Clinical education

3,686 views
3,558 views

Published on

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,686
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
36
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Clinical education

  1. 1. Department of Health and Social Care BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Clinical Educators Handbook September 2005 Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  2. 2. BRUNEL UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF HEALTH SCIENCES AND SOCIAL CARE OSTERLEY CAMPUS BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy Course Leader: Sandra Naylor MEd, MCSP, DipTP Tel: 01895 268810 E-mail:sandra.naylor@brunel.ac.uk Clinical Co-ordinators: Jill Lloyd, BA, MCSP Tel: 01895 268795 Fax: 01895 269853 E-mail: jill.lloyd@brunel.ac.uk Shari Rone-Adams, DBA, MHSA, PT, GCS Tel: 01895 268830 Fax: 01895 269853 E-mail: shari.rone-adams@brunel.ac.uk Clinical administrator: Janet MacPhail (Brunel) Tel: 01895 268799 Fax: 01895 269853 E-mail: janet.macphail@brunel.ac.uk Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  3. 3. Staff list Email Room No. Tel Amanda Austin amanda.austin@brunel.ac.uk AP2/16 01895 268736 Betty Bond betty.bond@brunel.ac.uk AP1/03 01895 268744 John Cossar john.cossar@brunel.ac.uk AP2/02 01895 268753 Andrea Davis andrea.davis@brunel.ac.uk AP1/02 01895 268789 (admin) Alan Esnouf alan.esnouf@brunel.ac.uk AP1/23 01895 268757 Alex Harvey alex.harvey@brunel.ac.uk AP1/05 01895 268771 Jenni Jones jennifer.jones@brunel.ac.uk AP2/03 01895 268784 Mandy Jones mandy.jones@brunel.ac.uk AP2/03 01895 268785 Anbreen Khan anbreen.khan@brunel.ac.uk AP0/10 01895 268788 Arturo Lawson arturo.lawson@brunel.ac.uk AP2/12 01895 268792 Jill Lloyd jill.lloyd@brunel.ac.uk AP1/12 01895 268795 Ivy Mann ivy.mann@brunel.ac.uk AP2/1 01895 268802 David Maskill david.maskill@brunel.ac.uk AP2/05 01895 268796 Sandra Naylor sandra.naylor@brunel.ac.uk AP1/09 01895 268810 Neil O’Connell neil.oconnell@brunel.ac.uk AP1/08 01895 268814 Mark Perchard mark.perchard@brunel.ac.uk H1/03 01895 268819 Gill Pink gillian.pink@brunel.ac.uk AP2/12 01895 268792 Shari Rone-Adams shari.rone-adams@brunel.ac.uk AP1/12 01895 268830 Sushma Sanghvi sushma.sanghvi@brunel.ac.uk AP2/2 01895 268753 Alison Sherwin alison.sherwin@brunel.ac.uk AP2/01 01895 268802 Pam Shiers pam.shiers@brunel.ac.uk H1/4 01895 268839 Siobhan Stynes siobhan.stynes@brunel.ac.uk AP2/12 01895 268792 Alyson Warland alyson.warland@brunel.ac.uk AP0/10 01895 268851 Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  4. 4. CONTENTS OF DOCUMENT Page INTRODUCTION 1 BRUNEL UNIVERSITY 1 THE PHYSIOTHERAPY COURSE 2 CLINICAL EDUCATION 2 Integration of Clinical Education 2 Completing and Returning the Clinical Assessment Form 3 Visiting 4 Role of the Academic Visitor 5 Role of the Clinical Educator 5 The Failing Student 5 Summary of Student Responsibilities 6 Summary of Clinical Educator Responsibilities 6 COURSE PLAN – Fig 1 (Full time mode) 7 PART-TIME MODE 8 COURSE PLAN – Fig 2 (Part time mode) 9 APPENDIX 1 – Modules Descriptions HH1011 Core Knowledge HH1102 Core Skills I HH1103 Communication & Clinical Effectiveness HH1104 Core Skills II HH1105 Musculoskeletal I HH1106 Cardio-vascular & Pulmonary I HH2100 Neurology HH2101 Musculoskeletal II HH2102 Clinical Education I HH2103 Cardio-vascular & Pulmonary II HH2104 Neurological Rehabilitation HH2105 Research Methods HH2106 Clinical Education II HH3150 Clinical Education III HH3151 Literature Review HH3152 Professional Practice HH3153 Musculoskeletal III HH3154 Preparation for Practice HH3155 Clinical Education IV HH3156 Clinical Education V HH3157 Research Proposal APPENDIX 2 - Placement Themes APPENDIX 3 - Placement Forms are not included for security reasons examples can be obtained from the Placements Office APPENDIX 4 - Danger of Failure Forms / Placement Visiting Report Form APPENDIX 5 – Brunel University Documents Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  5. 5. INTRODUCTION Clinical education is a crucial and integral part of the BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy programme. This handbook aims to prepare you for your role in the education of undergraduate physiotherapy students from Brunel University. It is hoped that it will be available for clinical educators for reference during preparation prior to the placement and throughout each placement. In addition, to further facilitate the role of clinical educator, courses are held regularly at Brunel University and at the other universities, (ie. University of Hertfordshire, University of East London and Colchester Institute, St. George’s Hospital Medical School, King’s College, University of Brighton, University of East Anglia). The clinical co-ordination teams from these universities have collaborated to provide a comprehensive rolling programme of clinical education courses for both new and experienced educators. Courses are held each month throughout the year, except for August. Information on the physiotherapy course programmes at all establishments will be available at each day, no matter at which establishment you choose to undertake your clinical education course. There will also be the opportunity for discussion with other colleagues concerning aspects of supervision. Also the clinical education team is happy to come to your work place and present aspects of the clinical education course to groups of 5 clinicians or more. Essentially, responsibility for the workplace education service, has been divided by the universities according to geographical convenience. It is hoped that this will increase the availability and convenience to facilitate attendance. Please contact Janet MacPhail at Brunel University or your manager for more details. BRUNEL UNIVERSITY The university has 4 campuses. The School of Health Sciences and Social Care is situated on the outskirts of West London at Osterley campus. The School of Health Sciences and Social Care offers the following undergraduate (BSc) degrees; Physiotherapy Occupational Therapy Health Care Law and Ethics Health Promotion Health Services Management and Administration Health Studies Social Work (BA) Post graduate (MSc) degrees; Neurorehabilitation Health Promotion Community Health Occupational Therapy Occupational Health and Safety Management Counselling in Health Care and Rehabilitation Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 1
  6. 6. Occupational Therapy Transdisciplinary Practice Applied Social Studies (MA) THE PHYSIOTHERAPY COURSE Along with other university courses, both at Brunel and elsewhere, the Physiotherapy course is modular and delivered in two semesters each year. Currently this is delivered full time over three years and accelerated part-time over four years. Each semester is fifteen weeks. The semesters run from late September to the end of January and from early February to June. All modules completed during the semesters require assessment as part of the modular structure. The student must pass all assessments both theory and clinical. One retake opportunity is normally available, thereafter students may be required to leave the course. The aim is to use a variety of assessment methods, which will suit all learning and working styles. The pass mark for all assessments is 40%. The aim of the course is to provide the student with the highest academic and clinical standards in order to enable them to qualify as a graduate physiotherapist, capable of professional autonomy and equipped with skills to continue their professional development. The course is delivered in themed modules. The first year is university based with strong clinical links integrated into theory delivery. Emphasis has been put on making these links both obvious and relevant. Technical skills are presented and taught by experts both within the department and from clinical practice. All modules are thoroughly assessed by internal and external scrutiny prior to the student presenting for clinical education. There is a reading list to support all modules, which is updated annually. CLINICAL EDUCATION Integration of clinical education. Brunel students will start their clinical work during the second year. Four placements (respiratory, neurology, orthopaedics, out-patients,) of four weeks are undertaken. Each placement is marked by the clinical educator and thus contributes to the final degree classification. Placements are interspersed with university modules integrating anatomy, physiology and pathology with management issues linked to clinical areas. A similar pattern continues in the 3rd year when the student will have 2 four-week placements and 2 six-week placements (advanced respiratory, advanced neurology, elderly rehabilitation, advanced out-patients). It is expected that the 3rd level experience will develop and intensify the clinical reasoning and skills acquired in level 2. Part-time students undertake two placements between level 2 and level 3 and two placements between level 3 and level 4. These placements are undertaken on a full-time basis. It is expected that on any clinical placement the student will be accepted as a member of the clinical unit concerned and that adequate changing facilities will be provided, together with access to departmental resources such as staff rooms, library facilities and computers. Each student must accrue at least 1,000 clinical hours in order to be eligible for membership of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. This means an average of 30 hours each placement week. The hours are negotiable locally. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 2
