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Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
Food Pledge....What You Can Do
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Food Pledge....What You Can Do

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  • You may have noticed that many of the institutions I’ve highlighted have signed the Pledge. Some did it after they had already started to make changes, but others have done it as a first step. Almost 50 hospitals have signed on to date, including two that signed in the last week- Fairview Hospital in Great Barrington, Massachusetts and Cooley Dickinson also in Northampton, Massachusetts Why sign? Demonstrate commitment Signal the market
  • Include people from different disciplines - clinical, nutrition, admin, health ed. The group can begin by conducting a self-assessment of the current food procurement system within the facility. There are many resources to help you get started, including many presentations, fact sheets, handouts etc… We can provide staff to help you begin.
  • HCWH created the Menu of Options a compilation of things that hospitals and health systems are already doing so we know they can be done.
  • Health Industry Group Purchasing Association – Supply Chain – But we are here to talk about food and food systems – Healthcare is clearly comitted to nutrition related issues, esp during the ibesity We were approached by our healthcare partners – our track record – healthcare is suffering crisis from nutritionally related diseases, our partners recogizi that it is wise to address from a systemic perspective – Not just about the individual choices – it is the system that is providing our food….similar to smoking, we need to address the environment with a broader public health approach Let’s step back and look at how our food is produced and distributed
  • What is the Green Guide for Health Care™? The Green Guide is the health care sector’s first quantifiable sustainable design toolkit integrating enhanced environmental and health principles and practices into the planning, design, construction, operations and maintenance of their facilities. This Guide provides the health care sector with a voluntary, self-certifying metric toolkit of best practices that designers, owners, and operators can use to guide and evaluate their progress towards high performance healing environments.  The Green Guide is divided into a Construction section and an Operations section.  The Construction section is relevant for new construction, renovations, and additions. Existing facilities are encouraged to track their ongoing performance using the Operations section, while making a commitment to utilize the Construction section on future projects. Construction projects are encouraged to identify the Operations- related credits that they intend to achieve and establish commitments to these O&M goals through policy setting. Note that construction projects are unable to attain all of the points in the Operations section, as some credits require a year’s worth of data to achieve credit goals.
  • The initiation of health care focused sustainable design tools began with the Green Healthcare Construction Guidance Statement published by the American Society for Healthcare Engineering (ASHE) in January 2002, representing the first sustainable design guidance document to emphasize a health-based approach. The Green Guide for Health Care development initiative began in March 2003 with a professionally and geographically diverse group of green health care industry leaders convened as an independent Steering Committee to guide the document development (see the Steering Committee list on the Contributors page).
  • Working Groups for each section of the document drafted credit language that was reviewed and approved by the Steering Committee as a whole. In December 2003, Version 1.0 of the Green Guidelines for Healthcare Construction was released in draft form for public comment. More than 900 registrants downloaded the document during the public comment period from organizations representing a broad range of architectural, engineering, construction, health care, and manufacturing firms and industry associations. Between December 2003 and the close of the comment period on February 29, 2004, more than 1,200 public comments were received. A partial listing of those who submitted comments is included on the Public Comment page. The Steering Committee reviewed all public comments prior to the drafting of Version 2.0. In November 2004, Version 2.0 of the Green Guide for Health Care was released for general use in the Pilot phase. Version 2.1, released in September 2005, included a substantial update to the Operations section of the document and minor revisions to the Construction section, covering copy and editorial changes.
  • When the Green Guide Pilot ended on January 31, 2007, 119 projects had registered with Pilot, representing more than 30 million square feet. As you can see from the maps, projects are spread out across the US, and several have already signed up internationally. Green Guide Pilot projects have also begun to concentrate in several regions of the country. In some cases, the majority of Pilots are still anonymous so their region has not realized yet that it is attracting green projects. In other cases, such as California and Massachusetts, the region has begun to capitalize on its success with green health care. All projects that have registered with the Green Guide after January 2007 are automatically registered as Green Guide Version 2.2 projects.
