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[ ] 7023PES_3071_CO.pdf

  1. 1. COURSE OUTLINE Academic Organisation: School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science Faculty: Griffith Health Credit point value: 15 Student Contribution Band: Band 2 Course level: Postgraduate Campus/Location/Learning Mode: Gold Coast / On Campus / In Person, In Field Convenor/s: Ms Suzanne Kuys (Gold Coast) Enrolment Restrictions: Restricted: Course must be listed in Program This document was last updated: 24 January 2007 BRIEF COURSE DESCRIPTION Continued development of clinical knowledge and skill, integrated with exercise and medical science knowledge base will occur in this course, with a focus on neurological disorders. Analysis of evidence- based practice of neurological physiotherapy will enable an evaluative approach to physiotherapy practice. The multidisciplinary approach to management of people with neurological disorders will be explored. The clinical application of knowledge and skills is a major feature of this course. Each student will complete a 4-week clinical unit that is included in the overall assessment of the course. Prerequisite: 7018PES Clinical Science II and 7020PES Practice of Physiotherapy III
  2. 2. SECTION A – TEACHING, LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT COURSE AIMS The course aims to: Develop student entry-level physiotherapy skills for the assessment of the neurological, rehabilitation and elderly patient Develop student entry-level physiotherapy skills in the treatment planning of the neurological, rehabilitation and elderly patient Develop student entry-level physiotherapy skills in the implementation of treatment plan in the neurological, rehabilitation and elderly patient LEARNING OUTCOMES Upon completion of this course students will be able to: Integrate background knowledge of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology with the clinical presentation of clients with neurological and gerontological disorders Plan and perform appropriate assessment procedures, develop a diagnosis, management and evaluation plan for patients with disorders affecting the neurological and ageing systems Apply and integrate relevant radiological and other diagnostic tests to the above conditions Discuss relevant research literature underpinning assessment and treatment choices for the above conditions Appreciate the ramifications for assessment procedures, treatment goal setting, and treatment selection and provision for patients with acute and chronic conditions and patients being managed in the community or hospital setting Apply and demonstrate outcome measures relevant to management of clients with the above conditions Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of and ability in analysis of ‘normal/abnormal’ movement. Demonstrate ability to postulate mechanisms underlying ‘abnormal’ movement Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of a patient-centred and holistic approach to the management of the person with a neurological or gerontological disorder Demonstrate an understanding of the continuum of patient care from initial presentation through to discharge planning Demonstrate understanding of the uses of various ambulation aids and other therapeutic equipment in the management of the person with a neurological disorder. Demonstrate appropriate and safe use of such equipment Appreciate the professional and referral responsibilities associated with working in an multidisciplinary health care team Demonstrate a strong ability in clinical reasoning Apply principles of quality assurance to their practice. Demonstrate ability in knowledge and reasoning, assessment and patient management, safety and professional issues 1
  3. 3. CONTENT, ORGANISATION AND TEACHING STRATEGIES This course will be presented to students via several different strategies including lectures, laboratory or practical sessions and clinical placements. Written lecture and practical material will be made available to students throughout the semester. The course builds upon 7018PES Clinical Science II and 7020PES Practice of Physiotherapy III. Classroom practical sessions with peers and with patients will prepare the students to develop clinical competence. Opportunity to develop and refine clinical skills will be provided in both classroom and clinical settings. Wherever possible acute and chronic manifestations and patients across the age span will be treated. Assumed Knowledge: Students are assumed to have a knowledge and understanding of the following: • Neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpinning all the neurological disorders covered in this course including the components and organisation of the nervous system and integrative functioning of the nervous system, • Neurology and neurosurgery: diagnosis, medical management, pharmacology related to the following conditions: Acute and chronic stroke Traumatic brain injury Acute spinal cord injury Degenerative neurological disorders: eg Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease Peripheral nervous system disorders: eg Multiple sclerosis, Guillain Barre syndrome CONTENT SUMMARY Students will participate in three-hour practical laboratory sessions and two-hour lecture sessions as detailed below. A practical examination will be held at the end of the lecture series. A laboratory manual will be available. This will include references to readings and questions pertaining to the laboratories. It is required that manuals are completed on entering clinical placement 5. The lectures and laboratories will complement each other providing students with theoretical knowledge and clinical application of the impairments, disabilities and handicaps associated with brain damage. The lecture and laboratory material covers aspects associated with brain and spinal cord damage. Specific neurological conditions will be covered by other assessment. A resource package will be produced for students on completion of presentations. Class: Day Room Time Lec1 Wednesday G23_1.14/1.18/1.19 08:00-10:00 (Weeks –1 to 6) Lec2 Wednesday G23_1.14/1.18/1.19 11:00-13:00 (Weeks –1 to 6) Lec3 Wednesday G30_2.11/2.12 14:00-16:00 (Weeks –1 to 6) Lab1 Monday GO2_2.35/2.39 09:00–12:00 (Weeks –1 to 5) Lab2 Tuesday GO2_2.35/2.39 09:00–12:00 (Weeks –1 to 2) Lec1: Lecture 1; Lec2: Lecture 2; Lec3: Lecture 3; Lec4: Lecture 4; Lec5: Lecture 5; Lab1: Laboratory 1; Lab2: Laboratory 2. 2