  7. 7. Students need the ability to critically assess the effectiveness of interventions and consider alternative approaches. They also require the ability to work individually and as a team member. Effective communication skills and the ability to manage change are introduced and developed along with an introduction to research skills during interprofessional studies with OT students during year 1. Research skills are explored further in year 2 once again in interprofessional studies, with progression to a literature review and presentation of a research proposal in year 3. The clinical element of the course is assessed on the clinical assessment form. These marks will thus feed into the final degree classification. For clinical assessments, failed placements during year 2 will require a second placement during the summer break. For 3rd year students extra placements can only be completed at the end of the course. Completing and Returning the Clinical Assessment Form. Since the clinical component is an essential and important element of the undergraduate course it is vital that the assessment is completed in a suitably rigorous manner. The student will bring the form with them when they start the placement. It will have a security mark stamped on the edge. Please complete this form and no other. A photocopy will not suffice (although we are prepared to mail extras if necessary). It is suggested that the forms are ‘student held’ forms in order that they do not become mixed with other paperwork and to enable the student to refer to them regularly concerning fulfilment of learning objectives etc. The form should be completed in blue or black ink and alterations signed. The student should have considered the learning outcomes and objectives prior to the placement and be prepared to negotiate these with you. Some discussion should occur involving the student and the educator on day one or day two to address the structure of the placement and to fill in the Learning Contract page of the form. Placement objectives should be documented. Hopefully appraisal and feedback is occurring spontaneously throughout the placement. The half way report provides an opportunity to formalise this procedure and relate it to the objectives. It is suggested that this is done at the end of week 2 in 4 week placements and at the end of week 3 in 6 week placements. Areas for improvement and progression should be highlighted and discussed. Students should be proactive in completing the reflection sections of the learning contract. The clinical educator will read the outcomes in the form for each section. The criteria for each grade are scrutinised and the student will then be given a mark for that section for half way. The criteria should be used as an indication of how well the student is achieving the learning outcomes – criteria and outcomes are designed to be used together. Written feedback should be provided on the form as well as oral feedback. Following disclosure of progress to the student the reflection for half way should be documented on the form by the student. Clear and unambiguous feedback must be provided indicating areas requiring more effort and improvement. In the case of the failing student we ask clinical educators to contact the clinical education team at the university at the earliest opportunity. Support in the form of an extra visit from academic staff may be offered Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 3
  8. 8. The Danger of Failing Form (see Appendix 4) should be requested from the university. This should be filled in during discussions with the student and academic visitor. Copies will be kept in the Clinical Education Office and in the student’s file. A similar procedure for completing the assessment form will be adopted at the end of the placement, normally on the final day of placement. It is important that the student adds some final reflective comments to aid future placements and development. When the form is completed we ask that it is placed in an envelope and that the clinical educator signs over the seal and gives it to the student to return to the clinical education office. It would be helpful if the clinical educator could keep a copy of the marks awarded. The marks are entered on a spreadsheet and the final mark for the placement is calculated at the university. Your remarks and overall impression of the students are most useful. The log of hours on the final page must be completed and it is suggested that the student completes this and presents it for signing. This is calculated in common with other universities in the region, by excluding the lunch breaks i.e. 9 – 4 is 6 hours. Part 2 of the form gives the educator an opportunity to fail the student on the grounds of unsafe practice or of unprofessional behaviour. The record of warnings delivered is a safeguard for both student and clinical educator, particularly as the form is a ‘student held’ document. The sections of the form are weighted differently, but we ask you to consider each section independently rather than trying to make the mark ‘fit’ what you may think the student deserves as an overall mark. In level 2 interpersonal skills carries 20% of the total marks, professionalism 10%, clinical reasoning 35% and treatment/management 35%. In level 3 interpersonal skills carries 20% of the total marks, professionalism 10%, clinical reasoning 40% and treatment/management 30%. This weighting is reviewed regularly by the universities. Further discussion on the form takes place at clinical educator days at all universities. In addition the academic visitor is happy to discuss any issues arising during placement. The course team recognises that there are consecutive placements in the course programme and that, should the student fail the placement extra support will be required. This is available from the clinical education team, the academic visitor, personal tutor and any other member of the course team. Clinical educators are encouraged to inform the clinical education team if the student is in danger of failing. There may be enough flexibility to allow the student to delay the start of the subsequent placement. This will enable the student to receive the necessary support and guidance. Visiting All Brunel students are visited once on each placement. This takes place during the 3rd week of a 4 week placement and during the 4th week of a 6 week placement. All academic staff participate in clinical visiting. The academic visitor is happy to visit more than once if this is required by clinical educator or student. Please inform the clinical education office if you foresee the need for additional visits. There is a form for the academic visitor to document perceived lack of progress or settling problems on a placement. This is only used when there are specific concerns. (Appendix 4) The same academic visitor will normally visit you each time. The purpose of the visit is to discuss the progress of the placement with both the educator and the student. Some students may wish to be observed during patient contact time by the academic visitor, occasionally some clinical educators request the academic visitor to observe the student. Usually this is not necessary, however it is a facility that is available if the need Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 4
  9. 9. arises. Please try to give the academic visitor ample warning if there is a need for the student to be watched to facilitate time management of visits. The academic visitor, like the clinical co-ordination team, endeavours to maintain the vital links between the clinical unit and the university. The date and time of visits will be arranged within the first seven working days of the placement. Role of the Academic Visitor In line with both CSP recommendations and course policy, clinical visits are made to all students on at least one occasion per placement by the designated academic tutor (academic visitor). These visits are organised within the first seven working days of the placement. Contact numbers for academic visitors are included in Appendix 5. The academic visitor acts as a link between the academic and the clinical environment. The academic visitor monitors student progress and provides personal support for the student when appropriate. Also, the academic visitor provides support and guidance for the clinical educator, as required. The academic visitor also has a role to play in the assessment of the students. Clinical visits normally occur after half-way reports and the academic visitor may discuss issues highlighted in the report with the students and clinical educator. In addition, the academic visitor arranges to see the unit manager annually. The purpose of this consultation is to facilitate the negotiation and development of future placements. This discussion also enables reflection on current provision and therefore identifies further requirements. Role of the Clinical Educator It is expected that a proportion of the clinical educator’s time will be spent in direct contact with the students. This contact will vary, depending on the needs of the student and the level of the placement, but it is anticipated that it may be several hours on day 1 diminishing to an our or so by the end of the placement. The clinical educator should facilitate the development of the student in order to utilise the potential learning experience. The clinical educator will liase with the clinical education team to monitor progress. There will be formal and informal feedback throughout each placement, culminating in the clinical educator completing the Clinical Assessment Form (Appendix 3). The Assessment Form includes guidelines for completing the form. The Failing student Early identification of the student who is not progressing may prevent placement failure occurring. Contact with the university is vital to record concerns and to plan possible extra visits and implement fresh learning strategies. Feedback should be provided for the student both in oral and written form. The Danger of Failure Form should be utilised (Appendix 4). The university is keen to support you if you feel the student is failing on placement. Summary of Student Responsibilities • Contact placement at least 2 weeks prior to commencement to enquire about reporting arrangements etc. • Organise timing and route of journey (if appropriate) • Request and book accommodation (and payment for same – if appropriate) • Prepare thoroughly for each placement Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 5
  10. 10. • Ensure forms have been collected, signed for and are safe also that they are returned within the correct time • Phone clinical educator if unable to attend due to sickness • Check professional appearance and comply with local regulations • Consider learning contract at least 2 weeks prior to placement. • Reflect appropriately on learning and progress • Remember to enjoy your new skills and learning environment! Summary of Clinical Educators Responsibilities • Organise increasing workload appropriate for level of student • Provide suitable supervision and discussion time daily • Timetable discussion period during day 1 or 2 for discussion of the learning contract • Provide continual feedback for the student • Facilitate development of the student • Consider the half way appraisal and discussion, filling in appropriate sections on the form • Complete the final part of the form and record the marks awarded • Contact the clinical education office if you have any concerns • Enjoy your role in the facilitation and development of new physiotherapists! Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 6
  11. 11. Fig. 1: BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy - Full time mode Semester I Semester II Year One Christmas Easter HH 1101 Core Knowledge HH 1104 Core Skills (20 credits) (20 credits) HH 1102 Core Skills HH 1105 Musculoskeletal I (20 credits) I (20 credits) N HH 1103 Communication & T HH 1106 Cardio-vascular & Pulmonary I Clinical Effectiveness (20 credits) E (20 credits) R Year Two S E HH 2100 M HH 2103 Cardio-vascular & Neurology HH 2102 E Pulmonary II (10 credits) HH 2106 (20 credits) Clinical S HH 2104 Neurological Rehabilitation Clinical Education I T (10 credits) Education II HH 2101 (20 credits) E HH 2105 (20 credits) Musculoskeletal II R Research Methods (20 credits) (20 credits) B R Year Three E A HH 3152 Professional K HH 3154 HH 3150 HH3151 Practice (10 credits) HH 3155 HH 3156 Preparation for Lit. Practice Clinical Clinical Clinical (10 credits) Education III Review Education IV Education V (20 credits) (10 (15 credits) (15 credits) HH 3157 HH 3153 credits) Research Musculoskeletal III (20 credits) Proposal (20 credits) Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 7