  • As in LEED, the GGHC is divided into sections, each with a series of prerequisites (first number) followed by points. In the Construction Section, section names are modeled on LEED divisions, with one important addition: Integrated Design. Many of the GGHC Construction credits are based on LEED-NC credits. However, with 97 points in comparison to LEED-NC’s 69 points, many credits were added in response to the Green Guide’s intent to customize for the health care sector and reflect an array of health based considerations.
  • The section names in the Operations section are not based on LEED, but many of the credits in this section were modeled on LEED for Existing Buildings. In addition, the Operations section includes many pollution prevention, waste management, and environmentally preferable purchasing strategies taken from health-care specific environmental non-profits such as Hospitals for a Healthy Environment and Health Care Without Harm. There are a total of 72 credits in the Operations section. The total number of credits in both the Construction and Operations sections are 166 credits and 21 Prerequisites.
  • 2 new sections: Sustainable Sites Management and Food Service
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Many hospitals and health systems across the country are now working to increase the amount of food they purchase from farms and ranches that are using more sustainable practices and/ or are more proximate to their facilities. By making these choices they are helping to move the market in a healthier direction.
  • Measurable-No uniform definition of sustainability and no one certification, however there are a variety of eco-labels and USDA or FDA sanctioned label claims that purchasers can use to identify food that were produced to meet one or more sustainability related criteria, such as produced without use of synthetic pesticides, produced without use of hormones and more. I’ll highlight a few of these for you in a moment. I’ll also talk to you about the definition we chose to use for local. Flexible-To be responsive to the fact that local growing seasons vary nationwide, certified foods can sometimes be more expensive and access to certified and otherwise eco-labeled foods can also vary. We set up the credit so that facilities can count purchases that meet a variety of sustainability qualifications. Incremental Success-The higher the percentage of foods that meet the criteria the more points a facility can earn.
  • (both in-house and contracted food service)
  • -Easiest method is form a relationship with the grower, so you know where they are -Some states may be too big to rely predominately on state marketing label; Almost, but not quite all of the state of PA lies within a 200 mile radius of Pittsburgh, most of the state of Ohio, parts of Maryland and West Virginia -Important to read the criteria that a state uses. For instance, the state of PA allows foods like chocolate to carry their logo as long as 100% of the final manufacturing process and packaging was done in Pennsylvania. Arizona Grown-ag product that is grown, raised or processed in state of Arizona
  • In addition to having standards around treatment of all animals, the Animal Welfare Approved certification also places restrictions on the type of farm or ranch
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts Facilities can earn up to four points: Designed to award use of reusable food service ware first and foremost- Mention reusable studies
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts Facilities can earn up to three points: Designed to award use of reusable food service ware first and foremost-
  • Emphasis is on post-consumer recycled content and avoiding use of chlorine or chlorine compounds in manufacturing
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • -Food and food waste products are the second largest constituent of the health care waste stream, comprising close to 20% of the solid waste volume in medical facilities with food service operations. -According to the U.S. EPA, roughly 20% of food produced in the U.S. is disposed of prior to consumption. -Composting of both prep and post-consumer food waste from institutions is becoming a more common practice and more and more hospitals are participating. Fletcher Allen Medical Center in Vermont has a long standing program whereby there prep food waste is hauled away to be composted and the resulting product is sold back to employees at a discount. St. Luke’s in Duluth, MN and OHSU in Portland, OR have been collecting their food waste for composting for several years now. -Beneficial reuse of organic matter diverts waste constituents from disposal while also contributing to ecosystem health. Composting organic matter and applying it to the soil increases soil micronutrients, and reduces reliance on chemical fertilizers and their associated industrial, ecologic and health burdens. -Many hospitals also have established food donation programs. Food donations both reduce facility solid waste disposal costs and reduce the need to produce and purchase duplicate food items for non-profits and charities such as homeless shelters and food kitchens.