  4. 4. Date Lecture Content Tutorial/Laboratory Content Readings (lectures) 12 Feb 2007 Lab 1: Introduction to the Lec 1: Neurological Physiotherapy semester and course and Lec 2: Upper Motor Neurone Lesion discussion of course outline Lec 3: Retraining Functional Carr & Shepherd Lab 2: Neurological / (2003) Ch 1, 4, 6 Movement – rolling, sitting and Functional Assessment standing up 19 Feb 2007 Lec 1: Vestibular assessment and Lab 1: Retraining functional Carr & Shepherd retraining (NJ) movement (2003) Ch 2,3 Moseley (1993) Lec 2: Assessment and retraining of AJP, 39: 259-267. balance Lab 2: Retraining lower limb Moores (1993) Lec 3: Assessment and retraining function and walking AJP, 39: 271-278. lower limb function and walking 26 Feb 2007 Lec 1: Amputees (HB) Lab 1: Retraining balance/ Carr & Shepherd vestibular function (2003) Ch 5 Sem Wk 1 Lec 2: Retraining sensory, perceptual and behavioural deficits Lab 2: Seating; Wheelchair prescription Lec 3: Assessment and retraining upper limb function – reaching and manipulation 5 Mar 2007 Lec 1: Acute Neurological Lab 1: Retraining upper limb Carr & Shepherd Management (JG) function (1998) Ch 12 Sem Wk 2 Lec 2: Traumatic Brain Injury (JG) Lab 2: Amputees (BL) ALL AM Carr & Shepherd (TBC) 1998 Ch 10 Lec 3: Movement Disorders (SC) 12 Mar 2007 Lec 1: Spinal Cord Injury (LM) Lab 1: Traumatic Brain Injury Carr & Shepherd (PAH Mon pm Masters; (2003) Ch 1, 6 Sem Wk 3 Lec 2: Paediatric Brain Injury (PI) Tuesday pm DD) 13.30 start. Plummer et al Lec 3: Pre-Clinical Education (Masters + 5 Mon AM PPIV; 2003 Physical Preparation DD Mon pm PPIV) Therapy 83, 8: 732-740 19 Mar 2007 Case Presentations PPIV and PPV Lab 1: Spinal Cord Injury (LM) (http://www.health all day (All Students) .qld.gov.au/qscis/i Sem Wk 4 nfo_equipment.as p) 26 Mar 2007 Practical Examination Sem Wk 5 (Tuesday/Monday) 2 April 2007 Clinical Units 5/6 9 April 2007 Clinical Units 5/6 16 April 2007 Clinical Units 5/6 23 April 2007 Clinical Units 5/6 30 April 2007 Clinical Units 5/6 7 May 2007 Clinical Units 5/6 14 May 2007 Clinical Units 5/6 21 May 2007 Clinical Units 5/6 28 May 2007 Clinical Units 5/6 3
  5. 5. 4 June 2007 Break Week 11 June Aquatic physiotherapy for Lab: Aquatic Physiotherapy 2007 neurological conditions (JL) TBC TBA Clinical Education Debrief TBA 18 June 2007 25 June Written exam TBA 2007 ASSESSMENT Summary of Assessment Item Assessment Task Length Weighting Total Due Date and Time Marks 1. Neurological Condition 15 minutes 10% 25 21 March 2007 Seminar 2. Practical Examination – 30 Minutes 20% 50 26/27th March 2007 Technique and Clinical Reasoning 3. Written Exam 2 Hours 30% 100 25 June 2005 4. Clinical Unit 5 Progressive 40% 5. Clinical Unit 5 Reflective 1000 P/F Via email by 5pm Monday Practice Exercise Words following end of Clinical Unit 5. Students must pass the practical examination component prior to commencement of Clinical Unit 5. Students must pass the academic and clinical based assessments to pass this course. If a student fails any of these components and they achieve an overall course grade of greater than 50%, the student will be given an SP grade. Note that an SP grade will not be considered as a passing grade for Practice of Physiotherapy V. Additional information available under Assessment Item 2 and Additional Course Information. Assessment Item 1 Neurological Condition Seminar The aim of this assignment is to expand your knowledge and clinical reasoning skills in a variety of neurological conditions and asks that you apply your skills in assessment and treatment of these patients. This assignment asks you to present information on your topic in a 15-minute presentation including questions. This assignment will challenge you to present relevant and evidence based research on this topic as well as your descriptions of the typical presentation of a patient with this condition, diagnostic criteria or differential diagnoses, a physiotherapy assessment, evidence-based treatments and techniques and the short term and long term management of such a patient with this condition. The topics are listed below. Students will work in groups of 3 for this assignment and can nominate for a topic of choice via the website: http://www.griffith.edu.au/ins.learningatgriffith The criterion marking scheme for this Assessment Item will be posted on website. Given this assignment will provide detailed information on a number of neurological conditions, which are not covered in class, all students must attend the presentations to have obtained entry level knowledge about these conditions one may encounter on clinical placements. Students will be required to submit an electronic version of their presentation to the Course Convenor via the website by 8am of the day of the presentation. All presentations will be made available via the website to share with your colleagues. 4
