Sleep Disorders
            How Much Sleep Do Children Need?
  The amount of s...
 


  Prolonged sleep deficit should be taken very seriously. If you think that someone you know or
love may be seriously ...
 


    will be able to help you determine whether or not your child's sleep problems may be caused or
             exacer...
 



                         Behavioral Health Issues
                                                   •    Insomnia:  ...
 


        distressed with typical routine separations such as being dropped off at school. Children
            with SAD...
 


           be an indication of underlying emotional problems. For example, a move to a new
          residence or the ...
 


         Night terrors are different than nightmares, in that the child usually cannot recall upon
        awakening w...
 


          Signs that your child may be grinding her teeth include complaints about a sore jaw,
          visual indica...
 


       infants who have been identified as 'high risk' need to sleep with a breathing monitor that
        has an alar...
 



               Sleep Disorders Related Web Links
                                                     Sleepnet.com

 ...
 



               Sleep Disorders Related Books and
                           References
                              ...
 


                                               Your Growing Child
                                                by P...
 


                                 Sleep : How to Teach Your Child to Sleep...
                                         ...
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Sleep Disorders How Much Sleep Do Children Need?

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Transcript of "Sleep Disorders How Much Sleep Do Children Need?"

  1. 1.   Sleep Disorders How Much Sleep Do Children Need? The amount of sleep a person needs depends largely on age, but also varies from individual to individual. In general, the younger the person, the more sleep is needed. Babies and young children need an average of 12 hours per day, including midday naps. Typically, children stop taking naps at about age 6, but then begin sleeping longer at night. Sleep requirements gradually taper off as children grow older. However, children under the age of 12 should get a minimum of 10 hours per night. By high school, teens typically require about 9 hours of sleep, and by adulthood, 8 hours per night is the average. There is an ongoing debate among researchers about whether or not people can 'make up' lost sleep. However, there is consensus that too little sleep over a prolonged period of time will result in significant mental, behavioral, and physical problems. Effects of Sleep Deficit in Children Sleep deficit, or not getting enough sleep, is the most common sleep problem among both children and adults. Stressful and hurried lifestyles, peer pressures, school concerns, and family relationship issues can lead to a lack of sufficient sleep in children. Parents often believe that children are immune to stress and pressure. However, in reality people of all ages are extremely vulnerable to stress, and difficulty with sleep is often the result. For children, sufficient sleep is necessary to allow the body to rest from high levels of daily physical activity and to promote healthy growth of bones, muscles, and other body tissues. And because the immune system is rejuvenated during sleep, insufficient sleep can cause the body begin to break down, making both children and adults more susceptible to infection and illness. Further, the human brain is often more active during sleep than it is during wakefulness, performing functions that are necessary for providing mental alertness the next day; if these functions are interrupted, problems with memory, concentration, and mood may result. If sleep deficit occurs over a prolonged period of time, serious consequences can result. For example, it is possible for a person who is sleep-deprived to become seriously depressed -- perhaps even suicidal. Sleep difficulties in children are also associated with other psychological problems and disorders, including Anxiety, Attention Disorders, Bed Wetting, and Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder. Further, lack of sleep can make other psychiatric and physical disorders more difficult to treat, and can produce fatigue which will limit motivation to engage in the self-care behaviors that are essential for relief of troublesome psychiatric and physical symptoms. 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  2. 2.   Prolonged sleep deficit should be taken very seriously. If you think that someone you know or love may be seriously depressed or is experiencing other symptoms as a result of prolonged sleep deficit, consult a medical doctor or behavioral health professional immediately. Children Sometimes Resist Sleep It is not uncommon for children to resist going to bed at night or naptime. They may become irritable or 'hyper' as the bedtime routine begins. Since they are likely to be tired from the day's activities, bedtime may lead to battles or power struggles between parent and child. This is not necessarily an indication of physical or psychological problems, and it may even be age- appropriate behavior; however, the bedtime routine should be structured to encourage 'winding down' and preparation for restful sleep. Ideas to Help Children Ages 4 to 8: Some children naturally resist sleep. If this is true for your child, start preparing him/her for bed early enough to allow for the expected resistance to ensure that lights are out by the planned time. You can minimize your frustration if you anticipate resistance and plan for it. For example, if it is your child's habit to fight against going to bed for up to 2 hours each night, then start the bedtime routine 2 hours before the scheduled "lights-out" time. It may help to wake the child earlier in the morning for a few days to establish the new schedule. Here are some other specific ideas to try: • Think of bedtime as an opportunity for quality family time.   • Establish a quiet, consistent bedtime routine. After several nights of doing the same quiet  activities, in the same sequence, your child will begin to associate them with going to sleep.   • Give your child a light snack to begin the bedtime routine. One or two crackers with cheese, a  small piece of fresh fruit, or a small bowl of unsweetened cereal should do the trick. Avoid foods  and beverages containing processed sugar or caffeine after about 4:00 P.M., and remember that  a heavy meal should not be eaten within 2 hours of bedtime.   • Include quiet activities such as listening to soft music, taking a warm bath, reading a favorite  book, and snuggling in bed with a favorite stuffed toy or doll, etc…   • Start early. Allow sufficient time to prepare your child for bed. As he gets used to the routine,  the time required to quiet down and fall asleep will decrease.   • Stay calm, keep your voice quiet, and be firm. Showing frustration will indicate to the child that  she is in control, and this will simply encourage her to continue the battle.   • Be patient. The process of establishing an effective bedtime routine might take a few days or  weeks, but the effort will be well worth the payoff in terms of improved functioning for your  child and your family.   • Remember that helping your child get adequate sleep is important to his/her health.   If you have diligently worked for several days to establish a bedtime routine and your child is still resistant, consider eliminating the daytime nap. Inform day care providers of your decisions and ask them to limit or eliminate the nap for a couple of weeks until you can get the routine established. If, after several weeks, the child still does not respond to the new routine, consider talking to your child's pediatrician or a behavioral health provider. A well-trained professional 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  3. 3.   will be able to help you determine whether or not your child's sleep problems may be caused or exacerbated by a behavioral disorder such as Anxiety or Attention Disorders. Ideas To Help Children Ages 8 to 16: Adolescents need an average of 9 hours of sleep per night. A recent national study has shown that very few children in this age group get enough sleep, which negatively impacts their mood, their ability to learn, and their physical health. Help your child take their need for sleep seriously through encouragement, support and structure. Children in this age group often prefer to stay up until midnight or beyond, and then to awaken in the mid-morning. In fact, there is emerging evidence that preference for such a schedule may be at least partially caused by biological changes taking place during adolescence. However, if your child's school schedule does not support this schedule, you must firmly insist upon earlier and consistent bedtimes that allow enough time for sufficient sleep. Tell your child or adolescent that your family's bedtime rules are intended to help keep him/her healthy and happy, and that you will impose fair consequences for a violation of these rules. Agree in advance upon consequences that are reasonable and can be monitored. For example, if s/he chooses to go to bed late one particular evening, then limit free time for extracurricular activities (e.g., TV, music or computer games) the following day. Be firm, and be sure to follow through consistently. If you state in advance that there will be a consequence, then be prepared to impose the consequence calmly and purposefully. Sleep Disorders Sleep disorders are common in our fast-paced society. Because the intensity and severity of these conditions can be progressive, consulting a physician or behavioral health professional who specializes in treating sleep disorders is very important. There are three broad categories of sleep disorders: Behavioral health problems include insomnia, separation anxiety, night fears, and nightmares. Arousal Disorders include sleepwalking, sleep talking, night terrors, bed wetting, and teeth grinding. Physical or neurological problems include narcolepsy, sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The most common disorders are those associated with behavioral health issues and are usually less complicated to treat. When arousal disorders and physical or neurological problems are the cause of sleep problems, medical intervention will be necessary. 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  4. 4.   