  • -Food and food waste products are the second largest constituent of the health care waste stream, comprising close to 20% of the solid waste volume in medical facilities with food service operations. -According to the U.S. EPA, roughly 20% of food produced in the U.S. is disposed of prior to consumption. -Composting of both prep and post-consumer food waste from institutions is becoming a more common practice and more and more hospitals are participating. Fletcher Allen Medical Center in Vermont has a long standing program whereby there prep food waste is hauled away to be composted and the resulting product is sold back to employees at a discount. St. Luke’s in Duluth, MN and OHSU in Portland, OR have been collecting their food waste for composting for several years now. -Beneficial reuse of organic matter diverts waste constituents from disposal while also contributing to ecosystem health. Composting organic matter and applying it to the soil increases soil micronutrients, and reduces reliance on chemical fertilizers and their associated industrial, ecologic and health burdens. -Many hospitals also have established food donation programs. Food donations both reduce facility solid waste disposal costs and reduce the need to produce and purchase duplicate food items for non-profits and charities such as homeless shelters and food kitchens.
  • -Food and food waste products are the second largest constituent of the health care waste stream, comprising close to 20% of the solid waste volume in medical facilities with food service operations. -According to the U.S. EPA, roughly 20% of food produced in the U.S. is disposed of prior to consumption. -Composting of both prep and post-consumer food waste from institutions is becoming a more common practice and more and more hospitals are participating. Fletcher Allen Medical Center in Vermont has a long standing program whereby there prep food waste is hauled away to be composted and the resulting product is sold back to employees at a discount. St. Luke’s in Duluth, MN and OHSU in Portland, OR have been collecting their food waste for composting for several years now. -Beneficial reuse of organic matter diverts waste constituents from disposal while also contributing to ecosystem health. Composting organic matter and applying it to the soil increases soil micronutrients, and reduces reliance on chemical fertilizers and their associated industrial, ecologic and health burdens. -Many hospitals also have established food donation programs. Food donations both reduce facility solid waste disposal costs and reduce the need to produce and purchase duplicate food items for non-profits and charities such as homeless shelters and food kitchens.
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • Impact both reducing use of virgin natural resources as well as improving life cycle impacts
  • -Traditional cleaning products present a variety of human health and ecological concerns. They may contribute to poor indoor air quality and contain chemicals that cause cancer, reproductive disorders, respiratory ailments (including occupational asthma), eye and skin irritation, central nervous system impairment, and other human health effects. In addition, some of these products contain persistent bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals (PBTs), are classified as hazardous waste, and/or otherwise contribute to environmental pollution during their manufacture, transport, use, and/or disposal. Pesticides in Healthcare, 2003 Report Findings, Small sample group of hospitals (from Laura B PP) 91% use pesticides inside 77% use pesticides on grounds 36% using pesticides no longer registered 18% using pesticide ingredient being phased out for safety reasons Only IL restricts use of some pesticides while patients are in area of treatment -Non-toxic and least-toxic cleaning products and materials exist for general cleaning purposes in a health care facility. -Say something about pest management Credit Goals • Utilize environmentally preferable cleaning chemicals to clean food preparation and food service areas (cafeterias), kitchen equipment, surfaces and dishware. These chemicals may include floor cleaners, drain cleaners, oven cleaners, dish detergent, glass and surface cleaners, multipurpose cleaners and any general surface disinfectants. Utilize cleaners certified under the listed specifications in GGHC ES Credits 1.3-1.4 for available product categories. Avoid phenolics and chlorinated cleaners for food service use. • Utilize only integrated pest management techniques for pest disturbances in the food services area per GGHC ES Credit 3: Integrated Pest Management. • Get written verification that all contractors for food services/dietary agree to abide by and purchase products meeting the above criteria.
