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Math notebooking collection 681 pgs.

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Interactive Notebook Foldables, Organizers and Templates

Interactive Notebook Foldables, Organizers and Templates

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    Math notebooking collection 681 pgs. Math notebooking collection 681 pgs. Document Transcript

    • A Collection of MathNotebook Templates &Pages from VariousWebsites and Blogs
    • JanuaryJanuaryMayMaySeptemberSeptember OctoberOctober NovemberNovember DecemberDecemberAugustAugustJulyJulyJuneJuneFebruaryFebruary MarchMarch AprilAprilNotesNotesSFTWTMS SFTWTMS SFTWTMS SFTWTMSSFTWTMSSFTWTMSSFTWTMSSFTWTMSSFTWTMS SFTWTMS SFTWTMS SFTWTMS© 2007 Notebooking Nook
    • JanuaryJanuaryMayMaySeptemberSeptember OctoberOctober NovemberNovember DecemberDecemberAugustAugustJulyJulyJuneJuneFebruaryFebruary MarchMarch AprilAprilNotesNotesSFTWTMS SFTWTMS SFTWTMS SFTWTMSSFTWTMSSFTWTMSSFTWTMSSFTWTMSSFTWTMS SFTWTMS SFTWTMS SFTWTMS© 2007 Notebooking Nook
    • BACK PAGEa)b)
    • a)b)a)b)c) ( ) ( ) ( )a)b) ( )c)
    • BACK PAGE
    • A number isdivisible by…if…2357the last digit, when ___________________________, andthen subtracted from the number formed by theremaining digits, gives a result of 0 or a number____________________________________________________.a)b)c)
    • a)b)c)a)b)c)a)b)
    • BACK PAGE( ) ( )
    • a)b)c)a)b)a)b)STEPS TO SOLVE:1. Write the quotient as a____________________________________.2. Rewrite as the _______________________of two fractions.3. Use the _______________________ ofPowers Property4. Simplify.
    • BACK PAGE( )( )( )( )( ) ( )( )( )
    • ( )a)b)c)a)b)c)d)
    • AbsoluteValueAbsolutevalueisusedtodescribethedistanceanumberisfrom________________.Thenotationweusetoshowabsolutevalueisapairof______________________________.Drawthesebelow.Toreadtheexpression|-4|youwouldsay,“_______________________________________________________”Lookingatthenumberlinebelow,wecanseethat-4is________________spacesawayfromzero.Positive4isalso__________________spacesawayfromzero.So,|-4|=AND|4|=Becauseabsolutevaluereferstodistanceonanumberline,itisalwaysa____________________________________.AbsoluteValueAbsolutevalueisusedtodescribethedistanceanumberisfrom________________.Thenotationweusetoshowabsolutevalueisapairof______________________________.Drawthesebelow.Toreadtheexpression|-4|youwouldsay,“_______________________________________________________”Lookingatthenumberlinebelow,wecanseethat-4is________________spacesawayfromzero.Positive4isalso__________________spacesawayfromzero.So,|-4|=AND|4|=Becauseabsolutevaluereferstodistanceonanumberline,itisalwaysa____________________________________.
    • Add glue here and glue to the back ofthe next strip.Add glue here and glue to the back ofthe next strip.     Accordion (horizontal)Cut out strips. Glue as indicat-ed. Fold like an accordion.Paste back of the last piece toyour lapbook.
    • Large Hexagon AccordionCut out shapes on solid black lines. Fold on dotted lines like an accordion (back and forth).Glue back of last piece to your lapbook.
    • Cut out shapes on solid black lines. Fold on dotted lines like an accordion (back and forth).Glue back of last piece to your lapbook. Hint: You might want to tie a ribbon or stringaround your accordion before you glue the back to your lapbook.Medium Hexagon Accordion
    • Cut out shapes on solid black lines. Fold ondotted lines like an accordion (back andforth).Glue back of last piece to your lapbook.Hint: You might want to tie a ribbon orstring around your accordion before youglue the back to your lapbook.Small Hexagon Accordion
    • Large Octagon Accordion Cut out shapes on solidblack lines. Fold on dot-ted lines like an accordi-on (back and forth).Glue back of last piece toyour lapbook.Hint: You might want totie a ribbon or stringaround your accordionbefore you glue the backto your lapbook.
    • Small Octagon AccordionCut out shapes on solid black lines.Fold on dotted lines like an accordion(back and forth).Glue back of last piece to your lap-book.Hint: You might want to tie a ribbon orstring around your accordion beforeyou glue the back to your lapbook.
    • Large Pentagon AccordionCut out shapes on solid black lines. Fold on dotted lines like an accordion (back and forth).Glue back of last piece to your lapbook. Hint: You might want to tie a ribbon or stringaround your accordion before you glue the back to your lapbook.