Behavioral Health Issues • Insomnia:   Sometimes, despite our best efforts, we cannot seem to fall asleep. Insomnia (inability to sleep) has many potential causes, and it is usually possible to identify the cause(s) of a particular episode of insomnia. In children, some of the most common causes are: oHaving an irregular or unpredictable sleeping schedule.   oTaking daytime naps that are too long or too frequent.   o Eating foods that are high in processed sugar or caffeine, especially when they are  consumed too close to bedtime.   o Trying to sleep in an uncomfortable environment (loud music, air temperature that is  too hot or too cold, etc..).   o Worrying about daytime stressors (family or peer relationships, school problems, etc...).   o Having an underlying physical or neurological problem (see section below).   If your child is having trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, first evaluate his bedtime routine. If he had previously been sleeping well, but a change in bedtime routine interrupted that pattern, then resume the original routine. If nothing has changed recently, then evaluate his/her daytime sleeping patterns. Try shortening or eliminating daytime naps then setting bedtime a little earlier to compensate for the loss of daytime sleep. If worry, or anxiety, seems to be the cause of your child's insomnia, or inability to sleep, talk to her about what might be causing it. Reassure her that you will help her resolve the problem; sometimes a little reassurance is all the comfort a child needs. If she seems to need more than simple reassurance, discuss several possible solutions to the problem, then help her choose and implement the solution she thinks will be most helpful to minimize anxiety. If a quick resolution to the anxiety-causing problem is not possible, you should help your child learn relaxation techniques such as deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation. Books on these topics are available at your local library or bookstore. Another good idea is to make and decorate a special 'worry box' from supplies you have around the house. Encourage your child to write about the problem and put the paper into the 'worry box'. Explain that leaving the worry in the special box will keep it safe until you both figure out what to do about it; this may help him let go of the perceived need to worry. If the problem persists and your child continues to sleep poorly, contact a medical professional or a behavioral health professional immediately. • Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD):   Many children experience distress or nervousness when they are separated from their parents or their home, but children with SAD become intensely anxious and extremely 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  5. 5.   distressed with typical routine separations such as being dropped off at school. Children with SAD fear that some terrible danger or harm will come to their parents, or to themselves, while they are separated. They may fear that their parents will have a car accident or get ill while they are away and that they may never be reunited again. They may also fear that they will be injured or kidnapped while they are not in their parents' care. Symptoms of SAD can include stomachache, nausea, headache, vomiting, crying, and clinging to the parent when the separation occurs or is anticipated. This anxiety results in significant avoidance of many situations and can severely affect a child's behavior and lifestyle. Children with SAD may become reluctant to go to school, spend the night with friends, go to camp, walk or bike alone, or engage in just about any activity which will require separation from their parents. Children with SAD will often have trouble sleeping in their own room and will try to sleep as close to the parent as possible (in their room, in their bed, or even in the hall outside their door). It should be noted that separation anxiety may occur in response to being separated from any caregiver or loved one, not just a parent. Children may also experience separation anxiety concerning only one parent or both. • Night Fears:   It is not uncommon for young children to be afraid of the dark or of what they cannot see. For example, a fear of monsters seems very real for many children, although this fear is not really rational. Avoid validating irrational fears; for example, if your child has an irrational fear of monsters, avoid telling monster stories just before bedtime. However, if the fear is reality-based (e.g., your home was burglarized and now the child is afraid of another break-in), respond by offering reassurance and talking about your own feelings and how you are dealing with them. Show them that doors are locked and windows are secure, that you are staying calm in the face of your own fear, and that you are doing everything you can to make safety a priority in your home. Don't allow your anxious child under the age of 8 to watch scary or violent movies, because most children younger than 8 cannot distinguish between fact and fiction. By the time a child has reached the age of 8, most have begun to discern fact from fantasy. However, even at this age, if a movie seems very real, a child may struggle to sort out the differences between what is real and what is not. By age 13, most children can more easily tell the difference between fact and fantasy; this is the rationale behind the PG-13 movie rating. • Nightmares:   As children grow, chemical changes occur in their bodies that can trigger temporary sleep problems. At least part of the time, nightmares appear to be caused by these chemical changes. If this is happening to your child, the nightmare pattern will not last more than a few nights, and they will stop as suddenly as they started. However, nightmares may also 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  6. 