (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
    • Indiana Resource Center for Autism
    • Autism Resource Team
    • Hamilton County Co-op
    • Tony Attwood
    • Autism/PDD Resources Network
    • Future Horizons
  • 21. Blind/Deaf Menu
    • General Information
    • Teaching Tips
    • References and Resources
  • 22. Blind/Deaf: General Information Since there are very few students that have vision or hearing impairments in public schools, teachers that have these students will be provided direct in-services that will detail specific information about a given student. This program only provides a few tips and some supplemental resources for the deaf and blind.
  • 23. Blind/Deaf: Teaching Tips
    • Making enlargements of notes, worksheets, etc. is helpful for students that have limited eyesight.
    • If you are viewing a video in you classroom, captioning may be the most appropriate way to give access to deaf viewers.
    • Some partially deaf students might use assistive listening devices to amplify your voice. If so you will be trained on how to properly use these devices.
    • In either case, a special education teacher will be a contact person for specific questions about any students that are blind or deaf.
    Tips menu Blind/Deaf Menu
  • 24. Blind/Deaf: References & Resources
    • Indiana School for the Blind
    • Indians Deaf-Blind Services Project
    • National Association of the Deaf
    • American Foundation for the Blind
    • New York Institute for Special Education
    • Hamilton County Co-op
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
  • 25. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Menu
    • General Information and Characteristics
    • Teaching Tips
    • References and Resources
  • 26. TBI: General Information and Characterisctics IDEA's Definition of "Traumatic Brain Injury" Our nation’s special education law, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) defines traumatic brain injury as... “ ...an acquired injury to the brain caused by an external physical force, resulting in total or partial functional disability or psychosocial impairment, or both, that adversely affects a child’s educational performance. The term applies to open or closed head injuries resulting in impairments in one or more areas, such as cognition; language; memory; attention; reasoning; abstract thinking; judgment; problem-solving; sensory, perceptual, and motor abilities; psycho-social behavior; physical functions; information processing; and speech. The term does not apply to brain injuries that are congenital or degenerative, or to brain injuries induced by birth trauma.” [34 Code of Federal Regulations §300.7(c)(12)]
  • 27. TBI: Teaching Tips
    • Find out as much as you can about the child’s injury and his or her present needs. Find out more about TBI. See the list of resources and organizations at the end of this publication.
    • Give the student more time to finish schoolwork and tests.
    • Give directions one step at a time. For tasks with many steps, it helps to give the student written directions.
    • Show the student how to perform new tasks. Give examples to go with new ideas and concepts.
    (continue to next slide)
  • 28. TBI: Teaching Tips
    • Have consistent routines. This helps the student know what to expect. If the routine is going to change, let the student know ahead of time.
    • Check to make sure that the student has actually learned the new skill. Give the student lots of opportunities to practice the new skill.
    • Show the student how to use an assignment book and a daily schedule. This helps the student get organized.
    (continue to next slide)
  • 29. TBI: Teaching Tips
    • Realize that the student may get tired quickly. Let the student rest as needed.
    • Reduce distractions.
    • Keep in touch with the student’s parents. Share information about how the student is doing at home and at school.
    • Be flexible about expectations. Be patient. Maximize the student’s chances for success.
    Tips menu TBI Menu National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities
  • 30. TBI: References and Resources
    • National Resource Center for Traumatic Brain Injury
    • - Traumatic Brain Injury
    • National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities
    • - Traumatic Brain Injury
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
  • 31. Tourette Syndrome Menu
    • General Information and Characteristics
    • Teaching Tips
    • References and Resources
  • 32. Tourette Syndrome: General Information and Characteristics TOURETTE SYNDROME is a brain disorder characterized by repeated involuntary movements and uncontrollable vocal sounds called tics. Tics may include repetitive eye blinking, head jerking, neck stretching, foot stamping, or body twisting and bending. In a few cases, such tics can include inappropriate words and phrases. It is not uncommon for a person with Tourette Syndrome to continuously clear his or her throat, cough, sniff, grunt, yelp, or shout. A few people with Tourette's engage in self-harming behaviors such as lip and cheek biting and head banging. Some children have been found to experience an abrupt, "overnight" onset of Tourette's symptoms and/or obsessive-compulsive symptoms following a strep throat infection. These sudden onset illnesses have been termed "PANDAS" (Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal Infections). National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
  • 33. Tourette Syndrome: Teaching Tips
    • Ignore the tics
    • If a student has vocal tics, consult with them privately about whether you should call on them to read aloud to class.