    • Medium Pentagon AccordionCut out shapes on solid black lines. Fold on dotted lines like an accordion (back and forth,back and forth). Paste the back of the last piece to your lapbook.
    • Small Pentagon AccordionCut out shapes on solid black lines. Foldon dotted lines like an accordion (backand forth).Glue back of last piece to your lapbook.Hint: You might want to tie a ribbon orstring around your accordion before youglue the back to your lapbook.
    • Large Rectangle AccordionCut out shapes on solidblack lines. Fold on dot-ted lines like an accordion(back and forth).Glue back of last piece toyour lapbook.Hint: You might want totie a ribbon or stringaround your accordionbefore you glue the backto your lapbook.
    • Small Rectangle AccordionCut out shapes on solid black lines. Fold ondotted lines like an accordion (back andforth).Glue back of last piece to your lapbook.Hint: You might want to tie a ribbon orstring around your accordion before youglue the back to your lapbook.
    • Small Square AccordionCut out shapes on solid black lines. Foldon dotted lines like an accordion (back andforth).Glue back of last piece to your lapbook.Hint: You might want to tie a ribbon orstring around your accordion before youglue the back to your lapbook.
    • Ticket AccordionCut out shapes on solid blacklines. Fold on dotted lines like anaccordion (back and forth, backand forth). Paste the back of thelast piece to your lapbook.
    • Cut out on solid lines. Starting with cover, accordion fold all the triangles on the dotted lines.Hold book so that long side of triangle is at bottom, point is at top, and text is horizontal. Thecover will open down. On the first flap have child write …, flip that down and write … and thenflip that down and write …. Illustrate.Glue where indicated.This sidegets glueddown
    • Print out and cutaround person andpages as a whole.Accordion fold pages socover is on top. Glueback of person intolapbook.
    • | | | || | | |
    • Integers: Adding & Subtracting (1.2 & 1.3)Main Idea DetailsHow do you addintegers on anumber line?How do yousubtract integerson a numberline?Adding Integers on aNumber LineMove right on a number line toadd a positive integer.Move left on a number line to adda negative integer.Subtracting Integers on aNumber LineMove left on a number line tosubtract a positive integer.Move right on a number line tosubtract a negative integer.Integers: Adding & Subtracting (1.2 & 1.3)Main Idea DetailsHow do you addintegers on anumber line?How do yousubtract integerson a numberline?Adding Integers on aNumber LineMove right on a number line toadd a positive integer.Move left on a number line to adda negative integer.Subtracting Integers on aNumber LineMove left on a number line tosubtract a positive integer.Move right on a number line tosubtract a negative integer.
    • Lesson: Date:AlgebraPractice EPractice DPractice CPractice BPractice A241223112210219208197186175164153142131
    • Lesson: Date:Test #28142713261225112410239228217206195184173162151
    • Algebraic EquationsA mathematical sentence with an equal sign is an_______________________. Algebraic equations contain variablesthat represent an unknown number.List some examples:A ___________________________ to an equation is any value for thevariable that makes the equation true.8 3The only value for x that would make this equation true is___________. Therefore, ________ .The _______________________ for an algebraic equation is the valueof the variable that makes the equation true.12 6 Since 12 6, ____ .It is important to _________________________ your solution in theequation, to make sure it is correct. 8 2 6 ?Algebraic EquationsA mathematical sentence with an equal sign is an_______________________. Algebraic equations contain variablesthat represent an unknown number.List some examples:A ___________________________ to an equation is any value for thevariable that makes the equation true.8 3The only value for x that would make this equation true is___________. Therefore, ________ .The _______________________ for an algebraic equation is the valueof the variable that makes the equation true.12 6 Since 12 6, ____ .It is important to _________________________ your solution in theequation, to make sure it is correct. 8 2 6 ?
    • © 2008 Notebooking Nook
    • © 2008 Notebooking Nook
    • © 2008 Notebooking Nook
    • © 2008 Notebooking Nook
    • © 2008 Notebooking Nook
    • © 2008 Notebooking Nook
    • © 2008 Notebooking Nook
    • © 2008 Notebooking Nook
    • © 2008 Notebooking Nook
    • ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Copyright 2012 www.design-your-homeschool.com For free use in your home.
    • ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Copyright 2012 www.design-your-homeschool.com For free use in your home.
    • ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Copyright 2012 www.design-your-homeschool.com For free use in your home.
    • ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Copyright 2012 www.design-your-homeschool.com For free use in your home.
    • _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Copyright 2012 www.design-your-homeschool.com For free use in your home.
    • ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Copyright 2012 www.design-your-homeschool.com For free use in your home.
