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Faculty of Health School of Health Professions Faculty of Health School of Health Professions Document Transcript

  • Faculty of Health School of Health Professions BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Leading to eligibility to apply for registration with the Health Professions Council and eligibility to apply for membership with the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009/2010 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010
  • If you require any part of this publication in larger print, or an alternative format, please contact Programme Administration at:- Faculty of Health University of Plymouth Room 101 Nancy Astor Building Drake Circus Plymouth PL4 8AA Telephone number: 01752 586964/586999 Faculty of Health University of Plymouth Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road Plymouth PL6 8BH Telephone number: 01752 588800/588833 Faculty of Health University of Plymouth Knowledge Spa Royal Cornwall Hospital Truro TR1 3HD Telephone number: 01872 256450 Faculty of Health University of Plymouth Somerset Centre Wellington Road Taunton TA1 5YD Telephone number: 01823 366900 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 2
  • Special Needs Notice Dear Student Important: please note If you have a disability The University is very supportive of students with disabilities, and year–on-year we are making adjustments to assist students with special needs. It may be that we have already put in place changes which will assist you – but unless we know what your needs might be, we cannot guarantee that that will be the case. If we can identify your needs sufficiently far in advance of when you intend to start a programme at the University, we are better able to put in place appropriate arrangements – or, if there is a health and safety issue or an issue about the expectations of students on the programme, to advise you on alternative options. However, we may not be able to do so if we do not know in advance. If you have not told us about your disability please do contact the University‟s Disability Assist Services on Plymouth 01752 587676 to discuss your needs. While we are making reasonable adjustments to our provision, we may not be able to meet your individual needs if we do not have the opportunity to assess them in advance, and that could impact negatively on your experience on the programme or even your ability to take up your place. If you have told us about your disability you may be asked for additional information or invited to attend an interview with Disability Assist Services. This is in order that we can properly assess your individual needs and ensure that we have the best possible chance of meeting them. Please do provide any information requested and come in to see staff if asked to do so, since otherwise you – and we - could find ourselves in a position in which it is difficult or even unsafe for you to take up your place. So please tell us about any disability – even if you do not think it will affect you while you are at the University – and respond positively to any requests for further details or for an information interview. If you do not do so, you may find yourself unable to take up your place or unable to complete the programme because we have not been able adequately to meet your needs. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 3 View slide
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 4 View slide
  • Contents Special Needs Notice ................................................................................................... 3 Contents ....................................................................................................................... 5 Disclaimer ..................................................................................................................... 7 Useful information ......................................................................................................... 8 Welcome and Introduction ............................................................................................ 9 Welcome on behalf of the Physiotherapy Team ......................................................... 10 1. Information about the Programme ................................................................... 11 1.1 Award Title .............................................................................................. 11 1.2 Peninsula Health Collaboration ............................................................... 11 1.3 University Regulations ............................................................................ 11 1.4 Exceptions to the Regulations ................................................................. 12 1.5 Regulatory and Professional Bodies ....................................................... 12 1.6 Key Contacts ........................................................................................... 14 2. Entry Requirements ......................................................................................... 16 2.1 Requirements for entry into the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme 16 2.2 Stepping off Points in the Programme ..................................................... 17 2.3 Stepping on Points .................................................................................. 18 3. Programme Overview ...................................................................................... 18 3.1 Aims ........................................................................................................ 18 3.2 Learning Outcomes ................................................................................. 19 3.3 Award Requirements ............................................................................... 38 3.4 Programme Management........................................................................ 38 3.5 Programme Structure .............................................................................. 39 3.6 Assessment Strategy .............................................................................. 61 3.7 Learning Environment ............................................................................. 65 3.8 Personal Development Planning (PDP) and Career Development ......... 74 4. Programme Policies and Guidelines ................................................................ 75 4.1 Programme Attendance and Responsibilities of Students ...................... 75 4.2 Conditions of unsupervised practice ....................................................... 76 4.3 Consent to act as a model in practical classes........................................ 77 4.4 Incidents in the Practice Area.................................................................. 78 4.5 Guidelines for dealing with unsafe practice/inappropriate ....................... 78 professional behaviour ....................................................................................... 78 4.6 Withdrawing from your programme ......................................................... 79 4.7 Returning to your Programme after an Interruption ................................. 79 4.8 Pastoral and Counselling Services .......................................................... 80 4.9 Financial Support .................................................................................... 81 4.10 Fitness to Practice Regulations ............................................................... 82 4.11 Health and Good Character .................................................................... 82 4.12 Students as Lone Workers ...................................................................... 82 4.13 Travel Insurance ..................................................................................... 83 4.14 Student Safety......................................................................................... 83 4.15 Uniform Policy ......................................................................................... 83 4.16 Smoking Policy........................................................................................ 84 4.17 Student Union ......................................................................................... 84 4.18 Jury Service ............................................................................................ 85 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 5
  • 4.19 Equal Opportunities ................................................................................. 85 4.20 Responsibilities of Students .................................................................... 85 4.21 Statement re Employment Law ............................................................... 85 5. Student Involvement ........................................................................................ 86 5.1 Student Representatives ......................................................................... 86 5.2 Student Role on Programme Committees ............................................... 87 5.3 Student Feedback and Evaluation .......................................................... 87 5.4 Student Staff Liaison Committee ............................................................. 87 Appendices ................................................................................................................. 89 Appendix One - Definitive Module Records ....................................................... 91 Appendix Two – Occupational Health Information ........................................... 145 Appendix Three – Guidelines for Students as Lone Workers .......................... 151 Feedback on the Student Programme Handbook ............................................ 157 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 6
  • Disclaimer Please Note: All students undertaking programmes delivered by the Faculty of Health are reminded that any alteration to University documentation, including practice portfolios, involving forgery/falsification of a mentor‟s comments or signature/initialling will be investigated. This investigation could lead to disciplinary action, which may lead to a student being unable to achieve professional registration. All the information in this handbook is correct at the time of printing. Programmes are regularly reviewed and updated so details may change. Occasionally, a module listed in the handbook may be replaced or withdrawn. The University of Plymouth is proud of its teaching and research and it undertakes all reasonable steps to provide educational services in the manner set out in this handbook and in any documents referred to within it. It does not, however, guarantee the provision of such services. Should industrial action or circumstances beyond the control of the University interfere with its ability to provide educational services, the University undertakes to use all reasonable steps to minimise the resultant disruption to those services. Update of Records (Criminal Records Bureau/ Occupational Health) A satisfactory enhanced Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) declaration is required to enter the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme (see entry requirements). Students will be asked each year to declare if their criminal/health status has changed as this may jeopardise their ability to undertake the practical elements of the programme and registration with the Health Professions Council. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 7
  • Useful information University Registration Number Personal Tutor Name: Office: Telephone: Office Hours: Programme Administration office Room FF02, Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road Plymouth PL6 8BH Telephone: 01752 588800/588833 Office Hours: 09.00-16.00 for students University of Plymouth Library Telephone: 01752 588588 contact numbers and opening hours (General Enquiries) Opening hours: Computing Services contact Telephone: 01752 588900 number and opening hours Opening hours: Health and Welfare Services Student Counselling 01752 587701 Occupational Health 01392 405092 Disability Assist, Babbage Building 01752 587676 Learning Development and Careers Service 01752 587456 Financial Help 01752 587680 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 8
  • Welcome and Introduction Welcome to the University of Plymouth, and the Faculty of Health. We hope that you will enjoy the physiotherapy programme, gain breadth and depth of knowledge in the subject and clinical experience that will prepare you for the role of an autonomous practitioner at the point of registration as a physiotherapist. This handbook provides information about organisation, assessment and module information that is specific to the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme that you are studying. It complements the general student handbook which provides wider information about the University of Plymouth regulations and policies. The programme is based in the School of Health Professions and has a philosophy that values inter-professional working, education and practice. The School of Health Professions is also committed to inter-professional collaboration in both education and practice, and this will be reflected in the programme offered, and facilitated by working alongside the Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry who had their first undergraduate intake in 2002. Within the first year of study in particular, you will learn alongside students studying Adult Nursing, Child Nursing, Dietetics, Mental Health Nursing, Midwifery, Occupational Therapy, Podiatry and Speech and Language Therapy programmes. Opportunities for further shared learning with other Health Professions and Medicine may be available in later parts of the programme. The School of Health Professions is committed to academic quality in learning and teaching and to health care research. There is an active Research Development Unit and academic staff are involved in the creation and dissemination of knowledge related to improving patient care and health services in a range of contexts. There are opportunities for graduates with high honours awards from this programme to apply for full time PhD studentships in the Faculty on completion of the programme. This handbook contains a great deal of information about your programme and as such it is an important document you will need to refer to throughout the programme. In addition, it tells you what you can expect from the programme and the staff who contribute to the programme. It also tells you what is expected of you in order to enjoy and successfully complete the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy degree. With this in mind, please read it carefully, ask for clarification on any points and keep it in a safe place. In addition to this programme handbook you will receive an electronic module handbook for each module you undertake which will provide specific information relating to learning outcomes, assessment and delivery of module. Professor Graham Sewell Head of School School of Health Professions 2009 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 9
  • Welcome on behalf of the Physiotherapy Team Welcome to the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme at the University of Plymouth. I would like to take this opportunity to welcome all the new physiotherapy students and to welcome back returning students into the second and third year of the programme. We hope that you will enjoy studying in our purpose built building; the skills laboratories and teaching rooms have enhanced the learning experience for both students and staff. As a programme we aim to produce competent physiotherapy practitioners who are fit for award and fit for practice. Therefore the programme team regularly reviews and updates the curriculum to reflect changes in current practice, evidence based guidelines, and government policy. The Year Tutor role was introduced so that students had a point of contact to discuss wider year issues. We value student feedback and one of the roles of the year tutor is to organise regular meetings between staff and students throughout the academic year. The year tutor roles have been very successful. For those of you new to the programme they are: Alec Rickard - Year 1 Tutor Gary Shum - Year 2 Tutor Claire Hornsby - Year 3 Tutor Best wishes for a successful academic year 2009/2010. Heather Hunter Programme Lead BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 10
  • 1. Information about the Programme 1.1 Award Title Successful completion of the programme leads to the award of: BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy The BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy is an academic qualification and conferment of the degree will entitle the graduate to apply for registration with the Health Professions Council Register. Development of the award to meet these goals has been through careful, ongoing collaboration between the academic staff, Physiotherapy Managers, the National Health Service Strategic Health Authority, clinical educators and student and user representatives. Intermediate: Certificate of Higher Education Diploma of Higher Education 1.2 Peninsula Health Collaboration This programme was developed in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Exeter and the University College Plymouth (St Mark and St John). A spirit of collaboration is a feature of this programme. 1.3 University Regulations Your physiotherapy programme is governed by University of Plymouth Regulations, which you may refer to at any time during your programme of study. These regulations are updated on a regular basis and are therefore kept centrally at the following website under Rules and Regulations: www.plymouth.ac.uk/studenthandbook  Assessment Regulations  Complaints  Appeals  Examination and Assessment Offences  Regulations on Late Coursework and Extenuating Circumstances  Repeat with attendance In addition to academic regulations, students on health professional programmes of study are also subject to codes of professional behaviour. These relate to the honesty, integrity and professional behaviour expected of you when you become a registered physiotherapist. A breach of an academic regulation may therefore have more serious consequences for you as a student on this programme as it could affect your future registration. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 11
  • 1.4 Exceptions to the Regulations There are some rules and regulations which will differ from the normal university rules and regulations. Exceptions to university rules are mainly made because of professional body regulations and professional requirements. The following rules and regulations are exceptions to the normal University regulations and apply to the physiotherapy programme: The following are exception to normal university regulations which will apply to the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy: 1. Students are required to pass all elements of a module assessment at 40% 2. Procedure in event of failure (level one, two and three): A student will be deemed to have completed a level if they have passed all modules within that level. There will be no compensation between modules and no compensatory passes will be awarded. No compensation for failure after completed resits can be awarded. 3. In the case of clinical education placement modules a maximum of two attempts at the module and its assessment can be permitted at the discretion of the Award Assessment Board. 4. To qualify for the award of BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy a student must pass all modules, including all clinical education placements, and have successfully completed 360 credits of which at least 120 must be at level 3 and a further 120 at level 2 or above. Furthermore a student must normally complete 1000 hours of clinical education placement experience. 5. An aegrotat award is not permitted for the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy. Further programme specific regulations can be found under section 4. 1.5 Regulatory and Professional Bodies Policies and Guidelines The BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme is validated by the Health Professions Council (HPC). At inductions students will receive the HPC Standards of Proficiency which details the expectations of a health professional. At least one of our external examiners is from the physiotherapy register of the HPC. Successful completion of the physiotherapy programme will lead to students being eligible to apply for registration with the HPC as a Physiotherapist. Registration with the HPC entitles the member to use the protected title „physiotherapist‟. The general public is also able to check if you are on the register. This will give them some form of assurance that a therapist on the register has undergone education and training at an approved training programme. Further information can be found at the HPC website: www.hpc-uk.org The BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy is also approved by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP). This is the professional body and trade union organisation for physiotherapists. Successful completion of your programme entitles you to apply for membership with the CSP. Again, you will need to take active steps and complete an application form to become a full member at the end of the programme. As a student physiotherapist, you are strongly advised to become a student member of the CSP. Student membership and fees are arranged between you and the CSP. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 12
  • Details of cost can be found on the CSP website (www.csp.org.uk). Student membership entitles you to a number of excellent benefits: Professional Liability Insurance (PLI) All students have automatic professional liability insurance cover. The policy covers students on all clinical placements including those voluntarily organised in the students‟ own time apart from electives in the USA and Canada. The key condition of this policy is that the student is supervised at all times by a qualified, chartered physiotherapist. Students can obtain proof of cover from the Students Officer where necessary. Being a member of the CSP may facilitate a more diverse range of clinical experience outside the NHS arena. Rules of Professional Conduct All students receive their own copy of the Society‟s Rules of Professional Conduct. All students registered with the Society are bound by its disciplinary procedures and bye-laws. Core Standards of Physiotherapy Practice All students receive their own copy of the Society‟s Core Standards of Physiotherapy Practice, which define the practical application of the ethical principles set out in the Rules of Professional Conduct. Students Officer The Society employs a full-time Students Officer to co-ordinate student services and help with problems students encounter during their course. Subscription to “Physiotherapy” and “Frontline” All students are entitled to a free subscription to “Physiotherapy” and “Frontline” (worth £125 per year). CSP e-Portfolio Pebble Pad All students will have access to an electronic portfolio in order to store evidence of their abilities, skills and achievements as part of their professional development. Student Handbooks/Employment Pack All new students receive a handbook in their first few weeks at university, which is followed by an employment pack during their final year which contains advice about how to secure their first post as a physiotherapist. Learning Resource Centre All students are entitled to use the services of the CSP library and resource centre either by personal visits (by appointment only) or by email/telephone. N.B. This service does not extend to staff undertaking literature searches on the students' behalf. Representation The CSP facilitates representation of students by students at local, regional and national levels, and on the key Standing Committees of the professional body - Learning and Development, Professional Practice and Industrial Relations, to ensure the student voice is heard. Students undertaking these activities are offered a free two day training programme organised by the CSP. In addition the CSP pays for delegates from each year in each institution to attend the annual student conference in January/February. More information about the activities of the CSP can be found at: www.csp.org.uk BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 13
  • 1.6 Key Contacts Name, phone and email Role Address Professor Graham Sewell Head of School Faculty of Health of Health University of Plymouth Professions Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588817 Derriford Road gjsewell@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Bernhard Haas Deputy Head of Faculty of Health School Learning University of Plymouth and Teaching Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588815 Derriford Road bhaas@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Samantha Ainsworth Programme Faculty of Health Administrator University of Plymouth Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588802 Derriford Road sam.ainsworth@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Heather Hunter Programme Faculty of Health Lead; PHY210 University of Plymouth and PHY311 Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588842 Module Leader Derriford Road hdhunter@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Physiotherapy and other Lecturing staff Amanda Austin Lecturer; Faculty of Health PHY312 Module University of Plymouth Leader Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 587995 Derriford Road amanda.austin@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Dr Jenny Freeman Reader – Faculty of Health Physiotherapy University of Plymouth Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588835 Derriford Road jenny.freeman@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Hilary Gunn Lecturer / Faculty of Health Clinical University of Plymouth coordinator Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588825 PHY106 and Derriford Road hjgunn@plymouth.ac.uk PHY208 Module Plymouth PL6 8BH Leader Claire Hornsby Lecturer/ Faculty of Health Year Three University of Plymouth Tutor; PHY105, Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588844 PHY212 and Derriford Road chornsby@plymouth.ac.uk PHY313 Plymouth PL6 8BH Module Leader BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 14
  • Name, phone and email Role Address Dr Alan Hough Lecturer; Faculty of Health PHY209 Module University of Plymouth Leader Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588837 Derriford Road adhough@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Tim Ley Lecturer; Faculty of Health HEAA137 University of Plymouth Module Leader Room 111, 10 Portland Villas Tel. No. 01752 588882 Drake Circus tley@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL4 8AA Dee Llywelyn Lecturer; Faculty of Health HEAA218 and University of Plymouth HEAA312 Knowledge Spa Module Leader Royal Cornwall Hospital Tel. No. 01872 256459 Treliske, Truro dee.llywelyn@plymouth.ac.uk Cornwall, TR1 3HD Susan May Lecturer; Faculty of Health PHY108 and University of Plymouth PHY314 Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No: 01752 588818 Module Leader Derriford Road susan.may@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Miriam McMillan Lecturer; Faculty of Health HEAA116 University of Plymouth Tel. No. 01752 233876 Module Leader Peninsula Allied Health Centre Derriford Road m.mcmillan@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL 6 8BH Tina McGahey Lecturer Faculty of Health PHY211 and University of Plymouth PHY109 Module Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588852 lead Derriford Road tmcgahey@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Joanne Paton Lecturer Faculty of Health HEAA219 University of Plymouth Module lead Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588845 Derriford Road Joanne.Paton@plymouth.ac.uk Plymouth PL6 8BH Alec Rickard Lecturer, Faculty of Health Year One Tutor; University of Plymouth Admission Peninsula Allied Health Centre Tel. No. 01752 588850 Tutor. HEAA138 Derriford Road arickard@plymouth.ac.uk and PHY107 Plymouth PL6 8BH Module Leader BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 15
  • Name, phone and email Role Address Gary Shum Lecturer; Faculty of Health PHY309 and School of Nursing and Acute Care PHY307 Module University of Plymouth Tel. No: 01752 588808 Leader Drake Circus gary.shum@plymouth.ac.uk Year 2 Tutor Plymouth, PL4 8AA Address details and telephone numbers for Programme Administration offices can be found on page 2 of this handbook. 2. Entry Requirements 2.1 Requirements for entry into the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Academic qualifications All applicants normally have a strong GCSE profile. The A-level profile is normally 300 points which must come from the A2 units and must include a biological science at grade B or above. Other qualifications and entry for mature students are accepted and welcome. These can include:  Access to Higher Education course. Successful completion of an OCN approved Access course (preferably in Science, Health Professions/Science or Physiotherapy). Applicants should normally have 20 (or 45 under the new credit system) credits at level 3.  BTEC/EDEXEL National Diploma (Science or Health Science). Distinction grades in final year. Applications from Countries of the European Union and Overseas Applicants must demonstrate an academic profile which is equivalent to applicants from the UK. This will be assessed utilising criteria and guidance from UCAS and NARIC. In addition, English Language qualifications are required. Examples of acceptable qualifications are the Certificate of Proficiency in English (Cambridge – Grade C) or the International English Language Testing System (a score of 7.0 overall, with no less than 6.5 in any one component) Key requirements In addition to the academic qualifications we carefully screen the UCAS application. Therefore, all applicants should ensure that their personal statement and /or reference address the following issues. These will be rated on a points system and the applicants with the highest points will be given priority.  Interest and knowledge of the profession  Work experience/shadowing in physiotherapy or other health related area  Communication skills  Ability to empathise with others  Ability to integrate information and skills across different subject areas BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 16
  •  Ability to solve problems  Ability to study/work independently and in groups Students with special needs/ disabilities If students identify on admission they will be invited to an informal introductory meeting with the Admission Tutor or the Programme Lead. This is to allow the disabled student to familiarise themselves with the building, and to discuss any requirements that may need to be put in place prior to arriving. Placement Learning Placement learning will take place across the South West Peninsula and travel to these placement areas is a feature of the programme. This will have financial implications for students. Health Screening The work of a physiotherapist is physically demanding. All prospective students have to complete a health declaration form and some may be invited for an Occupational Health assessment. Applicants with disabilities will normally be invited for interview to assess how the university can support them during the course. Criminal Records Physiotherapists work with children and other vulnerable people and therefore any criminal record must be disclosed. The nature of certain criminal convictions will debar successful students from gaining registration as a physiotherapist. Applicants who have a criminal record are advised to discuss the matter further with the admissions tutor. All prospective students are subject to a police check before (enhanced Criminal Record Bureau CRB declaration) before commencing the course. Update of Records (Criminal Records Bureau/ Occupational Health) Programme Students will be asked each year to declare if their criminal/health status has changed as this may jeopardise their ability to undertake the practical elements of the programme and registration with the Health Professions Council. 2.2 Stepping off Points in the Programme Occasionally a student is unable to complete the full three years of the programme. A student who has successfully completed 120 credits at Level 4 or above but is not continuing on the programme is eligible for the award of a Certificate of Higher Education. A student who has successfully completed 240 credits, including at least 120 credits at level 5 or above but is not continuing on the programme is eligible for the award of a Diploma of Higher Education. Students should also be aware of the University of Plymouth regulations for withdrawal from a programme. Information can be found in the University of Plymouth student handbook and under Rules and Regulations on the website www.plymouth.ac.uk/studenthandbook BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 17
  • 2.3 Stepping on Points It may be possible to enter the programme after the beginning of year one and/or to return back on to the programme after a brief intermission (see section 4.6 for further information). Applications for stepping onto the programme or returning to the programme are considered on an individual basis. Stepping onto the programme and transfers are considered by an Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) panel. Accreditation of Prior Learning Credit for prior learning, whether certified or experiential, may count towards the requirements of a named award up to the following maxima: Certificate of Higher Education 60 credits Diploma of Higher Education 160 credits Diploma in Professional Studies 160 credits Ordinary Degree 220 credits Honours Degree 240 credits It is important to note that these maxima can only be applied in very specific and rare circumstances. The APEL panel will carefully consider the type of prior learning as well as the manner in which this learning has been achieved. In particular, the panel will have to consider the Problem Based Learning nature of this physiotherapy programme and whether an applicant who has not been exposed to this approach to learning would be able to enter the programme with advanced standing. In all cases the learning for which credit is awarded must constitute a coherent programme of study when considered with the credits gained for study within the University. Accreditation of prior learning is based on the concept of specific credit (that is that the learning outcomes of the prior learning are directly equivalent to those of the modules from which the student will be exempt as a result). Clinical placements successfully completed at another university can be considered for APEL into this course but the overall experience of all core clinical areas must be considered. An APEL panel will meet to assess an application for accreditation of prior learning made by a prospective student. This APEL panel will consist of: • The Programme leader • A subject specialist (or module leader) from the area for which an application of accreditation of prior learning is being made. 3. Programme Overview 3.1 Aims The programme is intended to: 1. Produce practitioners who are able to practice physiotherapy competently and safely upon graduation in a variety of service and practice settings. 2. Develop the full range of generic, graduate and transferable skills in every student. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 18