    • Do NOT punish a student for a tic as it won't help "teach" the student anything other than they are being punished for what they can't help .
    • Model acceptance
    Tips menu Tourette Menu (For a more complete list of teaching tips click on the following website: Tourette Syndrome )
  • 34. Tourette Syndrome : References and Resources
    • U.S. National Library of Medicine
    • - Tourette Syndrome
    • Tourette Syndrome Association
    • - Tourette Syndrome
    • National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
    • - Tourette Syndrome
    • TOURETTE SYNDROME "PLUS"
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
  • 35. Learning Disability (LD) Menu
    • General Information
    • Characteristics
    • Teaching Tips
    • References and Resources
    Dyslexia, a type of learning disability, has letter reversal a characteristic associated with the disorder. Photo: www.healthy.net
  • 36. LD: General Information
    • “ LD is a disorder that affects people's ability to either interpret what they see and hear or to link information from different parts of the brain. These limitations can show up in many ways--as specific difficulties with spoken and written language, coordination, self-control, or attention.”
    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
  • 37. LD: Characteristics
    • Slower reading rate
    • Poor read comprehension
    • Difficulty in sentence structure
    • Limited use of phonic
    • Letter and/or number reversal
    • Difficulty in operational processes
    (For a more complete list of characteristic behaviors click on the following website: Southern Maine Technical College )
  • 38. LD: Teaching Tips
    • Work closely with the resource teacher
    • Seat students in the classroom were they can best be served
    • Help students develop an organization system
  • 39. LD: Teaching Tips
    • Encourage students to use planners to keep track of assignments
    • Work to the student’s strengths
    • Be aware of the student’s accommodations
    • Help the student stay on task
    • Break down multi-step tasks for more clarity (Chris Graves, HSE counselor)
    Tips menu LD Menu
  • 40. LD: References and Resources
    • Information from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
    • - Learning Disabilities
    • ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education
      • Dyslexia
      • Gifted students and learning disabilities
      • Learning disabilities
      • Self-Determination
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
  • 41. Attention Deficit Disorder (with/without hyperactivity) Menu
    • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Menu
    • Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) Menu
  • 42. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Menu
    • General Information
    • Characteristics
    • Teaching Tips for ADD/ADHD
    • References and Resources for ADD/ADHD
    Photo: www.iemily.com
  • 43. ADHD: General Information
    •   “ ADHD refers to a family of related chronic neurobiological disorders that interfere with an individual's capacity to regulate activity level (hyperactivity), inhibit behavior (impulsivity), and attend to tasks (inattention) in developmentally appropriate ways.”
    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
  • 44. ADHD: Characteristics
    • Inattention include:
      • becoming easily distracted
      • failing to pay attention to details
      • rarely following instructions
      • losing or forgetting things
    • Hyperactivity and impulsivity are:
      • feeling restless
      • blurting out answers
      • having difficulty waiting
    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
  • 45. ADHD: Characteristics
    • Inattention include:
      • becoming easily distracted
      • failing to pay attention to details
      • rarely following instructions
      • losing or forgetting things
    • Hyperactivity and impulsivity are:
      • feeling restless
      • blurting out answers
      • having difficulty waiting
    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
  • 46. ADD/ADHD: Teaching Tips
    • Make directions clear and direct
    • Encourage student to seek teacher assistance
    • Require a daily assignment notebook
    • Avoid distracting stimuli
    • Avoid debating or arguing with the student
    • Enforce classroom rules consistently
    • (For a more complete list of teaching tips click on the following website:
    • Teaching Children with ADHD )
    ADHD Menu Tips menu ADD Menu
  • 47. ADD/ADHD: References & Resources
    • Information from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
      • - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
      • - Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Questions and Answers
      • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program) ADD Menu ADHD Menu
  • 48.