    • Cutouttopportionasonepiece.Cutoutlongrectanglewithanexactoknife.Cutoutbottomportionasonepiece.Cutonorangelines.Rollupbottomportionandstickthemthroughtherectangleonthetopportion.Videotohelp-http://www.liveandlearnpress.com/movies/000_0441.mov Bound Book
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comCharacter AnalysisTitle of work:Name of author:EvidenceRevealedThroughtrait1Charactertrait2trait3RevealedThroughRevealedThrough
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comCharacter TransformationTitle of work:Name of author:EvidenceRevealedThroughCharacterEnding traitRevealedThroughBeginning traitHow theChangeComesAboutCHANGE
    • Date: ____________Combining Like TermsMain Idea DetailsWhat arelike terms?Example:When is analgebraicexpression insimplestform?Example:Parts of an algebraic expression arecalled _______. ______ ________ areterms that have the same _________raised to the same ___________.A term without a ________ is called a________. __________ terms are also_______ _______.An algebraic expression is in _______________ when it has no ______________ and no ___________.Practice Problems: ____________________________________Date: ____________Parts of an algebraic expression arecalled _______. ______ ________ areterms that have the same _________raised to the same ___________.A term without a ________ is called a________. __________ terms are also_______ _______.An algebraic expression is in _______________ when it has no ______________ and no ___________.Practice Problems: ____________________________________Combining Like TermsMain IdeaWhat arelike terms?Example:When is analgebraicexpression insimplestform?Example:Parts of an algebraic expression arecalled _______. ______ ________ areterms that have the same _________raised to the same ___________.A term without a ________ is called a________. __________ terms are also_______ _______.An algebraic expression is in _______________ when it has no ______________ and no ___________.Practice Problems: ____________________________________Date: ____________DetailsParts of an algebraic expression arecalled _______. ______ ________ areterms that have the same _________raised to the same ___________.A term without a ________ is called a________. __________ terms are also_______ _______.An algebraic expression is in _______________ when it has no ______________ and no ___________.Problems: ____________________________________
    • Name DateCone NetCopyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.Grade 6, Multi-UseLearning Tool50✄
    • A printable resource from the Saskatoon Public School, Math ResourcesWebsite - http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/math1-3/Cone: Cut out on dark lines. Fold dotted lines and assemble the cone.
    • 2019181716151413121110987654321-20 -19 -18 -17 -16 -15 -14 -13 -12 -11 -10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20-1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-15-16-17-18-19
    • Do not redistribute these pages or post anywhere online for resale.These pages are copyrighted and only intended to be a teaching toolto create your own notebooking pages. Click the link below to find thehow-to videos related to these pages.© 2012 Notebooking Nookhow-to videos related to these pages.… http://notebookingnook.blogspot.com/2012/04/how-to-make-notebooking-page-video.htmlIf you’d like to share the videos to these pages or the powerpointdownload, please link directly to the Notebooking Nook blog postabove.If you have any other request for notebooking pages that you’d like tosee in this series, please feel free to contact me at …http://notebookingnook.blogspot.com/p/contact-me.html
    • © 2012 Notebooking NookThis Notebook Belongs to:
    • © 2012 Notebooking NookThis Notebook Belongs to:
    • beehive colony© 2012 Notebooking Nook
    • © 2012 Notebooking Nook
    • 1© 2012 Notebooking Nook234
    • © 2012 Notebooking Nookeyethoraxforewing
    • Honeybees© 2012 Notebooking Nook
    • Honeybees© 2012 Notebooking Nook
    • Name DateCopyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.Grade 6, Multi-UseCube NetLearning Tool47
    • A printable resource from the Saskatoon Public School, Math ResourcesWebsite - http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/math1-3/Cube: Cut out on dark lines. Fold dotted lines and assemble the cube.
    • Name DateCopyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.Grade 6, Multi-UseCylinder NetLearning Tool51✄
    • A printable resource from the Saskatoon Public School, Math ResourcesWebsite - http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/math1-3/Cylinder: Cut out on dark lines. Fold dotted lines and assemble the cylinder.
    • 1©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/201012÷11÷DivisionDivisionDivisionDivision WheeWheeWheeWheellllssss Cut out the circles, number bar and its window.Laminate for durability.Attach the number bar with a brad on the topof the circle. Rotate to practice.10÷
    • 2©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20107÷9÷8÷
    • 3©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20104÷6÷5÷
    • 4©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20101÷3÷2÷
    • Envelope BookCut book out as one piece. Fold four flaps under, using dotted lines as your guides.