  • For more helpful information on these topics
  • Just added a slew of new ones in preparation for this conference
  • Transcript

    • 1. <ul><li>Maine Health </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop </li></ul><ul><ul><li>November 4th, 2008 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Michelle Gottlieb, MEM </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.noharm.org </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul>Healthy, Local, Sustainable Food in Healthcare: Food Pledge and GGHC
    • 2. <ul><li>The Healthy Food in Health Care Pledge </li></ul>Bartels Lutheran Retirement Community - IA Fletcher Allen Health Care - VT Good Shepherd Medical Center - OR St. Luke’s Hospital - MN Hackensack University Medical Center - NJ Oregon Health and Science University Hospital - OR Fairview Hospital - MA   Cooley Dickinson Hospital - MA Sinai Hospital - MD Baystate Health - MA Advocate Lutheran General Hospital - IL The Center for Discovery - NY Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital - MA Littleton Regional Hospital - NH Swedish Covenant Hospital - IL Carroll Hospital Center - MD Arroyo Grande Community Hospital - CA Bakersfield Memorial Hospital - CA Barrow Neurological Institute - AZ CA Hospital Medical Center - CA Chandler Regional Hospital - AZ Community Hospital of San Bernardino - CA Dominican Hospital - CA French Hospital Medical Center - CA Glendale Memorial Hospital and Health Center - CA Marian Medical Center - CA Mark Twain St. Joseph&apos;s Hospital - CA Mercy General Hospital - CA …………………
    • 3. Venues for Change <ul><li>Patient food </li></ul><ul><li>Cafeteria </li></ul><ul><li>Catering </li></ul><ul><li>Vending Machines </li></ul><ul><li>Franchises </li></ul><ul><li>Employees benefits </li></ul>
    • 4. Start a Conversation About Healthy Food <ul><li>Create a multi-disciplinary food committee or “team” composed of staff from: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Food and nutrition services; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Purchasing; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Administration; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nursing, and clinicians; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other - public affairs, ethics and quality improvement personnel. </li></ul></ul>
    • 5. Menu of Options: Steps to Healthier Food in Hospitals
    • 6. Purchasing Preferences <ul><li>Poultry and Meat Raised Without Use of Nontherapeutic Antibiotics </li></ul><ul><li>Dairy products produced without rBGH </li></ul><ul><li>Certified Foods </li></ul><ul><li>Locally produced </li></ul>
    • 7. <ul><li>HCWH works with all major GPOs </li></ul><ul><li>Develops model contract language </li></ul><ul><li>Educational content </li></ul><ul><li>Training </li></ul>
    • 8. GGHC Food Service Credits 2008 Revision to Green Guide for Health Care Version 2.2 Operations Section www.gghc.org
    • 9. What is the GGHC? <ul><li>Self certifying tool kit to steer facilities through greener design, construction and operations. </li></ul><ul><li>Version 1.0 released in 2003 – Review of Versions 2.0, 2.1 and now 2.2 </li></ul>
    • 10. Protect the immediate health of building occupants. Protect the health of the surrounding local community. Protect the health of the global community and natural resources. 1 2 3 2002 ASHE Green Healthcare Construction Guidance Statement foundational document
    • 11. The design and operation of health care buildings is highly regulated with intense economic and life safety oversight Health care facilities are often multiple building campuses of varying ages, conditions, systems 24/7 operations with patients in place require intensive coordination and redundancy of all services at all times. Long ownership mean owners realize life cycle implications of their construction choices. 1 2 3 4 overview design attributes
    • 12. <ul><li>Void in the marketplace of health-care specific green building tool </li></ul><ul><li>Core content transfer from existing tools (e.g., LEED®) but need to tailor for healthcare </li></ul><ul><li>Explicit health-based focus </li></ul><ul><li>Sensitivity to an over-regulated sector --&gt; voluntary best practices with no certification thresholds </li></ul><ul><li>Reinforces integrated design as essential </li></ul><ul><li>Bridges design &amp; construction with operational considerations </li></ul>
    • 13. <ul><li>Dec 2003 – Version 1.0 Released in Draft Form </li></ul><ul><li>More than 900 registrants downloaded during public comment period </li></ul><ul><li>Steering committee reviewed comments </li></ul><ul><li>Nov. 2004 – Version 2.0 Released for general use in pilot phase </li></ul><ul><li>Sept. 2005 – Version 2.1 Released (operations update and minor revisions to construction) </li></ul><ul><li>January 2007 – Version 2.2 Released (construction update and minor revisions to operations) </li></ul><ul><li>Spring 2008 – Release of Operations Section – Public Comments Close May 16th </li></ul>History of GGHC
    • 14. Intent Documentation Health Issues Reference Standards Credit Goals Technologies &amp; Strategies GGHC Credit Organization