  • 3. Create reflective practitioners who are able to identify personal and professional goals for continuing professional development and lifelong learning. 4. Promote enquiring practitioners with the necessary clinical reasoning skills to identify, implement and inform best available practice. 5. Encourage students to develop autonomy and accountability. 6. Generate physiotherapists who are fit for purpose, fit for award and fit to commence employment as a physiotherapist. 3.2 Learning Outcomes A prime objective is that University of Plymouth physiotherapy graduates should have well developed practical skills underpinned by the necessary theoretical and research basis. The programme will use a pattern of interspersing university-based education with clinical placements throughout the three years of the course. This is aimed at integrating clinical practice with theoretical underpinning and enhances the development of autonomous practitioners. Central to this development is the commitment of sufficient time during university based modules to allow students to reach high standards in practical areas. Graduates will have to work in a number of different multi-professional and inter-professional teams and therefore during teaching block one students undertake shared learning with other professions. In years two and three there is a strong element of Inter-professional Learning with the introduction of two Inter-professional Modules in Management and Leadership. The programme team is committed to the education of students for "life long learning". You will gain the knowledge, skills, abilities and personal qualities to function autonomously and flexibly and to continue to develop as an effective practitioner and member of the multidisciplinary team in the ever-changing health care environment. Central to this is the use of a problem based learning curriculum for the physiotherapy specific elements of the course. This encourages collaborative learning with peers; discussion and setting of learning objectives which encourages self-directed learning – an essential aspect of the autonomous practitioner. There are a number of academic and professional threads that you will be introduced to in year one and they will be enhanced and developed over the subsequent years. There is grounding in evidence based practice in year one which is enhanced with further research modules in years two and three. Students are introduced to the concept of inter-professional learning and are encouraged to reflect on their experiences on placement, which is a rich source of inter-professional learning. Through the personal tutoring system students are introduced to Personal Development Planning PDP and this is further enhanced through regular biannual meetings with personal tutors and through modules on inter-professional team working and management and leadership; and evidenced by the use of a Personal Professional Portfolio. Clinical reasoning starts in all physiotherapy specific modules in year one (Cardiorespiratory, Neurological and Musculoskeletal) and is developed and broadened through the subsequent clinical modules and the clinical practice placements. Table 1 shows the detailed learning outcomes and the links with the programme aims. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 19
  • Table 1 Detailed Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the programme, the graduate should be able to: Programme CSP Framework Outcomes QAA Benchmark HPC Standards of Proficiency Related Aims Statements for Physiotherapy Modules 1, 4, 5, 6 Practise within the core areas of • Be able to practice within the physiotherapy • An understanding of the legal and ethical boundaries of All clinical biological, physical and physiotherapy modules, • Assess and evaluate patient needs, behavioural sciences which • Be able to exercise a HEAA138, taking account of psychological, underpin physiotherapy professional duty of care HEAA137 cultural, social and environmental • An ability to apply • Know the limits of their practice PHY108 • Use the core skills of manual appropriate physiotherapy and when to seek advice PHY105, therapy, therapeutic exercise and the assessment techniques. • Know the professional and PHY106 application of electro-physical • Safe and effective use of personal scope of their practice PHY107, modalities to promote, maintain and therapeutic exercise, manual and be able to make referrals PHY210, restore patients' physical, therapy and of • Know the key concepts of the PHY208, psychological and social well-being electrotherapeutic modalities biological, physical, social, PHY209, • Understand the importance of • An understanding of the role psychological and clinical PHY211 assessment, clinical reasoning, of physiotherapy in the sciences which are relevant to PHY311, problem-solving, goal-setting, prevention of illness and their profession-specific practice PHY312, evaluation injury and in health. • Know how professional PHY313 • Understand the breadth of • The information gained from principles are expressed and physiotherapy practice, appreciating the assessment process translated into action through a opportunities for specialisation after sufficient to assess a patient number of different assessment, qualification, the changing nature of safely and effectively taking treatment and management the profession's scope of practice and into account physical, approaches and how to select or the profession's evolving evidence psychological and cultural modify approaches to meet the base. needs. need of the individual BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 20
  • Programme Graduate Attributes Skills for Health Knowledge and skills Related Modules Aims framework 1,4,5,6 Assess patient suitability for Health and well-being: All clinical • Systematic understanding of key planned procedure. Plan, develop and evaluate modules, aspects of field of study Prepare individualised programmes to promote HEAA138, • Problem-solving skills treatment plans for health and wellbeing and HEAA137 • Ability to evaluate arguments, individuals prevent adverse effects on PHY108 assumptions, abstract concepts Identify the learning needs of health and well being PHY105, PHY106 and data, make appropriate patients and carers t enable Plan deliver and evaluate PHY107, PHY210, judgements and frame appropriate management of a defined interventions and / or PHY208, PHY209, questions to solve problems condition treatments PHY211, PHY311, • Ability to initiate and carry out Undertake examination and PHY312, PHY313 projects manipulation of the body for assessment purposes. Enable patients to make informed choices / decisions Support individuals to keep mobile Implement physiotherapy and movement programmes Repair muscles, ligaments, tendon and connective tissue BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 21
  • Programme CSP Framework Outcomes QAA Benchmark HPC Standards of Proficiency Related aims Statements for Physiotherapy Modules 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Manage oneself and work with • Recognise the need for others to optimise results • A sufficient understanding of effective self-management of All clinical individual and team working workload and to be able to modules, Inter- • Manage time effectively through practices to be able to work in practice accordingly professional appropriate caseload management both contexts where • Be able to work, where learning Recognise and manage personal appropriate appropriate, with other opportunities emotions and stress • The use of IT and professionals, support staff, HEAA219 • Promote a safe and healthy information management patients, clients and users, and HEAA309 working environment systems sufficient to maintain their relatives and carers HEAA138 • Evaluate personal professional patient records • Be able to contribute effectively HEAA137 activity against pre-set objectives • An understanding of the role to work undertaken as part of the HEAA116 and the best available evidence of other professions multi-disciplinary team HEAA218 • Demonstrate sensitivity to the • An ability to work as a • Be able to demonstrate HEAA312 needs of others member of a health care effective and appropriate skills in • Secure the commitment of other team. communicating information, people in appropriate ways advice, instruction and • Present oneself and the professional opinion to physiotherapy profession positively colleagues, patients, clients, to others. users, their relatives and carers • Recognise and respect the goals • Understand the need for and priorities of other members of effective communication the health care team throughout the care of the patient • Communicate and co-operate • Understand the need for, and effectively be able to establish and maintain, a safe practice environment BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 22
  • Programme Graduate Attributes Skills for Health Knowledge and skills Related aims framework Modules 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, • Problem solving skills Develop relationships with Health, safety and security: All clinical 6, • Exercises initiative and personal individuals that support them Promote, monitor and maintain modules, Inter- responsibility in addressing their health best practice in health, safety and professional • Ability to make decisions in needs security learning complex and unpredictable Develop and agree priorities Develop and maintain opportunities contexts for improving health communication with people about HEAA219 Plan activities, interventions difficult matters and/ or difficult HEAA309 and treatments to achieve situations HEAA138 specified health goals HEAA137 Mange information and HEAA116 material for access by HEAA218 patients and carers. HEAA312 Co-ordinate therapeutic programmes for individuals Communicate significant new to individuals Give presentations to groups BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 23
  • Programme CSP Framework Outcomes QAA Benchmark Statements HPC Standards of Related aims Proficiency for Modules Physiotherapy Enable individual patients and 1, 2,3,4, 5,6 groups to optimise their health • An ability to apply appropriate • Be able to contribute All clinical and social well being physiotherapy assessment effectively to work modules, techniques undertaken as part of the PHY105, • Promote good health and self- • An understanding of the role of multi-disciplinary team PHY106 care, using interventions that lie physiotherapy in the prevention • Know the limits of their PHY107, within the scope of physiotherapy of illness and injury and in practice and when to seek PHY210, practice and that are based on the health. advice PHY209, best available evidence regarding • Communication skills sufficient • Be able to work, where PHY208, their safety and effectiveness. to communicate safely and appropriate, with other PHY311, • Teach and advise individual effectively as a professional with professionals, support staff, PHY312, patients and groups, carers and patients, carers and colleagues. patients, clients and users, PHY313 others and their relatives and PHY211 • Advise individual patients and carers groups, carers and others • Be able to demonstrate (including other health care effective and appropriate professionals and support workers) skills in communicating on the scope of physiotherapy information, advice, practice and its evidence base. instruction and professional opinion to colleagues, patients, clients, users, their relatives and carers BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 24
  • Programme Graduate Attributes Skills for Health Knowledge and skills Related aims framework Modules 1, 2,3,4, 5,6 Identify the learning needs of Quality: All clinical • Ability to communicate patient and carers to enable Maintain quality in own work modules, effectively to a range of audiences management pf a defined and encourage others to do PHY105, • Problem-solving skills condition so. PHY106 Enable individuals to mange their Promote monitor and PHY107, defined health condition maintain best practice in PHY210, Enable individuals to change their health, safety and security PHY209, behaviour to improve their own PHY208, health and well-being PHY311, Enable patients to make informed PHY312, decisions / choices PHY313 Give presentation to groups PHY211 Develop relationships with individuals that support them in their health needs BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 25
  • Programme CSP Framework Outcomes QAA Benchmark HPC Standards of Proficiency Related aims Statements for Physiotherapy Modules 1,2,3,4,5,6 Deliver physiotherapy in response to An understanding of the • Be able to contribute All clinical patient need biological physical and effectively to work undertaken modules, behavioural sciences as part of the multi-disciplinary PHY105 • Assess patients' needs to optimise which underpin team PHY106, functional capacity, independence and physiotherapy. • Be able to gather information PHY107, well-being through structured forms of • An integrated effectively PHY108 clinical-reasoning understanding of the • Be able to use appropriate PHY208, • Recognise the range of possible ethical, moral and legal assessment techniques PHY209, physiotherapy interventions issues in relation to • Be able to undertake or PHY210, • Work in partnership, and through physiotherapy practice arrange clinical investigations as PHY311, negotiation, with patients and carers appropriate PHY312, • Plan and implement an appropriate • Be able to analyse and PHY313 physiotherapy programme based on an evaluate the information PHY211 assessment of individual need, the best collected HEAA138, available evidence, the risks involved to • Be able to use research, HEAA137 self and others, and personal capacity to reasoning and problem solving execute safely, effectively and efficiently. skills to determine appropriate • Evaluate the effectiveness of a chosen actions physiotherapy programme • Be able to draw on appropriate • Record all aspects of the physiotherapy knowledge and skills in order to programme fully and accurately make professional judgements • Refer patients to the members of the • Be able to formulate specific healthcare team or other care agencies and appropriate management • Determine and agree in partnership with plans patients and carers the most appropriate time to terminate physiotherapy programmes and manage discharge and/or transfer arrangements effectively, efficiently and with sensitivity. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 26
  • Programme Graduate Attributes Skills for Health Knowledge and skills Related Modules aims framework 1,2,3,4,5,6 • Problem-solving skills Plan activities, interventions Health and wellbeing: All clinical modules, • Ability to initiate and carry out and treatments to achieve Plan, deliver and evaluate PHY105 projects specified health goals interventions and / or PHY106, PHY107, •Communicate effectively to a Prepare individualised treatment PHY108, PHY208, range of audiences treatment plans for individuals Assess physiological and or PHY209, PHY210, • Ability to make decisions in Undertake examination and psychological function and PHY311, PHY312, complex and unpredictable manipulation of the body for develop monitor and review PHY313 contexts. assessment purposes related treatment plans PHY211 Enable individuals to use and HEAA138, operate healthcare equipment HEAA137 technologies and devices Communicate significant news to individuals Enable patients to make informed decisions / choices Co-ordinate therapeutic programmes for individuals Manage information and material for access by patients and carers BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 27
  • Programme CSP Framework Outcomes QAA Benchmark Statements HPC Standards of Related aims Proficiency for Modules Physiotherapy Promote equality to all 1,2,3,4,5,6 individuals in physiotherapy • Be able to practice in a practice • The assessment process non-discriminatory manner All clinical sufficient to assess a patient • Be able to maintain modules, • Implement non-discriminatory safely and effectively taking into confidentiality and obtain HEAA137 practice account physical, psychological informed consent HEAA218 • Ensure the confidentiality and and cultural needs. • Be able to demonstrate PHY105, security of information • An integrated understanding of effective and appropriate PHY106 • Promote and support patients' the ethical, moral and legal skills in communicating PHY107, rights and choice in their receipt issues in relation to information, advice, PHY108 of physiotherapy physiotherapy practice instruction and professional PHY208, • Respect patients' personal opinion to colleagues, PHY209, beliefs, dignity and identity. patients, clients, users, their PHY210, • Support patients through relatives and carers PHY311, effective communication and PHY3121, collaboration with others PHY313 • Understand self and personal PHY211 prejudices and manage these appropriately. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 28
  • Programme Graduate Attributes Skills for Health Knowledge and skills Related aims framework Modules 1,2,3,4,5,6 • Systematic understanding of Develop relationships with Equality and diversity: All clinical key aspects of field of study individuals that support them in Promote equality and value modules, • Ability to initiate and carry out addressing their health needs. diversity HEAA137 projects Manage information and material Develop and maintain HEAA218 • Communicate effectively to a for access by patients and communication with people PHY105, range of audiences carers. about difficult matters and/ or PHY106 Prepare individualised treatment in difficult situations PHY107, plans for individuals PHY108 PHY208, PHY209, PHY210, PHY311, PHY312, PHY313 PHY211 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 29
  • Programme CSP Framework Outcomes QAA Benchmark HPC Standards of Proficiency Related aims Statements for Physiotherapy Modules 1,2,3,4,5,6 Engage in research and evidence- • Be able to use appropriate based health care • Evaluation and research assessment techniques All clinical processes sufficient to • Be able to undertake or arrange modules, • Have a developed sense of the find and use available clinical investigations as HEAA116, knowledge base of the profession evidence in order to appropriate HEAA219, • Understand the range of research choose and evaluate • Be able to analyse and evaluate PHY309, processes relevant to evaluating treatment intervention the information collected PHY105 physiotherapy practice safely and effectively. • Be able to use research, PHY106, • Have the capacity and aptitude to • An understanding of the reasoning and problem solving PHY107, contribute to the profession's culture performance framework skills to determine appropriate PHY208, of enquiry and quality assurance actions PHY209, • Critically appraise research evidence mechanisms within • Be able to draw on appropriate PHY210, • Evaluate the outcomes of physiotherapy practice. knowledge and skills in order to PHY311, physiotherapy • Capacity to use make professional judgements PHY312, • Recognise the importance of numerical and IT skills to • Be able to monitor and review PHY313 providing cost-effective physiotherapy present, manage and the ongoing effectiveness of PHY211 programmes analyse data planned activity and modify appropriately. accordingly • An ability to implement • Be able to audit, reflect on and clinical practice based on review practice research evidence. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 30
  • Programme Graduate Attributes Skills for Health Knowledge and skills Related Modules aims framework 1,2,3,4,5,6 • Skills of analysis and enquiry Develop learning tools and Personal and people All clinical • Ability to devise and sustain methods for individuals to development: modules, arguments mange their defined health Develop own skills and HEAA116, • Ability to critique research condition knowledge and provide HEAA219, and advance scholarship Enable patients to make information to others to PHY309, • Ability to initiate and carry informed decisions help their development PHY105 out projects Assess suitability for planned Service improvement: PHY106, PHY107, procedure Contribute to the PHY208, PHY209, Plan activities interventions an improvement of services PHY210, PHY311, treatment to achieve specified PHY312, PHY313 health goals PHY211 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 31
  • Programme aims CSP Framework Outcomes QAA Benchmark HPC Standards of Related Statements Proficiency for Modules Physiotherapy 1,2,3,4,5,6 Demonstrate and apply knowledge and understanding • Be able to draw on to issues affecting • An appreciation of the appropriate knowledge All clinical physiotherapy practice complexities of health and skills in order to make modules, • Respond appropriately to the care systems within which professional judgements HEAA218 scope and limitations of physiotherapy is • Know the limits of their HEAA312 personal/professional practice delivered. practice and when to seek PHY105 • Respond appropriately to the • An understanding of advice PHY106, effect of resource limitations performance framework PHY107, • Demonstrate and apply and quality assurance PHY108 knowledge and understanding of mechanisms PHY208, the ethical and professional • An understanding of the PHY209, framework, health and social social and economic PHY210, policies and of legislation factors that impact on PHY311, relevant to physiotherapy health and delivery of PHY312, practice. care PHY313 PHY211 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 32
  • Programme aims Graduate Attributes Skills for Health Knowledge and skills Related Modules framework 1,2,3,4,5,6 • Systematic understanding of Manage information and Quality: Maintain quality All clinical key aspects of field of study materials for access by in own work and modules, • Conceptual understanding patients and carers encourage others to do HEAA218 • Ability to review, consolidate, so HEAA312 extend and apply the PHY105 knowledge and understanding PHY106, PHY107, PHY108 PHY208, PHY209, PHY210, PHY311, PHY312, PHY313 PHY211 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 33
  • Programme CSP Framework Outcomes QAA Benchmark HPC Standards of Related aims Statements Proficiency for Modules Physiotherapy Respond appropriately to 1,3,4,5,6, changing demands • An ability to use this • Be able to gather All clinical • Demonstrate the ability to transfer (professional) knowledge appropriate information modules, knowledge, skills and attributes to a and understanding • Be able to draw on HEAA218 variety of settings appropriately in a variety of appropriate knowledge HEAA312 • Recognise the need to adapt practice contexts. and skills in order to make HEAA137 physiotherapy practice to meet • An appreciation of the professional judgements PHY105, varying needs complexities of health care • Be able to monitor and PHY106 • Recognise the evolving nature of systems within which review the ongoing PHY107, physiotherapy practice physiotherapy is delivered. effectiveness of planned PHY208 • Ensure that responses to change activity and modify PHY209 do not compromise the duty of care accordingly PHY210 to individuals. • Be able to audit, reflect PHY311 on and review practice PHY312, PHY313 PHY211 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 34
  • Programme Graduate Attributes Skills for Health Knowledge and skills Related aims framework Modules 1,3,4,5,6 • Ability to cope with uncertainty, Plan activities, Health safety and All clinical ambiguity and limits of knowledge interventions and security: Promote, modules, • Ability to make decisions in treatments to achieved monitor and maintain HEAA218 complex and unpredictable contexts specified goals best practice in health, HEAA312 Assess patient suitability safety and security HEAA137 for planned procedure PHY105, Manage information and PHY106 materials for access by PHY107, patients and their carers PHY208 Enable individual to PHY209 change their behaviour to PHY210 improve their own health PHY311 and well-being PHY312, PHY313 PHY211 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 35
  • CSP Framework Outcomes QAA Benchmark HPC Standards of Programme Statements Proficiency for Related Aims Physiotherapy Modules Practise and promote CPD 1,2,3,4,5,6 • Recognise the importance of undertaking • Understand the All clinical career-long CPD for maintaining and enhancing • Reflection and the obligation to maintain modules, the quality of care to individuals and service learning process, in order to fitness to practice HEAA218 delivery and for fulfilling professional and future identify personal and • Understand the need for HEAA312, statutory responsibilities professional goals for CPD career-long self directed HEAA219, PHY309, • Appreciate, and respond appropriately to, the and lifelong learning. learning PHY108 learning continuum across qualifying education PHY105, and post-qualifying practice. PHY106, • Recognise the links between CPD, reflective PHY107 practice and engaging in clinical effectiveness. PHY208, • Take responsibility for personal and PHY209, professional learning and development, seeking PHY210, advice, guidance and support from appropriate PHY311, sources and recognising the diverse ways and PHY312, areas in which CPD can, and should take place. PHY313 • Enhance, update and develop appropriate PHY211, Inter- professional knowledge, skills and attributes, professional balancing personal needs with available learning resources and taking account of the best opportunities available evidence regarding safe and effective practice and its delivery. • Share and disseminate professional knowledge and skills to colleagues, individuals and carers, recognising the responsibility to play a role in educating future members of the profession BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 36
  • Programme Graduate Attributes Skills for Health Knowledge and skills Related Modules aims framework 1,2,3,4,5,6 • Ability to manage personal learning Communicate significant Quality: Maintain quality All clinical modules, using appropriate resources and news to individual in own work and HEAA218 materials Give presentations to encourage others to do HEAA312, • Ability to review, consolidate, extend groups so HEAA219, and apply knowledge and Personal and people PHY309, understanding development: PHY108 • Ability to cope with uncertainty, Develop own skills and PHY105, PHY106, ambiguity and limits of knowledge knowledge and provide PHY107 PHY208, information to others to PHY209, PHY210, help their development PHY311, PHY312, Service improvement: PHY313 Contribute to the PHY211, improvement of services Inter-professional learning opportunities BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 37
  • 3.3 Award Requirements On completion of all stages of the programme students will be conferred with an award from the University of Plymouth. The title of the award is BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy. You will also be eligible to apply for registration on the appropriate part of the Health Professions Council Register. 3.3.1 Honours Degree The award is classified according to the University of Plymouth Academic Regulations. Year 1 module results do not contribute to the degree classification, but students must achieve 120 level 4 credits. Year 2 modules contribute 30% to the degree classification. Year 3 modules contribute 70% to the degree classification. Classification Bands First Class Honours 70% or above Second Class Honours, Upper Division 60% - 69% Second Class Honours, Lower Division 50% - 59% Third Class Honours 40% - 49% 3.4 Programme Management Programme Leader The programme leader is responsible for the day to day running of your physiotherapy programme. Part of the role of the programme leader is to support and co-ordinate the activities of other key members of staff within the physiotherapy division. The other key roles are the admissions tutor, the clinical education tutor, the year tutors, the module leaders and the personal tutors. Programme Committee The Programme Committee is a vital element of the programme management and quality control. You will be able to elect student representatives to attend this Committee. Other members are the module leaders and teaching staff, representatives from the physiotherapy service and representatives from Information and Learning Services. The Committee has corporate responsibility for the quality of the academic programme that includes:  annual monitoring and evaluating the quality of academic provision through self-critical evaluation and consideration of the opinions of staff, students, external examiners and other relevant parties  maintaining minutes of the Programme Committee  establishing appropriate mechanisms for the evaluation of the effectiveness of teaching in each module and reviewing the outcomes of these evaluations  obtaining feedback and evaluating the views of students about their learning experiences  establishing and maintaining effective links with learning support services  approving a Programme handbook for students, and updating it annually BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 38
  •  conducting an annual monitoring of the operation of the programme by a process established by the Faculty/ to consider the inputs and report on the outputs/ action plans as specified in the University process for annual monitoring  ensuring that matters and issues raised by external examiners are discussed and addressed, with timely responses to externals on any issues raised  ensuring that matters arising from placements, or placement supervision, are discussed with the relevant parties and addressed  ensuring that matters raised by students are addressed and that students receive feedback on any actions arising  proposing nominations for new external examiners and external advisors. Clinical Education Coordinator The Clinical Education Coordinator is responsible for coordinating and monitoring of the clinical education placement component of your programme. Year Tutor A named year tutor will be responsible for each student year group. Specific responsibilities include induction processes for each year group, efficient and smooth running of the timetable for that year, monitoring of student attendance in practical classes and PBL tutorials, arranging and chairing regular staff-student liaison meetings with other year tutors, acting as the contact person for student issues affecting the year of the programme for which they are responsible, overseeing and arranging practical exams and overseeing and arranging specific sessions appropriate to that year, e.g. career development processes; personal development planning. Module Leaders Each module has a designated module leader who is responsible for the day to day running of their module, including delivery, assessment and evaluation. Personal Tutor In year one you will be allocated a personal tutor who has an academic as well as a personal welfare role. Your personal tutor will invite you for a meeting at the beginning of each teaching block. You can of course see your personal tutor in addition to these two invites. Your tutor will support you in your personal and professional development. For more details of this see section 3.7.3 Support for learning. Your tutor is also there in a personal crisis and will be able to identify and refer you to other support agencies. 3.5 Programme Structure 3.5.1 Overview of the Programme The BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy is a three year programme. Each academic year is organised into two teaching blocks and the curriculum is presented within distinct modules. Each module has a certain credit rating and each module is delivered at a particular academic level. Table 2 shows the credit values of each of the modules in the three levels. . BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 39
  • Table 2 Year 1 Modules Module Module Title Level Credits Code HEAA116 Evidence Based Professional Practice 1 20 Module Leader: Miriam McMullan HEAA137 Psychosocial Studies for Health Care 1 20 Module Leader: Tim Ley PHY108 Physiotherapy Foundations 1 20 Module Leader: Susan May HEAA138 Introduction to Human Anatomy and 1 20 Physiology Module Leader: Alec Rickard PHY105 Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 1 1 10 Module Leader: Claire Hornsby PHY107 Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 1 1 10 Module Leader: Alec Rickard PHY106 Neurological Physiotherapy 1 10 Module Leader: Hilary Gunn PHY109 Clinical Education Placement Level1 1 10 Module Leader: Tina McGahey Year 2 Modules Module Module title Level Credits Code PHY210 Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 2 2 20 Module Leader: Heather Hunter PHY208 Neurological Physiotherapy 2 2 20 Module Leader: Hilary Gunn PHY209 Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 2 2 20 Module Leader: Alan Hough PHY212 Clinical Education Placement Level 2 2 20 Module Leader: Claire Hornsby HEAA219 Project Studies 2 20 Module Leader: Joanne Paton PHY211 Physiotherapy for health and wellness in 2 10 the lifespan Module leader: Tina McGahey HEAA218 Inter-Professional Working 2 10 Module Leader: Dee Llywelyn BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 40
  • Year 3 Modules Module Module title Level Credits Code PHY309 Advanced Project Studies 3 20 Module Leader: Gary Shum PHY310 Clinical Education Placement Level 3 3 20 Module Leader: Claire Hornsby HEAA312 Management and Leadership for 3 10 Collaborative Practice Module Leader: Dee Llywelyn PHY313 Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 3 3 20 Module Leader: Gary Shum PHY311 Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 3 3 20 Module Leader: Heather Hunter PHY312 Neurological Physiotherapy 3 3 20 Module Leader: Amanda Austin PHY314 Clinical Education Placement: 3 10 Consolidation of Professional Practice Module Leader: Sue May BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 41
  • 3.5.2 Shared Learning When you qualify as a physiotherapist, you will be working as part of a multi-professional team. Depending on the specialism you choose to work in the mix of colleagues working together will vary but nonetheless there will be professions other than physiotherapists in that setting. In current health and social care practice, the importance of a multi -professional approach is emphasised because it means that client needs are better met if those professionals involved in their care are working not just alongside each other but collaboratively and „inter-professionally‟ as well. As you are going to be working with other professions in the future, it makes sense for you to share some of your learning with students from other professions in preparation for when you are qualified. Shared learning takes place throughout the three years of this degree programme and is an integral part of your professional development and final qualification. The University of Plymouth works in partnership with other Higher Education Institutions in the region and the South West Strategic Health Authority, to provide multi-professional and inter-professional curricula to a wide variety of student health professionals. You will be studying the shared curriculum with students from the other partners from the University College Plymouth (St Mark and St John), Plymouth (Speech and Language Therapy) and from the University of Plymouth (Adult Nursing, Child Nursing, Dietetics, Mental Health Nursing, Midwifery, Occupational Therapy, and Podiatry). In addition, there are opportunities being developed to share learning with medical students from the Peninsula Medical School. There are two aspects of campus-based shared learning within the degree programme. These are multi-professional learning and inter-professional learning.  Multi-professional learning is when you learn about particular subject areas you have in common together, rather than in separate professional groups. The multi- professional approach should help you to understand and appreciate that there is a huge amount of underpinning foundation knowledge and skills shared by all health care professionals, and thus provide you with a common language with which to communicate with colleagues from other disciplines in the future.  Inter-professional learning has an added dimension, and is about greater interaction to learn together, especially about each other‟s roles and potential contribution to client care, and to health, social care, and education service provision. You will find that each part of the shared curriculum has aspects of both multi-professional and inter- professional learning. The exact definition of these terms is less important than the experience of learning to work with colleagues from other professions right at the start of your future career! There will also be some opportunities for shared learning in practice placements. However, the specific nature of these will depend on the type of placement you undertake. In year one, virtually the whole of teaching block one is all multi-professional, and comprises shared modules. These shared modules are „HEAA116 Evidence Based Professional Practice, HEAA137 Psychosocial Studies for Health Care and HEAA138 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology‟. However in order to gain an earlier understanding of the physiotherapy profession a new module has been created entitled Physiotherapy BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 42