  12. 12. PART-TIME MODE The part-time mode runs over four years. The part-time students are taught with the full-time students, whenever possible. The students study the same modules as the full-time students, although these may be in a different order (see Fig 2, p.11). During each year students are on campus 2 full days a week. (The day of attendance at the university may change each year to allow the students to share modules with Occupational Therapy students). In years 2, 3 and 4 there are clinical education modules. These modules will be mainly during the summer period and will require full-time attendance. The part-time students have to fulfil the same requirements for entry to the course as the full-time students. Also all assessment requirements are the same for both modes of study. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 8
  13. 13. Fig. 2: BSc (Hons) Physiotherapy - Part time mode Semester I Semester II Year 1 HH1101 Core Knowledge HH 1104 Core Skills (20 credits) (20 credits) HH 2018 HH 1102 Core Skills HH 1105 Musculoskeletal I (20 credits) (20 credits) I Year 2 N HH 1103 Communication & Clinical T HH 1106 Cardio-vascular and pulmonary Effectiveness (20 credits) E (20 credits) HH 2102 R Clinical HH 2101 Musculoskeletal II HH 2105 Research Methods Education I (20 credits) (20 credits) (20 credits) S E M Year 3 E HH 2103 Cardio-vascular & HH 2106 HH 2100 HH3153 S Pulmonary II (10 credits) Clinical Neurology Musculo-skeletal III T Education II (20 credits) (20 credits) E HH 2104 Neurological Rehabilitation (20 credits) R (10 credits) Year 4 B R HH 3150 APPENDIX 1 HH3151 E HH 3155 HH 3156 HH 3157 Research Clinical Lit. HH 3152 A Clinical Clinical Proposal (20 c) Education III Review Professional K Education Education HH 3154 Preparation (20 credits) Module Descriptions (10 c) Practice (10 credits) (15 credits) (15 credits) For Practice (10 c) (10 credits) Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 9
  14. 14. MODULE NUMBER: HH1101 TITLE: CORE KNOWLEDGE TIME ALLOCATION: 200 HOURS CREDIT VALUE: 20 LEVEL I CREDITS MODULE LEADER: JENNI JONES MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module will introduce you to the normal structure and function of the human body, and the basic concepts of health and disease. You will be introduced to the basic tissue organisation of the body, the structural and functional anatomy of the upper and lower limbs, and key physiological processes and responses. Foundation knowledge gained in this module aims to underpin your understanding for all other modules. Parallel and subsequent modules will incorporate and build on the core subjects introduced. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On completion of this module, you will be able to: 1. Describe the relationship of bony and soft tissue structures of the upper limb and pectoral girdle, and the lower limb and pelvic girdle. 2. Describe the function of bony and soft tissue structures of the upper limbs and pectoral girdle, and the lower limb and pelvic girdle. 3. Describe actions and functions of muscles and joints in terms of muscle work, joint range and limiting factors, and with reference to biomechanical principles. 4. Describe basic cell structure and differentiation into tissues. 5. Discuss the structure and function of muscle, bone and cartilage. 6. Describe the mechanisms of force production in muscle and the factors which affect it. 7. Describe the process of healing, inflammation and repair in relation to soft tissue (not nerve) and bone. TEACHING METHODS AND LEARNING STRATEGIES: Lectures, practical tutorials, computer-assisted learning, student self-directed learning, and dissection demonstrations. INDICATIVE CONTENT: ♦ The classification, structure and function of bones, joints and muscles of the upper and lower limbs, and pectoral and pelvic girdles. ♦ Introduction of the analysis of joint movement taking into account the role of muscle, joint range and factors limiting movement. ♦ Classification of tissues, the histological structure of connective tissue (bone, cartilage, tendon and ligament). ♦ Muscle structure and function. ♦ The process of inflammation, and the response of the body to injury/disease. ASSESSMENT: 3 hour unseen written examination Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  15. 15. INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential reading:  Marieb E.N. (1997) Human Anatomy and Physiology (3rd edition) Wokingham Benjamin Cummings Publishing Co. Palastanga N. Field D Soames R. (1998) Anatomy and Human Movement (4th edition) Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann. Recommended reading: Field D. (1997) Anatomy, Palpation and Surface Markings (2nd edition) Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Jones D.A. Round J.M. (1990) Skeletal Muscle in Health and Disease. Manchester University Press. Norkin C.C. Levangie P.K. (1992) Joint Structure and Function (2nd edition) F.A.Davies Olsen T.R. (1996) A.D.A.M. – Student Atlas of Anatomy Williams and Wilkins Williams P. Warwick, R. Dyson, M. (1995) Grays Anatomy (38th edition) New York: Churchill Livingstone Videos Acland R.D. 1996 The Video Atlas of Human Anatomy Tape 1: The Upper Extremity Tape 2: The Lower Extremity Williams & Wilkins Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  16. 16. MODULE NUMBER: HH1102 TITLE: CORE SKILLS I TIME ALLOCATION: 200 HOURS CREDIT VALUE: 20 LEVEL I CREDITS MODULE LEADER: ALISON SHERWIN MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: NONE MODULE CO-REQUISITES: CORE KNOWLEDGE, COMMUNICATION & CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module is designed to introduce you to the foundations of kinesiology, manipulative procedures and electrotherapy, the integration of academic knowledge to practice and development of an awareness of movement based on biomechanical principles. Your psychomotor sensitivity will be facilitated through their practice and application of techniques using a problem based approach. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: To enable you to acquire a body of knowledge in the fields studied and apply generic practical based treatment skills, using a problem solving approach. Effective communication and a professional manner will be encouraged. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On completion of this module, you will be able to: 1. Discuss the concepts of normal movement . 2. Describe, analyse, measure, and record human movement in terms of muscle work, muscle and joint range and group action of muscle at foundation level. 3. Select and demonstrate some movement therapies eg . free exercise, resisted exercise and an appropriate progression using a problem solving approach to application. 4. Demonstrate and apply appropriate exercise therapies to different client groups eg.the elderly. 5. Select and teach exercise to individuals 6. Select and apply appropriate relaxation techniques 7. Discuss and demonstrate management using exercise therapy to return to full function a variety of client groups. 8. Demonstrate handling skills, including massage and passive movements applied to a variety of problems. 9. Select and demonstrate the safe application of thermal and some electrical modalities to the tissues of the body. 10. Consider the indications, contra-indications and precautions for use of some specified sources of thermal and electrical energies and explain the theoretical basis of electrical energies. TEACHING METHODS AND LEARNING STRATEGIES: The module will be delivered using a combination of lectures, practical classes and student self – directed learning. INDICATIVE CONTENT: • Movement definition and description: Normal movement, analysis of muscle work, group action, joint range, and their measurement. • Exercise prescription : Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  17. 17. Assisted, free, resisted (manual/mechanical) exercise, warm-up/warm down functional exercise. Return to full function with appropriate exercise prescription for different client groups eg . the elderly, sports, home exercises and activities of daily living. Fitness evaluation. Relaxation strategies and techniques. Problem Solving. • Handling skills: Passive movements, massage. • Electrotherapy : Ice, wax, muscle stimulation, eutrophic stimulation, biofeedback, TNS, interferential therapy. ASSESSMENT: A practical assessment including a written question (1 hour in total) All elements must be passed. TIMING OF THE ASSESSMENT: Level 1, Semester 1, Week 15. INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential Reading Kisner C & Colby LA (1996) Therapeutic Exercise – Foundation and Techniques (3rd  Ed) F.A.Davis Low J & Reed A (1994) "Electrotherapy Explained" ( 2nd Ed) Butterworth Heinemann Indicative Reading List DeDomenico G & Wood EC (1997) Beards Massage WB Saunders Ltd Galley F.M & Forster A.L (1991) Human Movement Churchill Livingstone Hall C & Brody LT(1999)"Therapeutic exercise, moving toward function" Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Hollis M (1999) Practical Exercise Therapy ( 4th Ed) Blackwell Publications Hollis M. (1998) Massage For Physiotherapists ( 2nd Ed) Blackwell Scientific Publications Holey and Cook E.M (1997) Therapeutic Massage WB Saunders Ltd McArdle W.D Katch F.I, & Katch V.L (1994) Essentials of Physiology (3rd Ed) Lea & Febiger Nordin M & Frenkel V.H (1989) Basic Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System (2nd Ed) Williams & Wilkins Norkin C.C & Levangie P.K (1992) Joint Structure and Function ( 2nd Ed ) FA Davis Palmer M.L & Epler M.E (1998) Fundamentals of Musculosketal Assessment Techniques ( 2nd Ed ) Lippincott Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  18. 18. Trew M, Everett T Human Movement: An Introductory Text (4th Ed) Churchill Livingstone Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  19. 