  6. 6. Students who do not attend the presentations nor submit an electronic version of their presentation will receive a 0 mark for the oral presentation assessment item. Topics: Multiple sclerosis Acoustic Neuroma Guillain Barre Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Post Polio Syndrome Subarachnoid Haemorrhage Erb’s / Bells Palsy Lateral Medullary Syndrome Huntington’s Disease Pusher Syndrome Spina Bifida Lacunar Infarcts Cerebral Palsy Brain Stem Lesions Motor Neurone Disease Peripheral Nerve Injuries – e.g Brachial Plexus Injury Cerebellar Ataxia Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis 5
  7. 7. Assessment Item 2 – Practical Examination – Technique and Clinical Reasoning The practical examination (a.k.a. Viva) is intended to assess student performance of practical and clinical reasoning skills prior to his or her participation in a subsequent Clinical Unit. Each student must demonstrate competence, i.e. pass the practical examination component prior to commencement of the subsequent clinical unit. Should a student fail a practical examination, he or she will be required to re-sit the exam within 14 days or prior to the commencement of the unit. Students who pass the second examination will receive his or her initial grade for the examination, but will be allowed to commence the next Clinical Unit. Should a student fail the second examination he or she will be required to show cause to the course Convenor, as well as the Senior Lecturer in Clinical Education, as to why he or she should be permitted to participate in that Clinical Unit. The course Convenor and the Senior Lecturer Clinical Education may consult with any appropriate persons and will make a final determination as to whether or not the student is permitted to commence the Clinical Unit. A timetable for the practical examinations will be placed on the website at least one week prior to the examination date. Students may need to bring a “model” to the exam. Students are responsible for checking their allocated time and ensuring that they (and their partner) are present at least 10 minutes prior to their scheduled time. Marks will be deducted at the discretion of the examiner for late arrival without prior permission from the course convenor. Students should come appropriately attired for the practical examination. Students who are being examined should be attired in their full clinical uniform. Students who are the ‘patients’ should also be suitably attired for practical testing. That is, appropriate underwear should be worn. The purpose of the practical examination is to assess the student’s ability to: Perform neurological assessment and practical techniques Demonstrate in-depth understanding of neurological conditions Design a treatment plan and justify your clinical reasoning for the chosen intervention Provide evidence for the effectiveness of a particular intervention Communicate effectively with the patient and plan overall management from holistic perspective Each student will be provided with the clinical notes for a patient who will require neurological / gerontological physiotherapy assessment and intervention. The clinical notes will be provided to the student 30 minutes prior to the practical examination. For this patient each student will be requested to: Demonstrate knowledge of presenting condition including aetiology, pathophysiology, and typical presentation. Demonstrate a particular assessment technique (for example coordination, spasticity) and/or a practical intervention technique (eg retraining sit to stand) Interpret the clinical notes and design a treatment plan including long term and short term treatment goals Discuss relevant clinical evidence for the effectiveness of a particular intervention A sample viva examination question is available below. The criterion based marking scheme will be posted on website. Sample question Mrs H suffered a (L) CVA two weeks ago and was admitted to your rehabilitation unit yesterday. The physiotherapist on the Acute Medical Unit has telephoned informing you that the patient requires two- person assist for transfers and has no active movement in her upper limb. 1. What is the typical presentation you would expect with a left sided CVA? 2. Demonstrate how you would assess sitting balance. Include an interview and physical examination in your assessment. 6
  8. 8. 3. Demonstrate an exercise you would prescribe to strengthen a lower limb muscle and discuss how you would progress this exercise for this patient. 4. What is the prognosis of this patient and detail your evidence to support this? Assessment Item 3 – Written Examination Each student is to complete a 2-hour written examination that will cover the lecture and laboratory material of the entire semester. The exam may include but not be limited to case studies, short answer, multiple choice and true/false questions. Assessment Item 4 – Clinical Unit 5 On clinical placements the student’s performance will be assessed on a progressive basis to enable formative assessment and feedback on their performance as well as summative assessment (to provide an overall mark by the end of the unit). In particular, the student will be progressively assessed until the midpoint of the unit and will perform a specific patient examination and treatment (or relevant task in a non- clinical setting eg. industry) at the midpoint and will receive feedback from these modes of assessment. During the second half of the placement, both progressive assessment and an end of unit one-off assessment of specific performance will be conducted with the