  • Foundations. This module will cover a number of core skills that you will require before you go out in placement including mandatory training. You will be introduced to the concept of Inter-professional learning prior to going out on placements as this is where you will see the importance of it in the clinical setting and you may wish to reflect on this in your portfolio. As well as the inter-professional modules you will complete physiotherapy specific modules in teaching block two; this will give you a physiotherapist‟s identity early in your programme and underpin modules in teaching block two and subsequent years. In year two, inter-professional learning continues with HEAA218 Inter-professional Working where you will be working with students from other professions integrating your profession specific knowledge and skills with your inter-professional skills. In year three there are further opportunities for inter-professional working with HEAA312 Management and Leadership for Collaborative Practice. This module aims to develop your management and leadership skills. Equally clinical placements will allow you to experience inter-professional working and learning first hand and your portfolio should evidence this experience. 3.4.3 Programme Features A brief outline of the three years is given below. Detailed information concerning the module aims, the assessed learning outcomes and indicative syllabus content for each module is recorded on the definitive module record (DMR). Copies of the relevant DMRs will be included with the module handbook for each module and are included in Appendix One of this handbook. Year 1 This year contains a strong element of shared learning with students from other health programmes. The second part of the year introduces the first profession specific modules and skills and concludes with the first clinical placement. HEAA116 – Evidence-Based Professional Practice Module Leader: Miriam McMillan Level 4 – 20 Credits Module Outcomes:  Describe search strategies to locate research evidence using electronic sources  Demonstrate a basic understanding of a range of different research approaches that underpin evidence-based professional practice  Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of research based evidence for health care professionals in practice. Theory content:  Quantitative and qualitative research approaches, design and methods  Reliability, validity, rigour  Ethical and professional considerations  Analysis and interpretation of research findings  Critical appraisal  Application of research to professional practice Assessment:  Appraisal of a research paper BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 43
  • HEAA137 – Psychosocial Studies for Health Care Module Leader: Tim Ley Level 4 – 20 Credits Module Outcomes  Understand fundamental concepts from psychology and sociology and relate these to health and health care  Identify determinants of health related behaviour of individuals and societal groups and their relevance for health professionals.  identify psychosocial and communication needs of individuals during the stages of their health careers  Apply psychosocial concepts to specific situations in health and social care including their application in understanding the behaviour of health professionals.  Recognise the consequences of the existence of societal groupings for health behaviour and health care. Theory content  Psychosocial theories to address the following themes: understanding health; health care and health care services; the life course; and Issues in the provision of health care. Assessment  Examination PHY108 – Physiotherapy Foundations Module Leader: Susan May Level 4 – 20 credits Module Outcomes  Discuss the application of the theoretical concepts underpinning physiotherapy practice  Discuss the impact of professional issues on patient care  Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of personal development in professional practice  Apply basic skills of self-reflection to the clinical context  Provide evidence of participation in mandatory training (including manual handling, Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and infection control) Theory content / practical content  Mandatory training, clinical skills e.g. goniometry, normal movement, palpation and exercise prescription.  Documentation and portfolio development.  Professionalism and effective communication.  Introduction to the clinical environment. Assessment Portfolio Essay BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 44
  • HEAA138 – Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology Module leader: Alec Rickard Level 4 – 20 credits Module outcomes:  Identify body systems and structures  Apply biomechanical theory to human movement  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of normal anatomy and physiology  Describe the control of human movement Theory content:  Form and function of musculoskeletal system  Nervous system  Homeostasis  Endocrine system  Cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular system  Biomechanics and the neural control of movement and gait Practical Skills:  Palpation  Gait analysis Assessment:  Multiple choice questions and short answer questions PHY105 – Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 1 Module leader: Claire Hornsby Level 4 – 10 credits Module outcomes:  Demonstrate basic examination, assessment and clinical reasoning skills of the cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular system  Outline the evidence base and theoretical concepts that underpin the overall management of cardiovascular and cardiorespiratory dysfunction by the multi- disciplinary team  demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills used in the management of patients with COPD, following abdominal and/or cardiac surgery Theory content:  Assessment and Investigation of patient‟s problem (including POMR)  Pathophysiology of the different COPD conditions and physiotherapy management including diagnostic tests and measurements in COPD  (Spirometry, Arterial Blood Gases)  Review of NICE guidelines for COPD  Drug Therapy and COPD  Overview of pulmonary rehabilitation and outcome measures  Acute and chronic respiratory failure  Effects of general anaesthesia on (lung function) high risk patient, upper abdominal surgery BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 45
  •  Review of evidence for the role of physiotherapy in post op complications  Physiotherapy management of a post surgical patient  Risk factors for CHD; medical and surgical management  Physiotherapy management of a post op cardiac patient / Cardiac rehabilitation stages  Cardiovascular response to exercise Practical Skills:  Recognition and palpation of anatomy of the respiratory system  Subjective and objective assessment of a person with COPD, pre and post operative patient and the CABG patient.  Note writing  Auscultation, voice sounds and percussion note  Lung Function Tests (Spirometry and Peak flow meter)  Positioning  Active Cycle of Breathing  Relaxation techniques  Proper use of Inhalers  The use of Borg‟s rating of perceived exertion  Shuttle Walk Test  Design of a pulmonary rehabilitation programme and differentiate this from Cardiac rehabilitation  Intermittent positive pressure breathing (Bird) IPPB  Continuous positive airway pressure CPAP  Humidification and Oxygen therapy  Incentive spirometry  Interpretation of chest X- rays  Heart rate measurement  Principles of exercise prescription FITT  Exercise training modes Assessment:  Individual Structured Practical Examination (ISPE) PHY107 – Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 1 Module leader: Alec Rickard Level 4 – 10 credits Module outcomes:  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the anatomy and physiology, related to the control of normal human movement.  Demonstrate basic examination, assessment and clinical reasoning skills of the musculoskeletal system.  Explain the rationale of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of musculoskeletal problems.  Analyse the consequences of nervous, muscular and skeletal system damage in relationship to their physical, psychological and social effects on the individual, their relatives and carers. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 46
  •  Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with musculoskeletal problems. Theory content:  Musculoskeletal - Low back pain scenario  Functional anatomy of the lumbosacral region  Pain mechanisms and psychosocial factors  Differential diagnosis for the lumbar spine and red flags  Overview of manual therapy concepts and principles  Radiological and other investigations, surgical procedures and  epidurals – their use and effectiveness  Lumbosacral stabilisation, exercise programmes and pain management programmes.  Musculoskeletal - Knee scenario  Anatomy and biomechanics of the knee complex and lower limb  Aetiology/pathology of anterior knee pain  Soft tissue injury and the healing process – its clinical implications  Electrotherapeutic modalities used in soft tissue injury management  Introduction to a biomechanical assessment of the lower limb and the  role of the podiatrist  Investigations and surgical management of the knee complex. Practical Skills:  Musculoskeletal - Low back pain scenario  Subjective assessment and skills  Objective assessment skills o Posture/alignment o AROM o McKenzie repeated movements o Neurological Ax: dermatomes, myotomes, reflexes, Babinski/clonus (brief review) o Neurodynamics: SLR, FNT o Palpation of lumbar spine bony landmarks, soft tissues and PAIVMs o Muscle palpation & length testing: quadratus lumborum, erector spinae, piriformis  Introduction to manual therapy treatment (mobilising) o Maitland mobs o McKenzie Rx  Introduction to manual therapy treatment (stabilising) o Postural correction o Core stability  Self-management strategies for LBP: TENS and heat  Musculoskeletal - Knee scenario  Subjective assessment and objective assessment skills o Postural alignment o Functional tests: squat etc o ROM: active/passive o Palpation o Ligament/meniscal tests o Accessory movements BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 47
  • o Muscle/ITB length: i.e. Thomas‟ test for iliopsoas/rectus femoris o Basic foot and ankle assessment o Review of gait  Treatment of the knee complex o Maitland mobs o MWMs o Treatment of patella femoral joint dysfunction o Patella position/tracking o Taping o Patella mobs o Lateral retinaculum stretching o VMO training  Pain relief o Ultrasound o Ice  Orthopaedic crutch use Assessment:  Individual Structured Practical Examination (ISPE) PHY106 – Neurological Physiotherapy Module Leader: Hilary Gunn Level 4 – 10 credits Module Outcomes  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the anatomy and physiology, related to the control of normal human movement.  Demonstrate basic examination, assessment and clinical reasoning skills of the neuromusculoskeletal system.  Explain the rationale of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of neurological problems.  Analyse the consequences of nervous, system damage in relationship to their physical, psychological and social effects on the individual, their relatives and carers.  Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with neurological problems. Theory content:  Neurology - Parkinson‟s disease scenario  An overview and introduction to neurological physiotherapy.  The structure and function of the basal ganglia in relation to the control of movement, the neuropathophysiological basis of PD; and medical management.  Medical and multi-disciplinary management of PD, and the underlying evidence base for this.  Physiotherapy intervention (focus on gait in PD)  Living with PD- session led by person with PD/ relative/ carer  Neurology - Stroke scenario  An overview of relevant anatomy and physiology in relation to stroke  Brain re-organisation (neuroplasticity) and functional recovery  Evidence base for stroke services and physiotherapy intervention, including the RCP Stroke Guidelines and the NSF for Older People. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 48
  •  Assessment and treatment of motor control – different physiotherapy approaches  Bio-psychosocial issues in stroke - a personal perspective (from stroke patient)  Interventions for upper limb management Practical Content:  Neurology – Parkinson‟s disease scenario  Analysis of normal posture and movement  Assessment: subjective and objective  Outcome measurement: rationale, issues relating to standardisation and reliability  Physiotherapy management strategies: cognitive strategies, stretching and strengthening  Physiotherapy interventions- gait: gait analysis, external cueing, walking aids- sticks and frames  Falls and home programmes  Note writing and treatment planning Neurology - Stroke scenario Assessment of the sensory system, including cutaneous sensation, proprioception, and stereognosis  Assessment of the motor system, including muscle tone, motor control (selective movement, holding, placing, strength), functional movements.  Physiotherapy interventions: limb care, re-education of movement in lower and upper limb, functional tasks  Note writing and treatment planning Assessment: Individual Structured Practical Examination (ISPE) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 49
  • PHY109 – Clinical Education Placement Level 1 Module leader: Tina McGahey Level 4 – 10 credits Module outcomes:  Demonstrate basic communication skills with patients/clients/carers and members of the health and social care team  Observe and employ basic examination and assessment of patients/clients problems identifying and recognising their physical, psychological and cultural needs.  Collate information from the assessment data to identify problems in order to formulate with guidance a treatment /management programme taking into account appropriate contextual factors.  Use basic problem solving and clinical reasoning skills to plan, deliver and evaluate treatment /management programmes adopting a patient centred approach which takes into account the needs of individuals or groups. Theory content:  This is a clinical placement and introduction to further theory will depend on nature and setting of placement Practical Skills:  Students work on the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes specific to the core areas of practice or other speciality areas of practice under the supervision of experienced clinicians Assessment:  The placement is assessed by the clinical educator, taking into account the student‟s performance over the five week placement. Year 2: The focus of this year is the continuation of professional education and training. Students will also commence their project research studies and develop their understanding of interprofessional practice. HEAA218 – Interprofessional Working Module lead: Dee Llywelyn Level 5 – 10 credits Module Outcomes  Discuss the impact of responsible self-management and inter-professional team working within a multi-professional environment  Demonstrate a knowledge of the principles of change implementation within an inter- professional environment  Apply knowledge and understanding through a process of analysis, reflection & evaluation Assessment  Formative  Participation in an online interprofessional discussion, exploring the role of their own and at least one other profession, in relation to one of the scenarios.  Summative 100% Coursework BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 50
  •  A written assignment exploring the interprofessional issues presented by the chosen scenario . PHY210 – Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 2 Module leader: Heather Hunter Level 5 – 20 credits Module outcomes:  Discuss the relative merit of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of cardiorespiratory problems  Analyse the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team, who are involved in the care of patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems  Examine the effects of cardiorespiratory/cardiovascular dysfunction on an individual, their relatives and carers  Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems  Formulate management plans for patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems Theory content:  Amputation case scenario:  Causes and levels of amputation  PVD and claudication  Review of anatomy of lower limb – muscles, nerves, arteries  Review of diabetes and effects of cardiovascular system – central and peripheral  Affects of amputation (balance, sensation, muscle imbalance, oedema, contractures)  Role of MDT  Early treatment of transtibial amputee  Role of DSC, assessment for prosthetic prescription  Wheelchairs / cushions/ casting  Psychological affects: Phantom limb sensation / pain  Amputation and gait, speed, energy expenditure, length, metabolic requirements  Cystic fibrosis case scenario:  Revision of anatomy, physiology  Pathology of CF  Respiratory and digestive symptoms  Physiotherapy for CF / Evidence based guidelines  Cardiovascular response to exercise  Transition child – adult, review, clings, terminal care  Psychological implications of CF, body image  Expert patient – effect of PT and dietary regime on life. Practical Skills:  Amputation scenario:  Exercises: Rhythmical stabilisation,  Contraction prevention: hold relax, positioning  Balance exercises  Core stability: gym balls BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 51
  •  Transfers  Wheelchairs (folding, brakes, self propelling, outdoor kerbs and slopes)  Gait training  Cystic fibrosis scenario:  Auscultation  Chest x-rays  Active Cycle of Breathing  Postural drainage  Respiratory techniques: Flutter, Pep mask, Autogenic drainage, Incentive spirometer  Postural assessment Assessment:  Essay  Individual Structured Practical Examination (ISPE) PHY208 – Neurological Physiotherapy 2 Module leader: Hilary Gunn Level 5 – 20 credits Module outcomes:  Discuss the relative merit of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of neurological problems  Analyse the contributions of the members of the multidisciplinary team within neurorehabilitation  Examine the effects of nervous system damage on an individual, their relatives and carers  Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with neurological problems  Formulate management plans for patients with neurological problems Theory content:  Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropathology related to Guillain-Barre syndrome and Multiple sclerosis  Patient management by the multi disciplinary team  Peripheral neuropathies  Functional Electrical Stimulation  Exercise for people with MS Practical Skills:  Manual muscle testing upper limb and lower limb  Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) – upper limb, lower limb and trunk  Subjective and objective assessment, including note writing  Gait analysis  Introduction to orthotics  Use of the Gymnastic ball  Postural management  Intervention planning BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 52
  • Assessment:  Reflective case study and management plan  Individual Structured Practical Examination (ISPE) PHY209 – Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 2 Module leader: Alan Hough Level 5 – 20 credits Module outcomes:  Discuss the relative merit of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of patients with musculoskeletal problems  Analyse the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team involved in the management of musculoskeletal problems  Examine the effects of musculoskeletal dysfunction on an individual, their relatives and carers  Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with musculoskeletal problems  Formulate management plans for patients with musculoskeletal problems Theory content:  Anatomy of the cervical spine  Physiology, biomechanics and pathology of the cervicothoracic spine  Anatomy of the thoracic spine and temporomandibular joint  Conservative management of whiplash and non-traumatic neck pain  Chronic pain management and medico-legal issues  Electrotherapy Practical Skills:  Subjective assessment  Assessment of posture, active range of movement and end-feel of the cervical and thoracic spine  Assessment and treatment of the cervical spine according to the McKenzie model  Vertebral artery insufficiency testing  Palpation and passive accessory movements of the cervical and thoracic spine  Passive physiological movements of the cervical spine  Assessment and treatment of muscle dysfunction  Neural mobility/sensitivity and integrity  Interferential and TENS Assessment:  Poster  Individual Structured Practical Examination (ISPE) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 53
  • HEAA219 – Project Studies Module leader : Joanne Paton Level 5 – 20 credits Module outcomes:  Demonstrate a clear understanding of key research concepts.  Undertake a critical review of the literature, using a systematic approach on a selected topic and present it succinctly.  Formulate a research question  Select a research design that is appropriate to the research question.  Prepare an outline proposal and protocol for a research project, taking into account ethical issues, using a prescribed format and guidelines Theory content:  Research methodologies – qualitative and quantitative  Formulating a research question  Literature searching  Data collecting  Single subject case studies  Data analysis and statistics  Protocol development  Ethics Assessment:  Research protocol  Written examination with MCQ‟s and short answer questions PHY212 – Clinical Education Placement Level 2 Module leader: Claire Hornsby Level 5 –20 credits Module outcomes:  Communicate well with patients/clients/carers and members of the health and social care team  Complete, with guidance, effective examinations and assessments of patients‟ problems, identifying and recognising their physical, psychological and cultural needs.  Apply the information gathered from the assessment data to prioritise, with guidance, problems in order to formulate a treatment /management programme taking into account appropriate contextual factors.  Demonstrate problem solving and clinical reasoning skills to plan, deliver and evaluate treatment /management programmes adopting a patient centred approach which takes into account the needs of individuals or groups. Theory content:  This is a clinical placement and introduction to further theory will depend on nature and setting of placement Practical Skills:  Students work on the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes specific to the core areas of practice or other speciality areas of practice under the supervision of BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 54
  • experienced clinicians Assessment:  The placement is assessed by the clinical educator, taking into account the student‟s performance over the five week placement. PHY211 – Physiotherapy for health and wellness in the lifespan Module leader: Tina McGahey Level 5 – 10 credits Module outcomes:  Examine the effects of dysfunction through the lifespan on an individual, their relatives and carers  Discuss the relative merit of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of patients within the specialist areas of practice, utilising clinical reasoning and evaluation of appropriate evidence based resources  Analyse the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team involved in the patient management  Demonstrate effective presentation skills Theory content: Women‟s Health scenario  Continence and Continence Management  Pregnancy, labour and post-natal care  Musculo-skeletal management in pregnancy- SI Joint and Symphysis Pubis Dysfunction Learning Disability scenario  Political/ service issues in Paeds/ L Disability  Physio role in L Dis/ service user perspective Elderly Care scenario  Biology of Ageing  Ageism and dignity in Elderly Care  Falls and Falls management Practical Skills: Women‟s Health scenario  Continence Assessment and Management  Musculo- skeletal assessment and management: o assessment of pelvis function and dysfunction o treatment through mobilisation and exercises o management with braces, walking aids etc. Learning Disability scenario  Learning Disability Management o Assessment/ management of complex postural problems o Seating/ 24 hr approach to management o Intervention planning (using scenarios) Elderly Care scenario  Falls assessment  Adaptation of assessment for elderly patients/ community settings  Appraisal/ use of falls outcome measures BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 55
  •  Intervention planning  Falls management with intervention to address:  Flexibility/ ROM  Strength and endurance  Balance  Coping strategies Assessment:  Verbal presentation  Year 3: The final year of the course has a strong element of clinical education with three placements. You will also conclude your project studies with data collection and the production of a research article. HEAA312 – Management and Leadership for Collaborative Practice Level 6 – 10 credits Module Lead: Dee Llwellyn Module outcomes  Evaluate the relationship between organisational culture & effective inter-professional working.  Critically analyse knowledge and understanding of management, leadership and quality theories.  Apply knowledge & understanding of management & leadership through a process of analysis, problem solving & evaluation Assessment Mode: An essay involving the critical appraisal of an aspect of inter-professional working taken from practice. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 56
  • PHY309 – Advanced Project Studies Module leader: Gary Shum Level 6 – 20 credits Module outcomes:  Contribute to the development and dissemination of evidence-based practice.  Undertake a critical review of the literature on a selected topic, using a systematic approach, and present it succinctly.  Develop, undertake and evaluate a small research project which includes data collection  Produce a research report suitable for publication in a peer reviewed scientific journal Theory content:  Students design, conduct, analyse and present their research projects; therefore theory content will be dependent on the nature and topic of the chosen project. Practical Skills:  Research skills, including project development, data collection appropriate measurement and evaluation, data analysis and presentation Assessment:  Literature review and journal article  Viva PHY 310 Clinical Education Placement Level 3 Module leaders: Claire Hornsby Level 6 –20 credits Module outcomes:  Communicate effectively and sensitively with patients/clients/carers and members of the health and social care team  Complete appropriate and effective examinations and assessments of patients‟ problems, identifying and recognising their physical, psychological and cultural needs.  Synthesise information gathered from the assessment data to prioritise problems in order to formulate an effective treatment /management programme taking into account appropriate contextual factors.  Apply consistently problem solving and clinical reasoning skills to plan, deliver and evaluate treatment /management programmes adopting a patient centred approach which takes into account the needs of individuals or groups.  Critically evaluate and reflect on their examination, assessment, clinical reasoning and patient management skills Theory content:  This is a clinical placement and introduction to further theory will depend on nature and setting of placement Practical Skills:  Students work on the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes specific to the core areas of practice or other speciality areas of practice under the supervision of BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 57
  • experienced clinicians Assessment:  The placement is assessed by the clinical educator, taking into account the student‟s performance over the five week placement. PHY314 Clinical Education Placement: consolidation of Professional Practice Module Lead: Sue May Level 6 – 10 credits Module Outcomes  Act as an integral team member, demonstrating the ability to work safely and effectively within their scope of practice, including clinical workload management  Complete appropriate and effective examinations and assessments of patients‟ problems, sensitively addressing their physical, psychological and cultural needs.  Consistently apply problem solving and clinical reasoning skills to plan, deliver and evaluate treatment /management programmes, adopting a patient centred approach which takes into account the needs of individuals or groups.  Demonstrate development of practice following critical evaluation and reflection on their patient management skills Practical skills  Students work on the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes specific to the core areas of practice or other speciality areas of practice under the supervision of experienced clinicians Assessment  Achievement of competences in interpersonal skills and professional behaviour, organisation and management, patient examination and assessment, implementation of physiotherapy practice, learning behaviour. These competences are assessed by the clinical educator, taking into account the student‟s performance over the five week placement.  Portfolio Pass/ Fail BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 58
  • PHY313 – Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 3 Module leader: Gary Shum Level 6 – 20 credits Module outcomes:  Critically evaluate musculoskeletal physiotherapy  Relate the effects of musculoskeletal dysfunction to the function, activities and participation on an individual, their relatives and carers  Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with musculoskelatal problems  Evaluate relevant national and international guidelines and management frameworks  Identify the physical, psychological and cultural needs of individuals and communities Theory content:  Anatomy of hip and pelvis  Anatomy of the forearm and hand  Fracture healing and management of fractures  Rheumatology  Bone disorders  Hydrotherapy  Complex regional pain syndrome Practical Skills:  Subjective and objective assessment of hip and hand  Developing exercise programme for post fracture rehabilitation  Mobilisation techniques for hip and hand  Splinting  Hydrotherapy Assessment:  Essay  Individual Standardised Practical Examination (ISPE) PHY311 – Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 3 Module leader: Heather Hunter Level 6 – 20 credits Module outcomes:  Critically evaluate cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular physiotherapy  Relate the effects of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular dysfunction to the function, activities and participation on an individual, their relatives and carers  Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems  Evaluate relevant national and international guidelines and management frameworks  Identify the physical, psychological and cultural needs of individuals and communities Theory content:  Physiotherapy management of the critically ill patient in ICU.  Ventilators: types, complications, indications and weaning from BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 59
  •  Pathophysiology of burns/ grafting and healing.  Physiological monitoring in ICU  On-call:  Policy; procedures; and suitable questions/ patients.  Specific indications for certain patients (paediatric, neuro etc) Practical Skills:  Suctioning; CXR; positioning (V/Q, ROM).  Contracture prevention; Manual hyperinflation; Ventilators. Interpretation of Physiological indicators: ABG‟s, Glasgow coma scale, Intracranial pressure. etc) Assessment:  Individual Standardised Practical Examination (ISPE)  Exam PHY312 – Neurological Physiotherapy 3 Module leader: Amanda Austin Level 6 – 20 credits Module outcomes:  Critically evaluate physiotherapy in the management of neurological problems  Relate the effects of nervous system damage to the function, activities and participation on an individual, their relatives and carers  Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with neurological problems  Evaluate relevant national and international guidelines and management frameworks  Identify the physical, psychological and cultural needs of individuals and communities Theory content:  Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropathology related to spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries  Patient management by the multi disciplinary team  Acute and long term management  Functional Electrical Stimulation  Patient experience of disability Practical Skills:  Subjective and objective assessment and examination  Acute patient management and treatment planning  Functional electrical stimulation  Transfers  Wheelchairs, aids and adaptations Assessment:  Leaflet  Individual Standardised Practical Examination (ISPE) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 60
  • 3.6 Assessment Strategy The University assessment strategy takes its responsibility for ensuring the quality and reliability of assessment very seriously. It recognises that high quality assessment practices are an important element of the student experience and that the outcomes of assessment influence students' future lives. The assessments are aimed at assessing the learning outcomes of each module. In addition, attempts are being made to offer a variety of different assessments modes so as not to „over use‟ one particular way of assessing. Repeat with Attendance Students may be requested to repeat a stage of the programme, with attendance, in accordance with the Academic regulations. Please note that fees may become payable for students who are required to repeat with attendance. You are also referred to the section on University Regulations of the University Academic Regulations, Notes for guidance and procedures for taught programmes. In particular please note the sections for Honours degrees in those regulations. You are also advised to familiarise yourself with those regulations relating to appeals, extenuating circumstances and academic dishonesty. Details of the University regulations can be found under Rules and Regulations on the website at www.plymouth.ac.uk/studenthandbook Further details on all specific assessments will be provided within individual module handbooks. 3.6.1 Inclusive and equitable assessment The need for inclusive assessment is recognised in the University‟s Disability Statement 'Access to Opportunity' and the Code of Practice on Equal Opportunities. These codes comply with the QAA Code of Practice: Students with disabilities. Responsibility for making „reasonable adjustments‟ and reducing discriminatory barriers when planning assessment strategies lies with programme teams. Inclusive assessments are considered for all modules and alternative assessments are considered for those students for whom inclusive assessment modes may not be a viable option. All individuals can discuss their requirements with the programme leader or the module tutor as it is not appropriate to assume that all students with similar impairments will require similar adjustments. Regulations for providing support for disabled students and for students with other short term needs are published in the University‟s Academic Regulations. All reasonable adjustments should be taken into account when designing assessment strategies to remove discriminatory barriers. However students can discuss their individual requirements with the module tutor. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 61
  • Types of assessments include: • Written examinations • Examination of practical skills • Essays • Verbal and poster presentations • Group tasks • Research critiques • Research projects • Reflective statements • Clinical placement assessment • Viva voce • Laboratory report • Portfolios Table 3 provides information about the type and timing of assessments of individual modules. Table 4 shows the exact hand-in dates of work for each module. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 62