19. MODULE NUMBER: HH1103 TITLE: COMMUNICATION AND CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS TIME ALLOCATION: 200 HOURS CREDIT VALUE: 20 LEVEL I CREDITS MODULE LEADERS: FRANCES REYNOLDS & RACHEL CROOKENDEN MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module explores current issues within health and social care such as the pursuit of clinical effectiveness, professional accountability, and ethical practice. Through a number of case examples, you will examine the rationale for a multi-disciplinary approach to patient care. All therapists require a high level of interpersonal communication skills in order to work effectively with patients, and these will be examined in detail. Research evidence that demonstrates how skilful communication maximises patients’ response to therapeutic interventions will be explored, and these results are explained in terms of the biopsychosocial model of health and illness. As well as developing interpersonal skills, the module contributes to professional development through extending your skills for literature search, writing and using information technology. . INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On completion of this module, you will be able to: 1. Describe current issues affecting therapy practice in the NHS and other contexts, including legislation and government policy 2. Identify the roles of different health care professionals within the health services and the rationale for multi-disciplinary practice 3. Identify a range of contexts in which therapists work 4. Compare and contrast older and more recent models of health, disability and intervention 5. Describe some methods for evaluating clinical effectiveness 6. Understand the importance of effective communication in health and social care 7. Articulate how skilful communication affects clients’ coping and response to treatment 8. Describe some cultural and environmental factors that influence communication processes 9. Identify some ethical and legal aspects of clinical decisions and record-keeping 10. Obtain evidence from a range of sources including relevant databases TEACHING METHODS AND LEARNING STRATEGIES: A range of teaching/learning strategies will be used including lead lectures, seminar discussions, case-focused learning and small-group presentations, directed computer/ library- based tasks. INDICATIVE CONTENT: • Current issues with the NHS, including government policy, legislation, clinical effectiveness, professional accountability, financial dilemmas. • Introduction to health professional roles, settings and multi-disciplinary practice • Models of health, illness and disability, including traditional (biomedical), client-centred and social models • Definitions of effective client-centred verbal and non-verbal communication • Communicating in multi-cultural environments Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  20. 20. • Establishing clinical effectiveness: some research approaches • The interview as an assessment, intervention and evaluation tool: purpose, goals, opening, information collection and giving, closing; distortions through bias, or stereotyping • Legal issues - ethical principles, confidentiality, professional accountability, data protection legislation, record-keeping • Methods for literature search and retrieval, including library and IT resources. ASSESSMENT: A 4000 word essay following format guidelines that will be issued at the start of the module.  INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential Reading: Aitken, P. & Jellicoe, H. (1996) Behavioural Sciences for Health Professionals . London: Saunders French, S (1997) Physiotherapy; a psychosocial approach (2nd Edition) Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann Senior, M. & Viveash, B. (1995) Health and Illness. Basingstoke: MacMillan Recommended Reading: Albrecht G et al (1999) The Handbook of Social Studies in Health and Medicine. London: Sage Alcock C, Payne S & Sullivan M (2000) Introducing Social Policy. Harlow: Prentice Hall Bowling, A. (1997) Research Methods in health: investigating health and health services. Buckingham: Open University Press Broome, A. & Llewellyn, S. (1995) Health psychology: processes and applications (2nd edition). Chapman & Hall. Burnard , P (1992) Effective Communication Skills for Health Professionals Chapman & Hall. Charmaz, K (1991) Good Days, Bad Days: The Self in Chronic Illness and Time. Brunswick. French, S. (ed) (1994) On Equal Terms: working with disabled people. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Ham, C. (1999) Health policy in Britain: the politics and organisation of the National Health Service. Basingstoke: MacMillan Hamer S & Collinson, G (1999) Achieving Evidence-based Practice. Bailliere-Tindall Harrison, A. & Dixon, J. (2000) The NHS: Facing the future. London: King’s Fund. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  21. 21. Horn, S. & Munafo, M. (1997) Pain: Theory, Research & Intervention. Milton Keynes: Open University Press. Kreps, G. (1994) Effective communication in multi-cultural health care settings. London: Sage Ley, P (1988) Communicating with Patients Chapman & Hall. Nichols, K (1993) Psychological Care in Physical Illness. Croom Helm. Ovretveit, P. & Thompson, T. (1997) Interprofessional Working for Health and Social Care. Basingstoke: MacMillan Seymour, W. (1998) Remaking the Body. London; Routledge Wall, A. & Owen, B. (1999) Health policy: health care and the NHS. Eastbourne: Gildredge Press Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  22. 22. MODULE NUMBER: HH1104 MODULE TITLE: CORE SKILLS II TIME ALLOCATION: 200 HOURS CREDIT VALUE: 20 LEVEL 1 CREDITS MODULE LEADER: ALISON SHERWIN CO-LEADER (ELECTROTHERAPY): ALAN ESNOUF MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: CORE KNOWLEDGE (HH1101), CORE SKILLS 1 (HH1102), COMMUNICATION & CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS ( HH1103) MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module provides the foundations of generic skills and theoretical principles of kinesiology and electrotherapy. It will provide you with the basis for safe and effective physiotherapeutic practice. Critical judgement will be developed through evaluation of current research related to physiotherapy practice and the use of a problem solving approach. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: To exercise critical judgement skills incorporating analysis, development of observation, interpretation and management planning To reveal a cognitive ability to integrate theory to practice. To acquire basic generic operational treatment skills and some core skills of electrotherapy. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On completion of this module you will be able to: 1. Demonstrate generic components of assessment of a patient 2. Demonstrate ability to use various methods of measurement and discuss their advantages and disadvantages 3. Demonstrate skills in problem identification, goal setting and clinical reasoning 4. Demonstrate ability to document findings and proposed management and discuss some factors which may influence the effectiveness of physiotherapy. 5. Demonstrate the ability to analyse and re-educate posture, balance and gait. 6. Discuss theoretical principles related to posture, balance and gait and their application to management. 7. Discuss and apply principles of motor learning to a variety of problems. 8. Select and demonstrate the safe application of thermal and some electrical modalities to the tissues of the body. 9. Consider the indications, contra-indications and precautions for use of some specified sources of thermal and electrical energies and explain the theoretical basis of electrical energies. 10. Communicate effectively and demonstrate a reasoning process applied to the body of knowledge acquired. 11. Discuss the relevant legislation concerning moving and handling. 12. Demonstrate and safely apply moving and handling skills and mobility aids. TEACHING AND LEARNING STRATEGIES: Lectures, practical classes and student self-directed learning INDICATIVE CONTENT: • Assessment skills: Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  23. 23. Principles of assessment, generic components of subjective and objective assessment. Measurement – reliability, validity, accuracy, uses and abuses. Observational skills • Operational Skills: Clinical & treatment planning: problem identification, goal setting, clinical reasoning at foundation level, documentation • Movement skills: Motor learning Application of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques as facillitatory and strengthening and mobilising methods. Facilitating normal movement, moving and handling. Wheelchair skills. Biomechanics, analysis and re-education of balance, posture and gait • Electrotherapy : TNS, LASER, shortwave diathermy (and pulsed SWD), ultrasound, therapy ASSESSMENT: A practical assessment and written question (1 hour in total) All elements must be passed TIMING OF THE ASSESSMENT: Level 1, Semester 2, Week 15 INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential Reading  Kisner C and Colby L.A (1996) Therapeutic Exercise – Foundation and Techniques (3rd Ed) F.A Davis Low J & Reed A (2000) Electrotherapy Explained ( 3rd Ed) Butterworth Heinemann Recommended Reading Galley F.M & Forster A.L (1991) Human Movement Churchill Livingstone Hall C & Brody T L (1999) "Therapeutic exercise, moving toward function" Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Hollis M (1999) Practical Exercise Therapy (4th Ed) Blackwell Publications Holey and Cook E.M (1997) Therapeutic Massage WB Saunders Ltd Kitchen S and Bazin S (1996) Clayton’s Electrotherapy ( 10th Ed) WB Saunders Low J & Reed A (1994) Physical Principles Explained Butterworth Heinemann McArdle W.D, Katch F.I, & Katch V.L (1994) Essentials of Physiology (3rd Ed) Lea & Febiger Nordin M & Frenkel V.H (1989) Basic Biomechanics of the Musculoskeletal System (2nd Ed) Williams & Wilkins Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  24. 24. Norkin C.C & Levangie P.K (1992) Joint Structure and Function ( 2nd Ed ) FA Davis Palmer M.L & Epler M.E (1998) Fundamentals of Musculosketal Assessment Techniques (2nd Ed) Lippincott Trew M, Everett T Human Movement: An Introductory Text (4th Ed) Churchill Livingstone Ward. A (1987) Electricity Fields and Waves in Therapy ( 2nd Ed) Science press Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  25. 25. MODULE NUMBER: HH1105 TITLE: MUSCULOSKELETAL I TIME ALLOCATION: 200 HOURS CREDIT VALUE: 20 LEVEL I CREDITS MODULE LEADER: NEIL O’CONNELL MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module will provide you with an opportunity to enhance your knowledge and skills acquired in prerequisite modules, and to apply these to a range of musculoskeletal conditions. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On completion of this module, you will be able to: 1. Demonstrate and apply a knowledge of the relevant anatomy of the lower limb and pelvic girdle; 2. Relate previously learned relevant knowledge and skills to acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions of the lower limb; 3. Describe and discuss the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, multi-disciplinary and physiotherapeutic management of the above conditions; 4. Describe the principles of examination, assessment and recording of musculosketal function of peripheral joints; 5. Perform an appropriate examination of the hip, knee, ankle and foot regions of patients/clients presenting with the above conditions; 6. Justify the selection and progression of physiotherapeutic treatment techniques; 7. Implement the physiotherapeutic management of patients/clients with the above conditions in a safe, effective and efficient manner, considering the psychological, socio- political, cultural and economic factors; 8. Demonstrate clinical reasoning skills in the management of the above conditions; 9. Communicate effectively both orally and in writing with regard to the module content; TEACHING METHODS AND LEARNING STRATEGIES: Lectures, seminars, study guide, student self-directed learning INDICATIVE CONTENT: • Applied anatomy of bones, joints and muscles of the lower limb; • Aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical features and management of acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions of the lower limb; • Clinical Reasoning skills; • Subjective assessment for peripheral musculoskeletal conditions; • Physical examination of the hip, knee, ankle and foot regions; • Application of the theory of joint mobilisation, and other relevant manipulative procedures and core skills to lower limb joints; • Basic bandaging/ orthotics. ASSESSMENT: 55 minute practical examination. Four elements form this assessment. If you failed ONE element, with a mark of 35 to 40%, and you pass the other elements, with a combined pass mark, for all elements, of 40% or above, you will pass the module. Two or more failed elements, or any elements(s) below 35%, will mean that you have to re-sit that / those failed elements, whatever the mark. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  26. 26. Failure of an element on safety grounds will be awarded a zero and therefore will have to be re-taken. INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential Reading:  Ombregt, L and Bisschop, P (1999) Atlas of Orthopaedic Examination of the Peripheral Joints. W.B. Saunders. Edinburgh Petty, N.J. and Moore, A.P. (1998) Neuromusculoskeletal Examination and Assessment. Churchill Livingstone Palastanga, N, Field, D, Soames, R. (1998) Anatomy and Human Movement (3rd Edition) Butterworth Heinemann Recommended Reading: Apley A. G., & Solomon, L. (1994) Concise System of Orthopaedics and Fractures (2nd Edition) Butterworth Heinemann Atkinson, K, Coutts, F. & Hassen-Kanip, A-M (1999) Physiotherapy in Orthopaedics: A Problem-solving Approach. Churchill Livingstone Corrigan, B. and Maitland, G. (1994) Musculoskeltal and Sports Injuries. Butterworth Heinemann Crawford Adams, J & Hamblen, D. (1995) Outline of Orthopaedics (12th Edition) Churchill Livingstone. Dandy, D. (1993) Essential Orthopaedics and Trauma (2nd Edition) Churchill Livingstone David, C. & Lloyd, J. (1999) Rheumatological Physiotherapy. Mosby International Field, D. (1997) Anatomy, Palpations and Surface Markings (2nd Edition) Butterworth Heinemann Hughes, S. & Porter, R.W. (1997) Textbook of Orthopaedics and Fractures. London: Arnold Maitland, G. D. (1991) Peripheral Manipulation (3rd Edition) Butterworth Heinemann Magee, D. (1997) Orthopaedic Physical Assessment (2nd Ed) W.B. Saunders McRae, R. (1994) Practical Fracture Treatment (3rd Edition) Churchill Livingstone Moore, K. L. (1999) Clinically Orientated Anatomy (4th Edition) Williams & Wilkins Norris, C. (1998) Sports Injuries (2nd Edition) Butterworth Heinemann. Olson, T. R. (1996) A.D.A.M. Student Atlas of Anatomy. Williams & Wilkins Tidswell, M, (1998) Orthopaedic Physiotherapy. Mosby International. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  27. 27. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  28. 28. MODULE NUMBER: HH1106 TITLE: CARDIOVASCULAR & PULMONARY I TIME ALLOCATION: 200 HOURS CREDIT VALUE: 20 LEVEL I CREDITS MODULE LEADER: SANDRA NAYLOR MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module is designed to introduce you to the academic component of this area of study, provide a theoretical framework to integrate with a practical and problem solving approach to cardiovascular and pulmonary disorders INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On completion of this module, you will be able to: 1. Describe the structure, function and regulatory mechanisms of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems. 2. Describe the relationships of the bony and soft tissue structures of the trunk 3. Discuss the pathological basis of common vascular and pulmonary conditions. 4. Discuss the identification, analysis, measurement interventions, and apply critical judgement to the management of some common medical and surgical cardiovascular and pulmonary conditions, including amputation. 5. Identify and consider the role of the physiotherapist in rehabilitation 6. Identify, demonstrate and communicate knowledge of pathophysiology 7. Discuss liaison/communication with other professionals and clients/patients and their carers 8. Demonstrate skills in problem identification, goal setting and clinical reasoning. 9. Demonstrate ability to document findings and proposed management. TEACHING METHODS AND LEARNING STRATEGIES: Lectures, practical sessions, and student self-directed learning. INDICATIVE CONTENT: • Classification and function of the bones, joints and muscles of the neck and trunk. • Analysis of movement. • Anatomy of the cardiovascular system • Function and regulation of the cardiovascular system • Anatomy of the respiratory system • Function and regulation of the respiratory system • Normal structure and function of renal, immune, digestive and temperature regulating systems and their clinical implications when abnormal • Basic respiratory assessment incorporating generic operational skills • Development of problem identification, goal setting, management strategies of medical, surgical and psychosocial issues by a problem solving approach, incorporating development of clinical reasoning • Development of psychomotor sensitivity facilitated through application of skills. ASSESSMENT: A 3 hour, short answers paper. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  29. 29. INTICATIVE READING LIST: Essential reading:  Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy by Mandy Jones and F Moffat Marieb E.N (2001) Human Anatomy and Physiology ( 5th Ed) Addison-Wesley-Longman Palastanga N, Field D, Soames R (1998) Anatomy and Human Movement (3rd Ed) Butterworth Heinemann Pryor J & Webber B (1998) Physiotherapy for Respiratory and cardiac Problems (2nd Ed) Churchill Livingstone Understanding Acid-base by B. Abelow, Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins West J Pulmonary Physiology 6th ed, Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins Recommended Reading: Ayliffe, G.A., Babb, J.R., Taylor L.J. (2001) Hospital Acquired Infection, Principles and Prevention. (3rd ed) London, Arnold Publishers. Barsby P, Ham R, Lumley C, & Roberts C. (1995) Amputee Management Kings College School of medicine & Dentistry Bourke, S.J. and Brewis, R.A.L. (1998) Lecture Notes on Respiratory Medicine. (5th ed) Oxford, Blackwell Science. Clark, T and Rees J (1998) Practical Management of Asthma. (3rd ed) London, Dunitz Dunn, D.C. and Rawlinson (1999) Dunn’s Surgical Diagnosis and Management (3rd ed) Oxford, Blackwell Science Ellis H, Calne R and Watson C (1998) Lecture Notes on General Surgery. (9th ed) Oxford, Blackwell Science. Engstrom B. & Van De Ven C. (1999) Physiotherapy For Amputees : The Roehampton Approach ( 3rd Ed ) Churchill Livingstone Field D. (1997) Anatomy, Palpations and Surface Markings ( 2nd Ed) Butterworth-Heinemann Hodkin J, Celli B and Connors G (2000) Pulmonary Rehabilitation. Lippincot. Hough A. (2001) Physiotherapy in Respiratory Care – A problem Solving Approach( 3rd Ed) Stanley Thorne Kapandji I.A (1982) Physiology of the Joints - Volume 111 – The Trunk Churchill Livingstone Longmore, J.M., Wilkinson I, Torok, E (2001) Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine (5th ed) Oxford, Oxford University Press. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  30. 30. Simonds, A.K., Muir, J.F and Pierson, D.J. (1996) Pulmonary rehabilitation.London, B.M.J. Publishing. West JB (2000) Respiratory Physiology – The Essentials (6th Ed) 0 Williams & Wilkins West JB (1998) Pulmonary Pathophysiology ( 5th Ed) Williams & Wilkins Wilson (2001) Infection Control in Clinical Practice Bailliere Tindall Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  31. 31. MODULE CODE: HH2100 MODULE TITLE: NEUROLOGY MODULE LEADER: BETTY BOND OTHER TEACHING TEAM: STEVE ASHFORD, DAVID MASKILL, JOHN COSSAR TIME ALLOCATION: 200 HOURS LEVEL: 2 CREDIT VALUE: 20 MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: CORE KNOWLEDGE, CORE SKILLS I & II MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module will introduce you to clinical neurological skills and to neurophysiological and pathological processes. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: This module will enable you to develop basic neurological physiotherapy assessment and intervention skills, and to develop knowledge and understanding of the physiological and pathological processes underlying neurological disease. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of this module you will be able to: 1. Describe the structure and function of the central nervous system (CNS) relating to motor control. 2. Explain how dysfunction of this system contributes to identified pathological conditions and common neurological impairments. 3. Discuss how different CNS systems interact and contribute to motor control. 4. Describe the pathophysiology, aetiology, epidemiology and associated clinical features of common neurological conditions 5. Describe and explain common neurological impairments and the activity and participatory problems that they may cause. 6. Describe the principles of neurological assessment and demonstrate basic clinical reasoning and treatment skills. 7. Describe the principles of physiotherapy intervention for people with neurological conditions. TEACHING METHODS AND LEARNING STRATEGIES: Lead lectures, student self-directed study, study guides, workshops, practical tutorials, tutorials. INDICATIVE CONTENT: ♦ Structure and function of the cortex and internal capsule, pathology of cerebral lesions and how this relates to neurological signs and symptoms. ♦ Cerebral circulation, pathophysiology, aetiology, epidemiology and associated clinical features of cerebro-vascular accidents (CVA). ♦ Structure and function of the cerebellum, ataxia. ♦ Principles of neuronal transmission, myelination of nerves. ♦ Pathophysiology, aetiology, epidemiology and associated clinical features of Multiple Sclerosis. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  32. 32. ♦ Structure and function of the spinal cord – motor and sensory pathways, stretch reflex, proprioception and sensory receptors. ♦ Structure and function of the basal ganglia. ♦ Pathology, aetiology, epidemiology and associated clinical features of Parkinson’s Disease. ♦ Models of motor control. ♦ Motor impairments and the upper motor neurone syndrome. ♦ Principles of assessment and treatment planning and intervention. ♦ Basic neurological assessment skills. ♦ Basic intervention skills – use of positioning, facilitation of movement, prevention and treatment of secondary complications, re-education of sitting balance, standing balance, sit-to-stand, walking and upper limb function. ASSESSMENT: 3 hour unseen written paper. TIMING OF ASSESSMENT: Level 2 Semester 1 Week 8 INDICATIVE READING LIST Essential reading:  Carr J and Shepherd R (1998) Neurological Rehabilitation: Optimising Human Performance, Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford. Carr J and Shepherd R (2003) Stroke Rehabilitation: Guidelines for exercise and training to optimise motor skill. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford. Cohen H (1999) Neuroscience for Rehabilitation, (2nd edition) Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia. Edwards S (2001) Neurological Physiotherapy: A problem-solving approach Churchill Livingstone, New York. Marieb E (2001) Human Anatomy and Physiology, Benjamin Cummings Publishing Co, London. Shumway-Cook A and Woolacott M (2000) Motor Control Theory and Application, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. Philadelphia. Stokes M (ed) (1998) Neurological Physiotherapy, Mosby, London. Recommended reading: Ada L and Canning C (1990) Key Issues in Neurological Physiotherapy, Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford. Carr, J and Shepherd, R (eds) (1987) Movement Science: Foundations for Physical Therapy in Rehabilitation, Aspen Publications, Rockville, Md. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  33. 33. Davies P (1985) Steps to Follow, Springer Verlag, Berlin. Davies P (1990) Right in the Middle, Springer Verlag, Berlin. Fredericks C and Saladin L K (1996) Pathophysiology of the Motor Systems: Principles and Clinical Presentations, F A Davis Co, Philadelphia. International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. World Health Organisation. Gevena (2001) Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  34. 34. MODULE CODE: HH2101 MODULE TITLE: MUSCULOSKELETAL II MODULE LEADER: WILLIAM OLDREIVE TIME ALLOCATION: 200 HOURS LEVEL: 2 CREDIT VALUE: 20 MODULE PREREQUISITES: CORE KNOWLEDGE, CORE SKILLS I AND II, MUSCULOSKELETAL I MODULE DESCRIPTOR: This module will provide you with an opportunity to enhance your knowledge and skills acquired in the prerequisite modules and apply them to a further range of musculoskeletal conditions. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: To further your knowledge with regard to the current clinical management of patients/clients with musculoskeletal conditions of the upper limb and peripheral nerve injuries. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of this module you will be able to: 1. Demonstrate and apply a knowledge of the relevant anatomy of the upper limb and the peripheral nerves; 2. Analyse and relate previously learned relevant knowledge and skills to acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions of the upper limb and peripheral nerve lesions; 3. Describe the aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical features, multi-disciplinary and physiotherapeutic management of the above conditions; 4. Appropriately examine the shoulder, elbow, and wrist and hand regions, and patients/clients presenting with the above conditions; 5. Justify the selection and progression of physiotherapeutic techniques; 6. Implement the physiotherapeutic management of patients/clients with the above conditions in a safe, effective, efficient and caring manner considering psychological, socio-political, cultural and economic factors; 7. Demonstrate clinical reasoning skills in the management of the above conditions; 8. Communicate effectively orally and in writing with regard to the module content; METHOD OF DELIVERY: Lectures, study guides, practicals/workshops and student self-directed learning. INDICATIVE CONTENT: • Applied anatomy of bones, joints and muscles of the upper limb, and origin, course and distribution of the nerve plexi and the main peripheral nerves; • Aetiology, pathophysiology, clinical features and management of acute and chronic musculoskeletal conditions of the upper limb and peripheral nerve lesions;. • Clinical reasoning skills. • Further application of the theory of joint mobilisation to upper limb joints and other relevant manipulative procedures; • Physical examination of shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand regions and peripheral nerve lesions; Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  35. 35. • Electrotherapy relevant to peripheral nerve lesions; • Relevant exercise therapy techniques. ASSESSMENT: 45 minute practical examination. Four elements form this assessment. If you fail ONE element, with a mark of 35 to 39% or above, you will pass the module. Two or more failed elements, or any element(s) below 35%, will mean that you have to re-sit that/those failed elements, whatever the mark. Failure of an element on safety grounds will be awarded a zero and therefore will have to be re-taken. TIMING OF ASSESSMENT: Level 2, Semester 1, Week 8. INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential Reading  Apley AG, Solomon L. (1994) (2nd ed.) Concise System of Orthopaedics and Fractures. Butterworth-Heinemann Corrigan B, Maitland GD. (1994) Musculoskeletal and Sports Injuries. Butterworth- Heinemann Ombregt L. Bisschop P. (1999). Atlas of Orthopaedic Examination of the Peripheral Joints. W. B. Saunders. Palastanga N. Field D. Soames R. (2002). Anatomy and Human Movement: Structure and Function (4th Ed.). Butterworth Heinemann. Petty NJ. Moore AP. (1998) Neuromusculoskeletal Examination and Assessment: a Handbook for Therapists. Churchill Livingstone. Recommended Reading: Boscheinen-Morris J, Davey V, Conolley BV. (1992) (2nd ed.) Fundamentals of Hand Therapy Butterworth-Heinemann Clark GL. Wilgis EFS. Aiello B. Eckhaus D. Valdata Eddington L. (1997) (2nd ed.) Hand Rehabilitation - a practical guide. Churchill Livingstone. Crawford Adams J. Hamblen D. (1995). Outline of Orthopaedics (12th ed.). Churchill Livingstone. Dandy D. (1983). Essential Orthopaedics and Trauma (2nd ed.). Churchill Livingstone. David C. Lloyd J. (1999). Rheumatological Physiotherapy. Mosby International. Field D. (1994) Anatomy: Palpation and Surface Marking. Butterworth-Heinemann. Hughes S. (1989). Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Edward Arnold. Hyam-smith (1998). Common Hand Conditions/Injuries. Smith and Nephew, First National Hand Therapy Conference. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  36. 36. Moore K. L. (1992) Clinically Orientated Anatomy (3rd ed.). Williams and Wilkins. Olson T. R. (1996) A.D.A.M. Student Atlas of Anatomy. Williams and Wilkins. Tidswell M. (1998). Orthopaedic Physiotherapy. Mosby International. Tubiana R. Thomine JM. Mackin E. (1996) Examination of the Hand and Wrist. Martin Dunitz. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  37. 37. MODULE CODE: HH2102 MODULE TITLE: CLINICAL EDUCATION I MODULE LEADER: KIRSTY MCCRANN TIME ALLOCATION: 240 HOURS. LEVEL: 2 CREDIT VALUE: 20 MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: ALL PREVIOUS MODULES MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module will provide you with the opportunity to develop your basic skills of assessment, analysis and treatment of patients/clients presenting with selected respiratory, peripheral musculoskeletal or neurological dysfunction. You will be encouraged, with appropriate guidance to problem solve and make informed decisions relating to the selection of appropriate physiotherapeutic interventions for the patients/clients. This experience will generally be undertaken in an inpatient or outpatient setting, but will be flexible according to the experiences available in each individual placement and your needs at this stage of the course. You will be encouraged to take an holistic approach to patient/client care taking into account psychological, social, cultural and economic factors. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: To provide you with the opportunity to develop your basic skills of examination, assessment and treatment of patients presenting with respiratory, peripheral musculoskeletal or neurological dysfunctions; To encourage you, with appropriate guidance, to identify patients' problems and make informed decisions relating to the selection of appropriate physiotherapeutic interventions. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of the module, you will be able to: 1. Complete an effective subjective and objective assessment of patients/clients with a variety of peripheral musculo-skeletal, neurological or respiratory dysfunctions. 2. Analyse and prioritise the presenting problems identified in the assessment. 3. Select and effectively implement an appropriate evidence-based management programme, justifying any modifications following reassessment of the patient. 4. Recognise and demonstrate the characteristics of working as a professional within the physiotherapy and health care teams. 5. Respond to and initiate communication with patients, colleagues and other members of the health care team. 6. Initiate the principles of health care and health promotion with reference to psychological, social, cultural and economic factors. METHOD OF DELIVERY: Clinical Placements x 2 (4 weeks each). INDICATIVE CONTENT: Examination, assessment and treatment of patients presenting with respiratory, peripheral musculoskeletal or neurological dysfunctions. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  38. 38. ASSESSMENT: Two clinical placement assessment reports. 50% + 50% TIMING OF ASSESSMENT: End of placements  INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential and Recommended Reading: See appropriate campus-based modules Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  39. 39. MODULE CODE: HH2103 MODULE TITLE: CARDIOVASCULAR AND PULMONARY II MODULE LEADER: JENNI JONES TIME ALLOCATION: 100 HOURS LEVEL: 2 CREDIT VALUE: 10 MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: CORE KNOWLEDGE, CORE SKILLS I & II, CARDIOVASCULAR AND PULMONARY I MODULE DESCRIPTON: This module will encourage you to consolidate knowledge/skills achieved in previous modules and gain a basic understanding of the management of patients who require support for one or more systems. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: To equip you with the knowledge and skills to fulfil your function when working with patients who require support for one or more systems and/or who are critically ill. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of the module, you will be able to: 1. Discuss the assessment and management of patients who require support for one or more body systems and may require admission to an intensive care unit. 2. Demonstrate a problem solving and holistic approach to the management of patients who may require admission to intensive care, taking into account psycho-social, cultural and economic factors. 3. Justify the management of patients who may require admission to intensive care. 4. Discuss the role of the physiotherapist within the multi-disciplinary team working in an acute setting. 5. Discuss the progression of patient management in the acute setting through the different stages of rehabilitation. 6. Demonstrate an ability to document findings and proposed management. METHOD OF DELIVERY: Lectures, tutorials, practical classes and student self-directed learning. INDICATIVE CONTENT: • cardiac and pulmonary pathologies and their management; • multi-system failure and support; • physiotherapy in the ITU setting; • head and neck surgery and airway management; • cardio-pulmonary paediatric conditions and their management • cutaneous and inhalation burns and their management; • Oncology; • HIV. ASSESSMENT: 2,000 word case presentation TIMING OF ASSESSMENT: Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005) 