final mark being an average of the marks of those two pieces of assessment. Again the student will receive feedback on their performance and will be encouraged to set priorities for their self-directed learning agendas. The assessment is based upon competencies demonstrated in clinical unit 5 (the neurological unit). Marking sheets for clinical units are found in your clinical information package. Students must pass both academic based and clinically based assessments to pass this course. If a student fails the academic or clinical based assessment component and they achieve an overall course grade of greater than 50%, the student will be given an SP grade. Note that an SP grade will not be considered as a passing grade for Practice of Physiotherapy V. Assessment Item 5 - Reflective Practice Assignment The aim of the reflective practice assignment is to commence the facilitation of reflective thinking and reflective practice in the physiotherapy students. It is important that all professionals, and especially physiotherapy students learn to develop a critical thinking process, to reflect on their feelings, actions and consequences and to relate explore and link the theory they have learned with the practice. Through this reflection students will be able to facilitate deeper learning by understanding what happened and be able to plan and implement changes of action accordingly. As part of the requirements of the Clinical Unit V, students are expected to complete a Reflective Practice Assignment by the end of Unit V, which should be emailed to the Course Convenor by 5.00 pm on the Monday immediately following the completion of the Clinical Unit V. Assignment Guidelines: Record as a journal in the following format: 1. Day 1 of Clinical Unit, describe: a. How you felt as you were starting this clinical unit b. What you see as being the role of a physiotherapist in this rehabilitation setting c. How you see the role of the physiotherapist in association with other health care professionals in this setting 2. Twice weekly entry – Select a patient/client you treat and describe (Please select a different patient each day): a. The medical condition of the patient b. How you felt when you were in contact with the patient c. What you did well for the patient d. What you could have done better and how would you do this better next time 3. Last day of Clinical Unit (last day), describe: a. How you felt at the end of this clinical unit b. What you see as being the role of a physiotherapist in a rehabilitation setting now 7
  9. 9. d. How you see the role of the physiotherapist in association with other health care professionals in this setting now 4. Write a small paragraph in your own words about your experience in the clinical unit. Please relate areas, conditions, and situations you have experienced in your clinical unit with the content of your lectures, and practicals of 7023PES Practice of Physiotherapy v course. Relate areas of the course content that have assisted in enhancing your experience in Clinical Unit V. The students may choose to also include additional information into their reflective practice entries that will assist them to better learn to reflect on their actions, and are not required to submit this additional information as part of the assignment. They are welcome to discuss any components they want to understand better with the course convenor or the Clinical manager. Reflective Practice Assignment Criteria The Reflective Practice Assignment is only marked on PASS/FAIL criteria. A student will fail only if the reflective practice assignment has not been completed. Evidence that the assignment has been done with an appropriately completed reflective assignment will automatically meet the requirements for this exercise and automatically grant a Pass to the student. The assignment may be up to approximately 1000 words in length; 1.5 line space; left justified; Times New Roman font 12; bulleted lists may be used when required; headings, page numbers, and a title page are mandatory. Please do not identify any patients by full name, can use initials. But please do refer to any patients as a person and not as ‘the patient’. The following marking criteria are utilised in assessing the assignment: 1. Correct spelling, grammar, punctuation, and unambiguous sentence structures. 2. Referencing of course content (lectures, practicals, site visits and reading material) GRADUATE SKILLS The Griffith Graduate Statement states the characteristics that the University seeks to engender in its graduates through its degree programs. Convenors are encouraged to make reference to graduate skills development within the subsections Learning Outcomes, Content, Organisation and Teaching Strategies and Assessment. In this section, convenors are required to summarise how this course contributes to the development of all or some of these graduate skills by checking the appropriate boxes in the following table. Assessed Practised Graduate Skills Taught Effective communication (written) Effective communication (oral) Effective communication (interpersonal) Information literacy Problem solving Critical evaluation Work autonomously Work in teams Creativity and innovation Ethical behaviour in social / professional / work environments Responsible, effective citizenship 8