    • 15. <ul><li>18,000+ website registrants </li></ul><ul><li>every state in the U.S. </li></ul><ul><li>every Canadian Province </li></ul><ul><li>500 new registrants/month </li></ul><ul><li>100+ countries </li></ul>GGHC Website Registration Last updated April 2008 Release GGHC Version 2.0 Pilot Release GGHC Version 2.1 Pilot Release GGHC Version 2.2 gghc website registrant growth geographic distribution Green Guide for Health Care Website Registrants overview registration <ul><li>Canada </li></ul><ul><li>Australia </li></ul><ul><li>United Kingdom </li></ul><ul><li>India </li></ul><ul><li>France </li></ul><ul><li>Malaysia </li></ul><ul><li>Argentina </li></ul><ul><li>Brazil </li></ul><ul><li>South Africa </li></ul><ul><li>Portugal </li></ul>top ten countries with international website registrants
    • 16. Current as of January 2007 geographic distribution Green Guide for Health Care Registered Projects overview project 148 registered projects 36,000,000 sf 34 states 4 Canadian provinces 7 countries green guide project growth Current as of April 2008
    • 17. construction section 1 – Integrated Design 2 – Sustainable Sites 3 – Water Efficiency 4 – Energy &amp; Atmosphere 5 – Materials &amp; Resources 6 – Environmental Quality 7 – Innovation &amp; Design Process 2 - 0 1 - 21 1 - 6 3 - 21 2 - 21 3 - 24 0 - 4 12 - 97 Section / Category Name Pre-Req. / Max. Total
    • 18. operations section 1 – Integrated Operations &amp; Education 2 – Sustainable Sites Management 3 – Transportation Operations 4 – Facilities Management 5 – Chemical Management 6 – Waste Management 7 – Environmental Services 8 – Food Service 9 – Environmentally Preferable Purchasing 10 – Innovation in Operation 1 - 2 0 - 9 0 - 5 6 - 39 3 - 5 3 - 6 0 - 8 0 - 14 2 - 19 0 - 7 15 - 114 Section / Category Name Pre-Req. / Total Points
    • 19. <ul><li>Improve the clarity of credit goals and implementation path. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Credit thresholds and/or benchmarks for continuous improvement </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Meet the needs of all users. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Those just getting started </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Those familiar with LEED rating system </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Those wishing to continuously improve their environmental strategies, pushing the envelope. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Group credits by department . </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporate key external resources . </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Review the LEED for High Performance Operations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Review for H2E programs </li></ul></ul></ul>Scope of Work &amp; Goals
    • 20. <ul><li>2008 Revised GGHC Operations Section used LEED as a foundational document. </li></ul><ul><li>34 of 56 prerequisites and credits in the GGHC Operations section derived from LEED EB. </li></ul><ul><li>Highlights </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies grouped by department </li></ul><ul><li>Reflects most up to date best practices and reference standards (as of 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Expanded scope: 2 new sections </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on continuous improvement </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on Integrated Operations and Education </li></ul>Overview
    • 21. Food Service Credits FS Credit 1: Sustainable Food Policy and Plan FS Credit 1.2: Nutrition FS Credit 2: Sustainable Food Education and Promotion FS Credit 3: Local, Sustainably Produced Food Purchasing FS Credit 4: Reusable &amp; Non-Reusable Products FS Credit 5: Hospital Supported Agriculture: Food and Farm Linkages FS Credit 6.1: Food Donation and Composting FS Credit 6.2: Food Services Recycling FS Credit 7: Food Vendors FS Credit 8: Chemical Management for Food Services Food Service Operational Credits
    • 22. FS Credit 1: Sustainable Food Policy and Plan Intent: Create, promote and implement practical sustainable food purchasing policies and plans that support human and ecological health. CHW recognizes that healthyfood” describes not only nutritional quality, but equally by a food system which is ecologically sound, economically viable, and supportive of human dignity and justice, and so; CHW aspires to develop a healthy food system <ul><li>Food policy Vision Statement or </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy Food in Health Care Pledge </li></ul>
    • 23. <ul><li>Achieve FS Credit 1.1: Sustainable Food Policy and Plan </li></ul><ul><li>AND </li></ul><ul><li>minimum of one fresh fruit option at each patient meal and at . lunch and dinner, provide a fresh green salad and a minimum of one non-starch fresh vegetable option. </li></ul><ul><li>whole grain options for minimum 50% of grains and breads </li></ul><ul><li>one protein-balanced vegetarian menu option during each meal. </li></ul>FS Credit 1.2:Food Nutrition Intent Create, promote and implement sustainable food purchasing policies and plans that support human and ecological health.