  • Table 3 Timetable for Assessment Key: C= Continuous assessment E= examination/ viva period/ presentation/End of module test L= launch of the assessment task S= submission date of essay or project Year 1 Teaching Block 1 Teaching Block 2 Module Assessment Task September November December February January October March credit June April May HEAA116 20 Appraisal L S HEAA138 20 Examination L E HEAA137 20 Examination L E PHY108 20 Essay / Portfolio L S S PHY105 10 Practical exam L E PHY106 10 Practical exam L E PHY107 10 Practical exam L E PHY109 10 Placement C BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 63
  • Year 2 Teaching Block 1 Teaching Block 2 Module Assessment Task September November December February January October March Credit June April May HEAA218 10 reflective case study L S PHY210 20 Essay/ Practical exam L S E PHY208 20 Case study/ Practical exam L S E PHY209 20 Individual poster/ Practical exam L S S/E PHY212 20 Placement C HEAA210 20 Protocol/MCQ test L S/ E PHY207 10 Presentation L E Year 3 Teaching Block 1 Teaching Block 2 Module Assessment task September November December February January October March Credit June April July May HEAA312 10 Essay L S PHY309 20 Dissertation/ Viva L S E E PHY310 20 Placement C C PHY313 20 Essay/ Practical exam L S E E PHY311 20 Exam/ Practical exam L S/E E PHY312 20 Individual leaflet/ Practical exam L S E E PHY314 10 Placement C BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 64
  • Table 4 Assessment types and hand-in dates Please note that these dates may be subject to change. Please consult your module handbooks for further information. A copy of all hand in dates is also kept by programme administration. Year 1 Code Type Hand in date HEAA116 Coursework Monday 11th January 2010 HEAA137 Examination Friday 15th January 2010 HEAA138 Examination Thursday 21st January 2010 PHY108 Portfolio Friday 23rd April 2010 PHY108 Essay Friday 26th February 2010 PHY105/107/106 ISPE‟s Week beginning Monday 17th May 2010 Placement PHY109 Friday 9th July 2010 Booklet Year 2 Code Type Hand in date HEAA218 Coursework Tuesday 8th June 2010 HEAA219 Exam Monday 21st June 2010 Protocol Friday 25th June 2010 PHY208 Coursework Friday 30th October 2009 ISPE w/c 18th January 2010 PHY209 Course work Monday 11th January 2010 ISPE W/c 18th January 2010 PHY210 Coursework Friday 4th December 2009 ISPE w/c 18th January 2010 PHY211 Presentation Thursday and Friday 1st and 2nd July 2010 PHY212 Practice Friday 30th April 2010 The Faculty of Health Undergraduate Programme Guidelines on Assessment and Marking (Assess 2009) are used for all Faculty of Health programmes. It is important that you familiarise yourself with these. Assess 2009 can be found on EMILY under the PHC Tab/Programme Documents. Assess 2009 also contains guidance on the preparation and presentation of coursework, including referencing conventions, and this is commended to you. There may be slight variations between the University of Plymouth regulations and the “Assess” guidelines used by the Faculty of Health, in relation to hand in dates for coursework. 3.7 Learning Environment The learning campus for you as a physiotherapy student will be at the Peninsula Allied Health Centre at Derriford, Plymouth. This Centre includes classroom facilities for lectures and small group activities, practical skills laboratories, research facilities and computing facilities. The main University College Plymouth (St Mark and St John) library will house books and journals most relevant to the physiotherapy programme. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook September 2008 65
  • 3.7.1 Modes of Learning The programme strategy encourages reflection, self-development, self-direction and critical thinking. In addition the strong emphasis on practical skill development is crucial to the effectiveness of the physiotherapist as a practitioner. The opportunity to practise these skills and being assessed in the competent use of these skills is essential and is supported by frequent feedback to the students. Problem Based Learning (PBL) The physiotherapy specific elements of your programme are delivered through a Problem Based Learning (PBL) approach. The key elements of this PBL approach are the:  PBL tutorials in small groups (approx. 7-10 students).  Practical skills classes (approx. 17-20 students).  Fixed resources sessions (whole student intake). The PBL tutorial is the key session to facilitate the student learning. Simulated case scenarios form the focus of learning for each of the physiotherapy specific university based modules. Most of these simulated clinical problems are studied over two weeks. The complexity of the problems increases as the students progress from level one to three of the course. The simulated clinical problems are built around the three core areas that are central to physiotherapy practice involving the management of patients with neuro- musculoskeletal, cardiorespiratory and neurological problems. Each problem integrates biological, physical, behavioural, social and clinical sciences underpinned by evidence-based practice, reflective thinking and clinical reasoning, and health promotion and injury prevention. PBL is an established educational approach, which has been used in medical education since the 1960s. It is now used in a number of Medical Schools in the UK, including the Peninsula Medical School at Plymouth/Exeter/Truro. In physiotherapy education PBL has been introduced in a number of accelerated physiotherapy programmes. A number of undergraduate physiotherapy programmes utilise elements of PBL. The physiotherapy programme at Plymouth currently has probably the largest PBL element of all undergraduate physiotherapy courses in the UK. All case scenarios should contain the following six elements. It should therefore be possible to construct learning outcomes from all of these elements:  Anatomy and physiology relevant to the case scenario.  Pathology, clinical signs and symptoms relevant to the case scenario.  Management of the patient. This should include physiotherapeutic management as well as management by the multi-disciplinary team.  Psychosocial aspects.  Professional issues.  Research aspects. What happens in a PBL tutorial may vary from group to group and from week to week. However, the experience of students should be comparable and therefore the following format is used: BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 66
  • The „14 steps‟: What should happen in your PBL tutorial: 1. The group establishes/re-affirms their ground rules. 2. The group considers the 'trigger' or 'case scenario' (unfold). 3. Clarify unfamiliar terminology and define terms that can be misinterpreted. 4. Define the major problems. 5. Hypothesise/use clinical reasoning to try to explain the major problems of the patient with the combined knowledge already present in the group. 6. Form clusters: identify what is already known and what needs to be known. 7. Define learning goals, and set objectives for the group and for yourself. 8. Work on these objectives; search for evidence , study. 9. Report back to the group, share information (but try not to look at your notes) (feedback). 10. Synthesise old and new information and determine how much can now be explained. 11. Identify what was not learned and summarise what has been learned and review your objectives. 12. If appropriate, test your understanding by applying your knowledge to another problem. 13. At the end of the case scenario reflect on your contribution to the group and on the effectiveness of the group. 14. At the end of the case scenario the group will receive the module objectives. These will be posted on blackboard by the module leader. What is expected from the facilitator (tutor)?  The facilitator is there to facilitate the group and not to teach.  The facilitator will keep the students to task, help them to focus and steer them away from dead end paths. Tutor notes in the tutor edition of the case scenario will provide a steer towards the objectives.  The facilitator will ensure that students cover all the issues relevant to the case scenario and identified in their tutor guide.  The facilitator will be familiar with the case scenario and the outcomes.  The facilitator will encourage the students to reflect on their contribution to the group.  The module leader will publish the learning objectives of the case scenario at the end of the scenario. What is expected from the student?  All students are responsible for their own learning.  All students attend all PBL tutorials and arrive on time.  Students will share resources and feed back information.  All students will work co-operatively.  All students will reflect on their contribution to the group.  Students will ensure that their objectives are recorded and distributed to all group members (normally written up and circulated within 24 hours after the tutorial). BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 67
  • 3.7.2 Clinical Education The clinical education placements are essential and integrated components of your education and development as a health professional. During this time you will have the opportunity to integrate academic, practical and interpersonal aspects of the profession and to develop skills, including problem solving and clinical reflection abilities. Senior physiotherapists in their role as clinical educators provide both formative and summative assessment of your performance during your placements. The clinical education placement element of the programme is seen as such an important element, that the marks awarded for it contribute to your final degree classification. Clinical education occurs in all three years of the course. There are six clinical education placements and all placements are 5 weeks in duration. Each clinical placement involves normally 36 hours per week in the clinical environment. The overall length of the clinical education is 30 weeks giving a total of 1080 hours. Clinical education placements for this course will be found within Devon and Cornwall. This means that you will have to travel away from your base in Plymouth. Further information on the clinical education element of your programme can be found in a separate Clinical Education handbook. The Practice Quality Development Division The Practice Quality Development Division (PQDD) provides strategic direction for the management of practice based learning across the Faculty of Health. The division works in partnership with other Higher Education Institutions, placement providers and healthcare commissioners to assure the provision of your quality practice learning. Professional programmes require you to successfully complete periods of clinical/professional placement as a condition of graduation. These placements are provided by external agencies such as health service providers. The University will take every care in ensuring that providers are advised of requirements in advance and in securing placements for all students at the requisite time. However, you should be aware that circumstances beyond the reasonable control of the University may occur in which, as a result of changes within the Health Service or other external factors, it is not possible for providers to meet placement requirements. In such circumstances, while the University will use its best efforts to make alternative arrangements for you to meet the requirements of your programme, including identifying suitable alternative placements wherever possible, you should be aware that it is possible that the completion of your programme may be unavoidably delayed and/or that the alternative arrangements put in place may cause some inconvenience. In such circumstances if you do not want to accept the alternative arrangements you would be entitled to terminate your studies and receive an appropriate refund of fees and recognition of your academic achievements. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 68
  • Please refer to Item 1.4 – Exceptions to the Regulations Supporting Learners in Practice Last year a new model of support for learners in practice was introduced. Placement Development Teams (PDTs) are based in Trust/ placement settings to manage this activity. Placement Development Teams are made up of an academic lead and a practice lead and are based in the Trust and their role is to support learners in practice. In addition they will be responsible for supporting mentor preparation and updates. These teams will also be responsible for quality assessment and monitoring and delivery of education in the workplace. A list of the personnel involved in PDTs can be found in the Assess 2009 document. The Role of the PDT includes:  Providing opportunities for students to discuss any aspects of their placement, positive as well as negative aspects of the learning experience. The issues discussed may relate to travel and accommodation, clinical practice or may be of a pastoral nature. The aim is to optimise individual students‟ use of the clinical learning environment by helping them to identify their learning needs and ways of meeting their learning outcomes.  Providing the clinical educator with any educational support that is required during the placement.  Enabling the clinical educator to discuss student progress and to give generic assessment guidance where appropriate.  Forming an appropriate link between the clinical placement unit and the university base.  Providing feedback to the clinical education co-ordinator regarding the quality of individual placements Supporting students with disabilities The University is committed to ensuring equality of access to all aspects of learning for all students, and therefore takes a proactive approach to supporting students who have disabilities whilst they are on placement. The Disability Assist team are actively involved in supporting those students who have an identified disability, and in providing assessment and advice to other students where issues have been recognised. The Physiotherapy team have undertaken several pieces of work designed specifically to assess and improve the support arrangements for students whilst on placements, and are always keen to support both students and educators to facilitate the placement experience. All students who have identified to the University a specific disability or learning support will be invited to meet with a member of the clinical placement team prior to their placements, to discuss any issues that may affect their performance and to plan the approach that they will take to make the most of their placement opportunity. This will include discussing issues such as disclosure, accessing and applying appropriate support strategies, and facilitating the process of students and educators implementing any „reasonable adjustments‟ that may be necessary. These meetings may involve linking with appropriate members of the disability and/or learning support units as well as arranging pre-placement visits where this may be helpful. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 69
  • There are a number of useful sources of further information and guidance for students and educators about this issue. Particularly recommended is the CSP guidance document: ' supporting disabled physiotherapy students on clinical placement ' (CSP 2003) 3.7.3 Support for Learning You will be allocated a personal tutor who has an academic as well as a personal welfare role. Your personal tutor will invite you for regular meetings during each teaching block via e-mail. Students should attend a personal tutorial at least annually, or more often if required. STUDENTS ARE EXPECTED TO BRING either a paper copy of their portfolio or share access to aspects of their e-portfolio Pebble- pad for meetings as appropriate. Personal tutees should discuss any pre-placement concerns and or issues with their personal tutor so that any recommendations / arrangement can be made prior to commencing placement. A record of each personal tutorial should be kept (either as an electronic or hard copy) by the tutor and tutee, with a copy for the student‟s personal file. You can of course contact and see your personal tutor in addition to these formal invitations. Please follow-up any invitation by making an appointment with your tutor. Your tutor will help you identify your learning needs; if appropriate they can refer you to the learning support unit or other services. Your tutor will support you in your personal and professional development. See section on Personal Development and Personal Development Planning. Your tutor is also there in a personal crisis and will be able to identify and refer to other support agencies. A good starting point for enquiries is www.plymouth.ac.uk/learn and the Learning Development team can be contacted at learn@plymouth.ac.uk. Review of Professional Development Portfolio All students will have access to a portfolio at the commencement of their course and should be using it as a learning and development tool throughout their training. Students enrolling for the first time in 2009-2010 will have access to Pebble pad which is an electronic portfolio. Training on its use will be provided at induction and further training will be introduced as required. Whether you use an e-portfolio or a paper portfolio, the use of a portfolio to demonstrate your learning remains the same. Tutors should be involved with reviewing the portfolio to discuss progress, and in assisting students to get the most out of it from an early stage. In year one, tutors should review the purpose and use of the portfolio, and the progress that tutees have made in completing their first SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis and Personal Development Planning PDP. In subsequent years, tutors should review records of placement experience and any reflective work the student has undertaken as this is an expected part of their university and placement based learning. Personal Development Planning What is Personal Development Planning? Personal Development Planning is a structured and supported process undertaken by an individual to reflect upon their own learning, performance and/or achievement and to plan for their personal, educational and career development. The PDP forms an integral part of the Professional Development Portfolio and the physiotherapy programme has embedded the introduction of personal development planning into PHY108 Physiotherapy Foundations and through the personal tutorial system. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 70
  • The primary purpose of a PDP (Personal Development Plan) is to help students learn and develop more effectively and to be able to:  become more effective, independent and confident self-directed learners;  understand how they are learning:  relate their learning to a wider context;  improve their general skills for study and career management;  articulate their personal goals and evaluate progress towards their achievement of these;  develop a positive attitude to learning throughout life.2 .2 Skills Plus, the University of Plymouth‟s Skills, Personal Development Planning and Employability Strategy, UOP 2003 Within the existing student portfolio there is a section relating to PDPs with proforma paperwork that may be useful (pages 41-43). New student for 2009-2010 will be able to access proformas and information on how to fill in a portfolio and the accompanying documents which can be accessed via EMILY. A helpful starting point for students who are struggling would be to encourage them to complete a SWOT analysis. Tutors should ensure that students complete a personal development plan at the beginning of each academic year, reflecting on their progress, achievements Support for Students and their Learning  One week induction programme for orientation and introducing study skills.  Student Programme handbooks and module handbooks.  Library and study skills packages.  Extensive library and other learning resources and facilities at all four main Faculty of Health sites.  A wide range of practice experience and clinical education supported by supervising physiotherapists.  Academic staff, if required, visit the practice placements to support and collaborate with students and placement supervisors.  All students are allocated personal academic tutors whose role is to assist them with academic, personal problems and to advise on pastoral issues.  Access to student counsellors.  Access to Teaching and Learning Support Services, which provides assistance and guidance, e.g. dyslexia, study skills. Student Liaison A student‟s liaison committee will be established to receive feedback and make recommendations to the academic team, placement and or programme committee about areas for action. This will be one of many mechanisms that will be available to students to provide feedback on their programme and discuss issues of concern. Student Evaluation 1. Module Evaluation Students will be invited to evaluate the delivery and content of each module as part of the quality assurance processes. Module Evaluation forms will be BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 71
  • distributed by the module teacher at the start of their programme and are readily available from Programme Administration. 2. Student Placement Evaluation Students will be periodically invited to evaluate their experience of placements as part of the quality assurance processes. Module teachers will distribute Student Placement Evaluation forms at intervals for them to complete. 3. The University Student Perception Questionnaire Students will be invited to provide feedback on the wider aspect of the University environment, introduction to the programme, the learning environment, quality of the programme and services / facilities available to them. This information would be gained via the Students Perception Questionnaire which all students complete between February and April each year. The results inform the University of the standard of its education provision and identify areas that require action. Student Representatives Students will identify a student representative from their group to represent their views about their programme to the Programme Committee and within their department. All students will be provided with information about the National Union of Students during the induction to the programme. The National Union of Students provides a service to its members and can be found on the University Campus (see Item 4.16). Faculty and University Student Support The University of Plymouth has a number of services and resources available to support you on this programme including:  Faculty Widening Participation Officer  University Student Support Services  Campus libraries  Computing Facilities  Counselling Services  Careers Service  Information for students with specific learning difficulties and/or disabilities and other (short term) needs  Health and Safety Information Details of these services can be found in the University of Plymouth student handbook. Information and Learning Services - Library Information As a student within the School of Health Professions you have full borrowing rights and access to all of the facilities offered by the main University of Plymouth library at Drake Circus. In addition you are able to borrow the books and use the resources held within the University College Plymouth (St Mark and St John) library. As students within the Faculty of Health you are also entitled to use the library services at Somerset College of Arts & Technology (SCAT), and the Knowledge Spa (KSpa) at the Royal Cornwall Hospital, Treliske, Truro. You will need to join these libraries individually as they are not part of the University network. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 72
  • The University of Plymouth library holds books, journals and AV material covering all subject areas taught at the University. Profession specific books and journals for Dietetics, Midwifery, Physiotherapy, Podiatry and Occupational Therapy can be found in the University College Plymouth (St Mark & St John) library. Books and journals are selected in consultation with the Academic staff to meet the needs of your individual programme. The University of Plymouth library subscribes to many electronic journals and databases to assist you with your course, and these are available through a service called Metalib, which can be accessed from any internet linked PC either on or off campus. User induction and subject based teaching sessions will be scheduled to enable you to make the most of all of the resources. There are enquiry desks at all library sites with staff available to help you locate resources, use the services or just find your way around. Subject librarians are also available at Drake Circus, SCAT and KSpa to give more detailed assistance. You can find information about all services offered by the Library, Media and IT departments from the ILS library pages, which you can access from any internet linked PC via the Student Portal. Hospital Libraries There are also collections of books based in Hospital staff libraries. These libraries are managed directly by the Hospital Trusts and have their own rules and regulations. It is possible if you are on placement or if you are a member of the hospital staff, to join the relevant staff library. Please ask the library where you are working for details. Opening hours Up to date opening hours for the University library can be found on the ILS Library pages. Students are advised to check with individual sites when visiting libraries during the Summer, Christmas or Easter periods. Vacation dates may vary between sites and from year to year. Please contact the site by telephone or check the student portal/Emily. Notices setting out vacation dates will also be displayed in each site library. E-learning The University now delivers a number of services online via its own electronic learning environment known as BLACKBOARD (EMILY). All students on registration will have access to “Blackboard” and the Student Portal, which in turn gives access to information and facilities. There are links to folders holding course material as well as e-mail, contacts, calendar and tasks. The programme will make full use of blackboard, as well as encouraging participation in the Faculty of Health research seminar sessions, and the use of video conferencing facilities where appropriate. This approach to learning and teaching is one of constant evolution and, over the period of your programme, developments that utilise the approach to the benefit of the student will be incorporated into the programme. The library is making extensive use of the studentportal/sharepoint to deliver a large selection of electronic resources ranging from specialist websites to key databases and electronic journals. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 73
  • Information & Learning Services – Computing services When you arrive at the University you self-register for a computing account and are given a unique username and password to access it. The account provides you with secure file space on the network (u-drive), a mailbox and an email address (eg. joe.bloggs@students.plymouth.ac.uk). It also allows access to a fleet of nearly 1800 networked student PCs with a wide variety of software applications, electronic resources and services provided by the University and external bodies. Open access computing areas are available on all Faculty of Health teaching sites (Drake Circus - Plymouth, Taunton, Truro and the Peninsula Allied Health Centre – Derriford, Plymouth). You should access your mailbox, file space and resources through the student portal/Emily at http://student.plymouth.ac.uk whether you're using a University networked PC or your own at home. This way you will be automatically authenticated for many of the external electronic resources available such as journals and databases. Your portal homepage will show links to your module folders which contain course material, lecture notes and discussion boards if lecturers have chosen to use these. Use the My Edesk tab on the portal menu to select and check your personal details, ensuring you keep them up-to-date. The student portal/Emily can be accessed at the following location: http://students.plymouth.ac.uk There are a number of regulations governing the use of computing facilities at the University of Plymouth. Students are asked to read the information at the following website: http://intranet.plymouth.ac.uk/computing/policies/intranet.htm 3.8 Personal Development Planning (PDP) and Career Development This is a structured process undertaken by yourself to reflect upon your own learning performance and / or achievement and to plan for your own personal, educational and career development (QAA 2000). This is an important part of your development to help you review, plan and take responsibility for your own learning. You will be told about this in your induction period and introduced to opportunities and processes to assist PDP at each stage of the programme. This may be through specific modular content as well as delivered through your personal tutorial system. You will also have a responsibility to meet with your tutor and undertake the activities identified within the programme to support you and to prepare you for the work place. Website http://staff.plymouth.ac.uk/skillsp/ http:www.qaa.ac.uk/crntwork/progfileHE/contents.htm Your Personal Development Planning will also feed into your career planning. We expect that most of you will be working as physiotherapists at the end of your programme. We want to help you secure your first post. There may also be some of you who may want consider alternatives. We also want to help you in this process. The university career service will be pleased to help you and we will be organising some formal sessions in your final year to prepare you for that all important step towards the job market. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 74
  • Careers Service, The Library, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, PL4 8AA. Email Address: careers@plymouth.ac.uk Tel: (01752) 587456 Fax: (01752) 232354 Office Opening Times Monday: 09:00 - 15:45 Tuesday - Thursday: 09:00 - 17:00 Friday: 09:00 - 16:30 During vacations we have reduced opening hours, they are: Monday - Friday: 09:00 - 12:00 & 13:30 - 16:00 Appointment Times: During term time, 30 minute careers interviews are available each weekday. Telephone or call in to make an appointment the day you would like one. You will receive a copy of your own CPD Development Portfolio CD from the CSP as part of your student membership. Use this portfolio as soon as possible. Physiotherapy managers will refer to the CPD portfolio when you apply for your first post in the NHS. 4. Programme Policies and Guidelines 4.1 Programme Attendance and Responsibilities of Students The pattern of attendance within a flexible programme will be variable. As students take more responsibility for their learning and use the Managed Learning Environment this flexibility will become increasingly so. The following principles relate to programmed study sessions and practice placements. Students are expected to attend all timetabled sessions; theory, practical and PBL. These sessions are an essential element of the course so that students are equipped with the appropriate knowledge and skills that are required in order to meet the Standards of Education and Training and Standards of Proficiency as laid down by the regulatory body (HPC). Therefore missing sessions of the course is incompatible with professional behaviour. A register of attendance will be taken for all PBL and practical skills sessions. If a student will be unable to attend a timetabled session for any reason they must discuss and agree it with the Module Teacher in advance. Should unforeseen circumstances occur which result in them being late for their timetabled session or unable to attend they must notify Programme Administration and ask for a message to be passed to the module teacher / PBL tutor as soon as possible. Non attendance at timetable sessions without prior notification to the module teacher is not acceptable within the programme. Students who have missed three or more sessions (either practical or PBL or a combination) will be invited to attend a tutorial with the appropriate stage tutor; with the aim of identifying any reasons for non attendance in order that appropriate assistance / mechanisms can be put in place. Examples may include a referral to BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 75
  • Learning Support, Disability Assist or Occupational Health if required. Student will be reminded of their professional responsibility. Sickness/Absence from Practice Placement Students are asked to inform the Clinical Educator / Supervisor in their placement of illness or their inability to get to their placement as soon as possible to enable appropriate staffing adjustments to be made. If they have asked someone else to make a phone call on their behalf they should ask them to speak to a senior member of staff. In addition they should advise Programme Administration at Peninsula Allied Health Centre. Sickness/Absence Notification to the University Students are responsible for notifying both Programme Administration and/or Module Leader/Teacher on the day of absence before their anticipated time of arrival. Each site is staffed from 8.30 a.m. and there is an answer phone for out of hours calls. If using the answer phone students should give details of their name, programme and cohort/year. This absence will be documented in the student's programme records. Programme Administration for the site can then notify the appropriate academic staff. If students are on placement and are notifying the Faculty of Health by telephone, they should give details of their placement supervisor‟s name, the department and placement address. This absence will be documented in the student's programme records. Programme Administration for the site can then notify the appropriate academic staff. Please note students are responsible for notifying their placement. 4.2 Conditions of unsupervised practice The development of your practical physiotherapy skills will need a great deal of practice. There will be opportunities to practice during your practical skill classes. In addition to this we recommend that you may also like to practice some of these skills outside of these supervised skill classes. The university is currently able to offer limited access to the skill laboratories in the Peninsula Allied Health Centre. Skill laboratories rooms that are not in use for teaching or other official University purposes may be used by student to practice some of their skills. The following conditions apply when practicing physiotherapy skills unsupervised on University of Plymouth premises:  All activities must comply with the University Health and Safety regulations. Please consult your University and School Health and Safety regulations. Please consult your University and School Health and Safety booklet for further information.  Unsupervised practice is only permitted during working hours 9.00am to 5.00pm, Monday to Friday  Students are only permitted to practice skills and techniques within the scope of practice as physiotherapy students. These must only be skills previously taught during supervised classes  Any skill which have an identified risk factor above „Low Risk- i.e. 4 or above‟ are not permitted to be practiced unsupervised on University of Plymouth premises. Module and or practical workbooks will contain risk assessments which will identify activities which cannot be practiced unsupervised  A minimum of two students must be present during all unsupervised practice sessions BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 76