  10. 10. TEACHING TEAM Convenors are required to provide information about the teaching team. For courses offered at more than one campus, the following table may be copied for each campus, or columns may be added/deleted as required. Course Convenor Convenor Details Gold Coast Campus Convenor Suzanne Kuys Email s.kuys@griffith.edu.au Office Location GO2 1.18 (Clinical Science 1 building, Gold Coast campus) Phone 555 27087 Fax 555 28674 Consultation times Tuesdays Additional teaching team members Additional teaching team members include: Mr Michael Harris Mrs Lucy Maugham Ms Heather Batten Ms Janelle Gesch Ms Natalie Johnson Ms Penny Ireland Mrs Judy Larsen Mr Barry Leech COURSE COMMUNICATIONS At all times students are encouraged to contact the Course Convenor or the Physiotherapy Administration Officer (Laurance Robillard) if they have any queries about this course or the program. Mrs Suzanne Kuys Tel: 07 5552 7087 Fax: 07 5552 8674 Email: s.kuys@griffith.edu.au Laurance Robillard: Tel: 07 5552 8922 Fax: 07 5552 8674 Email: l.robillard@griffith.edu.au Lecture material and other support documents pertaining to the course will be posted on the Learning@Griffith website. Students are encouraged to check this on a regular basis. TEXTS AND SUPPORTING MATERIALS Texts • (*) Carr J & Shepherd R. (2003 ) Stroke Rehabilitation, Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford. • Carr J & Shepherd R. (1998) Neurological Rehabilitation – Optimizing Motor Performance, Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford. • (*)Hill K., et al (2005) Manual for clinical outcome measurement in adult neurological physiotherapy. APA Neurology Special Interest Group (Victoria). (Available from the APA Office Melbourne – see attached application form) 9
  11. 11. • (*) Stokes M. (2004) Physical Management in Neurological Physiotherapy. Mosby London • (*)Umphred, D. A. (2001) Neurological Rehabilitation. Mosby, London. Other Supporting Material The books with (*) are held on closed reserve in the Griffith University Library. • Davies P.M., (1990) Steps to Follow, Springer-verlag, Germany • Davies P.M., (1990) Right in the Middle, Springer-verlag, Germany • Davies P.M., (1998) Starting Again, Springer-verlag, Germany th • Kandel E., Schwartz JH. Jessell TM (2000) Principles of Neuroscience. 4 Ed. Appleton-Lange, Connecticut. • Morris M, et al (1995) Moving ahead with Parkinson' a guide to improving mobility in people with s: Parkinson' Kingston Centre, Victorial. s. • Refshauge K et al (2005) Science Based Rehabilitation. Butterworth Heinemann, Oxford. rd • De Lisa J A., Gans B M., (eds) (1998) Rehabilitation medicine: principles and practice. 3 edition. Lippincott-Raven, Philadelphia. • Edwards S E (ed.) (2002) Neurological Physiotherapy: a problem-solving approach. Churchill Livingstone New York • Bertoti DB (2004) Functional Neurorehabiltiation Through The Lifespan. FA Davis, Philadelphia 10
  12. 12. ABN 89 004 265 150 Quantity Price !" # " !# $% & proof of student status is required _____ _______ please send copy of student card with orders Quantity Price ! !! ' ( ) * + ! ) , ' * # , ( % Quantity Price " !" # " !# , ' * # , ( - . POSTAGE & HANDLING !" # $% &' # ( ) *"! # * ( ) ///////////////// % ! + , ,! ! - * ." / ./ 0 +1 2 ! 3 ! 3 , . ////////////////// , # +! # 4 0 5 6 ' ) 0 1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! $ 1!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ) 1 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 2 , #$ 1 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! $ 1 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 3 1 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 3 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 6'$ # 7 )3) 5 14 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 % 8 )9: !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! , ) 3 , , ) 2 , 1 ο; < ο5 2 ο= ο: 2 2 !1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ! ' > , 1 # $ 1 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 !! 2 ? 1 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ! ( ! # 4 6 0 77 6 0 !1 0 1 00 6 ! ' 8 9:9; ) 2 2 , 1 4$ %&<;%: <: 84$ %&<;%: < << = 4 > 77 6 ? 1 0 1 > 0 > 11
  13. 13. SECTION B – ADDITIONAL COURSE INFORMATION 1. Attendance Attendance at all lecture/laboratory/practical sessions/coursework sessions is compulsory and a class roll will be taken at random. Absence without proper justification from any session is not acceptable. If there is a valid medical reason for absence, the course Convenor should be notified and a supporting medical certificate supplied as soon as possible. Remedial classes or evidence of extra study may be required. The details of make-up work after an absence should be negotiated with the course Convenor. Where extenuating circumstances create student absence the situation should be explained to the course Convenor as early as possible, in writing, accompanied by supporting documentation. The plan and strategies required to cover the missed course content must be documented. Applications for leave of absence will be treated confidentially; none will receive automatic approval. Approvals require input from all the relevant staff members from the School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science. The student will subsequently be notified of the decision in writing (where possible). Non-attendance of three (3) sessions in any one semester or course of study, without reasonable justification or medical certification (see below) will result in; the deduction of 15% of the academic component of this course. The consequences of a deduction of 15% may jeopardize progress to the subsequent clinical placement. Non-attendance of three (3) sessions with reasonable / medical justification will mean that the student must take remedial action. These provisions are in place to ensure that the clinical competencies prescribed for this course are fulfilled, and that clinical placements can be safely completed without detriment to patients, to the facility and its staff, or to the student. 