    • ADHD Articles from National Association of School Psychologist (NASP)
      • - Attention, Trauma, and Anxiety
      • - Attention: Depression and Temperament
      • - ADHD Look-Alikes - Guidelines for Educators
      • - ADHD Children and Social Skills Training
      • ADHD Students in the Classroom
    ADD/ADHD: References & Resources (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
  • 49. ADD/ADHD: References & Resources
    • Methodist Health Care System of Houston, Tx.
      • ADHD Video and Information
    • ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education
      • Attention deficit disorders (ADD)
      • Gifted students and attention deficit disorders
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
  • 50. ADD/ADHD: References & Resources
    • Additional Teacher Tips
    • - ADD strategies
    • Yahoo! Mental Health ADHD
      • Multimedia Videos on ADHD
    ADHD Menu (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program) ADD Menu
  • 51. Attention Deficit Disorder Menu
    • General Information and Characteristics
    • Teaching Tips for ADD/ADHD
    • References and Resources for ADD/ADHD
  • 52. ADD: General Information and Characteristics
    • Attention deficit disorder without hyperactivity
    • focuses on mainly on the inattention of
    • students. The following are just a few of many
    • characteristics that might be observed in the
    • classroom:
    • Introverted and shy in the classroom
    • Fail to give close attention to details and make careless mistakes
    • Have difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities
    • Does not seem to listen when spoken to directly
  • 53. Emotional Disabilities (ED) Menu
    • General Information on ED
    • Bipolar Disorder
    • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
    • Teaching Tips
    • References and Resources
    Bipolar Disorder is a condition in which the student "swings" between different types of mood episodes. Photo: www.schoolbehavior.com
  • 54.
    • “ Defining the disability of emotional disturbance to certain standards is difficult because of the changing and revised criteria for determining eligibility.
    General Information on ED (continue to next slide) (P. Buckley Moss Foundation for Children's Education)
  • 55.
    • ". . . a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time and to a marked degree that adversely affects educational performance –
    (P. Buckley Moss Foundation for Children's Education) (continue to next slide)
  • 56.
    • An inability to learn that cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory, or health factors;
    • An inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers;
    (P. Buckley Moss Foundation for Children's Education) (continue to next slide)
  • 57.
    • Inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances;
    • A general pervasive mood of unhappiness or depression; or
    • A tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems."
    (P. Buckley Moss Foundation for Children's Education) ED Menu
  • 58. Bi-Polar Disorder
    • “ Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness, is a brain disorder that causes unusual shifts in a person's mood, energy, and ability to function.
    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) (continue to next slide)
  • 59.
    • Different from the normal ups and downs that everyone goes through, the symptoms of bipolar disorder are severe.”
    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) ED Menu
  • 60. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) (continue to next slide) People with OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER (OCD), an anxiety disorder, suffer intensely from recurrent, unwanted thoughts (obsessions) and/or repetitive behaviors (compulsions) that they feel they cannot control. Repetitive behaviors such as hand washing, counting, checking, or cleaning are often performed with the hope of preventing obsessive thoughts or making them go away.
  • 61.
    • Performing these so-called "rituals," however, provides only temporary relief, and not performing them markedly increases anxiety. Left untreated, obsessions and the need to carry out rituals can take over a person's life. Both adults and children can develop OCD.
    National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) ED Menu
  • 62. ED: Teaching Tips
    • Do not get into a power struggle with ED kids.
    • Always give choices.
    • When there is a problem try not to yell, pull the student aside to talk with them.
    (continue to next slide)
  • 63. ED: Teaching Tips
    • If there is a problem give student a cooling off period.  Do not expect them to make a “good” decision on the spot.