6.   be an indication of underlying emotional problems. For example, a move to a new residence or the loss of a pet or a loved one can cause children to become fearful and upset, which in turn can produce nightmares. When your child reports having just had a nightmare, listen attentively and lovingly, offer comfort, and stay with her until she falls back to sleep. Reassuring your child that you are there for her and will protect her from harm will help minimize her fears. If nightmares persist in spite of your best efforts to offer reassurance and comfort, consult a medical doctor or behavioral health professional. Arousal Disorders • Sleepwalking:   Sleepwalking is usually harmless, but it can also be very dangerous because the sleepwalker is unaware of his actions. Approximately 40% of children will experience at least one episode of sleepwalking. An immature central nervous system is believed to be the primary causal factor. As the nervous system develops and matures, sleepwalking episodes usually decline in frequency until they finally cease altogether. Children of parents who had this disorder when they were children are far more likely to sleepwalk than children whose parents did not. Sleepwalking usually occurs during the first few hours of sleep. Symptoms range from simply sitting up in bed and mumbling to actually getting out of bed and walking around as if awake. A sleepwalker might get herself something to eat or sit down and watch TV. Parents usually know that the child is still asleep because she is difficult to arouse, and seems unaware about things going on around her. A sleepwalker seldom remembers the episode. Although sleepwalking itself is not dangerous, injuries and fatalities have occurred. Because of the risks involved with sleepwalking, it is highly recommended that you request consultation from a medical doctor or a behavioral health professional who specializes in sleep disorders. You will need to make certain that doors and windows are locked, and that it is impossible for your child to open them while sleeping. You will need to be aware of other potential hazards, as well, and work to make the sleeping environment as safe as possible for your child. • Sleeptalking:   Unlike sleepwalking, sleeptalking is not usually considered dangerous or harmful. While it is more common for adults to talk in their sleep than for children, some children do display this behavior. Sleeptalking often begins soon after the person has fallen asleep. Sometimes people will talk while dreaming, and occasionally they will even respond to questions while they are asleep. Since sleeptalking is not dangerous, there is little reason to be concerned about it or try to eliminate it. However, it is known that noise seems to increase episodes of sleeptalking, so it may help to make the sleeping room as quiet as possible. • Night Terrors:   2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  7. 7.   Night terrors are different than nightmares, in that the child usually cannot recall upon awakening what frightened her. A child with night terrors often thrashes in her sleep and then rejects help when it is offered. Once a child has awakened, there is no memory of what has frightened her, and often she may not even understand why you are attempting to comfort her. However, these episodes can be disturbing to parents. Take comfort in knowing that almost all children outgrow this problem by the age of 11. The cause of night terrors is not entirely known, but they are not believed to be caused by psychological trauma. A genetic factor seems to be involved, since approximately 80% of children who experience night terrors have relatives who also experienced them as children. There also seems to be a relationship between night terrors and a phase of normal sleep known as rapid eye movement (REM). REM is the state of deep sleep when the brain is extremely active. Researchers believe that one part of the brain 'wakes up' while the other stays in deep sleep. In addition to the genetic factor, it appears that night terror episodes increase when a child is over-tired. Enforcing a consistent sleeping schedule, which provides the necessary amount of sleep, may help reduce their frequency. In the long run, the best remedy for night terrors is to provide comfort and caring attention to your child after he is awake. You may need to hold him against his will until he wakes up completely. Once awake, the apparent state of panic will dissipate. Comfort your child as needed, then let him fall back to sleep. If a parent is concerned about persistent and frequent night terrors, or if the episodes continue to occur regularly after age 11, consult a medical doctor or a behavioral health professional that specializes in sleep disorders. • Bed Wetting:   Nocturnal Enuresis (bed wetting) is a relatively common disorder fraught with emotional, physical, and social effects. By the age of 3, about 60% of children will be dry through the night. Most