2. Medical Certificates The following extract is taken from the Griffith University Undergraduate Studies Handbook and relates to deferred assessment. This policy will be strictly enforced. Students may apply for Deferred Assessment if they were prevented from performing an assessment item on the grounds of illness, accident, disability, bereavement or other compassionate circumstances. Students applying for deferred assessment on medical grounds must submit a medical certificate from a registered medical or dental practitioner stating: (i) The date on which the practitioner examined the student; (ii) The severity and duration of the complaint; (iii) The practitioner' opinion of the effect of the complaint on the student' ability to s s undertake the assessment item A statement that the student was "not fit for duty" or was suffering from a "medical condition" will not be accepted unless the information required in (i), (ii) and (iii) above is included. A copy of the recommended student medical certificate for use by Griffith University students is attached. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure they are familiar with this material. 3. ASSESSMENT 3.1 Viva Voce In most cases a practical examination (a.k.a. Viva) is intended to assess student performance of practical and clinical reasoning skills prior to his or her participation in a subsequent Clinical Unit. Each student must demonstrate competence, i.e. pass the practical examination component prior to commencement of the subsequent clinical unit. Should a student fail a practical examination, he or she will be required to re-sit the exam within 14 days or prior to the commencement of the unit. Students who pass the second examination will receive his or her initial grade for the examination, but will be allowed to commence the next Clinical Unit. Should a student fail the second examination he or she will be required to show cause to the course Convenor, as well as the Senior Lecturer in Clinical Education, as 12
  14. 14. to why he or she should be permitted to participate in that Clinical Unit. The course Convenor and the Senior Lecturer Clinical Education may consult with any appropriate persons and will make a final determination as to whether or not the student is permitted to commence the Clinical Unit. 3.2 Return of Assessment Items Results of presentations, viva and written examinations will be posted in ‘My Grades’, Learning@Griffith, within a reasonable time frame after the due date of each assessment item. Feedback on each assessment item will be available to students from the course Convenor for a period of 2 weeks following the return or posting of results of the assessment item. Criterion based marking will be used, and there will be no scaling of marks. Allocation of grades will be according to Griffith University Assessment Policy: High Distinction (HD) > 85% Distinction (D) 75% - 84% Credit (C) 65% - 74% Pass (P) 50% - 64% Pass Conceded (PC) 48%-49% Fail (F) < 48% If a student gains a Pass Conceded, then the course cannot be used as a prerequisite for another course. Please consult the Griffith University handbook for all procedures associated with process to be followed if students are in circumstances, which might adversely influence their progress and performance in the course. 3.3 Notification of Availability of Feedback on Assessment Students are encouraged to discuss with academic staff their performance in assessment items during a course. Should a student wish to review their feedback or mark with the convenor, the following procedure should be followed: 1. A request for an appointment must be made with the convenor in writing by email 2. The email must state the specific reason for the request 3. The request must be received by the course convenor within 14 days of having received the marked assessment item Please note, should a student request an assessment item be remarked, the item will be remarked by the course convenor as well as a second academic staff member. The mark for the reviewed item may increase, decrease, or be the same as the original mark, and it is the reviewed mark that will be considered to be the final mark for that assessment item. 3.4 Assignment Extensions Extensions will not be given automatically. Each request for an extension will be judged on a case-by- case basis with the final decision to grant/reject an extension application to be made by the course Convenor. Students seeking an extension or change are encouraged to submit their request early. Extensions/changes will only be considered after evidence of significant application/progress to the coursework/assignment has been demonstrated. 3.5 Late Submission of Assignments Students are expected to coordinate assessment schedules for all courses studied during a semester in a timely manner in order to avoid late submissions. Penalties for late submissions are as follows: 1 day late - item will be marked at 85% of original assessment value (e.g. item assessment value of 30% will be marked out of 25.5%) 2 days late - item will be marked at 70% of original assessment value (e.g. item assessment value of 30% will be marked out of 21%) 3 days late - item will be marked at 50% of original assessment value (e.g. item assessment value of 30% will be marked out of 15%) 4 days late - item will not be marked (e.g. item assessment value of 30% will receive 0%) 13