    • Seat an ED student next to a strong student or have them work in strong groups.
    (continue to next slide)
  • 64. ED: Teaching Tips
    • Take time in your day or week to talk to the student about things other than school. 
    • Make sure you pick your battles. Try not to be nit picky about things that really are not that important.
    • (Keri Brown, HSE emotional disability teacher)
    Tips menu ED menu
  • 65. ED: References and Resources
    • Information from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
      • - Bipolar Disorder
      • - A story of bipolar disorder: Does this sound like you?
      • - Child and Adolescent Bipolar Disorder: An Update from the NIMH
      • - Going to Extremes: Bipolar Disorder
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program)
  • 66. ED: References and Resources
    • ERIC Clearinghouse on Disabilities and Gifted Education
      • Behavior disorders
      • Bipolar disorder
      • Oppositional defiant disorder
    • Information from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
      • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
    (Links to websites: Click on “X” in right hand corner to get back to program) ED Menu
  • 67. IEP: General Information
    • The IEP is developed by a case conference committee for each child eligible for special education based on the child's unique needs. The IEP addresses the student's present level of performance, educational needs, and educational goals . It is reviewed at least annually by the case conference committee .
  • 68. IEP: Case Conference Committee
    • The case conference committee consists of the student’s custodial parent(s), special education teacher, general education teacher, and chairperson. Others may be invited to attend. (i.e.: the student, school psychologist, principal, etc.)
  • 69. Tips on reading an IEP (For general education teachers)
    • The general education teacher should read the entire IEP; however, there are a few section that one should make special note of: (click on the section for more information)
        • Eligibility Determination
        • Educational Needs
        • Measurable Annual Goals
        • Accommodations
        • Services Implementation
    IEP Menu
  • 70. IEP: Eligibility Determination In this part (found on page 14e-5) of the IEP you will be able to find out what type of disability your student has. Once you know the type of disability, you will then be able to better accommodate the student.
  • 71. IEP: Educational Needs In this part (found on page 14e-5) of the IEP you will be able to find out what type of educational needs your student has. This section indicates the overall educational needs that the students has due to their disability.
  • 72. IEP: Measurable Annual Goals In this part (found on page 14e-9) of the IEP you will be able to find out the goals for your student. The case conference committee determines these goals based upon the student’s educational needs. These goals are monitored by the special education teacher. Many of these goals may be reached through the general education curriculum.
  • 73. IEP: Accommodations In this part (found on page 14e-10) of the IEP you will be able to find out what type of accommodations your student has. This section is probably the most important for general education teacher, because it will indicate any type of special arrangements that you will have to provide for that student. Make a special note of this section so that you will be able to best serve the special education student in your classroom.
  • 74. IEP: Services Implementation In this part (found on page 14e-11) of the IEP you will be able to find out what type of special services your student has. This section would indicate some of the following services: resource study hall, speech therapy, occupational therapy, help of an aide, etc. The people that provide these services for the special education student can be a resource to the general education teacher.
  • 75. Tips on following an IEP (for general education teachers)
    • Read the IEP!!!!!
    • Identify (highlight, etc.) these students in your seating chart and/or grade book
    • Have a checklist of accommodations for each period based upon the special ed. Students in that class
    • Use the special education teacher for help
    • Talk to former teachers to get tips on what practices worked for a given student
    (continue to next slide)
  • 76.
    • Stay on top of the paperwork
    • Contact the parent and resource teacher about concerns academically, behaviorally, etc.
    • Remember that following the IEP is not a choice, so do the best you can
    • (Chris Graves, HSE counselor)
    Tips on following an IEP (for general education teachers) IEP Menu
  • 77. IEP: References and Resources
    • U.S. Department of Education
      • IEP Guide
  • 78. Special Education In-Service Documentation Click on the button below to take you to the documentation form. Print out this form and complete. Make sure you sign, date and return the documentation form to your school principal. This form will indicate to administration that you have completed the in-service. (Click on the X in the upper right hand corner of the word document to return to this program.) END In-service Documentation

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