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comFactors & MultiplesFactors Multiples
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comFactors & MultiplesFactors Multiples
    • ©The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comFactorsMultiplesThe numberFeaturing
    • ©The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comFactorsMultiplesThe numberFeaturing
    • How do you find the slope of a line given two points on the line?Step 1Label the coordinates as(x1, y1) and (x2, y2).Step 2Substitute thecoordinates into theslope formula:2 12 1y ymx xStep 3Simplify the expression.Given: A line that passes through (3,-6) and (1, 8)Step 1(x1, y1) (x2, y2)(3, -6) (1, 8)Step 21 38 ( 6)mStep 38 ( 6) 1471 3 2mThe slope is –7.Example:Step 1Step 2Step 3
    • Cut book out as one piece. Fold top under. Fold bottom under. Open book. Cut on solidblack lines to form two flaps. Refold so that the cover is on the front.   Two Flap (Horizontal)
    •      Three Flap (Horizontal)Cut book out as one piece. Fold top under. Fold bottom under. Open book. Cut on solidblack lines to form three flaps. Refold so that the cover is on the front.
    •         Four Flap (Horizontal)Cut book out as one piece. Fold top under. Fold bottom under. Open book. Cut on solidblack lines to form four flaps. Refold so that the cover is on the front.
    • Two Flap (Vertical)Cut out book as one piece. Fold left side under. Fold right side under (it is the cover). Un-fold book. Cut on the lines between the names to form two flaps.
    • Cut out book as one piece. Fold left side under. Fold right side under (it is the cover).Unfold book. Cut on the two lines between the names to form three flaps.Small Three Flap (Vertical)
    • Cut on solid lines. Fold on dotted lines (like a pamphlet).Medium Three Flap (Vertical)
    • Large Three Flap (Vertical)Cut on solid lines. Fold on dotted lines (like a pamphlet).
    • Cut out book as one piece. Fold left side in. Fold right side in. Open book. Cut on dottedline to form four flaps. Refold book.Medium Four Flap (Vertical)
    • Large Four Flap (Vertical)Cut out book as one piece. Fold left side in. Fold right side in. Open book. Cut on dottedline to form four flaps. Refold book.
    • Cut out book as one piece. Fold left side under. Fold right side under (it is the cover). Unfoldbook. Cut on the lines to form five flaps.Small Five Flap (Vertical)
    • Cut out book as one piece. Fold left side under. Fold right side under (it is the cover). Unfoldbook. Cut on the lines to form five flaps.Large Five Flap (Vertical)
    •       Cut out book as one piece. Fold left side in. Fold right side in. Open book.Cut on dotted lines to form six flaps. Refold book.Six Flap (Vertical)
    • Cut on solid lines. Fold on dotted lines (like a pamphlet).Seven Flap (Vertical)
    • Cut out solid lines. Fold on dotted line. You should have a space at the bottom of this bookto write a title.Concept Map 2 Areas
    • Concept Map 3 AreasCut out solid lines. Fold on dotted line. You should have a space at the bottom of this bookto write a title.
    • ProperFractionImproperFractionMixedNumberEquivalentFractions
    • Created by JimmieJimmieJimmieJimmie for http://www.squidoo.com/math-notebooking½ ¾ ¼ Fractions ½ ¾ ¼
    • Created by JimmieJimmieJimmieJimmie for http://www.squidoo.com/math-notebooking
    • Created by JimmieJimmieJimmieJimmie for http://www.squidoo.com/math-notebooking½ ¾ ¼ Fractions ½ ¾ ¼
    • Created by JimmieJimmieJimmieJimmie for http://www.squidoo.com/math-notebooking½ ¾ ¼ Fractions ½ ¾ ¼
    • Created by JimmieJimmieJimmieJimmie for http://www.squidoo.com/math-notebooking
    • Created by JimmieJimmieJimmieJimmie for http://www.squidoo.com/math-notebookingFractions⅓ ⅔ ⅛ ⅜ ⅝ ⅞ ¼ ½ ¾
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comGamefinishstart
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comstart
    • Game© The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comfinish
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comstartGame
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comfinish
    •     Cutoutrectangles.Stacktogether(smallesttolargest)withcoverontopandstaple.Layer 3
    • Layer 4 (includes this page and next)Cut out the five rectangles. Stack together (smallest to largest) with cover on top and staple.
    • Layer 5, 6, or 7 Cut out rectangles. Stack together (smallest to largest) with cover on top and staple.
    • Slope Graphic Organizer & Answer Key
    • Information:If you have any questions, comments, and/or suggestions, please send anote on teachers pay teachers, or email me at:FortheLoveofMathTpT@yahoo.com. I would appreciate it if you wouldleave feedback for this product. Feedback helps let me know if thisproduct needs any adjustments. Leaving feedback on TpT products youpay for helps you earn TPT credits which add up to money you can spendon TeachersPayTeachers.com.Thank you!***Note: Some of the graphics used in this document are from:http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Teachesthirdingeorgia © 2013 Teachers3rdInGeorgia. It is aviolation of copyright laws to remove the graphics from this presentation for other uses, or to use thisproduct for anything other than was stated in the copyright notice when the product was purchased.Thank you for respecting copyright laws!