children that struggle with bedwetting after age 3 are boys, and about 85% of them will sleep dry by the age of 5. Some of the remaining 15% will sleep dry some of the time, but will experience periods of bed wetting even through early adulthood (1% at age 18). While this may be disconcerting, an estimated 6 million children in the United States that are currently experiencing problems with bed wetting. There are several different ways that you can help your child. Visit our Bed Wetting article for more specific information on this issue. • Teeth Grinding (Bruxism):   The severity of Bruxism varies depending on how hard and how frequently a child grinds her teeth. This problem affects about 14% of all children between the ages of 6 and 12, and can be a difficult habit to break. Medical or dental intervention may be necessary to prevent serious damage to the teeth. 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  8. 8.   Signs that your child may be grinding her teeth include complaints about a sore jaw, visual indications of tooth wear, and actually seeing and hearing your child grind her teeth while asleep. In some cases this problem is associated with stress, so teaching your child relaxation techniques to use at bedtime can be helpful. Consult a medical or dental professional immediately to minimize damage to your child's teeth and to get more information about how to help your child curb this problem. Physical or Neurological Problems • Narcolepsy:   This is a very rare disorder that results in frequent and recurrent episodes of sudden drowsiness and unexpectedly falling asleep during the day, even when engaged in an interesting activity. The disorder is caused by biological rather than psychological processes, and hence requires the attention of a skilled medical professional with experience in treating this disorder. • Sleep Apnea:   Sleep apnea is also a fairly rare disorder that can affect children, but is far more common in adults. The symptoms may include some or all of the following: intervals of 10 seconds or more in which breathing stops (followed by loud gasps for air), sudden arousal from sleep, chronic loud snoring or labored breathing, daytime fatigue and drowsiness, morning headaches, frequent upper respiratory tract infections, mouth breathing during sleep, and symptoms of sleep deprivation. • Restless Leg Syndrome:   The symptoms of this disorder include discomfort in the legs (usually a prickly, tingling sensation) that the child might report as pain. Since this interferes with the child's ability to get comfortable and relaxed for sleep, he may have a hard time falling asleep or staying asleep. You can help to relieve these symptoms by getting your child up to walk around the house a bit, massaging his legs, and offering a warm bath or shower. Little is known about the cause of this disorder, but it is considered to be a serious condition that may require medical attention. If the problem is severe enough that your child is losing significant amounts of sleep, or the pain persists while awake, you should you should contact a medical doctor or behavioral health professional who specializes in sleep disorders. • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS):   Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) occurs when a healthy baby stops breathing during sleep, requiring some kind of stimulation to start breathing again. Typically, 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  9. 9.   infants who have been identified as 'high risk' need to sleep with a breathing monitor that has an alarm that sounds the moment breathing stops. Sometimes the alarm is enough to startle the infant awake, causing her to resume normal breathing. If not, additional assistance may be required. Medical researchers do not yet know the cause of this disorder. However, there are many theories as to the cause, including genetic factors, poor bonding or nurturing, chaotic home environments, and drug or alcohol use - either during pregnancy by the mother or prior to conception in either the mother or the father. Children seem to outgrow this disorder, and the chances of surviving it are greatly increased by early medical intervention. If you notice irregular breathing in your infant while sleeping, consult the child's pediatrician immediately. Authors in order of contribution: • Mary A. Brasch, M.A./M.A. CAC   • Julie Reed, MC, CPC   • Beth Keen, Ph.D.   © 2000-2008 Notmykid.org All Rights Reserved.     Related Articles - Sleep Disorders Children's Sleep Problems Many childhood sleep problems are related to irregular sleep habits or to anxiety about going to bed and falling asleep. Persistent sleep problems may also be symptoms of emotional difficulties. Support Organizations - Sleep Disorders Narcolepsy Network 1092 Reed Hartman Highway Cincinnati, Ohio 45242 The American Sleep Apnea Association 1424 K Street NW, Suite 302 Washington, DC 20005 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  10. 10.   