  15. 15. 4. ASSESSMENT OF CLINICAL COMPETENCE In 7023PES Practice of Physiotherapy V, clinical assessment is worth 40% of the total course mark. Assessment is based upon competencies demonstrated in Clinical Unit 5. Each student’s performance on clinical placement will be assessed on a progressive basis to enable formative assessment and feedback on performance as well as summative assessment (to provide an overall mark by the end of the unit). Complete details of assessment in clinical units can be found in the clinical education policy and procedures manual which can be found at: http://www62.gu.edu.au/policylibrary.nsf During Clinical Placements, physiotherapy students are expected to conduct themselves according to the standards set by the University for student behaviour, according to the professional standards set by the Course Convenor and Senior Lecturer in Clinical Education for clinical placements and the ethical guidelines of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. In any course that contains a clinical unit students must pass both academic based and clinically based assessments to pass that course. If a student fails the academic or the clinical based assessment component, but achieves an overall course grade of greater than 50%, then he or she will be awarded a Supplementary Pass (SP). Note that an SP grade may not be considered as a passing grade for subsequent courses. Specifically, if a student passes the academic component of the course and fails a clinical unit, they not have reached a competency standard to make them eligible for graduation from Griffith University. To ensure competency, the student will be required to complete a supplementary clinical unit. The format of the supplementary clinical unit will be decided by a committee comprising the course Convenor, the Senior Lecturer in Clinical Education (PES) and the relevant Clinical Educator, in accordance with Griffith University Assessment Policy. If a student passes the clinical component of the course, but fails the academic component of the course they will be required to complete a supplementary examination. The format of the supplementary examination will be decided by the course Convenor, in accordance with Griffith University Assessment Policy. Under Griffith University policy, 7023PES (Practice of Physiotherapy V) is a designated course for exclusion, ie, a course comprising a clinical placement setting where failure may be associated with unprofessional conduct and/or client-at-risk conduct, and where the option of allowing the student back for another clinical placement may be problematic. 5. CONDUCT 5.1 Conduct on campus Students should attend class appropriately attired to allow his or her participation as "patients" or "models". Students are permitted to practice independently and unsupervised in rooms GO2_2.35 & 2.39 provided they have completed the appropriate paperwork available from the course Convenor, and provided that guidelines for room use, and safe conduct, are followed. Students are responsible for being familiar with the rules and regulations for unsupervised practice. Students are responsible for the care and maintenance of equipment and facilities during practice sessions. Only academic staff can grant access to rooms. At all times students must follow the direction of the teaching staff and have high regard for their own safety, and the safety of others. The presence of children may contravene University Workplace Health and Safety policies - students should discuss this matter with the course Convenor prior to bringing children to classes. 5.2 Conduct on clinical placement Physiotherapy students are expected to conduct themselves according to; the behavioral standards set by the University, the professional standards set by the course Convenor and Senior Lecturer in Clinical Education for clinical placements, and the ethical guidelines of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. 14
  16. 16. Where it is noted that a student has been in breach of the Student Charter or the expected standards of appropriate, ethical behaviour the course Convenor has the right to: o Discuss the behaviour with the student o Note the behaviour on an incident report (to be signed by both the student and staff) o Refer the behaviour to the Physiotherapy Program Convenor o Institute or require remedial action of the student, as appropriate If the student’s behaviour remains below a level appropriate for acceptable professional conduct, then he or she may be required to present to a School Academic committee (to be advised). 5.3 Academic Misconduct Plagiarism will not be tolerated. The following extract from the Griffith University Undergraduate Handbook outlines behaviours considered to be academic misconduct. “Students must conduct their studies at the University honestly, ethically and in accordance with accepted standards of academic conduct. Any form of academic conduct that is contrary to these standards is academic misconduct, for which the University may penalize a student. Specifically it is academic misconduct for a student to: o Present copied, falsified or improperly obtained data as if it were the result of laboratory work, field trips or other investigatory work; o Include in the student' individual work material which is the result of significant assistance from s another person if that assistance was unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; o Assist another student in the presentation of that student' individual work in a way that is s unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; o Cheat; (cheating is dishonest conduct in assessment); o Plagiarize; (plagiarism is knowingly presenting the work or property of another person as if it