    • Slope Formula:Slope Intercept Form:y = _______________m =_________The difference in ________Over the difference in _________RiseRunFind the Slope:A) (3, 4) & (2, -7)B) (6, -4) & (-9, 7)Special Slopes:Horizontal Lines:Slope = _____Vertical Lines:Slope = ___________Graphic OrganizerSlope:Point- Slope Form:Need:1 point on the line & and the slopeA) (4, 6), m = -1/2 B) (12, -3), m = 1/4Slope is:___________________________________________________),( 11 yx ),( 22 yxName: ________________________
    • Slope Formula:Slope Intercept Form:y = mx+bm = slopeThe difference in yOver the difference in _x_RiseRunFind the Slope:A) (3, 4) & (2, -7)B) (6, -4) & (-9, 7)Special Slopes:Horizontal Lines:Slope = 0Vertical Lines:Slope = undefinedGraphic OrganizerSlope:Point- Slope Form:Need:1 point on the line & and the slopeA) (4, 6), m = -1/2 B) (12, -3), m = 1/4Slope is: the steepnessof a line)( 11 xxmyy 1212xxyym),( 11 yx ),( 22 yx2216)4(216xyxy101103237+6 +6821 xy3413)12(413xyxy641 xy-3 -31511151169)4(7ANSWER KEY
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com 4 Squares 
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Arc Organizer
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com 3 x 3 Printable Bingo Card
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com 5 x 5 Printable Bingo Card
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com 7 x 7 Printable Bingo Card
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Coat of Arms
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Concept WebWho WhatWhen WhereHow WhyTopic: _____________________      
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Concept Wheel
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Concept / Event MapWhy When How WhereWho WhatTopic
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Double C
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Hand Map12345
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com KWLTopic: ____________________KWhat I KnowWWhat I Want To LearnLWhat I Have Learned
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Main Idea MapMAIN IDEA    IDEA   IDEA   IDEADetail Detail Detail Detail
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Meeting New Vocabulary Words OrganizerWord Drawing or Symbol for WordPredicted meaning of word: _____________________________________________________Based on that meaning, use this word in a sentence:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Definition from dictionary: _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Based on the dictionarys meaning, use this word in a sentence:________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Moving Cycle Organizer
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com 4 Slice Pie Organizer
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com 8 Slices of Pie Organizer
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com PowerTriangle 
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Raindrop Map 
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Leaf Groups of 2You can use these leaves to write students names in. This canreally help you when making cooperative groups.
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Leaf Groups of 3Write a different student’s name in each leaf. Then createcooperative groups of 3 by passing them out.
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Leaf Groups of 4An easy way to make cooperative groups of 4 students. Just writetheir names.
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Leaf Groups of 55 leafs for 5 students. A good way to create random cooperativegroups.
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com 2 Suitcase SortingYou can use these for sorting activities of all kinds. They makegreat name tags too.
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com 3 Suitcase SortingThese also make great name tags, but they are usually used tohelp guide students to sort things into 3 different topics orcategories.
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Sorting with 4 SuitcasesThese should be a great help when you have 4 topics or conceptsto sort between.
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Theme ComparisonTheme(s):Differences: Similarities: Conclusion(s): 
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Triple Venn Diagram
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Venn Diagram_____________ _____________
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Who What WhereWhen Why How
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Big Mac Paragraph Writing OrganizerIntroduction:Detail 2: Conclusion: Detail 1: Detail 3: 
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Character AnalysisPyramidName/TitlePhysical AppearanceCharacter’s RoleProblems / ChallengesCharacter Accomplishments
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Positive CharacterEndEndBeginningBeginningMiddleCharacterEnd End
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Evil CharacterEndEndBeginningBeginningMiddleEnd EndCharacter 
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Elements Of the StoryDirections: In the space provided below, explain the major elements of the story.Title of Story: _______________________ProblemRising Action Falling ActionSolution
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Its All In the TitleTitle of Story: Based on the title, what do you think a problem in the story might be?Based on the title, what types of characters do you expect to be in the story? In the space provided below, draw a cover page for the story based on the title. 