    • 24. FS Credit 1.2:Food Nutrition <ul><li>AND a minimum of four of the following practices: </li></ul><ul><li>Wholesome Soup : all patient and cafeteria soups are made from scratch ( excepting canned legumes and tomatoes). </li></ul><ul><li>Meat Free Option : Cafeteria and patient food meat-free one day per week. </li></ul><ul><li>Trans Fats and Healthy Oils: Eliminate all products that contain trans fats AND, create a heart-healthy oils purchasing policy </li></ul><ul><li>Fried Food Elimination : Eliminate deep fried foods from patient menus and cafeteria. </li></ul><ul><li>Nanotech Foods: Develop and implement a policy requiring disclosure and elimination of nanotech additives. </li></ul><ul><li>Food Color and Additives : a purchasing policy and program to eliminate food additives </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy Vending and Snacks </li></ul>
    • 25. Hold Educational Event Post Vision in Facility and on Website FS Credit 2: Sustainable Food Education and Promotion Intent: Create awareness among staff, patients, visitors, service providers, vendors and the community of hospital food service initiatives around sustainability through education programs and constant reinforcement of the benefits to human health.
    • 26. FS Credit 2: Sustainable Food Education and Promotion <ul><li>Upon hire and annually, 1 educational event targeted to the food service department explicitly explaining the link between human health and food production. </li></ul><ul><li>• Hold a minimum of 1 educational event annually targeted to hospital employees </li></ul>And…… Education
    • 27. FS Credit 2: Sustainable Food Education and Promotion <ul><li>( Annually 3 of the following) : </li></ul><ul><li>Post and annually update a signed copy of the facility’s Food Policy in a visible site within the hospital and on the hospital website explicitly explaining the link between human health and food production. </li></ul><ul><li>Establish and maintain a program to inform cafeteria consumers of specific product offerings that are seasonal, organic, locally grown, sustainably grown/produced, etc </li></ul><ul><li>Establish and maintain a program to inform patients </li></ul><ul><li>Host special events targeted to patients, employees, and hospital visitors that promote the facility’s sustainable food products and initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Hold special events (onsite or offsite) targeted to the larger community highlighting the facility’s commitment to supporting healthy, local, seasonal, organic, and sustainable foods and food systems. </li></ul>Healthy Sustainable Food Promotion
    • 28. Support certified and locally produced food products FS Credit 3: Local, Sustainably Produced and Food Purchasing Intent: Improve human and ecological health through purchase of local and sustainably produced food products. Credits 3.1, 3.2, 3.3
    • 29. Credit Goals <ul><li>Credit Goals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Measurable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Approved to carry one or more of the listed independent third party certified ecolabels and/or </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Carry one of the listed label claims allowed by USDA or FDA and/or </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Farms, ranches, and production/processing facilities located within a 200-mile radius of the facility </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reward Incremental Success (15, 25, 50 percent) </li></ul></ul>FS Credit 3: Local, Sustainably Produced and Food Purchasing
    • 30. Eco-labels http://www.greenerchoices.org/eco-labels/
    • 31. Label Claims FS Credit 3: Local, Sustainably Produced and Food Purchasing Label Claim Food Category “ Raised without antibiotics” or ”No antibiotics administered” poultry and meat “ Raised without added hormones” or “No hormones added” beef and lamb only “ No genetically engineered ingredients” products made from corn, soy, canola or their derivatives “ rBGH-free”, “rBST-free”, or something to this effect “our farmers pledge not to use rBGH or rBST”/”Our famers pledge not to use artificial hormones” milk, butter, cheese, yogurt, ice cream, sour cream, cottage cheese “ Grass-fed” products from ruminants such as beef cattle, dairy cattle, lamb
    • 32. Local Sourcing Strategies FS Credit 3: Local, Sustainably Produced and Food Purchasing <ul><li>Direct relationships </li></ul><ul><li>May be able to use state local food marketing programs* </li></ul><ul><li>Processed foods &gt;50% by weight </li></ul><ul><li>Independent family farms/ranches or cooperatives/networks </li></ul>