  •  The use of electrotherapeutic equipment is not permitted in unsupervised practice sessions  Students must adhere to the rules of Professional Conduct for Physiotherapist. Breach of the rules of Professional conduct may be reported to the professional and statutory bodies and may lead to exclusion from the programme  Students must report all injuries, incidents, accidents, faulty or damaged equipment to a member of staff. Report forms are available in all skills laboratories.  Only University of Plymouth Physiotherapy students are allowed to be present during unsupervised sessions  Students wishing to use any of the available skills laboratories must report to Julie Soane, Senior Technician (room GF17, extension 38812) to obtain access to the room. At the end of the practice session students must report back to Julie Soane who will lock the room  Students must tidy the room at the end of the session  Any student not behaving in accordance with these conditions or otherwise in an unsafe or unprofessional manner will be liable for disciplinary action and may not be permitted to use University of Plymouth premises for unsupervised practice in the future 4.3 Consent to act as a model in practical classes Skills are integral to your development as a physiotherapist. Participation in interactive practical classes involving experience, observation, and feedback is essential to physiotherapy education. At the beginning of each academic year, module leaders will give you an overview of the theory and practice to be covered in the modules. This information is detailed in your module handbook and or practical workbook where all skills are risk assessed. You will be given time for discussion and clarification. At each practical class, the lecturer will demonstrate safe procedure of practical activities, explaining also all indications, contraindications, hazards and safety aspects. You will be given time to ask questions before commencing practice. You are strongly encouraged to act as a model for the teaching and learning processes involved in the acquisition of physiotherapy skills both in the School and in clinical placements. Each year students will be asked if they are prepared to act as a model (for example, be observed, palpated, undertake role play) and if in agreement students will be asked to sign a consent form agreeing that they are willing to act as a model. However you are under no obligation to agree to be a model and your refusal is in no way a barrier to your continued eligibility to participate in skills learning exercises. You are responsible for your own health and safety and it is very important that you understand this. If you have any medical problems that might be made worse or otherwise prevent you from agreeing to model, it is your responsibility to inform the lecturer and/ or clinical educator. As standard practice, people who are not able to participate in practical activities are encouraged to see the Occupational Health team who are always pleased to help. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 77
  • 4.4 Incidents in the Practice Area You may witness an incident while in practice placement as an observer or a participant. Potentially this may involve you as a witness and you may be asked to write a statement of events. This is not something to be worried about but you should seek the advice of your personal tutor. He/she will advise you on how to manage such situations and accompany you to any necessary meetings which are arranged as a result of the incident. 4.4.1 Accident Forms 1. It is a requirement under the Health and Safety at Work Act that all accidents should be properly recorded. Therefore anyone who has an accident should complete an Accident Form. 2. If an accident occurs on University of Plymouth/Faculty of Health premises or its environs, the Accident Form may be obtained from the Programme Administration Department for completion. In addition you should be aware of the Health and Safety handbook relevant to the Peninsula Allied Health Centre. 3. If an accident occurs on Trust premises or at any other placement premises, the Accident Form will normally be provided by staff at that location and they will retain the completed form. 4. In cases outlined in 3 above, it is important the Faculty of Health is aware of the accident, so that any particular circumstances or injuries can be taken into account when the student returns to the Faculty of Health premises. It is in your own interest that all accidents are retained on your Faculty of Health file so that full information is available if there are long-term consequences of injury which were not immediately apparent at the time of the accident. 5. If an accident does arise away from University of Plymouth/Faculty of Health premises the student should either ask for a copy of the completed Accident Form to be forwarded to the Faculty of Health (Programme Administration) or alternatively, if in doubt, should ask the Faculty of Health for an Accident Form for completion. 6. If you are injured in any way while on Trust premises, you will be treated in the first instance by the Trust Occupational Health or Accident and Emergency Department. At a later date you will be seen by Exeter Occupational Health and Safety Service. 4.5 Guidelines for dealing with unsafe practice/inappropriate professional behaviour The Faculty of Health expects you to act at all times in such a manner as to: promote the interests of patients, clients, peers and colleagues (also see HPC Guidance Standards of Conduct, Performance and Ethics, CSP Rules of Professional Conduct). BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 78
  • Where practice, which apparently compromises the safety of others, is reported verbally, in writing or within assignments, you are bound to act in a manner that protects those at risk. All cases of practice that compromise the safety of others revealed through reporting, reflection or in writing will up acted upon:  Practice that compromises the safety of others will be discussed in a non- disciplinary/supportive way with the appropriate line manager.  In order to encourage student responsibility they may if they wish, be involved in discussions with the appropriate party.  The appropriate party shall be deemed to be the designated Senior Manager in the practice placement.  It is the responsibility of the placement provider to investigate and act upon the information received from the teacher, to ensure the maintenance of quality care and safe practice for patients, clients and others, to keep appropriate records and to report action taken to the teacher and student concerned. 4.6 Withdrawing from your programme If you feel that you are unable to continue on your programme, then please discuss this as early as possible with an appropriate member of staff (personal tutor, module teacher or programme leader). It might be possible in certain circumstances to interrupt your programme and return when you are ready and able to resume your studies. It is best to discuss this with a member of staff who will be able to explain details of intermissions, conditions for return, effects on student bursaries etc with you. See Section 2.2 Stepping Off. Students should also be aware of the University of Plymouth regulations for withdrawal from a programme. Information can be found in the University of Plymouth student handbook and under Rules and Regulations on the website: www.plymouth.ac.uk/studenthandbook 4.7 Returning to your Programme after an Interruption The Faculty of Health has a specific policy if you are on a programme leading to a professional qualification and do not undertake normal programme activities for a period of six months or more. This could be due to deferral, interrupt or special leave/ study arrangements on health and social care programmes. The Faculty of Health policy indicates that you must undergo a renewed enhanced CRB check and a further occupational health assessment before returning to the programme (if there is an available place) regardless of your rationale for non-attendance. In addition, should any concerns arise at any point during a programme of study the programme lead may initiate a referral with Occupational Health Services through the normal channels (PQDD Co-ordinator). BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 79
  • 4.8 Pastoral and Counselling Services Pastoral Support for Students Undertaking a physiotherapy programme involves a considerable personal and professional investment. It is important from both your own and the Faculty of Health perspective that this time and experience is as productive and positive as possible. In the Faculty of Health we aim to deliver programmes to enable you to successfully complete your assignments and assessments of practice within the specified time scales. However, there may be times when the demands or structure of your programme or placements do not best fit with your current circumstances. This may be due to a variety of factors - changes to your personal circumstances, unexpectedly high work pressures, finding aspects of the coursework particularly difficult, uncertainty over assignment preparation, a period of sickness, etc. When faced with such a situation the first step in trying to resolve any problem or difficulty that is interfering with your studies is to talk to someone. It is quite likely that the issue is one that can be readily addressed if it is brought to our attention, especially at an early stage. Your personal tutor is the first person you should approach as they are best placed to know about the practical issues associated with your programme and the range of potential solutions. However, if your personal tutor is not readily available there are a number of other people who should be able to either deal with your query or who will be able to direct you to someone who can. Chaplaincy The University chaplains work alongside other support services in ensuring that students feel supported and part of the University. The chaplains:  offer practical help and friendship, regardless of religious background or belief, or indeed lack of it  liaise with local church groups and other world faith communities to offer everyone access to their own traditions of worship and practice.  organise social events (walks, meals, video evenings, etc.)  provide you with opportunities to make new friends and contacts across the University On the Plymouth campus, Chaplaincy House provides a coffee lounge and space for its “listening ear” service. A variety of student-run groups make use of the house and a busy calendar of social events is organised. On other campuses the chaplains work closely with the local community to help students make the most of their time at the University. Counselling Student Counselling Service The Student Counselling Service is available to all students on each of the University campuses. You may wish to access the service if, during your time at University, you experience personal and emotional difficulties that impact on your academic work or on your enjoyment of university life in general. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 80
  • The service offers workshops, for example on managing stress and depression, in addition to both individual and group counselling. Please see website for more details: www.plymouth.ac.uk/counselling How to contact You can contact the Counselling Service in person, by e-mail (studentcounselling@plymouth.ac.uk) or by telephone. The Service is open throughout term-time and vacations, although during the vacations, there is a reduced service. Not all campuses are staffed on a full-time basis – please check the website for more details. Campus Location Telephone Plymouth 4 Portland Mews 01752 587701 Drake Circus Truro S19, Level 4, Knowledge Spa 01872 255103 A member of the physiotherapy team can also provide support. It is important to tell them if you are experiencing personal difficulties. 4.9 Financial Support Bursaries and Student Travel Guidelines The Student NHS Business Services Authority is responsible for assessing, reviewing and paying bursary entitlements to eligible students studying on NHS funded courses. The information regarding student entitlements and methods of payment is in the Department of Health booklet “Financial Help for Healthcare Students” Fifth Edition. Copies are available on telephone number 0845 6060655 or e-mail doh@prolog.uk.com. It is also available on the Department of Health website www.doh.gov.uk/hcsmain.htm Student Loans You may be entitled to a student loan to cover the balance of your living costs. NHS means tested Bursaries are not intended to meet all your maintenance requirements, so you are encouraged to consider carefully whether you will need a loan to avoid hardship during your programme. You should apply, via your local education authority (LEA) for a loan before the programme starts. The LEA will tell the Student Loans Company the maximum loan to which you are entitled. You can then decide how much of the available loan, if any, you want. Your LEA will be happy to give you more detailed advice. Travel costs Normal daily travel between your home and normal college base will not be reimbursed. However, the cost of journeys between your term time residence and a clinical placement site which is not part of the University of Plymouth can be reimbursed providing the cost is in excess of your normal daily travel costs from your term time residence to your Plymouth University base. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 81
  • Student Responsibilities You should obtain relevant travel claim forms from Programme Administration at your Faculty of Health site. These should be completed and delivered to Programme Administration (together with timesheets) for checking and authorisation. All receipts for claimable expenditure (e.g. bus tickets) should be firmly attached. Payment cannot be approved without corresponding tickets and receipts. These claims will then be forwarded onto the Student Grant Unit who will pay them with the next convenient bursary payment. This can take up to eight weeks. Enquiries about financial support may be directed to: NHS Student Bursaries Hesketh House, 200-220 Broadway, Fleetwood, Hampshire, FY7 8SS Telephone: 08453 586655 Fax: 01253 774490 enquiries@nhspa.gov.uk www.nhsba.nhs.uk/students 4.10 Fitness to Practice Regulations The Faculty of Health monitors the progress of all students registered on the portfolio of pre-registration programmes particularly in respect of any issues raised related to good health and good character. The Faculty has therefore implemented the Fitness to Practice procedure to assist in this monitoring process. The Faculty Fitness to Practice regulations should be read in conjunction with the University Disciplinary Code of Conduct for Students and in most cases will be used in place of the University Code when concerns arise relating to fitness to practice issues. A copy of the full Fitness to Practice procedure is available to all students on both Sharepoint and EMILY. 4.11 Health and Good Character In accordance with Health Professions Council guidance, after an initial enhanced Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check and Occupational Health check prior to commencement of the programme, you are required to sign a self declaration in respect to these at the start of each academic year. 4.12 Students as Lone Workers The Guidelines for Students as Lone Workers can be found in Appendix Three of this document. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 82
  • 4.13 Travel Insurance You need to ensure that, when you undertake senior community placements using your own car, your current car insurance provides business cover. In addition any equipment carried in your own car needs to be covered by insurance. 4.14 Student Safety Personal Details: Please inform Programme Administration of any changes in name and/or address or that of your next of kin, preferably before the event. Changes of names should be supported by the necessary documentation e.g. marriage certificate, copy of statement to solicitor etc. We need to be informed of movement within accommodation as well as movement in or out. It is not the Accommodation Officer's responsibility to tell us! 4.15 Uniform Policy Appearance During the programme you will come into contact with the public in a variety of ways and in a variety of settings. Sometimes you will need to wear ordinary clothes, sometimes you will need to wear protective clothing and if this is the case a set of uniforms will be supplied. When in direct contact with patients or clients, you may be required to wear either protective clothing or uniform. You must adhere to the following guidelines which have been designed for your safety as well as the patients: (a) hair must be kept off the face and above the collar line, (b) only one plain gold stud in each ear may be worn, (c) only a wedding ring may be worn, (d) only low-heeled plain nursing shoes may be worn, unless otherwise specified. If you are not required to wear protective clothing or uniform but your own clothes, it is expected that the points made above will be respected. When in practice students must adhere to the uniform policy of the local trust. Uniform is designed to be worn while you are in a practice placement. It should not be worn outside the working environment. The Physiotherapy student uniform consists of: Navy blue trousers White tunic or white polo shirt Dark shoes Identity badges should be worn whenever you are on Faculty of Health business. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 83
  • 4.16 Smoking Policy Details of the University of Plymouth Smoking Policy can be found in the University of Plymouth Student Handbook and Guide to Services. The Faculty of Health is appreciative of the difficulties that may be associated with trying to adopt this policy and various lines of support and communication are available to staff and student. Please note that some Trusts operate a total no smoking ban on their premises. A revised Code of Practice on smoking will be available this Autumn in compliance with new national legislation. If you are a smoker and wish to give up smoking or think you will have a problem conforming to this policy, please tell your personal tutor as soon as possible. Under no circumstances must staff/students smoke whilst in uniform. In addition students are subject to the relevant Trust policy whilst in clinical placement. 4.17 Student Union What is UPSU: and what can it do for you? As a student, you are represented by the Students‟ Union and every student at the university automatically becomes a member. Representation basically means that if you have any problems in or outside university we are here to help. We offer an advice service with trained advisors offering you help in academic, financial or legal advice. If you have any problems with your programme, a lecturer or the university we can represent your views and ensure your concerns are heard. The Union is also the social hub of the university so if you want food, drink (both alcoholic and non-alcoholic!), entertainment, bars, games, TV, somewhere to meet and chat the Union has got it covered. It is also the place to join all the sports clubs and societies. There are over eighty to choose from so if you fancy skydiving, powerboating, football or even the joining Medsoc the Union is the place to be. UPSU has a long history of volunteering within our local communities and provides students with a fantastic opportunity to develop their skills and experience. You might find that volunteering changes your life or the life of those you help. Our Student Community Action Project (SCAP) works with charities and has been involved in developing gardens in community centres or travelling to Kenya to help build schools. For more information on everything we do please come and visit. You can check out our website at www.upsu.com or email our President presplymouth@su.plymouth.ac.uk You are also automatically a member of the University College Plymouth St Mark and St John Student Union and have access to all their facilities please do use them! BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 84
  • 4.18 Jury Service Following a change in legislation in 2004 students in healthcare environments are now eligible to be called for jury service. Further information concerning jury service can be found at: www.cjsonline.gov.uk www.hmcourts-service.gov.uk 4.19 Equal Opportunities The University of Plymouth is fully committed to providing equality of opportunity for all of its staff and students, applicants and visitors. The University will not tolerate unfair or unlawful discrimination on the grounds of gender, ethnicity, colour, disability, religion, nationality, age, occupation, marital status, sexual orientation or any other irrelevant distinction. This policy applies to all aspects of staff and student activity within the University. The following three policies listed are available in full at: www.plymouth.ac.uk/equality http://intranet.plymouth.ac.uk/equality Equal Opportunities; Harassment; Race Equality. The University of Plymouth policy on Harassment and Bullying for Staff and Students has been revised to reflect updated procedures. A network of trained, voluntary Harassment Advisors is available for staff and students. Any member of staff or any student may consult any advisor in confidence. The list of advisors is available on the Equality and Diversity Community noted above. There is also a policy regarding Consensual Relations between staff and students. If you require more information or an alternative format please contact the Equality and Diversity Office at equality@plymouth.ac.uk 4.20 Responsibilities of Students In addition to the above policies and guidelines students should be aware of the University of Plymouth Code of Conduct and general regulations for students as outlined in the University of Plymouth handbook for students. 4.21 Statement re Employment Law Having taken advice from the Legal Department of the University and the Nursing and Midwifery Council the following statement has been prepared in response to a query raised by a pre-registration nursing student. The following statement however is pertinent to all students from the Faculty. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 85
  • Essentially a student who is on placement may not be considered as an employee and does not have the same rights, pursuant to employment legislation as if they were to be treated as an employee. Therefore in so far as an employee might have the right to request flexible working in order to deal with post-pregnancy issues, that right does not apply to persons who are on placement. From a Nursing and Midwifery Council perspective they advise that flexibility can only achieved if it is available at a local level and indeed it may result in a student needing to lengthen their programme in order to achieve the requisite number of hours prior to registration. We as a Faculty, abide by Section 22 of the Sex Discrimination Act 1975 recognising that is unlawful for the „responsible body‟ of an educational establishment to discriminate on grounds of sex. Furthermore we cannot and indeed do not discriminate in the terms on which it offers to admit a student, or by refusing or deliberately omitting to accept an application, or the terms upon which a student, once admitted, is given access to facilities. We will as a Faculty always do our best to be flexible and accommodate students‟ requests, however due to the limits placed on us by the placement process, it may not always be possible to do so. 5. Student Involvement 5.1 Student Representatives It is important to the University that you participate in the evaluation and improvement of the quality and standards of the education it provides. Your views are vital in developing our programmes and support services. There are a variety of ways in which you can have an input to the running of the University. For example, the annual Student Perception Questionnaire is undertaken across the institution and its Partner Colleges to gain an overall view of your opinions. The results of the questionnaire help shape improvements to the quality and standard of our educational provision. Students are represented on the University's Board of Governors and the Academic Board (the committee responsible for determining the institution's academic policy). There are also Students' Union representatives on the University committees which deal with the assurance of academic standards and the quality of teaching and learning. One of the most important ways in which you can have an impact is to become a Programme Representative. Programme Representatives are the vital link between students, academic staff and programme administration. They provide feedback to both the University and the Students' Union, communicating the views and concerns of students. Programme Representatives are elected to represent the students on a particular course or programme and hold the post for one academic year. The role does not just involve attending course/programme committee meetings, but also providing a chain of communication between students and staff throughout the year. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 86
  • The Programme Representative system enables the students on a programme to have a voice in the decision-making process and also gives staff feedback on the effectiveness of the educational service they are providing. The system allows students and staff to work together to ensure that any problems which arise are dealt with quickly and effectively. The role of a Programme Representative can be demanding but also very rewarding. You will learn a lot of new skills, such as problem solving, time management and public speaking, which may well be of benefit to you when looking for employment. On completion of your year as Programme Representative, you will receive NUS certification which identifies those transferable skills which you have developed. There is also the opportunity to participate in the Student/Liaison Group/Site Meetings which are held regularly on the main campus and at the Enhanced Study Centre in Exeter. 5.2 Student Role on Programme Committees Each programme has a programme committee on which students from each year are represented. The primary role of the student representatives is to provide the University with a balanced view of the perceptions of the student body on the quality and standards of the education and services being provided. At programme level, they facilitate a dialogue between members of staff who deliver the programme and the students whose learning is determined by the programme. They may also participate in the programme review. 5.3 Student Feedback and Evaluation Student feedback and evaluation, both of individual modules and of the whole programme is an integral and important part of the learning and teaching process. You will be invited to evaluate the delivery and content of each module, utilising a standard Module Evaluation form, which will be distributed by module leaders. In addition, some form of qualitative evaluation will normally be undertaken. You will also be invited to provide feedback on the wider aspects of the University environment, introduction to the programme, the learning environment, quality of the programme and services/ facilities available. This information will be gained via the Student Perception Questionnaire (SPQ) – more details can be found at the following web address: http://staff.plymouth.ac.uk/quality/spq/ 5.4 Student Staff Liaison Committee There is provision for regular meetings between student representatives from each year group, the programme leader and teaching staff for dissemination of information and discussion of current issues pertaining to the programme. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 87
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 88
  • Appendices Appendix One – Definitive Module Records Appendix Two – Occupational Health Information Appendix Three – Guidance for Students as Lone Workers BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 89
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 90
  • Appendix One - Definitive Module Records Year 1 modules Module Module title Level Credits Code HEAA116 Evidence- based Professional Practice 1 20 HEAA137 Psychosocial Issues in Health Care 1 20 HEAA138 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 20 PHY108 Physiotherapy Foundations 1 20 PHY105 Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 1 1 10 PHY106 Neurological Physiotherapy 1 1 10 PHY107 Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 1 1 10 PHY109 Clinical Education Placement 1 1 10 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 91
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 92
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: HEAA116 Credits: 20 Level: 4 Module Title: Evidence-Based Professional Practice Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor: This module introduces students to the principles of evidence-based professional practice and research methodologies that underpin patient/client care. Elements of Assessment: (C1) Coursework 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: PHC Shared Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: In the context of evidence-based professional practice, students will develop basic problem solving and reasoning skills. Alongside this they will develop an understanding of professional practice. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Describe search strategies to locate research evidence using electronic sources/databases 2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of a range of research approaches that underpin evidence-based professional practice 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of research-based evidence for health care professionals in practice Knowledge and understanding (LO1,2, 3); Analysis (LO1,2); Synthesis (LO2,3,); Autonomy (LO1,2); Problem solving (LO1,2,3,); Communication Skills (LO2); Management of information (LO2,3,) Indicative Syllabus Content: Quantitative and qualitative research approaches Research designs and methods of data collection Issues of reliability, validity and rigour in research Ethical and professional considerations in health care research Analysis and interpretation of research findings Critical appraisal Application of research to professional health care practice BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 93
  • Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: N/A Name of Site: All sites Module Leader: Dr Miriam McMullan Session: 08/AU/M Module Code: HEAA116 Assessment Criteria: 1. Description of an appropriate search strategy 2. Evidence of understanding of a range of research methodologies that underpin evidence- based professional practice 3. Evidence of ability to identify relevance of research-based evidence to professional practice Please refer to the Assess framework for general marking criteria for summative assessments. Assessment Mode: 100% coursework involving the appraisal of a piece of published research evidence of relevance to professional healthcare practice within a 2,500 word limit. Formative assessment process involves appraisal of examples of published research evidence during smaller group seminars. Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered by means of lead lectures, seminars and workshops and is supported with on-line learning resources. Opportunities for formative feedback are provided within seminars and workshops. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are outlined below: Craig, J.V., Smyth, R.L. (2007) Evidence Based Practice Manual for Nurses, 2e London, Churchill Livingstone Dawes, M., Davies, P., Gray, A., Mant, J., Seers, K. and Snowball, R. (2005) Evidence-Based Practice. A Primer for Health Care Professionals. London, Churchill Livingstone Gomm, R. & Davies, C. (2000) Using Evidence in Health & Social Care. London, Sage Publications Greenhalgh, T. (2006) How to read a paper: The basics of evidence based medicine. Massachusetts, Blackwell BMJ Publishing Inc. Nordenstrom, J. (2007) Evidence-Based Medicine in Sherlock Holmes‟ footsteps. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Ltd Taylor M.Clare (2000) Evidence-based practice for occupational therapists. Oxford: Blackwell Science Ltd BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 94
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: HEAA137 Credits: 20 Level: 4 Module Title: Psychosocial Issues in Health Care Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor: This module addresses a number of themes in health and social care from a psychosocial perspective. Students are introduced to a number of issues in health care and provided with a foundation in psychology and sociology with which to consider them. The psychosocial concepts taught within this module can act as a foundation for subsequent studies. Elements of Assessment: (E1) Examination 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: PHC Shared Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable the students to consider issues in health care from a psychosocial perspective while learning and utilising fundamental concepts from psychology and sociology. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Understand fundamental concepts from psychology and sociology and relate these to health and health care 2. Identify determinants of health related behaviour of individuals and societal groups and their relevance for health professionals. 3. identify psychosocial and communication needs of individuals during stages of their lives, and of their health careers 4. Apply psychosocial concepts to specific situations in health and social care including their application in understanding the behaviour of health professionals 5. Recognise the consequences of the existence of societal groupings for health behaviour and health care. Knowledge and understanding (LO1,2,3); Analytical skills (LO2,3); Synthesis (LO2,3); Planning and management of learning, autonomy (LO1,2,3); problem solving (LO1,2,3); Communications skills (LO1,2,3). Indicative Syllabus Content: Issues relating to health and health care will be addressed with psychosocial theories within the following themes: understanding health; health care and health care services; the life course; and Issues in the provision of health care. Determinants of health related behaviour including, societal, social, cognitive, behavioural and developmental factors. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 95
  • Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Applied Psychosocial Sciences Partner Institution: None Name of Site: All sites of PAHC Module Leader: Tim Ley Session: 08/AU/M Module Code: HEAA137 Assessment Criteria: Evidence of meeting the learning outcomes, able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of fundamental psychosocial concepts and to relate these to health related behaviour and health care. Assessment Mode: Formative assessment During the course of the module students will given an opportunity to answer questions similar to those that will be in the final assessment. At a later date, staff will provide answers to these questions thus providing students with an opportunity to monitor their own progress. Summative assessment At the end of the module there will be an examination of 2 hours that will address the learning outcomes. Where appropriate, the examination materials will be formatted to meet the needs of candidates with disabilities. Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered by means of weekly lectures, small group sessions. There will be resources such as lecture MP3s, readings, exercises, and answers to the exercises which will be available electronically. Recommended Texts and Sources: Denny, E. and Earle, S. (2005) Sociology for Nurses. Cambridge: Polity Press Gross, R. and Kinnison N. (2007) Psychology for Nurses and Allied Health Professionals. London: Hodder Headline. Sheaff, M. (2005) Sociology and Health Care. Milton Keynes: The Open University Press Taylor, S. & Field, D. (2007) Sociology, Health and Health Care. 4e Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Walker, J., Payne, S., Smith, P. Jarrett, N. (2007) Psychology for Nurses and the Caring Professions 3e. Milton Keynes: The Open University Press BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 96
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: HEAA138 Credits: 20 Level: 4 Module Title: Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: /No (Please indicate) Short Module Descriptor This module is designed to introduce students to the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology relevant to professional practice. Elements of Assessment: (E1) Examination 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To introduce students to the fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology relevant to professional practice. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Identify body systems and structures 2. Apply biomechanical theory to human movement 3. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of normal anatomy and physiology 4. Describe the control of normal human movement (Selected from Knowledge and Understanding (LO 1,2,3,4) ; Cognitive/Intellectual Skills (LO 1,2,3,4) Key/Transferable Skills (LO2); Practical Skills (LO1,2) – see SEEC level descriptors) Indicative Syllabus Content: Form and function of the musculoskeletal system, the nervous system, the endocrine system, the cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular system. Biomechanics and neural control of movement and gait. Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 97
  • Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: (for FHSW only) Name of Site: Marjon Module Leader: Alec Rickard Session* 08/AU/M Module Code: HEAA138 Assessment Criteria: 1. Able to identify body systems and structures 2. Evidence of application of biomechanical theory to human movement 3. Able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of normal anatomy and physiology 4. Able to describe the control of normal human movement Assessment Mode: Formative Assessment Formative feedback is incorporated at regular intervals with the use of tutorials (utilising MCQ‟s and short answer questions in the same format of the exam) and verbal feedback to students during practical sessions Summative assessment Written end of module examination in form of MCQ‟s and short answer questions Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered by means of weekly lectures and seminars. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Drake, R, Vogl, W. and Mitchell, A. (2005) Gray‟s Anatomy for students. Philadelphia: Churchill Livingstone. Palastanga, N., Field, D. and Soames, R. (2006) Anatomy and human movement. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann. (Please note that this book is available as an e-book online from the UoP library web pages) Porter, S. (2002) The Anatomy Workbook. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann. Saladin, K. (2006) Anatomy and Physiology, The Unity of Form and Function. 4e London: McGraw Hill Tortora, G.J. and Grabowski, S.R. (2006) Principles in Anatomy and Physiology 11e. New York: John Wiley & Sons Trew, M. and Everett, T. (2005) Human Movement. 5e Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Whittle, M. (2006) Gait Analysis - An Introduction. 4e Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 98
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY108 Credits: 20 Level: 4 Module Title: Physiotherapy Foundations Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No (Please indicate) Short Module Descriptor This module introduces students to physiotherapy practice including mandatory training and basic observation and handling skills. It aims to develop an understanding of professional practice; including personal development, professionalism, and effective communication within the context of the clinical environment. Elements of Assessment: C1 coursework 100% C2 portfolio pass/fail Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To develop foundations in physiotherapy practice, including professionalism, personal development and core skills. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Discuss the application of the theoretical concepts underpinning physiotherapy practice 2. Discuss the impact of professional issues on patient care 3. Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of personal development in professional practice 4. Apply basic skills of self-reflection to the clinical context 5. Provide evidence of participation in mandatory training (including manual handling, Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and infection control) Knowledge and Understanding (LO1,2,3); Cognitive/Intellectual Skills(LO1,2,3,4,); Key/Transferable Skills (LO1,2,3,4,5); Practical Skills (LO1,5) Indicative Syllabus Content: Mandatory training, clinical skills e.g. goniometry, normal movement, palpation and exercise prescription. Documentation and portfolio development. Professionalism and effective communication. Introduction to the clinical environment. Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 99
  • Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: (for FHSW only) Name of Site: Module Leader: Sue May Session: 08/AY/AU/M Module Code: PHY108 Assessment Criteria: 1. Evidence of the ability to apply the theoretical underpinning of basic physiotherapy skills to the clinical context 2. Demonstrates awareness of the importance of professionalism in the clinical context 3. Evidence of self assessment and personal development planning 4. Demonstrates an ability to engage in reflective practice 5. Provides evidence of participation in mandatory training (including manual handling, Cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and infection control Assessment Mode: Summative Assessment The assessment consists of 2 elements. Both elements must be passed  Portfolio (Pass/fail)  Essay: 1500 words (100%) Formative assessment  Essay Time will be allocated for group discussion of the coursework during lecture sessions in the module, and students are encouraged to make use of the discussion board within the electronic learning resource to discuss issues with input from the module team as necessary.  Portfolio Students will receive formative feedback on reflective writing and other portfolio work from their personal tutors during tutorial sessions Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered by a series of lectures, seminars and practical sessions Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Drake, R. L., Vogl, W., and Mitchell, A. (2005) Gray‟s anatomy for students. Philadelphia: Churchill Livingstone French, S., and Sim, J. (2004) Physiotherapy: a psychosocial approach. 3e Edinburgh: Butterworth Heinneman Porter, S. (2002) The Anatomy workbook Edinburgh: Butterworth Heinneman Trew, M., and Everett, T. (2005) Human Movement: An introductory text. 5e Edinburgh: Elsevier Whittle, M. (2007) Gait analysis: An introduction. 4e Edinburgh: Elsevier BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 100
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY105 Credits: 10 Level: 4 Module Title: Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 1 Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor This module introduces the students to cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular physiotherapy practice. Simulated case scenarios will facilitate the students‟ learning of physiotherapy related to specific patient problems encountered in this area of physiotherapy practice. Elements of Assessment: (E2) Examination 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable the students to develop knowledge and understanding of the cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular system of the body and of pathological processes affecting these systems. To develop an understanding of the effect of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular pathology on the individual, relatives and carers and to develop physiotherapy skills utilised in this clinical area. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Demonstrate basic examination, assessment and clinical reasoning skills of the cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular system. 2. Outline the evidence base and theoretical concepts that underpin the overall management of cardiovascular and cardiorespiratory dysfunction by the multi disciplinary team. 3. Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills used in the management of patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems. (Knowledge and Understanding (LO 1,2,3); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3); Key/transferable skills (LO 2, ) ; Practical skills (LO3) Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios (which will include acute as well as chronic conditions commonly seen by physiotherapists the students will cover relevant areas of: • Anatomy, physiology and pathology (e.g. structure and function of heart and lungs) • Physiotherapy skills utilised in cardiorespiratory physiotherapy (e.g. assessment, auscultation exercise, relaxation, sputum clearance) • Patient management by the multi disciplinary team • Professional issues: (e.g. NICE guidelines) • Psychosocial aspects: (e.g. palliative, curative care, death and dying) • Research skills and evidence based practice (e.g. systematic reviews) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 101
  • Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: (for FHSW only) Name of Site: Marjon Module Leader: Claire Hornsby Session: 09/SP/M – Spring Module Module Code:PHY105 Assessment Criteria: 1. Demonstrates basic examination and assessment skills of the cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular system based on clinical reasoning model 2. Ability to explain the evidence base and theoretical concepts that underpin the overall management of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular dysfunction by the multi disciplinary team. 3. Demonstrates safe, effective and appropriate physiotherapy skills used in the management of patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems. Assessment Mode: Summative assessment  Practical examination of physiotherapy skills and a viva to explore students‟ theoretical knowledge and clinical reasoning. Formative assessment  Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback during practical sessions within the module, and at a revision session prior to the practical examination. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the viva element Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small problem based learning groups, practical skills classes and large group sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Buckley, J., Holmes, J. and Mapp, G. (1999) Exercise on prescription. London: Butterworth Heinemann Hough, A. (2001) Physiotherapy in respiratory care – an evidence-based approach to respiratory and cardiac management 3e London: Nelson Thornes Kumar, P., and Clarke, M. (2005) Clinical medicine. 6e London: W.B. Saunders Pryor, J. A. and Prasad, S.A. (eds) (2002) Physiotherapy for respiratory and cardiac problems. 3e Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 102
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY106 Credits: 10 Level: 4 Module Title: Neurological Physiotherapy 1 Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor: This module introduces the students to physiotherapy practice in the area of neurological rehabilitation. Simulated case scenarios will facilitate the students‟ learning of physiotherapy related to specific conditions. Elements of Assessment: (E2) Examination 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable the students to develop knowledge and understanding of the nervous, muscular and skeletal system and of pathological processes affecting these systems. To develop an understanding of the effect of neurological system damage on the individual, relatives and carers and to develop physiotherapy skills utilised in these areas. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of anatomy and physiology, related to the control of normal human movement 2. Demonstrate basic examination, assessment and clinical reasoning skills of the neuro - musculoskeletal system 3. Explain the rationale of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of neurological problems. 4. Analyse the consequences of nervous system damage in relationship to the physical, psychological and social effects on the individual, their relatives and carers Knowledge and Understanding (LO1,2,3,4); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO1,2,3,4); Key/transferable skills (LO2,3); Practical skills (LO3) Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios (which will include a range of neurological conditions including single impact and chronic disease) the students will cover relevant Anatomy, physiology and pathology (e.g. Nervous system, movement control, plasticity) • Physiotherapy skills (e.g. assessment, balance and gait training, mobilisation, patient handling, stretching) • Patient management by the multi disciplinary team • Professional issues: (e.g. Multi agency working, National Service Frameworks, record keeping, litigation) • Psychosocial aspects: Communication, function/activity/participation, unclear diagnosis) • Research skills and evidence based practice (e.g. evidence for cueing strategies) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 103
  • Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: N/A Name of Site: All Sites Module Leader: Hilary Gunn Session : 09/SP/M Module Code: PHY106 Assessment Criteria: 1. Demonstrates knowledge and understanding of the anatomy and physiology, related to the control of normal human movement 2. Demonstrates basic examination, assessment and clinical reasoning skills used in the management of patients with neurological problems. 3. Ability to explain the rationale of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of neurological problems. 4. Ability to analyse the consequences of neurological system damage in relationship to the physical, psychological and social effects on the individual, their relatives and carers Assessment Mode: Summative assessment  Practical examination of physiotherapy skills and a viva to explore students‟ theoretical knowledge and clinical reasoning. Formative assessment  Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback during practical sessions within the module, and at a revision session prior to the practical examination. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the viva element Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small problem based learning groups, practical skills classes and large group sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Carr, J. H., and Shepherd, R. (2003) Stroke Rehabilitation. London: Butterworth-Heinemann,. Edwards, S. (2002) Neurological Physiotherapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Meara, J., and Koller, W. C. (2000) Parkinson's Disease and Parkinsonism in the Elderly. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Palastanga, N., Field, D., and Soames, R. (2006) Anatomy and human movement 5e. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann Stokes, M. (2004) Physical management in Neurological Rehabilitation 2e London: Mosby. Trew, M., and Everett, T. (2004) Human Movement. 5e Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Students will be directed to appropriate journal articles and web based materials BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 104
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY107 Credits: 10 Level: 4 Module Title: Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 1 Pre-requisite (s): none Co-requisite (s): none Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor: This module introduces the students to physiotherapy applicable to musculoskeletal conditions. Simulated case scenarios will facilitate the students‟ learning of physiotherapy related to specific conditions in this area of practice. Elements of Assessment: (E2) examination100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40%. Module Aims: To enable the students to develop knowledge and understanding of the musculoskeletal system and the pathology affecting it. To develop an understanding of the effect of musculo-skeletal dysfunction on the individual/relatives/carers and the physiotherapy skills utilised. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the anatomy and physiology related to the musculoskeletal system 2. Demonstrate basic examination, assessment, clinical reasoning and treatment/management skills applicable to musculoskeletal conditions 3. Explain the rationale of various therapeutic approaches in the management of musculoskeletal problems. Knowledge and Understanding (LO 1,2,3); Cognitive/Intellectual Skills (LO 1,2,3); Key/Transferable Skills (LO 2,3); Practical Skills (LO 2) Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios (both spinal and peripheral conditions) the students will cover relevant:  Anatomy, physiology and pathology (e.g. the spine, inflammation)  Therapy skills (e.g. assessment, mobilisation, stretching)  Professional issues (e.g. multi-disciplinary and agency working, record keeping)  Psychosocial aspects (e.g. communication, attitudes and behaviours)  Research skills and evidence-based practice (e.g. guidelines, evidence for taping). Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 105
  • Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: (for FSHW only) Name of Site: All sites Module Leader: Alec Rickard Session* 09/SP/M Module Code: PHY107 Assessment Criteria: 1. Demonstrates knowledge and understanding of the anatomy and physiology related to the musculoskeletal system 2. Demonstrates basic examination, assessment, clinical reasoning and treatment/management skills applicable to musculoskeletal conditions 3. Ability to explain the rationale of various therapeutic approaches in the management of musculoskeletal problems. Assessment Mode: Summative assessment  Practical examination of physiotherapy skills and a viva to explore students‟ theoretical knowledge and clinical reasoning. Formative feedback  Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback during practical sessions within the module, and at a revision session prior to the practical examination. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the viva element Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small problem based learning groups, practical skills classes and large group fixed resource sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: An anatomy text: Drake, R., Vogl, W., and Mitchell, A. (2004) Gray‟s Anatomy for Students. Philadelphia: Churchill Livingstone or Palastanga, N., Field, D., and Soames, R. (2006) Anatomy and Human Movement. 5e. Edinburgh: Butterworth Heinemann. (NB 4e. (2002) available as an eBook). Robertson, V., Ward, A., Low, J., and Reed, A. (2006) Electrotherapy explained. 4e. Edinburgh: Butterworth Heinemann Petty, N.J. (2004) Principles of Neuromusculoskeletal Treatment and Management: A Guide for Therapists. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Petty, N.J. (2005) Neuromusculoskeletal Examination and Assessment: A Handbook for Therapists. 3e. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Students will also be directed to appropriate journals and web-based resources. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 106
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY109 Credits: 10 Level: 4 Module Title: Clinical Education Placement Level 1 Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor This is the first five week clinical education placement. The students will be in direct contact with patients under the supervision and guidance of a clinical educator. Elements of Assessment (P1) Practice 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable students to apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained during their university modules in the examination, assessment and treatment /management of patients/clients with a variety of problems. To enable students to relate and adapt to a variety of situations within the practice setting and to develop the necessary interpersonal skills with patients as well as other members of the therapeutic /multidisciplinary team. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Demonstrate basic communication skills with patients/clients/carers and members of the health and social care team 2 Observe and employ basic examination and assessment of patients/clients problems identifying and recognising their physical, psychological and cultural needs. 3 Collate information from the assessment data to identify problems in order to formulate with guidance a treatment /management programme taking into account appropriate contextual factors. 4. Use basic problem solving and clinical reasoning skills to plan, deliver and evaluate treatment /management programmes. This requires a patient centred approach which takes into account the needs of individuals or groups and an awareness of their role in the multi- professional team. (Knowledge and Understanding (LO 2,3,4); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4); Key/transferable skills (LO 1) ; Practical skills (LO 1,2,3,4) Indicative Syllabus Content: Five week clinical education placement. Integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes specific to the core areas of practice or other speciality areas of practice Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: (for FHSW only) Name of Site: Module Leader: Tina McGahey Session* 09/SU/M BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 107
  • Module Code: PHY109 Assessment Criteria:  Achieves safe clinical performance.  Demonstrates developing interpersonal skills, professionalism, clinical reasoning, patient treatment and management.  Practices physiotherapy safely within the professional rules of conduct. Assessment Mode: Achievement of competences in interpersonal skills and professional behaviour, organisation and management, patient examination and assessment, implementation of physiotherapy practice, learning behaviour. These competences are assessed by the clinical educator, taking into account the student‟s performance over the five week placement. Formative Assessment Students receive regular feedback on their performance from their clinical educator, with formal written feedback at the half way stage Schedule of Teaching and Learning: Experiential learning in clinical placement setting, facilitated by clinical educators. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (2005) Rules of Professional Conduct. London, Chartered Society of Physiotherapy Health Professions Council (2003) Standards of proficiency: Physiotherapists. London, Health Professions Council Anderson, B., Boud, D., and Sampson, J. (1996) Learning Contracts: A Practical Guide. London: Kogan Page Higgs, J., and Jones, M. (2000) Clinical reasoning in the health professions. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann Mattingly, C., and Hayes Fleming, M. (1994) Clinical reasoning - forms of enquiry in therapeutic practice. Philadelphia: F.A. Davies In addition the recommended texts from their first three university based physiotherapy specific modules will be utilised here. Students will be directed to appropriate journal articles and web based resources. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 108
  • Year 2 modules Module Module title Level Credits Code HEAA218 Inter-Professional Working 2 10 PHY208 Neurological Physiotherapy 2 2 20 PHY209 Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 2 2 20 PHY210 Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 2 2 20 PHY211 Physiotherapy for Health and Wellness through 2 10 the Lifespan PHY212 Clinical Education Placement Level 2 2 20 HEAA219 Project Studies 2 20 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 109
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 110
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: HEAA218 Credits: 10 Level: 5 Module Title: Interprofessional Working Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor: This module considers how individual management and leadership is essential within a multi- professional and inter-professional working environment Elements of Assessment: (C1) Coursework 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: PHC Shared Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: This module aims to develop personal professional management skills & inter-professional working within the context of a health care environment. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1) Discuss the impact of responsible self-management and inter-professional team working within a multi-professional environment 2) Demonstrate a knowledge of the principles of change implementation within an inter- professional environment 3) Apply knowledge and understanding through a process of analysis, reflection & evaluation Knowledge and Understanding LO2; Cognitive / Intellectual Skills LO3; Key/Transferable Skills LO1; - see SEEC level descriptors Indicative Syllabus Content: Inter-professional working; patient/client centred care; change, implementation & leadership theory; personal and joint decision making; negotiation & assertiveness skills; professional & organisational culture. Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 111
  • Faculty: Health School: Applied Psychosocial Sciences Nursing and Midwifery Health Professions Partner Institution: N/A Name of Site: Module Leader: Dee Llywelyn Session: 09/AY/AU/M Module Code: HEAA218 Assessment Criteria: Evidence of teamwork knowledge and understanding of teamwork and inter-professional working, with application to contemporary clinical practice Assessment Mode: Formative Assessment: Participation in an online interprofessional discussion, exploring the role of their own and at least one other profession in relation to one of the scenarios. A printout of the discussion, together with a short commentary, must be included as an appendix to the summative assignment. Summative Assessment: 100% Coursework An individual 1500 word written summative assignment, exploring the interprofessional issues presented by the chosen scenario. Schedule of Teaching and Learning: Group work, experiential learning approaches, lectures, facilitated inter-professional days, e- learning. Recommended Texts and Sources: Alexis O (2005) Managing Change: Cultural Diversity in the NHS Workforce Nursing Management 11, (10), 28-30 Cameron E & Green M (2004) Making Sense of Change Management: a Complete Guide to the Models, Tools & Techniques of Organisational Change. London Kogan Page Cottrell S (2005) Critical Thinking Skills: developing analysis & argument Basingstoke, Palgrave Study Guides Department of Health (2001) Working Together – Learning Together: A Framework for Health Professionals. London Department of Health Jones R & Jenkins F eds (2007) Key Topics in Healthcare Management: understanding the bigger picture Abingdon, Radcliffe Publishing NMAP (Nursing, midwifery & allied Health gateway of „Intute‟: Health & Life Sciences internet resources http://www.intute.ac.uk/healthand lifesciences/ NMC materials on clinical supervision, CPD etc http://www.nmc-uk.org/ Onyett S (2002) Team working in Mental Health Basingstoke Palgrave Expanding Nursing and Health Care Practice: Interprofessional Working by Day, J (2006) Nelson Thornes publishers BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 112
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY208 Credits: 20 Level: 5 Module Title: Neurological Physiotherapy 2 Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor: This module builds on the basics of neurological physiotherapy, and covers further areas of practice in neurological rehabilitation. Elements of Assessment: (C1) Coursework 50% (E2) Examination 50% The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40%. Module Aims: To enable the students to develop further knowledge and understanding of the nervous system and of pathological processes affecting the nervous system. To deepen their understanding of the effect of nervous system damage on the individual, relatives and carers and to develop further physiotherapy skills utilised in neuro-rehabilitation. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1 Discuss the relative merit of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of neurological problems 2 Analyse the contributions of the members of the multidisciplinary team within neuro-rehabilitation 3 Examine the effects of nervous system damage on an individual, their relatives and carers 4 Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with neurological problems 5 Formulate management plans for patients with neurological problems Knowledge and Understanding (LO 1,2,3,4,5); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4,5); Key/transferable skills (LO 2,3,4,5); Practical skills (LO 3) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 113
  • Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios (which will include a variety of neurological conditions across the age range) the students will cover relevant • Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropathology (e.g. motor control, balance, vision) • Physiotherapy skills utilised in neurorehabilitation (e.g. clinical reasoning, PNF, trophic stimulation, mobility, postural management) • Patient management by the multi disciplinary team • Professional issues: (e.g. complementary therapies, National guidelines) • Psychosocial aspects: (Occupation and education, family and social roles, sexuality) Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: N/A Name of Site: All Sites Module Leader: Hilary Gunn Session : 09/AU/M BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 114
  • Module Code: PHY208 Assessment Criteria: 1 Provides evidence of the effectiveness of physiotherapy in neurorehabilitation. 2 Able to identify and discuss the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team 3 Demonstrates ability to debate structure and function of the normal nervous system and an analysis of the effects of nervous system damage which includes the individual, relatives and carers and the wider society 4 Demonstrates safe, effective and appropriate practical physiotherapy skills based on current best evidence 5 Outlines appropriate, evidence based and clinically reasoned, patient management plans Assessment Mode: Summative Assessment The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed.  Coursework: submission of a reflective case study and management plan  A practical examination of physiotherapy skills and viva of theoretical knowledge and clinical reasoning. Formative assessment Coursework: Time will be allocated for group discussion of the coursework during lecture sessions in the module, and students are encouraged to make use of the discussion board within the electronic learning resource to discuss issues with input from the module team as necessary.  Practical examination: Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback during practical sessions within the module, and at a revision session prior to the practical examination. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the viva element Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small problem based learning groups, practical skills classes and large group sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Campbell, S.K., Vander Linden, D.L. and Palisano, R.J. (2006) Physical Therapy for Children 3e. Missouri: Saunders Carr, J. and Shepherd, R. (1998) Neurological Rehabilitation - Optimizing Motor Performance. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann: Edwards, S. (2002) Neurological Physiotherapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Guillain-Barre syndrome (Cochrane review). http://www.update- software.com/abstracts/ab001798.htm Hughes, R. A. C., Raphael, J. C., Swan, A. V. and van Doorn, P. A. (2002). Intravenuous immunoglobulin for Guillain-Barre syndrome (Cochrane review). http://www.update- software.com/abstracts/ab002063.htm. Larner, A. J. and Farmer, S. F. (1999) Recent advances: Neurology. British Medical Journal 319 (7206): 362-366 Pope, P. (2007). Severe and complex neurological disability. London: Butterworth Heinneman Stokes, M. (2004) Physical management in Neurological Rehabilitation. 2e London: Mosby. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 115
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 116
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY209 Credits: 20 Level: 5 Module Title: Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 2 Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor: This module builds on the basics of musculoskeletal physiotherapy and covers further areas of theory and practice in the aetiology, assessment and management of musculoskeletal disorders. Elements of Assessment: (C1) Coursework 50% (E2) Examination 50% The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40%. Module Aims: To enable the students to develop further knowledge, understanding and clinical skills in the assessment and management of musculoskeletal disorders. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Discuss the normal structure and function of the musculoskeletal system and the aetiology of various disorders affecting the system 2. Justify various physiotherapy approaches for these disorders 3. Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with musculoskeletal problems 4. Formulate assessment and management plans for patients with musculoskeletal disorders 5. Analyse the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team involved in the management of musculoskeletal problems Knowledge and Understanding (LO 1,2,3,4, 5); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4,5) ; Key/transferable skills (LO 2,3,4); Practical skills (LO 3) Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios the student will cover relevant:  Anatomy, physiology, pathology, and aetiology of musculoskeletal disorders  Physiotherapy assessment and management skills utilised in musculoskeletal conditions (e.g. clinical reasoning, exercise therapy, manual therapy, electrotherapy)  Patient management by the multidisciplinary team (e.g. GP, consultant, OT, podiatry etc.)  Professional issues (e.g. Clinical guidelines, medico legal, complimentary therapy)  Psychosocial aspects (Occupation, employment, social roles)  Research Skills and evidence based practice (Cochrane reviews, Quebec task force) Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: N/A Name of Site: All sites Module Leader: Alan Hough Session: 09/AU/M BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 117
  • Module Code: PHY209 Assessment Criteria: 1. Demonstrates ability to debate the normal structure and function of the musculoskeletal system and the aetiology of various disorders affecting the system 2. Provide rationale for various physiotherapy approaches for these disorders 3. Demonstrates safe, effective and appropriate practical physiotherapy skills based on current best evidence 4. Outlines appropriate, evidence based and clinically reasoned, patient assessment and management 5. Able to identify and discuss the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team Assessment Mode: Summative assessment The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed.  Coursework: production of a poster and a 500 word evidence based summary  Examination: A practical examination of physiotherapy skills and viva of theoretical knowledge and clinical reasoning. Formative Assessment  Coursework: Time will be allocated for group discussion of the coursework during lecture sessions in the module, and students are encouraged to make use of the discussion board within the electronic learning resource to discuss issues with input from the module team as necessary.  Practical examination: Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback during practical sessions within the module, and at a revision session prior to the practical examination. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the viva element Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small PBL groups, practical skills classes and large group sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Drake, R., Vogl, W., and Mitchell, A. (2004) Gray's Anatomy for Students. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. [or similar anatomy text] McRae, R. (2004) Clinical Orthopaedic Examination. 5e Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Petty, N. J. (2004) Principles of Neuromusculoskeletal Treatment and Management: A Guide for Therapists. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Petty, N. J. (2005) Neuromusculoskeletal Examination and Assessment: A Handbook for Therapists. 3e Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 118