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Life Cycles
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com AppearanceNameBehaviorChallenge(s) PersonalitySolutionsCharacterMap
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Double Character MapUse this organizer to map two characters of any body of work.ChallengeChallengeSolutionSolution
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Triple Character MapWorking on a story? This organizer will help you map out themain characters.Protagonist AntagonistSupporting CharacterMotivation MotivationPurpose
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Quadruple Character MapReading a longer story? This organizer will help you get a handleon the four main characters.Hero: __________ Villain: ________Love Interest: __________ Supporting Character: __________
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com SQ3R ChartTitle of Work: _______________________Survey: Record important titles and subtitles from work.________________________________________________________________________Question: Write "Who, What, When, Where, and Why" questions from main topics.________________________________________________________________________Read: Write answers to questions from above.________________________________________________________________________Recite: Record key facts and phrases as needed for each question.________________________________________________________________________Review: Create a summary paragraph for each question.________________________________________________________________________
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com A Glance at the WeekMonday:Tuesday:Wednesday:Thursday:Friday: Weekend:
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Break Out Topics Organizer
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Multiple Intelligence Lesson PlanningDirections: Use this lesson matrix to make sure all learners needs are met.Verbal / Linguistic Logical / MathematicalVisual / Spatial Body/KinestheticMusicalInterpersonalIntrapersonal
    • Name ___________________________ Date ____________________ ©www.GetWorksheets.com Scope and Sequence Ladder1234567
    • Cut shape out as one piece. Write one fact on each petal. Fold flaps in using the dottedlines as your guide. Tuck the last flap under so that book will stay closed.Hexagon Petal
    • Cut shape out as one piece. Write one fact on each petal. Fold flaps in using the dottedlines as your guide. Tuck the last flap under so that book will stay closed.Pentagon Petal
    • Cut shape out as one piece. Write one fact on each petal. Fold flaps in using the dottedlines as your guide. Tuck the last flap under so that book will stay closed.Triangle Petal Large
    • Triangle Petal SmallCut shape out as one piece. Fold flaps in using the dotted lines as your guide. Tuck the lastflap under so that book will stay closed.
    • You are looking at the inside of the book. Cut shape out as one piece. Fold flaps in usingthe dotted lines as your guide. Tuck the last flap under so that book will stay closed.Square Petal
    • TypesofSlopePositive Slope-Lines with a positive slope slant up(like going up a hill)Negative Slope- Lines with a negative slope slant down(like going down a hill)Zero Slope-Lines with a slope of zeroare horizontal(They have zero slant!)Undefined Slope-Lines that are vertical have noslope or undefined slope.(They do not point from left toright at all!)
    • Have Students Make This!Step 1: Make sure every student has a piece of paper (you can give themcolored paper or copy paper or they can use notebook paper!)Step 2: Fold the paper hot dog style then fold it hamburger style (so thereare 4 squares)Step 3: Do not unfold the 4 squares! While folded, fold down the insidecorner. (See picture 1 to the right). This will create a diamond in the middleof the squares when you open up the paperStep 4: Unfold paper. Use a writing utensil to trace the diamond & the foldsseparating the 4 sections(as shown in picture 2).**You can now give students the information on the original document.They can fill in the information on different types of slope. I prefer thistype of note taking because it is something different for students. They donot just have to sit with a pencil & write, they actually create a templatefor their notes which makes taking the notes a little bit more fun!**Picture 1Picture 2
    • Name:Nickname:Birthday:My Favoritfood:music:sport:color:movie:book:place:Three words__________If I could inve__________I would like t__________The person__________In the futur_______________________________tes:______________________________________________________________________s I would use t___________ent somethin___________to take a vaca___________I most admire___________e I would like t___________Aut______________________________________________________________________________________________________________to describe my___________g to make the___________ation to:___________e is ___________________to be a(n):___________thor Pag_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________yself are:____________e world a bette____________________________________________________________e____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________er place it wou________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________uld be:__________________________________ b____________________________________________________________________________________________because__________
    • Positive – Negative Number Overlay StripsPrint sheet in two colors, one sheet torepresent positive numbers, one fornegative numbers. If the equation callsfor two numbers either positive ornegative, the strips should be the samecolor. When using to represent adding apositive number to a negative number,the larger of the two will be longer, andthe answer, whether positive or negative,will be clear because of the color.