    • 33. Family Farm? <ul><li>No uniform definition </li></ul><ul><li>Few certifications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Animal Welfare Approved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>… one on which a family or individual </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Owns the animals, and </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Participates in the daily physical labor to manage the animals and the farm or ranch operation, and </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Derives a meaningful share of their livelihood from that farm or ranch </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>American Family Farmed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Also tied to production practices </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Under development </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.familyfood.net </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 34. Convert to/ maintain use of reusable food service ware Choose preferred biobased disposables Recycled content, unbleached paper products Bottled Water Elimination FS Credit 4: Reusable &amp; Non-Reusable Products Credits 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4 Intent: Reduce use of virgin resources in food service ware and food service paper products.
    • 35. http://www.noharm.org/details.cfm?ID=1456&amp;type=document
    • 36. FS Credit 4: Reusable &amp; Non-Reusable Products Non Food Service Ware Items
    • 37. <ul><li>Eliminate single-use bottled water sales inc. vending/meetings and conferences. </li></ul><ul><li>In cafeteria provide easy access to water derived from local public water supply. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide reusable water containers (for purchase or free) </li></ul><ul><li>Provide clear signage indicating nearest local publicly accessible water fountain. </li></ul>FS Credit 4.4 Bottled Water Elimination and Public Drinking Water Access Intent Support environmental stewardship of virgin resources by purchasing reusable and non-reusable products.
    • 38. CSAs Food Box Program Sponsor Farmers Markets FS Credit 5: Hospital Supported Agriculture: Food and Farm Linkages Intent: Support local and regional food production by increasing its visibility in the community and strengthening local agriculture infrastructure.
    • 39. FS Credit 5: Hospital Supported Agriculture: Food and Farm Linkages <ul><li>Processing and Season Extension D evelop and support relationships with at least one local farm, not-for-profit farming organization, and/or meat or produce processing facility to extend the seasonal availability of local food in the facility. </li></ul><ul><li>• Food Service Procurement - Coordinate with local farm to match planting decisions with purchasing intentions prior to growing season. </li></ul><ul><li>• Farmers Markets - Host and promote local or onsite farmers markets. </li></ul><ul><li>• Food Box - Actively promote Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) food box programs. Host CSA pick up locations on-site. </li></ul><ul><li>• Hospital Garden or Hospital Farm - Support on-site or off-site hospital owned food producing garden(s) and/or farm(s). </li></ul><ul><li>• Urban Garden Program – Provide direct or in-kind support for not-for-profit urban food producing community garden organization(s). </li></ul><ul><li>• Conference and Meeting Food Policy – Develop and implement a policy requiring sustainable purchases at all facility-sponsored or -hosted conferences and workshops. </li></ul>Credit Goals – (minimum of 3 innovation for extra 2)
    • 40. Compost Food Waste Develop Food Donation Program FS Credit 6.1: Food Donation and Composting Intent: Support food security programs, soil restoration, and waste reduction through food service donation and composting programs.
    • 41. FS Credit 6.1: Food Donation and Composting Credit Goals • Develop and implement a food donation program • Develop and implement a food waste composting program • Develop and implement food donation and food waste composting written management plans • Estimate and track pounds of donated food • Provide controlled areas to facilitate easy removal of food waste, consistent with an Integrated
    • 42. Compost Food Waste Develop Food Donation Program FS Credit 6.1: Food Donation and Composting Intent: Support food security programs, soil restoration, and waste reduction through food service donation and composting programs.