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY210 Credits: 20 Level: 5 Module Title: Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 2 Pre-requisite (s): none Co-requisite (s): none Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor This module builds upon the basics of Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy practice and covers further areas of practice in cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular rehabilitation. Elements of Assessment: (C1) Coursework 50% (E2) Examination 50% The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable the students to develop further knowledge and understanding of the cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular system of the body and of pathological processes affecting these systems. To develop further understanding of the effect of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular pathology on the individual, relatives and carers and to develop physiotherapy skills utilised in this clinical area. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1 Discuss the relative merit of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of cardiorespiratory problems 2 Analyse the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team, who are involved in the care of patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems 3 Examine the effects of cardiorespiratory/cardiovascular dysfunction on an individual, their relatives and carers 4 Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems 5 Formulate management plans for patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems Knowledge and Understanding LO 1,2,3,4,5); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4,5) ; Key/transferable skills (LO 2,3,4,5); Practical skills (LO 3) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 119
  • Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios (which will include a range of cardiorespiratory / cardiovascular conditions including single impact and chronic disease) the students will cover relevant • Anatomy, physiology and pathology (e.g. surface anatomy, mucociliary escalator, genetics, diabetes) • Physiotherapy skills utilised in cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular physiotherapy (e.g. clinical reasoning, active cycle of breathing, autogenic drainage, contracture prevention, stump care) • Patient management by the multi disciplinary team • Professional issues: (e.g. working within the MDT, specialist clinics) • Psychosocial aspects: (Occupation, family and social roles, genetic counselling, body image) • Research skills and evidence based practice (e.g. Cochrane reviews, outcome measurements) Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: Name of Site: Marjon Module Leader: Heather Hunter Session* 09/ /AU/M - Autumn Module Module Code:PHY210 Assessment Criteria: 1 Provides evidence of the effectiveness of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular physiotherapy. 2 Able to identify and discuss the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team. 3 Demonstrates ability to debate structure and function of the cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular systems and an analysis of the effects of dysfunction in these systems on the individual, relatives and carers and the wider society 4 Demonstrates safe, effective and appropriate practical physiotherapy skills based on current best evidence 5 Outlines appropriate, evidence based and clinically reasoned, patient management plans Assessment Mode: The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed. Summative Assessment  Coursework: submission of a 1500 word essay  A practical examination of physiotherapy skills and viva of theoretical knowledge and clinical reasoning. Formative Assessment  Coursework: Time will be allocated for group discussion of the coursework during lecture sessions in the module, and students are encouraged to make use of the discussion board within the electronic learning resource to discuss issues with input from the module team as BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 120
  • necessary.  Practical examination: Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback during practical sessions within the module, and at a revision session prior to the practical examination. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the viva element Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small problem based learning groups, practical skills classes and large group sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Engstrom, B. and van den Ven, C. (eds) (1999) Therapy for amputees. 3e Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Hough, A. (2001) Physiotherapy in respiratory care – an evidence-based approach to respiratory and cardiac management. London: Nelson Thornes Kumar, P. and Clarke, M. (2005) Clinical medicine. 6e London: W.B. Saunders Pryor, J. and Prasad, S. (eds) (2008) Physiotherapy for Respiratory and Cardiac Problems. Adults and paediatrics. 4e Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 121
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 122
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY211 Credits: 10 Level: 5 Module Title: Physiotherapy for health and wellness in the lifespan Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor This module introduces the students to the role of the physiotherapist at key stages through the lifespan. Elements of Assessment (C1) Coursework 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable the students to develop knowledge and understanding of physiotherapy in some of the more specialist areas of practice which are linked to key life events. To develop their understanding of the effect of issues related to health and wellness at these times on the individual, relatives and carers and to develop appropriate physiotherapy skills to optimise patient management. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1 Examine the effects of dysfunction through the lifespan on an individual, their relatives and carers 2 Discuss the relative merit of various physiotherapy approaches in the management of patients within the specialist areas of practice, utilising clinical reasoning and evaluation of appropriate evidence based resources 3 Analyse the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team involved in the patient management 4 Demonstrate effective presentation skills (Knowledge and Understanding LO 1,2,3,4); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4) ; Key/transferable skills (LO 2,3,4); Practical skills LO 2) Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios from specialist practice areas through the lifespan such as women‟s health, paediatrics, mental health, learning difficulties, care for the older person, the students will cover relevant • Anatomy, physiology and pathology (e.g. changes related to the lifespan) • Physiotherapy skills (e.g. clinical reasoning, assessment and examination, exercise, falls prevention) • Patient management by the multi disciplinary team • Professional issues: (e.g. record keeping, settings and service delivery, National Service Frameworks)) • Psychosocial aspects: (Pain, self management, occupation, function/activity/participation, stigma, education) • Research skills and evidence based practice (e.g. Meta analysis, evidence-based practice, medication, research designs) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 123
  • Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: (for FHSW only) Name of Site: Marjon Module Leader: Tina McGahey Session 10/SP/M Module Code: PHY211 Assessment Criteria: 1 Able to identify and discuss the contributions of the members of the multi-disciplinary team 2 Demonstrates ability to debate structure and function of the various systems and an analysis of the effects of dysfunction on the individual, relatives and carers and the wider society 3 Able to propose safe, effective and appropriate physiotherapy interventions based on current best evidence 4 Outlines appropriate, evidence based and clinically reasoned, patient management plans Assessment Mode: Coursework: Verbal Presentation Summative Assessment  A verbal presentation Formative feedback  Presentation: Time will be allocated for group discussion of the presentation during lecture sessions in the module, and students are encouraged to make use of the discussion board within the electronic learning resource to discuss issues with input from the module team as necessary. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the verbal presentation. Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small problem based learning groups, practical skills classes and large group sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Burns, Y.R. and MacDonald, J. (1996) Physiotherapy and the Growing Child. London: W.B. Saunders. Campbell, S.K., Vander Linden, D.L. and Palisano, R.J. (2000) Physical Therapy for Children. London: W.B. Saunders. Everett, T., Donaghy, M. and Feaver, S. (2003) Interventions for Mental Health. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann French, S. (1997) Physiotherapy a Psychosocial Approach. 2e Oxford: Butterworth Heinmann. Mantle, J., Haslam, J. and Barton, S. (2004) Physiotherapy in Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2e. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann Porter, S. B. (2003) Tidy's physiotherapy. Edinburgh: Butterworth-Heinemann Squires, A. and Hastings, M. (2002) Rehabilitation of the older person. Cheltenham: Nelson Thornes Students will be directed to appropriate journal articles and web based materials BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 124
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY212 Credits: 20 Level: 5 Module Title: Clinical Education Placements Level 2 Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): none Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor This module consists of two elements which are the students‟ second and third five week clinical education placements. The students will be in direct contact with patients under the supervision and guidance of a clinical educator. Elements of Assessment (P1) Practice 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40%. Module Aims: To enable students to apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained during their university modules in the examination, assessment and treatment /management of patients/clients with a variety of problems. To enable students to relate and adapt to a variety of situations within the practice setting and to develop the necessary interpersonal skills with patients as well as other members of the therapeutic /multidisciplinary team. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Communicate professionally and effectively with patients/clients/carers and members of the health and social care team 2. Begin to demonstrate independent personal workload management, taking into account appropriate contextual factors. 3. Complete, with guidance, effective examinations and assessments of patients‟ problems, identifying and recognising their physical, psychological and cultural needs. 4. Demonstrate problem solving and clinical reasoning skills to plan, deliver and evaluate treatment /management programmes adopting a patient centred approach which takes into account the needs of individuals or groups. 5. Provide evidence of engagement in self appraisal and reflective practice to direct personal and professional development Knowledge and Understanding (LO 2,3,4, 5); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4,5); Key/transferable skills (LO 1,2) ; Practical skills (LO 1,2,3,4,5) Indicative Syllabus Content: Two clinical education placements of five weeks duration each. Integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes specific to the core areas of practice or other speciality areas of practice Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 125
  • Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: Name of Site: Marjon Module Leader: Claire Hornsby Session* 10/SP/M Module Code: PHY212 Assessment Criteria:  Achieves a safe clinical performance with developing effectiveness.  Demonstrates appropriate interpersonal skills, professionalism, clinical reasoning, patient treatment and management.  Practices physiotherapy safely within the professional rules of conduct. Assessment Mode: Achievement of competences in interpersonal skills and professional behaviour, organisation and management, patient examination and assessment, implementation of physiotherapy practice, learning behaviour. These competences are assessed by the clinical educator, taking into account the student‟s performance over the five week placement. Formative Assessment Students receive regular feedback on their performance from their clinical educator, with formal written feedback at the half way stage Each placement will be assessed as an individual element within the module. Both assessed elements must be passed Schedule of Teaching and Learning: Experiential learning in clinical placement setting, facilitated by clinical educators. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (2005) Rules of Professional Conduct. London: Chartered Society of Physiotherapists Health Professions Council (2003) Standards of proficiency: Physiotherapists. London: Health Professions Council Anderson, B., Boud, D. and Sampson, J. (1996) Learning Contracts: A Practical Guide. London: Kogan Page Bury, T. and Mead, J. (1998) Evidence-based healthcare. Edinburgh: Butterworth-Heinemann Higgs, J. and Jones, M. (2000) Clinical reasoning in the health professions. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann Mattingly, C. and Hayes Fleming, M. (1994) Clinical reasoning - forms of enquiry in therapeutic practice. Philadelphia: F.A. Davies In addition the recommended texts from the university based modules, which they have completed to date will be utilised here. Clinical educators may also direct the students to specific resources. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 126
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: HEAA219 Credits: 20 Level: 5 Module Title: Project Studies Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor: This module develops knowledge and skills related to evidence-based practice and lifelong learning. The content is designed to enable the students to understand different research designs, to evaluate the research literature and to prepare them to undertake research at undergraduate level. Elements of Assessment: (C1) Coursework 50% (E1) Examination 50% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Podiatry Minimum pass mark: 40% No compensation on each element. Both elements must be passed Module Aims: To enable the students to develop a sound understanding of research terminology, methods, and principles. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1 Demonstrate a clear understanding of key research concepts. 2 Undertake a critical review of the literature, using a systematic approach on a selected topic and present it succinctly. 3 Formulate a research question 4 Select a research design that is appropriate to the research question. 5 Prepare an outline proposal and protocol for a research project, taking into account ethical issues, using a prescribed format and guidelines (and where appropriate to ethics committee submission) (Knowledge and Understanding LO 1,2,3,4,5); Analytical skills (LO 1,2,3,4,5) Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4,5) ; Key/transferable skills (LO 2,3,4,5); Practical skills (LO 3) Indicative Syllabus Content: Using appropriate resources for a literature search; undertaking a literature review, selecting appropriate methodology, formulating a research question, ethical issues, project management, quantitative and qualitative data analysis and hypothesis testing. Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: Name of Site: Module Leader: Joanne Paton Session: 10/SM/M BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 127
  • Module Code: HEAA219 Assessment Criteria: 1. Demonstrates a sound knowledge of a range of research concepts and methodologies 2. Demonstrates critical appraisal of the literature of the selected topic 3. Produces a well defined and relevant research question, which is feasible for implementation as a small scale research study 4. Demonstrates critical appraisal in the selection and description of an appropriate methodology best suited to the research question. 5. Produces a clear, succinct and scientifically robust research proposal. Assessment Mode: Formative: Small group discussion of research papers Group tutorials based on developing research protocol Feedback from school ethics committee regarding research protocol Mock self-assessed online test Summative: 1500 word research protocol End of module written examination in the form of multiple choice and short answer questions Both elements must be passed. Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through key note lectures and small group tutorials, supported by individual tutorials with potential research supervisors. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Bury, T. and J. Mead. (1998) Evidence-based healthcare. Edinburgh: Butterworth-Heinemann Descombe, M. (2003) The Good Research Guide: for Small-scale Social Research Projects. Buckingham: OU Press. Field, A. (2000) Discovering statistics using SPSS for windows. London: Sage Hammell, K. W., Carpenter, C. and Dyck, I. (2000) Using qualitative research - a practical introduction for occupational and physical therapists. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Hicks, C. (2004) Research methods for clinical therapists. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Polgar, S. and Thomas, S.A. (1995) Introduction to Research in the health Sciences. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Students will be directed to appropriate journal articles and web based materials BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 128
  • Year 3 modules Module Module title Level Credits Code PHY309 Advanced Project Studies 3 20 PHY310 Clinical Education Placement Level 3 3 20 HEAA312 Management and Leadership for Collaborative 3 10 Practice PHY311 Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 3 3 20 PHY312 Neurological Physiotherapy 3 3 20 PHY313 Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 3 3 20 PHY314 Clinical Education Placement: consolidation of 3 10 Professional Practice BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 129
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 130
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY309 Credits: 20 Level: 6 Module Title: Advanced Project Studies Pre-requisite (s): Development of a protocol suitable for undertaking a small scale research study (for example that undertaken for Project Studies 1). Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor (For module catalogue. Maximum four lines 12pt print): This module develops learning related to evidence based practice and research methodology skills. Students will investigate systematically and in-depth an area of particular interest and direct relevance to the field of study and will carry out a small-scale research project. Elements of Assessment: (C1) Coursework 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable the students to engage in self directed and group study. To plan, undertake and evaluate a research project and to write up this project suitable for publication. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1 Contribute to the development and dissemination of evidence-based practice. 2 Undertake a critical review of the literature on a selected topic using a systematic approach, and present it succinctly. 3 Develop, undertake, critically evaluate and defend a small research project which includes data collection 4 Produce a research report suitable for publication in a peer reviewed scientific journal 5. Undertake a verbal presentation summarising both the research process and outcome in relation to their specific study; providing a defence of this approach (Knowledge and Understanding LO 1,2,3,4,); Analytical skills (LO 1,2,3,4,) Ethics (LO 3), Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4,) ; Key/transferable skills (LO 1,2,3,4); Practical skills (LO 2,3) Indicative Syllabus Content: Students will work under the supervision of a member of staff to select, pilot and undertake a small research project using a methodology that is appropriate to the research question. Normally this work will be undertaken as part of a group project. Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 131
  • Faculty: Health School: School of Health Professions Name of Site: Marjons Module Leader: Dr Gary Shum Session : 10 /AU/M Module Code: PHY309 Assessment Criteria: 1. Able to clearly place their study within a health and social context, and provide a rationale for the choice of research study, 2. Able to produce a comprehensive and critical review of the literature pertinent to the research study undertaken. 3. Demonstrates the ability to undertake data collection in a reliable and valid manner. 4. Produces a sound, critical and evaluative paper, which would be suitable for publication in a peer reviewed scientific journal. 5. Able to verbally present a summary of the research process and findings; and provide a robust defence of this. Assessment Mode: Summative assessment Submission of a 4500 word journal article (normally group submission - 50%), plus individual viva (50%); both elements (written submission as well as viva) must be passed. Formative feedback Coursework: The project supervisor will read and comment on one written draft of the journal article and students are encouraged to make use of the discussion board within the electronic learning resource to discuss issues with input from the module team as necessary. Individual viva: A lecture will be given so that students will be familiar with the format of the examination. Students will have also opportunities to clarify any problems during the project tutorial with their supervisors. Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through project tutorials and directed study. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Bury, T. and Mead, J. (1998) Evidence-based healthcare. Edinburgh: Butterworth-Heinemann Day, R.A. (1998) How to write and publish a scientific paper. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Hammell, K. W., Carpenter, C. and Dyck, I. (2000) Using qualitative research - a practical introduction for occupational and physical therapists. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Hicks, C. (2004) Research methods for clinical therapists. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Pallant, J. (2003) SPSS Survival Manual. Polgar, S. and Thomas, S.A. (1995) Introduction to Research in the Health Sciences. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Sarantacos, S. (1998) Social Research. Hampshire: Macmillan Press BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 132
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code:PHY310 Credits: 20 Level: 6 Module Title: Clinical Education Placement Level 3 Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): none Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor This module consists of two elements which are the students‟ fourth and fifth five week clinical education placements. The students will be in direct contact with patients under the supervision and guidance of a clinical educator. Elements of Assessment (P1) Practice 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable students to apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained during their university modules in the examination, assessment and treatment /management of patients/clients with a variety of problems. To enable students to relate and adapt to a variety of situations within the practice setting and to develop the necessary interpersonal skills with patients as well as other members of the therapeutic /multidisciplinary team. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. As an integral member of the multi-professional team, communicate effectively and sensitively with colleagues, patients/clients and carers 2. Manage the varying demands of clinical practice, responding appropriately to the needs of patients, colleagues and the department. 3. Synthesise relevant information gathered from a holistic assessment to prioritise problems and formulate an effective treatment /management programme, considering appropriate contextual factors. 4. Consistently apply problem solving and clinical reasoning skills to plan, deliver and evaluate treatment /management programmes adopting a patient centred approach which considers the needs of individuals or groups. 5. Demonstrate development of practice following critical evaluation and reflection on their patient management skills (Knowledge and Understanding (LO 2,3,4,5); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4); Key/transferable skills (LO 1,5) ; Practical skills (LO 1,2,3,4) Indicative Syllabus Content: Two clinical education placements of five weeks duration each. . Integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes specific to the core areas of practice or other speciality areas of practice Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 133
  • Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: Name of Site: Marjon Module Leader: Claire Hornsby Session* 010/AU/M Module Code: PHY310 Assessment Criteria:  Achieves consistently a competent and safe clinical performance.  Demonstrates appropriate and effective interpersonal skills, professionalism, clinical reasoning, patient treatment and management.  Practices physiotherapy safely within the professional rules of conduct. Assessment Mode: Achievement of competences in interpersonal skills and professional behaviour, organisation and management, patient examination and assessment, implementation of physiotherapy practice, learning behaviour. These competences are assessed by the clinical educator, taking into account the student‟s performance over the five week placement. Formative Assessment Students receive regular feedback on their performance from their clinical educator, with formal written feedback at the half way stage Each placement will be assessed as an individual element within the module. Both assessed elements must be passed Schedule of Teaching and Learning: Experiential learning in clinical placement setting, facilitated by clinical educators. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (2005) Rules of Professional Conduct. London: Chartered Society of Physiotherapists Health Professions Council (2003) Standards of proficiency: Physiotherapists. London: Health Professions Council Anderson, B., Boud, D. and Sampson, J. (1996) Learning Contracts: A Practical Guide. London: Kogan Page Bury, T. and Mead, J. (1998) Evidence-based healthcare. Edinburgh: Butterworth-Heinemann Higgs, J. and Jones, M. (2000) Clinical reasoning in the health professions. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann Mattingly, C. and Hayes Fleming, M. (1994) Clinical reasoning - forms of enquiry in therapeutic practice. Philadelphia: F.A. Davies In addition the recommended texts from the university based modules, which they have completed to date will be utilised here. Clinical educators may also direct the students to specific resources. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 134
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY311 Credits: 20 Level: 6 Module Title: Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 3 Pre-requisite (s): none Co-requisite (s): none Compensatable within this Programme: /No Short Module Descriptor This module builds upon „Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy 1and 2‟ and completes physiotherapy practice in this area Elements of Assessment: (E1) Examination 50% (E2) Examination 50% The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable the students to develop a sound understanding of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular physiotherapy Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1 Critically evaluate cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular physiotherapy 2 Relate the effects of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular dysfunction to the function, activities and participation on an individual, their relatives and carers 3 Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems 4 Evaluate relevant national and international guidelines and management frameworks 5 Identify the physical, psychological and cultural needs of individuals and communities (Knowledge and Understanding LO 1,2,3,4,5); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4,5) ; Key/transferable skills (LO 2,3,5); Practical skills (LO 3) Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios (which will include a range of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular conditions including single impact and chronic disease) the students will cover relevant • Anatomy, physiology and pathology (e.g. Normal blood gases, bronchospasm, asthma) • Physiotherapy skills utilised in cardiorespiratory problems(e.g. clinical reasoning, interpretation of chest x-rays, pharmacology, breathing techniques) • Patient management by the multi disciplinary team • Professional issues: (e.g. BTS guidelines, extended scope practice, seven day working) • Psychosocial aspects: (occupation, education, family, dependency, preservation of life, ethics) • Research skills and evidence based practice (e.g. Cochrane reviews, outcome measurements) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 135
  • Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: Name of Site: Marjon Module Leader: Heather Hunter Session* 11/SP/M – Spring Module Module Code: PHY311 Assessment Criteria: Provides evidence of critical evaluation skills of the effectiveness of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular physiotherapy. 2 Provides distinctions of the effects of cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular system damage on function, activity limitations and participation restrictions of the individual, relatives and carers and the wider society 3 Demonstrates safe, effective and appropriate practical physiotherapy skills based on current best evidence 4 Provides evaluation of relevant guidelines and frameworks 5 Identifies the physical, psychological and cultural needs of individuals and groups of patients with cardiorespiratory and cardiovascular problems Assessment Mode: The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed. Summative Assessment  Examination: Multiple choice questions and short answer questions to explore students‟ theoretical knowledge  Viva to explore students‟ understanding of theoretical knowledge and the application of clinical reasoning Formative Assessment  Examination: Time will be allocated for group discussion of relevant physiology and anatomy during lecture and practical sessions in the module. Students are encouraged to make use of the discussion board within the electronic learning resource to discuss issues with input from the module team as necessary.  Viva: Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback during practical sessions within the module. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the viva element Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small problem based learning groups, practical skills classes and large group sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Harden, B. (2004) Emergency Physiotherapy: On Call Survival Guide. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Hough, A. (2001) Physiotherapy in respiratory care – an evidence-based approach to respiratory and cardiac management. London: Nelson Thornes Kumar, P. and Clarke, M. (2005) Clinical medicine. 6e London: W.B. Saunders Pryor, J., and Prasad S.A. (eds) (2008) Physiotherapy for Respiratory and Cardiac Problems. Adults and paediatrics. 4e Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 136
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY312 Credits: 20 Level: 6 Module Title: Neurological Physiotherapy 3 Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor: This module builds on neurological physiotherapy 1 and 2, and is designed to progress the breadth and depth of students‟ clinical skills, knowledge and understanding in neurological rehabilitation. Elements of Assessment: (C1) Coursework 50% (E2) Examination 50% The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable the students to develop clinical reasoning skills and deepen their understanding of physiotherapy in the area of neurological rehabilitation. To further develop their understanding of the effect of nervous system damage on the individual, relatives and carers and to begin to critically appraise physiotherapy skills utilised in neuro-rehabilitation. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1 Critically evaluate physiotherapy in the management of neurological problems 2 Relate the effects of nervous system damage to the function, activities and participation on an individual, their relatives and carers 3 Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with neurological problems 4 Evaluate relevant national and international guidelines and management frameworks 5 Identify the physical, psychological and cultural needs of individuals and communities (Knowledge and Understanding LO 1,2,3,4,5); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4,5) ; Key/transferable skills (LO 2,3,5); Practical skills LO 3) Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios (which will include a range of neurological conditions including single impact and chronic disease) the students will cover relevant • Neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and neuropathology (e.g. neuroplasticity, speech swallowing, behaviour) • Physiotherapy skills utilised in neuro-rehabilitation (e.g. clinical reasoning, treadmill training FES, postural management • Patient management by the multi disciplinary team • Professional issues: (e.g. ethical issues, National guidelines) • Psychosocial aspects: (Counselling leisure, carer strain) • Research skills and evidence based practice (e.g. Cochrane reviews, evidence for specialist units, novel approaches) BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 137
  • Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: N/A Name of Site: All Sites Module Leader: Amanda Austin Session : 11/SP/M Module Code: PHY312 Assessment Criteria: 1 Provides evidence of critical evaluation skills of the effectiveness of physiotherapy in neuro- rehabilitation. 2 Provides distinctions of the effects of nervous system damage on function, activity limitations and participation restrictions of the individual, relatives and carers and the wider society 3 Demonstrates safe, effective and appropriate practical physiotherapy skills based on current best evidence 4 Provides evaluation of relevant guidelines and frameworks 5 Identifies the physical, psychological and cultural needs of individuals and groups of patients with neurological problems Assessment Mode: Summative Assessment The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed. • Coursework: Information leaflet and 1000 word evidence based summary • A practical examination of physiotherapy skills and a viva to explore students‟ theoretical knowledge and clinical reasoning. Formative feedback  Coursework: Time will be allocated for group discussion of the coursework during lecture sessions in the module, and students are encouraged to make use of the discussion board within the electronic learning resource to discuss issues with input from the module team as necessary.  Practical examination: Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback during practical sessions within the module, and at a revision session prior to the practical examination. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the viva element Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small problem based learning groups, practical skills classes and large group sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: Basso, D. M. (2000) Neuroanatomical substrates of functional recovery after experimental spinal cord injury: Implications of basic science research for human spinal cord injury. Physical Therapy 80 (8): 808-817 Bromley, I. (2006) Tetraplegia and Paraplegia. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Carr, J. and Shepherd, R. (1998) Neurological Rehabilitation - Optimizing Motor Performance. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann Edwards, S. (2002) Neurological Physiotherapy. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone Lindsay, K.W., Bone, I. and Callander, R. (2004) Neurology and neurosurgery illustrated. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Pope, P. (2007) Severe and complex neurological disability. London: Butterworth Heinneman Stokes, M. (2004) Physical management in Neurological Rehabilitation 2e London: Mosby. Trew, M. and Everett, T. (2005). Human Movement – An Introductory text. London: Churchill Livingstone. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 138