  40. 40. Level 2, Semester 2, Week 10 INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential Reading: Adams S & Osborne S. (1997) Critical Care Nursing Oxford Medical Pub. Hough A (1996) Physiotherapy in Respiratory Care - a problem solving approach Chapman Hall (2nd Ed) Pryor J & Webber B (1998) Physiotherapy for Respiratory and Cardiac Problems Churchill Livingstone Recommended Reading Ammani Prasad,S and Hussey,J (1995) Paediatric Respiratory Care. A Guide for Physiotherapists and Health Professionals. London Chapman Hall. Bosworth, C (1997) Burns Trauma. Management and Nursing Care. London, Bailliere Tindall in association with the R.C.N. Brannon, F.J., Foley, M.W., Starr, J.A , Saul, L.M. (1998) Cardiopulmonay Rehabilitation . Basic Theory and Application Philadelphia, F.A. Davis Company (3rd ed). Carrougher G J (Ed) (1998) Burn Care and Therapy Mosby Clarke J A (1992) A Colour Atlas of Burns Injuries Chapman & Hall Coats (1995) BACR Guidelines for Cardiac Rehabilitation Blackwell Science Dawkins K.D. (1987) Manual of Cardiology, Churchill Livingstone Dee & West (1995) Cardiac Rehabilitation BMJ Publishing. Dhillon, R.S. and East C.A. (1999) Ear, Nose and Throat and Head and Neck Surgery London, Churchill Livingstone (2nd ed). Ellis and Alison (1992) Key Issues in Cardiorespiratory Physiotherapy, Butterworth- Heinemann Gabriel, J. (ed) (2001) Oncology Nursing in Practice, London, Whurr Publishers Ltd. Hope, R.A., Longmore, J.M., Mcmanus,S.K., Wood-Allum, C.A. (1998) Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine. Oxford, Oxford University Press (4th ed) James D.G. & Studdy F.R.(1993) A Colour Atlas of Respiratory Diseases, Wolfe Medical (2nd Ed) Leatham A. (1991) Lecture Notes on Cardiology. Blackwell Scientific Publications (3rd Ed) Lissauer, T and Clayden, G (1997) Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  41. 41. Illustrated Textbook of Paediatrics,.London, Mosby. Mackenzie C, Imle P, Ciesla N (1989) Chest Physiotherapy in the Intensive Care Unit Williams & Wilkins (2nd Ed) Marieb E.N.(1998) Human Anatomy and Physiology. Benjamin Cummings Publishing Co (4th Ed) Paw H.G.W and Park,G.R (2000) Handbook of Drugs in Intensive Care. An A-Z Guide, London, Greenwich Medical media Ltd. Pollock, M.L. and Schmidt,D.H (eds) (1995) Heart Disease and Rehabilitation. (3rd ed) Pratt, R (1995) H.I.V. and A.I.D.S., A Strategy For Nursing Care. London, Arnold (4th ed) Settle, J.A.D (1986) Burns, The First five Days, Hull, Smith and Nepthew Smart, J (ed) (2000) The Royal Children’s Hospital Melbourne Paediatric Handbook. London, Blackwell Science (6th ed) Smith M & Ball V (1998) Cardiovascular / RespiratoryPhysiotherapy Mosby Viney, C (1996) Nursing the Critically Ill. London, Bailliere Tindall in association with the R.C.N. West J (1995) Respiratory Physiology-the Essential Williams & Wilkins (5th Ed) White (1992) Equipment Therapy for Respiratory Care, Delmas Publishers Inc Whiteley, S.M., Bodenham, A and Bellamy, M.C. (1998) Churchill’s Pocket Book of Intensive Care. London, Churchill Livingstone. Woodrow, P (2000) Intensive Care Nursing, London and New York, Routledge Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  42. 42. MODULE CODE: HH2104 MODULE TITLE: NEUROLOGICAL REHABILITATION MODULE LEADER: JOHN COSSAR OTHER TEACHING TEAM: STEVE ASHFORD, BETTY BOND, DAVID MASKILL TIME ALLOCATION: 100 HOURS LEVEL: 2 CREDIT VALUE: 10 MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: CORE KNOWLEDGE, CORE SKILLS I & II, NEUROLOGY MODULE DESCRIPTION: The module builds on Neurology to introduce more complex problems associated with neurological conditions and to develop knowledge and physiotherapy skills to address these as part of a multi-professional team. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: To develop the knowledge and skills to fulfil your role as a physiotherapist when working with people with complex neurological problems. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of this module you will be able to: 1. Describe and explain the common clinical problems listed in the indicative content, and discuss physiotherapy strategies to deal with them as part of a multi-disciplinary team. 2. Discuss the pathophysiology, epidemiology, aetiology, and associated clinical features of complex neurological conditions. 3. Describe and discuss the role of the physiotherapist within the multi-disciplinary management of people with neurological conditions within different health provision environments. 4. Identify the impairments, activity and participatory based patient problems within the context of the World Health Organisation ICF-2 model. 5. Develop and justify appropriate physiotherapy goals and intervention as part of a multi- disciplinary team – be able to re-analyse and progress these as appropriate for different stages of the rehabilitation process. METHOD OF DELIVERY: Lead lectures, student self-directed study, study guides, workshops, practical tutorials, tutorials. INDICATIVE CONTENT: • The impact of cognitive and behavioural problems on physical rehabilitation • The implications of complex balance problems in physical rehabilitation • The physical implications of Alzheimer’s Disease and dementia • Prevention and management of falls • Management of muscle length and contracture • Role of exercise in neurorehabilitation • Management of minimal awareness • Prevention of secondary complications and management of severe physical neurological impairment Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  43. 43. • Pathophysiology, aetiology, epidemiology and associated clinical features of head injury, space occupying lesions, and spinal cord injury • Physiotherapy within the multi-disciplinary management of spinal cord injuries, head injury, space occupying lesions and stroke • Physiotherapy within the multi-disciplinary management of common progressive conditions ASSESSMENT: Case study, 2000 words TIMING OF ASSESSMENT: Level 2, semester 2, week 10 INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential Reading:  Bromley I (1998) Tetraplegia and Papraplegia: a guide for physiotherapists (5th ed) Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh Linsay KW, Bone I & Callander R (1997) Neurology and Neurosurgery Illustrated, (3rd ed). Churchill Livingstone, London Bronstein AM, Brandt T, Woollacott MH (1996) Clinical disorders of balance, posture and gait. Arnold, London Everett T, Dennis M, Ricketts E (1959) Physiotherapy in mental health: a practical approach. Butterworth/Heinermann, Oxford. Carr J, Shepherd R (2003) Stroke rehabilitation. Guidelines for exercise and training to optimize motor skill. Butterworth/Heineermann, Oxford. World Health Organisation (2001) International classification of functioning, disability and health. World health organization, Geneva. Grieve J (1999) Neurophychology for occupational therapists: assessment of perception and cognition. Blackwell Science, Oxford. Nieuwenhuis A (1993) Teamwork in neurology. Chapman and Hall, London Edwards S (2001) Neurological physiotherapy: a problem solving approach. (2nd Ed.) Churchill Livingstone, London Recommended Reading: Ada L & Canning C. (1990). Key Issues in Neurological Physiotherapy. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford Carr JH & Shepherd RB (eds) (1987). Movement Science: Foundations for Physical Therapy in rehabilitation. Butterworth Heineman, Oxford Davies P (1985) Step to Follow Springer Verlag, Berlin Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  44. 44. De Souza L (1990). Multiple Sclerosis: Approaches to Treatment Chapman & Hall Fussey I & Muir G. (1999). Rehabilitation of the Severely Brain injured Adult; A Practical Approach, Croon Helm, Suffolk Garner R (1990) Acute Head Injury; Practical Management in Rehabilitation Chapman & Hall, London Greenwood, Barnes McMillan & Ward (Ed) (1997). Neurological Rehabilitation Psychology Press U.K, Hove Muir G & Clark-Wilson J (1993). Brain Injury Rehabilitation; A neurofunctional approach. Chapman & Hall, London Whalley-Hammel K (1995) Spinal Cord Rehabilitation. Chapman & Hall, London Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  45. 45. MODULE CODE: HH2105 MODULE TITLE: RESEARCH METHODS. MODULE LEADERS: PAUL RODEN, WILLIAM OLDREIVE TIME ALLOCATION: 200 HOURS LEVEL: 2 CREDIT VALUE: 20 MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: COMMUNICATION AND CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS MODULE DESCRIPTION: This module provides you with an introduction to basic research skills required of professionals working within contemporary healthcare settings. You, as a therapist, should be able to read and evaluate scientific publications within your area of expertise. Therapists should also be able to evaluate clinical effectiveness in healthcare settings and possibly make a contribution to scientific research themselves. This module provides a necessary grounding in these skills. Learning approaches will include problem formulation, small-scale data collection and analysis employing qualitative and quantitative approaches. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: Expose you to a range of evaluation methods and procedures; Deepen your understanding of the practical use of research and evaluation in healthcare settings. Develop understanding of research concepts. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of this module, you will be able to: 1. Explain the contribution of research in promoting and enhancing clinical effectiveness 2. Examine the ethical issues pertinent to the research process 3. Formulate appropriate research aims 4. Identify and develop appropriately worded research questions 5. Interpret the influence of bias on research outcomes 6. Choose appropriate research designs 7. Compare and contrast the characteristics of qualitative and quantitative approaches to healthcare research 8. Select and justify statistical methods and techniques appropriate to a range of research designs 9. Demonstrate an understanding of research ideas and concepts. METHOD OF DELIVERY: Lectures, practicals/workshops, student self-directed learning. INDICATIVE CONTENT: • Need for research and evaluation in healthcare settings • Critical reviewing of literature • Ethical issues in healthcare research • Validity and reliability in research • Refining research aims • Setting research question/hypothesis • Defining research variables Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  46. 