were one' own).” s i. Examples of Plagiarism Example 1: Word for word copying …. of sentences or paragraphs from one or more sources which are the work or data of other persons (including books, articles, thesis, unpublished works, working papers, seminar and conference papers, internal reports, lecture notes or tapes) without clearly identifying their origin by appropriate referencing. “Word for word copying must be properly referenced as a direct quote, not by an in text reference to the author.” Example 2: Closely para-phrasing …. sentences or paragraphs from one or more sources without appropriate acknowledgment in the form of a reference to the original work or works. Sanctions for plagiarism are Course specific, and extend to exclusion from the Course, the Program in which the student is enrolled, and/or Griffith University. For full information about Griffith University’s guidelines regarding academic misconduct or plagiarism see www.gu.edu.au/ua/aa/ppm/pae/content/StudAppeals_Pol_fs.html 5.4 Referencing The link below opens a guide to referencing, avoiding plagiarism, and study skills that was developed by the Faculty of Arts, Griffith University. https://mail01.domino.gu.edu.au/mail01/s356673.nsf/38d46bf5e8f08834852564b500129b2c/19581ed4357 ed8b44a25725f0025621c/$FILE/Referencing.pdf Another useful site is the Learning Assistance Unit’s information on referencing at: www.gu.edu.au/ins/lils/lau/frameset4.html. All physiotherapy courses require compliance by students with the Student Charter, available at: http://www.griffith.edu.au//ua/aa/secretariat/studentcharter/ 15
  17. 17. 6. PROFESSIONAL SKILLS The course Practice of Physiotherapy V provides the student with knowledge, skill and attitudes that relate to many aspects of the Australian Standards for Physiotherapy (2006). A copy of the Standards may be downloaded from the Australian Physiotherapy Council website: http://www.physiocouncil.com.au/file_folder/AustralianStandardsforPhysiotherapySummary For details see policy document "Inability to complete required components of professional qualification" which can be found at: http://www62.gu.edu.au/policylibrary.nsf Where it is noted that a student has been in breach of the Student Charter or the expected standards of appropriate, ethical behaviour the Course Convenor has the right to: - Discuss the behaviour with the student - Note the behaviour on an incident report (to be signed by both the student and staff) - Refer the behaviour to the Physiotherapy Program Convenor - Institute or require remedial action of the student, as appropriate If the student’s behaviour does not improve to a level appropriate for acceptable professional conduct, students may be required to present to a School Academic committee (to be advised). 16
  18. 18. SECTION C – KEY UNIVERSITY INFORMATION ACADEMIC MISCONDUCT Students must conduct their studies at the University honestly, ethically and in accordance with accepted standards of academic conduct. Any form of academic conduct that is contrary to these standards is academic misconduct, for which the University may penalise a student. Specifically it is academic misconduct for a student to: present copied, falsified or improperly obtained data as if it were the result of laboratory work, field trips or other investigatory work; include in the student' individual work material that is the result of significant assistance s from another person if that assistance was unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; assist another student in the presentation of that student' individual work in a way that is s unacceptable according to the instructions or guidelines for that work; cheat; (Cheating is dishonest conduct in assessment); plagiarise (Plagiarism is knowingly presenting the work or property of another person as if it were one' own.) s Visit the University’s Policy on Academic Misconduct for further details. KEY STUDENT-RELATED POLICIES All University policy documents are accessible to students via the University’s Policy Library website at: www.griffith.edu.au/policylibrary. Links to key policy documents are included below for easy reference: Student Charter Academic Standing, Progression and Exclusion Policy Student Administration Policy Policy on Student Grievances and Appeals Assessment Policy Examinations Timetabling Policy and Procedures Academic Calendar Guideline on Student E-Mail Health and Safety Policy UNIVERSITY SUPPORT RESOURCES The University provides many facilities and support services to assist students in their studies. Links to information about University support resources available to students are included below for easy reference: Learning Centres - the University provides access to common use computing facilities for educational purposes. For details visit www.griffith.edu.au/cuse Learning@Griffith - there is a dedicated website for this course via the Learning@Griffith student portal. Student Services facilitate student access to and success at their academic studies. Student Services includes: Careers and Employment Service; Chaplaincy; Counselling Service; Health Service; Student Equity Services (incorporating the Disabilities Service); and the Welfare Office. Learning Services within the Division of Information Services provides learning support in three skill areas: computing skills; library skills; and academic skills. The study skills resources on the website include self- help tasks focusing on critical thinking, exam skills, note taking, preparing presentations, referencing, writing, proof reading, and time management. 17

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