    • 43. <ul><li>Credit Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Glass, metal and plastic </li></ul><ul><li>• Corrugated boxes, boxboard and paper </li></ul><ul><li>• Shrink wrap (bagged or baled) </li></ul><ul><li>• Return pallets to vendors for reuse. </li></ul>FS Credit 6.2: Food Service Recycling Intent: Reduce solid waste disposal in landfills and incinerators generated by the food service department through recycling.
    • 44. Purchase sustainable foods, nutritious foods Compost Establish Farm Connections FS Credit 7: Food Vendors Intent: Establish facility-wide implementation of healthy, sustainably produced food service programs by establishing parallel policies and programs with contracted food service vendors CBS/AP/iStockphoto
    • 45. Credit Goals FS Credit 7: Food Vendors 2 points available
    • 46. Food Service Credit 8 EPP Cleansers and detergents Use Integrated Pest Management FS Credit 8: Chemical Management for Food Services Intent: Minimize the use of toxic chemicals in the food services preparation and service areas, including cleaning chemicals and pest management.
    • 47. <ul><li>Specs listed under GGHC ES Credits 1.3-1.4 </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid phenolics and chlorinated cleaners for food service use </li></ul>Environmentally Preferable Cleaning Products FS Credit 8: Chemical Management for Food Services
    • 48. Integrated Pest Management FS Credit 8: Chemical Management for Food Services <ul><li>Scouting and treatment thresholds </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No routine treatment – only when pests are present </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Non chemical methods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Good sanitation practices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Structural maintenance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cultural practices </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Least toxic controls </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Minerals, soaps, boric acid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enclosed baits, crack and crevice treatments </li></ul></ul><ul><li>No treatment while spaces are inhabited </li></ul>
    • 49. http://www.h2e-online.org /
    • 50. <ul><li>Adele Houghton, GGHC, [email_address] , 512 928 4786 </li></ul><ul><li>GGHC Steering Committee and Food Workgroup Chair, HCWH </li></ul><ul><li>Jamie Harvie [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Marie Kulick, IATP HCWH Food Purchasing Coordinator </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Michelle Gottlieb, HCWH Food Workgroup Co-Chair and New England Coordinator [email_address] </li></ul>Contacts
    • 51. Additional Tools and Assistance <ul><li>Lists of sustainable producers/review of producer claims </li></ul><ul><li>Fact sheets and general purchasing guidance docs </li></ul><ul><li>Help to draft organization specific policies </li></ul><ul><li>Help to draft organization specific language for RFIs, RFPs and contracts </li></ul><ul><li>Provide “experts” for Grand Rounds, food teams </li></ul><ul><li>Work with GPOs and distributors </li></ul><ul><li>Communication network for health care providers </li></ul><ul><li>healthyfoodinhealthcare.org </li></ul>
    • 52. www.foodmed.org <ul><li>Breakout Tracks: </li></ul><ul><li>Obesity and the Food System </li></ul><ul><li>Antibiotics, Arsenic and Poultry </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable Meat Production </li></ul><ul><li>Food Waste Management </li></ul><ul><li>Farmers Markets and Onsite Gardens </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding Food Certification </li></ul><ul><li>Food Miles and local procurement </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy Vending and Catering </li></ul><ul><li>Case Studies </li></ul>
    • 53. RESOURCES <ul><li>Health Care Without Harm Food Workgroup </li></ul><ul><li>www.healthyfoodinhealthcare.org </li></ul><ul><li>Hunger and Environmental Nutrition Dietary Practice Group www.hendpg.com/ </li></ul><ul><li>FoodMed Conference www.foodmed.org </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy Food Pledge www.noharm.org/us/food/pledge </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.noharm.org/us/food/listserv </li></ul><ul><li>Green Guide for Healthcare www.gghc.org </li></ul>

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