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY313 Credits: 20 Level: 6 Module Title: Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy 3 Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor This module covers aspects of musculoskeletal physiotherapy with an emphasis on critical evaluation and clinical reasoning skills and builds on musculoskeletal physiotherapy 1 and 2. Elements of Assessment: C1 coursework 50% E1 Practical Examination 50% Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable the students to develop a sound understanding of musculoskeletal physiotherapy. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Critically evaluate musculoskeletal physiotherapy 2. Relate the impact of musculoskeletal dysfunction on the function, activities and participation of an individual, their relatives and carers 3. Demonstrate appropriate physiotherapy skills, utilising clinical reasoning, used in the management of patients with musculoskeletal problems 4. Evaluate relevant national and international guidelines and management frameworks 5. Identify the physical, psychological and cultural needs of individuals and communities Knowledge and Understanding (LO 1,2,3,4,5); Cognitive/Intellectual Skills; (LO 1,2,3,4,5) Key/Transferable Skills; (LO2,3,5) Practical Skills (LO 3) Indicative Syllabus Content: Through simulated case scenarios (which will include a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions including single impact and chronic disease) the students will cover relevant - Anatomy, physiology and pathology (e.g. the hand, hip, trauma, carpal tunnel) - Physiotherapy skills utilised in musculoskeletal problems (e.g. clinical reasoning, graded exercises, hydrotherapy, mobilisations) - Patient management by the multidisciplinary team - Professional issues (e.g. standards, confidentiality) - Psychosocial aspects (occupation, body image, chronic pain) - Research skills and evidence based practice (e.g. Cochrane reviews) Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: Name of Site: Marjon Module Leader: Claire Hornsby Session 11/SP/M BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 139
  • Module Code: PHY313 Assessment Criteria: 1. Provides evidence of critical evaluation skills of the effectiveness of musculoskeletal physiotherapy 2. Provides distinctions of the effects of musculoskeletal damage on the function, activity limitations and participation restrictions of the individual, relatives and carers and the wider society 3. Demonstrates safe, effective and appropriate practical physiotherapy skills based on current best evidence 4. Provides evaluation of relevant guidelines and frameworks 5. Identifies the physical, psychological and cultural needs of individuals and groups of patients with musculoskeletal problems Assessment Mode: Summative assessment The assessment consists of two elements, both contributing 50% to the overall module mark. Both elements must be passed. - Coursework: 1500 word essay - A practical examination of physiotherapy skills and viva of theoretical knowledge and clinical reasoning. Formative feedback  Coursework: Time will be allocated for group discussion of the coursework during lecture sessions in the module, and students are encouraged to make use of the discussion board within the electronic learning resource to discuss issues with input from the module team as necessary.  Practical examination: Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback during practical sessions within the module, and at a revision session prior to the practical examination. Peer and tutor led discussion during problem based learning sessions will enable students to explore their understanding and clinical reasoning in preparation for the viva element Schedule of Teaching and Learning: The module is delivered through simulated case scenarios involving small problem based learning groups, practical skills classes and large group sessions. Recommended Texts and Sources: Atkinson, K., Coutts, F. and Hassenkampf, A. (2005) Physiotherapy in Orthopaedics: a problem solving approach. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone McRae, R. and Esser, M. (2002) Practical Fracture Treatment. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone, Palastanga, N.P., Field, D.G. and Soames, R. (2002) Anatomy and Human Movement: Structure and Function. 4e. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann. Petty, N.J. (2004) Principles of Neuromusculoskeletal Treatment and Management: A Guide for Therapists. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Petty, N.J. (2005) Neuromusculoskeletal Examination and Assessment: A Handbook for Therapists. 3e. Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. Students will be directed to relevant journal articles and web based resources BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 140
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: PHY314 Credits: 10 Level: 6 Module Title: Clinical Education Placement: Consolidation of Professional Practice Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): none Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor This module is the final five week clinical placement, and will focus on the students‟ ability to work as a safe and effective practitioner in preparation for qualification. The students will be in direct contact with patients under the supervision and guidance of a clinical educator. Elements of Assessment (P1) Practice 100% (C2) Portfolio Pass/Fail Subject Assessment Panel Group: Physiotherapy Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To enable students to apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes gained during their university modules in the examination, assessment and treatment /management of patients/clients with a variety of problems. To enable students to relate and adapt to a variety of situations within the practice setting and to develop the necessary interpersonal skills with patients as well as other members of the therapeutic /multidisciplinary team. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1. Act as an integral team member, demonstrating the ability to work safely and effectively within their scope of practice, including clinical workload management 2. Complete appropriate and effective examinations and assessments of patients‟ problems, sensitively addressing their physical, psychological and cultural needs. 3. Consistently apply problem solving and clinical reasoning skills to plan, deliver and evaluate treatment /management programmes, adopting a patient centred approach which takes into account the needs of individuals or groups. 4. Demonstrate development of practice following critical evaluation and reflection on their patient management skills (Knowledge and Understanding (LO 2,3,4,5); Cognitive/intellectual skills (LO 1,2,3,4); Key/transferable skills (LO 1,5) ; Practical skills (LO 1,2,3,4) Indicative Syllabus Content: One clinical education placement of five weeks duration. Integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes specific to the core areas of practice or other speciality areas of practice Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 141
  • Faculty: Health School: Health Professions Partner Institution: Name of Site: Marjon Module Leader: Susan May Session* 11/SU/M Module Code: PHY314 Assessment Criteria:  Consistently achieves a competent and safe clinical performance.  Demonstrates appropriate and effective interpersonal skills, professionalism, clinical reasoning, patient treatment and management.  Practices physiotherapy safely within the professional rules of conduct. Assessment Mode: The module has 2 assessed elements. Both elements must be passed  Achievement of competences in interpersonal skills and professional behaviour, organisation and management, patient examination and assessment, implementation of physiotherapy practice, learning behaviour. These competences are assessed by the clinical educator, taking into account the student‟s performance over the five week placement.  Portfolio Pass/ Fail Formative Assessment Students receive regular feedback on their performance from their clinical educator, with formal written feedback at the half way stage. Students will be able to discuss and receive feedback on their portfolio from either their clinical educator and or their personal tutor Schedule of Teaching and Learning: Experiential learning in clinical placement setting, facilitated by clinical educators. Recommended Texts and Sources: The recommended texts for the course are: Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (2005) Rules of Professional Conduct. London, Chartered Society of Physiotherapists Health Professions Council (2003) Standards of proficiency: Physiotherapists. London, Health Professions Council Anderson, B. Boud, D. and Sampson, J. (1996) Learning Contracts: A Practical Guide. London: Kogan Page Bury, T. and J., M. (1998) Evidence-based healthcare. Edinburgh: Butterworth-Heinemann Higgs, J. and Jones, M. (2000) Clinical reasoning in the health professions. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann Mattingly, C. and Hayes Fleming, M. (1994) Clinical reasoning - forms of enquiry in therapeutic practice. Philadelphia: F.A. Davies In addition the recommended texts from the university based modules, which they have completed to date will be utilised here. Clinical educators may also direct the students to specific resources. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 142
  • University of Plymouth Module Record Module Code: HEAA312 Credits: 10 Level: 6 Module Title: Management & Leadership for Inter-professional Practice Pre-requisite (s): None Co-requisite (s): None Compensatable within this Programme: No Short Module Descriptor This module builds on level 2 work to enable students to apply and evaluate models of management & inter-professional working within healthcare. Elements of Assessment: (C1) Coursework 100% Subject Assessment Panel Group: PHC Shared Minimum pass mark: 40% Module Aims: To develop the application of management, leadership & inter-professional working within the context of a wider health care environment. Assessed Learning Outcomes: At the end of the module the learner will be expected to be able to: 1) Evaluate the relationship between organisational culture & effective inter-professional working. 2) Apply knowledge & understanding of management, leadership and quality theory through a process of analysis, problem solving & evaluation 3) Work in collaboration with other potential agencies and the public Knowledge and Understanding LO2; Cognitive/ Intellectual skills LO2; Key/Transferable skills LO1; Practical Skills LO3 Indicative Syllabus Content: Political, social and organisation culture; supervision, appraisal and mentorship; quality, clinical governance & risk management; inter-professional & stake-holder links Approval: Date of Approval: 10/04/08 Date of Implementation: 09/08 Date(s) of Approved Change: XX/XX/XX Faculty: Health School: Applied Psychosocial Sciences Nursing and Midwifery Health Professions Partner Institution: N/A Name of Site: Plymouth Module Leader: Dee Llywelyn Session: 10/AY/AU/M BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 143
  • Module Code: HEAA312 Assessment Criteria: To be able to evaluate & critically apply the knowledge of management, leadership and quality theory in the context of a changing inter-professional health care environment. Assessment Mode: The formative component will be directed study looking at inter-professional working The summative assignment will be a 1500 word essay involving the critical appraisal of an aspect of inter-professional working taken from practice Schedule of Teaching and Learning: Group work, experiential learning approaches, lectures, facilitated inter-professional days, e- learning Recommended Texts and Sources: Bryans W (2004) Managing in Health & Social Care: essential checklists for frontline staff Radcliffe Publishing, Abingdon Chambers R, Mohanna K, Spurgeon P & Wall D (2007) How to Succeed as a Leader Radcliffe Publishing, Abingdon Clegg SR, Hardy C & Nord W (2006) The Sage Handbook of Organisational Studies London, Sage Davies C, Finlay L & Bullman eds (2000) Changing Practice in Health & Social Care London, OU in association with Sage (Reader for OU Course K302) Gorman P (1998) Managing Multi-disciplinary Teams in the NHS Kogan Page Mallik, Hall C & Howard D (2004) Nursing Knowledge & Practice: Foundations for Decision Making 2e London, Balliere Tindall Marquis BL & Huston CJ (2006) Leadership Roles & Management Functions in Nursing: theory & application 5th e Philadelphia, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins Sale D (2005) Understanding Clinical Governance & Quality Assurance : Making it Happen Hampshire, Palgrave Macmillan Spouse J& Redfern L eds (2000) Successful Supervision in Health Care Practice: Promoting Professional Development Oxford, Blackwell Science BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 144
  • Appendix Two – Occupational Health Information What is occupational health? Occupational health is concerned with the effect of Health on Work, and the effect of Work on Health. There are various pieces of legislation that affect health and safety at work. These include:  Health and Safety at Work Act 1974, which protects employees by requiring the employer to “safeguard as far as is reasonably practicable, their health, safety and welfare”.  Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992, amended 2002, require employers to avoid or reduce the risk involved in manual handling operations. Thus students should not lift patients or heavy loads until suitable training has been given.  Management of Health and Safety at Work 1999  Control of Substances Hazardous to Health 2002 (COSHH) which requires workplace assessments with subsequent prevention or control. Under this piece of legislation YOU need to know about the nature of substances you work with and the risks created by those substances. The Faculty of Health contracts with Exeter Occupational Health Service (EXOHS) for the provision of occupational health services for all healthcare students. EXOHS role is to provide professional, impartial and confidential advice to both the Faculty and the students, as required, on fitness to practice. Key functions include:  pre-employment screening  screening/immunisations  referral for work-related issues, advice may include suggesting adjustments that might need to be considered to accommodate any identified health problems  advice following an inoculation injury The service is based at the Royal Devon and Exeter Foundation NHS Trust (Heavitree) in Exeter, but the OH team provides the opportunity to be seen at Plymouth, Taunton and Truro. You are reminded of the importance of keeping EXOHS informed of any change of circumstances, eg change of name or address. If an Occupational Health appointment is made whilst you are on placement allocation, priority must be given to attending the Occupational Health appointment. In most cases the time spent out of the placement area will be a maximum of 4 hours, and in these instances you will not be required to make up this time. Travel to EXOHS can be claimed in accordance with the standard student travel policy. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 145
  • Staffing: Reception 01392 405062 Miss Jenny Braysher 01392 405079 (administrative officer) Dr. A Rossiter Consultant Occupational Physician The following services are provided: An Immunisation Service: As a healthcare student, you are expected to comply with Department of Health guidelines with regard to the immunisations required to protect you, and your patients, during the course of your work. In order to go on placement you will need to have a complete immunisation record. Students should therefore be aware that it is a compulsory requirement for healthcare students to have complied with this policy. Screening/immunisation against Hepatitis B, Mumps, Measles, Rubella and Tuberculosis is required, and your immunity status to Varicella Zoster, (Chicken Pox) will also be established by a blood test. Students undertaking exposure prone procedures, ie midwives, paramedics and theatre practitioners, will require a blood test to confirm their Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV status. These particular students will need to provide photographic ID. This process will normally begin during the induction week when the EXOHS nurses are on site. The nurses regularly visit the various sites, and it is very important to keep appointments. REMEMBER, that you will be charged £30.00 for non- attendance. If you are unable to attend, please give 48 hours notice by ringing 01392 405062/405079. Please note: practice placements will be affected if students fail to receive Occupational Health Screening/immunisations (see attached schedule). Provide a Referral Service/Appointments There may be occasions when the Faculty of Health wishes to seek the advice of EXOHS with regard to a medical condition and the impact it may have on your ability to complete your programme or to practice thereafter. A referral may also arise from a period or periods of sickness absence. You will be advised of the need for this health assessment by your Student Co- ordinator or Pathway Leader and will normally be seen on the EXOHS Exeter premises. You will be informed of the date and time of your appointment by letter. It is very important that these appointments are attended. If you are unable to attend, you should cancel at least 48 hours prior to your appointment by contacting the department on: Exeter (01392) 405079. If you fail to keep an appointment without previously notifying the Exeter Occupational Health Service, the Faculty of Health will be informed and your placement experience will be compromised. You will also be charged the appropriate non attendance fee which will affect your course progression if not paid. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 146
  • Vaccinations ........................................... £30.00 Consultant Physician .............................. £100.00 OH Nurse ............................................... £55.00 If you are generally unwell please seek advice from your General Practitioner or the Emergency Department in an emergency. Students may not self refer but should seek advice from their tutor if they have any health concerns which may have an impact on their ability to work. Fitness for work As well as complying with the statutory guidance and local policies, you should be aware that it is YOUR responsibility to care for yourself. You will have completed a health questionnaire prior to commencing the programme. If you develop any significant health problems during your programme, which may have an impact on your ability to work in clinical areas, you should, in the first instance, seek advice from your personal tutor. The conditions that may affect your ability to provide care include:  Resolving or recurrent back pain  Other musculo-skeletal problems which may interfere with your ability to lift and handle clients  Skin problems, especially if affecting hands or forearms, eg eczema or psoriasis. It is therefore imperative that you protect and care for your skin. Nails should be kept short, clean, and not bitten.  Epilepsy or any condition causing a loss or alteration of consciousness  Insulin dependent diabetes  Diseases/medication that can cause the immune system to be compromised, eg HIV and some malignancies  Diseases which might represent a risk of infection to clients e.g. Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C and HIV  Mental health problems, including stress. Be aware of the pressures you are under as a student and familiarise yourself with local support mechanisms. The University of Plymouth Student Counselling Service offers a support service for students.  Infection Control Standard Precautions are outlined in Hospital Infection Control Manuals. Familiarise yourself with them and ensure the continuity of safe practice during your nursing career. If you are aware of being in contact with, or possibly suffering symptoms of an infectious disease, you should report it immediately to the relevant person e.g. tutor or placement supervisor. Open wounds should always be covered with waterproof dressing/plaster in the working environment.  Diet/Exercise: are important factors in your ongoing well-being. Organise your life to ensure regular exercise and a good, balanced diet.  Smoking: is a known hazard to health and is also prohibited in the working environment. Support from local PCT Agencies is available to assist with quitting BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 147
  •  Pregnancy: known hazards exist in every workplace and pregnant students must inform their tutor and/or ward/department manager when the pregnancy has been confirmed so that the risks in their current working environment can be assessed. Pregnant mothers should not normally care for patients suffering from rubella or varicella zoster. You should have had your immunity to varicella checked at commencement of training and been immunised with the MMR if indicated. Inoculation injury It is important that these injuries are dealt with as a matter of priority, and advice should be sought immediately at the time of injury from the host Occupational Health Service who will liaise with Exeter regarding documentation. It is in your interest to ensure that you report these injuries to the person supervising your practice and follow the correct local procedure.  Ideally avoid! By covering any cuts on your hands/forearms, being familiar with the proposed procedure and having a sharps bin to hand, to ensure safe disposal  Seek advice from your local Occupational Health Department and inform your Academic co-ordinator – ideally have the telephone number with you  If working in Exeter, ring the Inoculation Injuries Hotline on 01392 405500  Ensure that a risk assessment is carried out, to establish the need for further treatment or follow up bloods  EXOHS is available for advice/guidance Hours of opening The Occupational Health Department is open Monday to Friday 8.15 am to 5.00 pm NB. Please note the following statement from the NMC A nurse, midwife or health visitor who believes that she or he may have been exposed to infection with HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C, in whatever circumstances, should seek specialist medical advice and diagnostic testing, if applicable. She or he must adhere to the specialist medical advice received. Each practitioner must consider very carefully their personal accountability as defined in the Council‟s Code of Professional Conduct and remember that she or he has an overriding ethical duty of care to patients‟. Arrangements for learners returning to the programme after 6 months interruption The management of occupational health assessment of learners who are due to return following deferral, interrupt or special leave/study arrangements on health and social care programmes. All learners who are on programmes leading to professional qualification, that do not undertake normal programme activities for a period of 6 months or more (despite their rationale for non attendance) must undergo a renewed enhanced CRB check and a further occupational health assessment. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 148
  • In addition, should any concerns regarding a learner arise at any point during a programme of study, the programme lead may initiate a referral with EXOHS through the normal channels (Practice Quality Development Division). Domestic Violence Domestic violence and abuse can be experienced by women and men whatever their race, age, class, colour, ability, religion or sexuality. The violence can begin at any stage of a relationship and may continue after the relationship has ended. Devon and Cornwall Police Non-emergency number is 08452 777444 (in an emergency, always dial 999). For confidential and general advice for those who do not want the Police involved, contact Plymouth Women‟s Aid, Telephone 01752 252033 8 Queen Anne‟s Terrace North Hill Plymouth Plymouth Women‟s Aid is an organisation completely separate from the police. They have independent domestic violence advocates who can give confidential advice and guidance from housing, personal safety to solicitors. Devon and Cornwall Police have further information and advice on the following web page. http://www.devon-cornwall.police.uk/v3/crime/domestic/index.htm BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 149
  • FACULTY OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL WORK STUDENT SCREENING STANDARDS Pre Employment Histories Vaccinations Serology Ref Course Paper Hep Chicken Hep BCG BCG / Chicken Hep Chicken HI Medicals Polio Tetanus TB MMR Scar Mantoux / MMR Vaccs Hep C MMR HIV No. Description Screen B pox B pox B pox Check Quantifero Adult Only if Only if n Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 1 Nursing - Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary Degree evidence Adult Only if Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 2 Nursing - Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary Diploma evidence Mental Only if Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 3 Health - Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary Degree evidence Mental Only if Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 4 Health - Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary Diploma evidence Midwifery - Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if 5 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes Yes Yes Degree necessary necessary necessary necessary evidence Midwifery - Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if 6 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes Yes Yes Diploma necessary necessary necessary necessary evidence Child Only if Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 7 Nursing - Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary Degree evidence Physiothera Only if Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 8 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes py - Degree required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary evidence Podiatry - Only if Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 9 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes Degree required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary evidence Dietetics - Only if Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 10 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes Degree required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary evidence ODP - Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if 11 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes Yes Yes Diploma necessary necessary necessary necessary evidence OT - Only if Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 12 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes Degree required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary evidence Social Only if Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if Only if Only if 13 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes Workers required necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary necessary evidence Only if Only if Yes, if no Only if Only if 14 Paramedics Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes documentary Yes Yes Yes Yes necessary necessary necessary necessary evidence May 09 BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 150
  • Appendix Three – Guidelines for Students as Lone Workers Practice Quality Development Division Faulty of Health and Social Work University of Plymouth GUIDELINES FOR STUDENTS AS LONE WORKERS Guidance for educators in practice/mentors and students when carrying out unaccompanied home visits and for the use of students‟ own cars for placement activity including escorting service users/clients. Purpose The following principles and check- list (appendix 1) are set out as guidance to ensure that educators in practice/mentors, as well as students understand their roles and responsibilities relating to home visit activity and the use of students own transport whilst undertaking practice placements. In is imperative that all learners adhere to the relevant Trust policies and specifically the sections relating to students. It also needs to be clear that activities undertaken by students are within their level of competence. There must always be an identified supervisor, but if not acting under direct supervision, the student and mentor will need to be clear what the scope and purpose of the „lone‟ activity is and that the student has explicit, clear understanding of  the current care plan for the patient  the purpose of the activity  planned action in the event of a crisis or untoward event  how to contact the base, mentor and key workers The check list as detailed in Appendix 1 will need to be completed by the educator in practice/mentor in partnership with the student prior to the student undertaking unaccompanied home visits and/or escorting patients/clients The Educator in Practice/mentor must undertake a risk assessment to include the following:  Educators in practice/mentors should use their own judgement and involve the student in the selection of appropriate home/community visits for the student to carry out alone. Educator/mentor and student should take into account the ability and experience of the student, the nature of the visit and the level of responsibility required. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 151
  •  Ensure the delegated activity/ home visit is clearly integral to the students learning needs for the placement.  Before making unaccompanied visits, the student should have the opportunity to experience home/community visits with the educator/mentor and/or other staff.  Before the visit, student and educator should discuss the visit and explore anticipated issues so that the student is aware of the level of responsibility he/she is required to take. Before the visit, student and educator/mentor should discuss the visit and explore anticipated issues so that the student is aware of the level of responsibility he/she is required to take. Ensure the student clearly understands when and who to ask for assistance to whom to report when working under indirect supervision and has the means to do so.  Ensure the student discusses and reflects on the experience with the educator/mentor following the visit.  If the student has to use their own car for this activity the Educators/mentors should give the student details of how a car is to be used in their earliest communication with the student. i.e. escort or visiting clients  Insurance – if using their own transport to either escort patients or to carry out home visits ensure that the student is currently insured to use their car for this sort of business use.  The base and educator/mentor must have the contact number of a working mobile carried by the student. Students must:  Work only within their level of understanding and competence.  Not participate in any procedure for which they feel they have not been fully prepared or without adequate supervision.  Not administer any prescribed medication or substance without direct supervision.  Be conversant with their Trust/Placement‟s Health and Safety and Risk and Lone worker Policy. Ensure the patient agrees to receive care from a student without direct supervision.  Insurance – if using their own transport to carry patients the student must confirm that they have current additional motor insurance to cover this purpose i.e. business insurance  Under no circumstances must a student carry clients/patients or their relatives in their vehicle unless a comprehensive risk assessment has been carried out with their educator in practice/mentor. It is preferable that students do not carry clients/patients at all but exceptional circumstances and local policies may require that they do this in order to complete an intervention process.  Students must refer to their educator in practice/mentor and local departmental policies regarding the use of vehicles on placement BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 152
  •  Students must always notify their educator in practice/mentor when going out on a visit in their vehicle, where they are going to, and when they expect to return.  Students must always carry the departmental telephone number with them in case of breakdown and emergencies. The student must inform the base and the educator/mentor of the contact number of a working mobile that will be carried at all times by the student. The student should leave the mobile phone on at all times. Acknowledgements Adele Kane. PDT Academic Lead, Cornwall NHS Sharon Jones PDT Academic Lead, Devon Primary Healthcare Trust Francis Russell, Lecturer, Occupational Therapy Bernhard Haas, Deputy Head of School, School of Allied Health Professionals John Rawlinson, Programme Lead, BSc (Hons) Mental Health These Guidelines have been informed by the following sources: CIOSPCT GGOV/HS/043/003/CPT/2002 Lone Worker Policy. Health Professions Council (2005) Standards for Education and training. Nursing and Midwifery Council (2005) An NMC guide for students of nursing and midwifery. Nursing and Midwifery Council (2007) Essential Skills Clusters for Pre- registration Nursing programmes. Nursing and Midwifery Council (2008) Standards to support learning and assessment in practice Nursing and Midwifery Council (2008) Standards for Medicines Management. Nursing and Midwifery Council (2008) Advice on delegation to non-regulated healthcare staff for nurses and midwives. Royal College of Nursing (2007) Guidance for Mentors of Nursing students and midwives, An RCN Toolkit. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 153
  • South West Strategic Health Authority (April, 2008) Statutory & Mandatory Training For Undergraduate Programmes (University Of Plymouth, University Of Exeter And University College Plymouth, Marjon. Department of Health (2006) Schedule 2 of the Benchmark pricing and national standard framework contract for professional health training: Learning and Development Agreement http://www.dh.gov.uk/en/Publicationsandstatistics/Publications/PublicationsPolicyAn dGuidance/DH_4133085 University of Plymouth (2007) Code of Practice: Students on Placement/Work experience Health and Safety. University of Plymouth, Faculty of Health and Social Work: Student Programme Handbooks 2008-2009. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 154
  • Appendix 1 Check list for educators in practice/mentors and students when carrying out unaccompanied home visits and for the use of students‟ own cars for placement activity including escorting service users/clients. To be used in conjunction with the policy document attached Date Signature of responsible Mentor/Supervisor Valid Business Insurance for vehicle to be used checked Risk Assessment completed Care plans of any patients involved and purpose of activity discussed with student Student provided with contact details of base and responsible supervisor Responsible supervisor provided with student‟s contact details including mobile phone number Student: Name___________________________________________ Programme______________________________________ Cohort__________________________________________ Mobile Phone no__________________________________ Responsible Educator in Practice in Practice/Mentor/Supervisor Name___________________________________________ Base/placement___________________________________ Contact no at base_________________________________ Mobile Phone no__________________________________. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 155
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 156
  • Feedback on the Student Programme Handbook Your comments are welcome. If you have any comments to make on the contents of this booklet, please detach this page and send with any remarks, either negative or positive to: Samantha Ainsworth, Programme Administrator, University of Plymouth, Faculty of Health and Social Work, Peninsula Allied Health Centre, Derriford Road, Plymouth, PL6 8BH. If these arrive at least two months prior to the student intake in September it should be possible to incorporate suggestions into the next edition of this handbook. Thank you for your help. BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 157
  • BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Programme Handbook 2009-2010 158