    • Integers & Absolute Value (1.1)Main Idea DetailsWhat are positivenumbers?What arenegativenumbers?What areintegers?What isabsolute value?______ _____ _ are_____________ than 0. They may bewritten with a positive _________ (+),but they are usually written without it._____________ ____________ are_________ than 0. They are alwayswritten with a negative sign (–).On a ____________ line, oppositesare the __________ distance from 0but on different ____________ of 0.___________ are the ________ of all________ numbers and their opposites.0 is neither negative nor positive.The _________ _______ of an integeris its __________ from 0 on a numberline. The symbol for absolute value is | |.|–3| = 3 |3| = 3• Absolute values are ______ negative.• Opposite integers have the_____________ absolute value.• |0| = 0Integers & Absolute Value (1.1)Main Idea DetailsWhat are positivenumbers?What arenegativenumbers?What areintegers?What isabsolute value?______ _____ _ are_____________ than 0. They may bewritten with a positive _________ (+),but they are usually written without it._____________ ____________ are_________ than 0. They are alwayswritten with a negative sign (–).On a ____________ line, oppositesare the __________ distance from 0but on different ____________ of 0.___________ are the ________ of all________ numbers and their opposites.0 is neither negative nor positive.The _________ _______ of an integeris its __________ from 0 on a numberline. The symbol for absolute value is | |.|–3| = 3 |3| = 3• Absolute values are ______ negative.• Opposite integers have the_____________ absolute value.• |0| = 0
    • WRAP-UP Name_______________________________Think about your experiences simplifying and solving problems with integers.Summarize ideas that help you with each operation in each box below.Include specific examples if you wish.Be ready to share your thinking with the class.Adding IntegersMultiplying IntegersSubtracting IntegersDividing IntegersOperationswithIntegers
    • Integers: Adding & Subtracting (1.2 & 1.3)Main Idea DetailsHow do you addintegers on anumber line?How do yousubtract integerson a numberline?Adding Integers on aNumber LineMove right on a number line toadd a positive integer.Move left on a number line to adda negative integer.Subtracting Integers on aNumber LineMove left on a number line tosubtract a positive integer.Move right on a number line tosubtract a negative integer.Integers: Adding & Subtracting (1.2 & 1.3)Main Idea DetailsHow do you addintegers on anumber line?How do yousubtract integerson a numberline?Adding Integers on aNumber LineMove right on a number line toadd a positive integer.Move left on a number line to adda negative integer.Subtracting Integers on aNumber LineMove left on a number line tosubtract a positive integer.Move right on a number line tosubtract a negative integer.
    • Integers & Absolute Value (1.1)Main Idea DetailsWhat are positivenumbers?What arenegativenumbers?What areintegers?What isabsolute value?______ _____ _ are_____________ than 0. They may bewritten with a positive _________ (+),but they are usually written without it._____________ ____________ are_________ than 0. They are alwayswritten with a negative sign (–).On a ____________ line, oppositesare the __________ distance from 0but on different ____________ of 0.___________ are the ________ of all________ numbers and their opposites.0 is neither negative nor positive.The _________ _______ of an integeris its __________ from 0 on a numberline. The symbol for absolute value is | |.|–3| = 3 |3| = 3• Absolute values are ______ negative.• Opposite integers have the_____________ absolute value.• |0| = 0Integers & Absolute Value (1.1)Main Idea DetailsWhat are positivenumbers?What arenegativenumbers?What areintegers?What isabsolute value?______ _____ _ are_____________ than 0. They may bewritten with a positive _________ (+),but they are usually written without it._____________ ____________ are_________ than 0. They are alwayswritten with a negative sign (–).On a ____________ line, oppositesare the __________ distance from 0but on different ____________ of 0.___________ are the ________ of all________ numbers and their opposites.0 is neither negative nor positive.The _________ _______ of an integeris its __________ from 0 on a numberline. The symbol for absolute value is | |.|–3| = 3 |3| = 3• Absolute values are ______ negative.• Opposite integers have the_____________ absolute value.• |0| = 0
    • CATEGORY Totally Awesome (5) Awesome (4) Pretty Good (3)Kick it up a Notch (2)Better Get Movin (1)Your table of Contents iscomplete.You forgot to list 1 page inyour Table of Contents orAll left pages and rightpages are listed with thecorrect page numbers.Your Table of Contents isnumbered incorrectly.Appearance and CompletenessYour notebook is very neat... SWEET! There are nobent or torn pages. Allcontent is included in yournotebook.Your notebook is neat.There are 1-2 bent or tornpages. All content isincluded in your notebook.Your notebook has 3-4 bent or torn pages.All content isincluded in yournotebook.Your notebook has 5or more bent or tornpages. or You aremissing 1-2 items inyour notebook.Your notebook has 5or more bent or tornpages and You aremissing items in yournotebook.Quality of WorkAll work in your notebookis done neatly. Allhandwriting is readable, allpages are glued down well,and all work is in thecorrect order.Most work in yournotebook is done neatly.There are 1-2 places wherehandwriting is unreadable, apage is not glued down, oran assignment is not in itscorrect place.Your notebook isreadable, but could