Sleep Disorders Related Web Links Sleepnet.com www.sleepnet.com Comprehensive website that covers all topics related to sleep. Medem: The Nation's medical site www.medem.com American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry www.aacap.org The Sleep Site www.thesleepsite.com Health Central www.healthcentral.com Night Terrors Resource Center www.nightterrors.org The purpose of this site is to help people understand that there are medical solutions and reasons for Night Terrors. American Sleep Apnea Association www.sleepapnea.org The American Sleep Apnea Association is dedicated to reducing injury, disability, and death from sleep apnea and to enhancing the well-being of those affected by this common disorder. The ASAA promotes education and awareness, the ASAA A.W.A.K.E. Network of voluntary mutual support groups, research, and continuous improvement of care. The Ultimate Resource for Teeth Grinding www.teethgrinding.org 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  11. 11.   Sleep Disorders Related Books and References The 7 O'Clock Bedtime : Early to Bed,... by Inda Schaenen, Judith Owens (Preface) Are children hardwired to stay up late, scarfing down cookies and soda and surfing the Internet? No, says Inda Schaenen, who advocates a no-nonsense, nurturing approach that will help you get your kids into bed by 7 o'clock -- and help you make a saner life for yourself. Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child by Marc Weissbluth One of the country's leading researchers updates his revolutionary approach to solving--and preventing--your children's sleep problems. Understanding Your Child's Dreams by Pam Spurr, Caroline Uff (Illustrator) Understand the rich tapestry of your child's inner world! With fewer inhibitions than adults, children eagerly share their dream life and visit their worst nightmares. But they often don't have the vocabulary to express their feelings. Sleeping Through the Night : How... by Jodi A. Mindell A child psychologist presents what all new parents so desperately need: a simple and accessible guide to getting babies and toddlers to fall asleep and stay asleep. Dr. Mindell shows how all members of the family can cope with the stresses associated with teaching a child to sleep. $20,000 budget. Sleep : How to Teach Your Child to Sleep... by Tamara Eberlein Offers real-world solutions to bedraggled parents, presenting proven methods to increasing the number of sleep hours per night, feeling less fatigued during the day, finding more time and energy, and improving a child's daytime demeanor. How to Help Children With Common Problems by Charles E. Schaefer, Howard L. Millman (Contributor) Good Behavior Made Easy Handbook by Stephen Garber, Marianne Garber, Robyn Suizman, Robyn free Spizman 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  12. 12.   Your Growing Child by Penelope Leach Your Growing Child is an A-to-Z compendium of vital information and comfort for every mother and father -- from new parents bringing home their first infant to parents of adolescents soon to strike out on their own. Whether she is telling you what to do when your child suddenly develops a high fever... Sleep Thief: Restless Legs Syndrome by Virginia N. Wilson, David Buchholz, Arthur S. Walters (Editor)   Sleep Disorders Related Books and References The 7 O'Clock Bedtime : Early to Bed,... by Inda Schaenen, Judith Owens (Preface) Are children hardwired to stay up late, scarfing down cookies and soda and surfing the Internet? No, says Inda Schaenen, who advocates a no-nonsense, nurturing approach that will help you get your kids into bed by 7 o'clock -- and help you make a saner life for yourself. Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child by Marc Weissbluth One of the country's leading researchers updates his revolutionary approach to solving--and preventing--your children's sleep problems. Understanding Your Child's Dreams by Pam Spurr, Caroline Uff (Illustrator) Understand the rich tapestry of your child's inner world! With fewer inhibitions than adults, children eagerly share their dream life and visit their worst nightmares. But they often don't have the vocabulary to express their feelings. Sleeping Through the Night : How... by Jodi A. Mindell A child psychologist presents what all new parents so desperately need: a simple and accessible guide to getting babies and toddlers to fall asleep and stay asleep. Dr. Mindell shows how all members of the family can cope with the stresses associated with teaching a child to sleep. $20,000 budget. 2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   
  13. 13.   Sleep : How to Teach Your Child to Sleep... by Tamara Eberlein Offers real-world solutions to bedraggled parents, presenting proven methods to increasing the number of sleep hours per night, feeling less fatigued during the day, finding more time and energy, and improving a child's daytime demeanor. How to Help Children With Common Problems by Charles E. Schaefer, Howard L. Millman (Contributor) Good Behavior Made Easy Handbook by Stephen Garber, Marianne Garber, Robyn Suizman, Robyn free Spizman Your Growing Child by Penelope Leach Your Growing Child is an A-to-Z compendium of vital information and comfort for every mother and father -- from new parents bringing home their first infant to parents of adolescents soon to strike out on their own. Whether she is telling you what to do when your child suddenly develops a high fever... Sleep Thief: Restless Legs Syndrome by Virginia N. Wilson, David Buchholz, Arthur S. Walters (Editor)   2211 E. Highland Ave. Suite 140, Phoenix, AZ 85016 | info@notmykid.org | o: 602 652 0163 | f: 602 795 8154   

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