46. • Qualitative and quantitative research designs • Methods of data collection • Construction of measurement tools • Small scale data collection • Statistical methods appropriate to healthcare research • Analysis of small-scale data sets ASSESSMENT: 3-hour written Examination. TIMING OF ASSESSMENT: Level 2, Semester 2, Week 10 INDICATIVE READING LIST Essential reading:  (purchase of one of the following books is recommended) Bork CE (Ed) (1993) Research in Physical Therapy. Philadelphia: Lippincott. French S (2001) Practical Research: A Guide for Therapists. (2nd ED.) Oxford: Butterworth- Heinemann. Hicks C (1999) Research for Clinical Therapists: Applied Project Design and Analysis (3rd ed.) London: Churchill-Livingstone. Polgar S & Thomas SA (2000) Introduction to Research in the Health Sciences (4th ed.) London: Churchill-Livingstone. Robson C (1993) Real World Research: A Resource for Social Scientists and Practitioner Researchers. Oxford: Blackwell. Recommended Reading: Bland M (1996) An Introduction to Medical Statistics. Oxford: Oxford Medical Publications. Pearson JCG & Turton SA (1993) Statistical Methods in Environmental Health. London: Chapman-Hall. Rowntree D (1991) Statistics Without Tears. Harmondsworth: Penguin Clegg F (1982) Simple Statistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press Coffey AS & Atkinson P (1996) Making Sense of Qualitative Data. London: Sage. Crabtree BF & Miller WL (1993) Doing Qualitative Research. London: Sage. Drummond A (1996) Research Methods for Therapists. London: Chapman-Hall. Maykut PS & Morehouse R (1994) Beginning Qualitative Research. London: Chapman-Hall. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  47. 47. Oppenheim AN (1992) Questionnaire Design, Interviewing and Attitude Measurement. London: Pinter. Silverman D (1997) Qualitative Research. London: Sage Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  48. 48. MODULE CODE: HH2106 MODULE TITLE: CLINICAL EDUCATION II MODULE LEADER: KIRSTY MCCRANN OTHER TEACHING TEAM: JILL LLOYD AND MEMBERS OF PHYSIOTHERAPY COURSE TEAM TIME ALLOCATION: 240 HOURS. LEVEL: 2 CREDIT VALUE: 20 MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: ALL PREVIOUS MODULES MODULE DESCRIPTOR: This module has been designed to enhance your knowledge of selected respiratory, peripheral musculoskeletal or neurological problems and their management through the development of problem-solving skills INTENDED MODULE AIMS: To enable you to build upon experiences gained during the first block of clinical education as well as apply and synthesise knowledge and skills introduced in previously taught academic modules; To enable you to further develop your skills of examination, assessment and treatment of respiratory, neurological or peripheral musculoskeletal dysfunctions; To emphasise to you the concepts of health care and health education which underpin the whole course. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of this module, you will be able to: 1. Complete an effective subjective and objective assessment of patients/clients with a variety of peripheral musculo-skeletal, neurological or respiratory dysfunction. 2. Analyse and prioritise the presenting problems identified in the assessment. 3. Select and effectively implement an appropriate evidence-based management programme, justifying any modifications following reassessment of the patient. 4. Recognise and demonstrate the characteristics of working as a professional within the physiotherapy and health care team. 5. Respond to and initiate communication with patients, colleagues and other members of the health care team. 6. Initiate the principles of health care and health promotion with reference to psychological, social, cultural and economic factors. METHOD OF DELIVERY: Clinical Placements x 2 (4 weeks each) INDICATIVE CONTENT: Examination, assessment and treatment of patients/clients with respiratory, peripheral musculoskeletal or neurological dysfunctions ASSESSMENT: Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  49. 49. Two clinical placement assessment reports. 50% + 50% TIMING OF ASSESSMENT: End of placements  INDICATIVE READING LIST: Essential and Recommended Reading: See appropriate campus-based modules. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  50. 50. MODULE CODE: HH3150 MODULE TITLE: CLINICAL EDUCATION III MODULE LEADER: JILL LLOYD TIME ALLOCATION: 240 HOURS LEVEL: 3 CREDIT VALUE: 20 MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF LEVELS 1 AND 2 MODULE DESCRIPTION: You will be encouraged to synthesise previous knowledge and skills in the management of patients/clients with multiple dysfunction. This may be cardiopulmonary, neurological or age related. The more extensive problem solving skills that you develop will enable you to establish realistic and achievable goals for your patients/clients. This clinical experience may be carried out in a variety of in-patient or out-patient settings. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: ♦ To encourage you to synthesise previous knowledge and skills in the management of patients/clients with multiple dysfunctions of cardiopulmonary, neurological or age related origin; ♦ To allow you to develop more extensive problem solving skills to enable you to establish realistic and achievable goals for your patients/clients INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of this module you will be able to: 1. Evaluate therapeutic problems following an appropriate assessment of patients/clients with age related, neurological or cardiopulmonary problems. 2. Formulate realistic achievable goals in collaboration with patients/clients, taking into account psychological, social and economic factors which may influence these goals and their realisation. 3. Facilitate good quality care by evaluating the effectiveness of the therapeutic intervention and modifying management programmes appropriately to address the changing needs of the patient/client. 4. Liaise effectively with members of the multi-disciplinary team and voluntary sectors concerned with patient care and initiate referral where necessary. 5. Evaluate the promotion of health and health education with reference to government directives. 6. Demonstrate flexibility and resourcefulness in a rapidly changing and varied clinical environment. 7. Manage self effectively according to time constraints within the health care setting. 8. Appraise available evidence to ensure best practice and quality patient management. 9. Reflect daily on clinical performance to facilitate maximal professional development. METHOD OF DELIVERY: Clinical Placements. INDICATIVE CONTENT: Examination, assessment and treatment of patients/clients presenting with cardio-pulmonary, neurological or age related dysfunctions. ASSESSMENT: Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  51. 51. Two clinical placement assessment reports. 50% + 50% TIMING OF ASSESSMENT: Throughout placements.  ESSENTIAL AND RECOMMENDED READING: See appropriate campus-based modules. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  52. 52. MODULE CODE: HH3151 MODULE TITLE: LITERATURE REVIEW MODULE LEADER: WILLIAM OLDREIVE/SANDRA NAYLOR TIME ALLOCATION: 100 HOURS LEVEL: 3 CREDIT VALUE: 10 MODULE PREREQUISITES: SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF LEVELS 1 AND 2 MODULE DESCRIPTOR: In order to practise and promote evidence-based intervention, therapists require a variety of literature search and evaluation skills. This module will give you the opportunity to undertake a critical review of the published literature in a defined subject area of your choice. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: To enhance your ability to analyse, evaluate and synthesise published literature, and write a report of your findings. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of this module you will be able to: Construct a literature review that has a clear defined focus on the area of interest; Select an appropriate proportion of peer-reviewed studies relevant to the chosen area of interest; Demonstrate critical skills in the assessment of the quality of the included studies; Combine, compare and contrast, where appropriate, the results of the critique of two or more published studies; Formulate an overall conclusion that demonstrates balance and judgement of the quality of the literature and propose a research question that will be operationalised in your research proposal. METHOD OF DELIVERY: Lecture, study guide, individual tutorials and self-directed learning. INDICATIVE CONTENT: ♦ Revision of methods of accessing and searching data bases and other sources of literature; ♦ Revision of critical skills for reviewing literature; ♦ The literature on the defined area of interest chosen by the student. ASSESSMENT: A LITERATURE REVIEW OF 2000 WORDS TIMING OF ASSESSMENT: Level 3, Semester 1, Week 14. INDICATIVE READING LIST: Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  53. 53. Essential Reading  Bork C.E. (1992) Research in Physical Therapy. Lippincott. French S. (2001) Practical Research: A Guide for Therapists (2nd Edition). Oxford, Butterworth-Heinemann. Hicks C. (1999) Research for Clinical Therapists: Applied Project Design and Analysis. Churchill Livingstone, London. Polgar S. And Thomas S.A. (2000) (4th ed.) Introduction to Research in the Health Sciences. Churchill Livingstone, London. + Literature relevant to the students’ chosen subject area. Recommended Reading: Bell J. (1999) Doing Your Research Project: A Guide for First-time Researchers (3rd Edition). Buckingham, Open University Press. Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)
  54. 54. MODULE CODE: HH3152 MODULE TITLE: PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE MODULE LEADER: ANNE HALL / ALAN ESNOUF TIME ALLOCATION: 100 HOURS. LEVEL: 3 CREDIT VALUE: 10 MODULE PRE-REQUISITES: SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF LEVELS 1 AND 2 MODULE DESCRIPTION: This interprofessional module seeks to prepare you for practice by enhancing awareness of health and social policy developments, providing a broader understanding of organisational structures. This module aims to deepen your understanding of how local, national and international policies influence professional practice. INTENDED MODULE AIMS: This module aims to prepare you for professional practice by advancing your knowledge of health and social care within the context of contemporary policy. It will also provide an opportunity for you to confirm your ability to function operationally in different social and health care environments. You will be encouraged to build on the communication and evaluation skills gained in the previous shared learning modules. This module will enable you to critically examine your future role as a qualified health professional in a changing complex environment. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES: On successful completion of the module, you will be able to: 1. Critically evaluate the contemporary health and social policy debates which influence the provision of services. 2. Evaluate public accountability through professional self regulation 3. Critically examine the role of the professional organisations 4. Appraise international perspectives on health and social care provision 5. Plan and implement effective self management within complex organisational environments. 6. Assemble the strategies necessary to manage your professional portfolio. 7. Analyse the key concepts of change management in organisations METHOD OF DELIVERY: Lectures, tutorials, self directed learning, role play INDICATIVE CONTENT: ♦ Structure and organisation of health and social care provision ♦ The therapist and the professional organisation ♦ Legal issues for the professional ♦ Professional accountability ♦ Recruitment and selection ♦ Managing change ♦ International perspective on health and social care provision Clinical Education Handbook (Sept 2005)

×