bedone neater. Thereare 3-4 places wherehandwriting isunreadable, a page isnot glued down, or anassignment is not inits correct place.Your notebook issloppy. There are 5 ormore places wherehandwriting isunreadable, a page isnot glued down, or anassignment is not inits correct place.Your notebook isunacceptably sloppy.It is hard to read anyhandwriting, there areseveral pages that arenot glued down, orthere are severalassignments that aremissing or in thewrong place.Right Side WorkAll right side work isincluded and completed. Itis placed on the odd pagenumbers. (Notes, examples,charts, foldables, etc.)All right side work isincluded, but there are 1-2places in your notes,examples, or charts that areblank.All right side work isincluded, but thereare 3-4 places in yournotes, examples, orcharts that are blank.All right side work isincluded, but thereare 5-6 places in yournotes, examples, orcharts that are blank.or You are missing 1-2 right side items.All right side work isincluded, but thereare more than 6places in your notes,examples, or chartsthat are blank. or Youare missing more than2 right side items.Left Side WorkAll left side work isincluded and completed. Itis placed on the even pagenumbers. (Textbookassignments, foldables,graphic organizers, etc.)All left side work isincluded, but there are 1-2places in your assignmentsthat are incomplete.All left side work isincluded, but thereare 3-4 places in yourassignments that areincomplete.All left side work isincluded, but thereare 5-6 places inassignments that areincomplete. or Youare missing 1-2 leftside items.All left side work isincluded, but thereare more than 6places in yourassignments that areincomplete. or Youare missing more than2 left side items.  Comments: _________________________________________________________________________  ___________________________________________________________________________________  ___________________________________________________________________________________Total Points: _______/25 = ______%Math Interactive Notebook RubricTable of ContentsYou forgot to list 2-3pages in your Tableof Contents.You forgot to list 4-5pages in your Tableof Contents.You forgot to listmore than 5 pages inyour Table ofContents.Student Name:     ________________________________________
    • Interactive Notebook GuidelinesWhy?To have a useable, working documentUsed for class notes, homework & other activitiesHelp youo understand the classo study for testso make connectionso make sense of what we do in classRequirements:1. Number each page2. Each assignment should have title, date, and page number (alsoadded to Table of Contents)3. Use highlighter & color to help distinguish important information4. Feel free to be artistic, but don’t crowd things5. All handouts must be glued / taped into the notebookRight Side:o On the right side record your notes in normal way—teacherinput sideo If you are given typed notes, glue / tape them hereLeft Side:This is YOUR side:) You will do your classwork and homework on the leftside. You will show what you learned!o Drawingso Graphic organizerso Picture sentenceso Drawingso Poetryo Rapso Cartoonso Charts and graphs
    • Materials:o Notebooko Highlightero Scissorso Glue sticko Tapeo Colored pencils – NOT MARKERS!Grading:o Notebooks will be checked informally at any time, and formally at theend of each unit. Homework assigned in the notebook will be checkeddaily.o All notes & assignments need to be included, even if student is absent.o Students are given a rubric.o It will be graded based on the following criteria:o COMPLETENESS – All assigned work must be completed toreceive full credit.o QUALITY – Assignments will be checked in detail for quality ofwork. Excellent quality means assignments are completedbeyond the minimum required.o VISUAL APPEAL, NEATNESS, ORGANIZATION – Notebooksshould be neat, not crowded with info, and should have a dateand title. Key ideas and headings are highlighted. All visualsmust be done with care. Handwriting must be legible!!If you are absent, it is yourresponsibility to make up missed work.
    • Name______________________________________________ Date________________________________ Class: ____________________________________Interactive Notebook RubricLearning GradePROFICIENT WITHDISTINCTIONPROFICIENTDEVELOPINGPROFICIENCYNOVICEOutput:Reflections &Activities(left side pages)All work is…CompleteThoughtful/CreativeMaking connectionsClearMost work is…CompleteThoughtful/CreativeMaking connectionsClearSome work is…CompleteThoughtful/CreativeMaking connectionsClearLittle/No work is…CompleteThoughtful/CreativeMaking connectionsClearPoints 4 3 2 1Input:Student Notes &Handouts(right side pages)All work is…CompleteThoroughThoughtfulMost work is…CompleteThoroughThoughtfulSome work is…CompleteThoroughThoughtfulLittle/No work is…CompleteThoroughThoughtfulPoints 4 3 2 1Effort Grade OUTSTANDING SATISFACTORY NEEDS IMPROVEMENT UNSATISFACTORYOrganization andNeatnessAll pages are numberedTable of contents is up todateRight side pages includelearning objective & dateAll items are in theirproper placeWork is neat, legible, andorganizedOnly minor errors or omissions(1-3)Several errors or omissions(4-7)Many errors or omissions(8 or more)Effort Score O S N UInteractive Notebook Score Comments:_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Learning Grade:(average points from top section)____________Effort Grade: ____________
    • Interactive Notebook Table of ContentsTitle/Description Page #
    • Title/Description Page #
    • Title/Description Page #
    • Title/Description Page #
    • Do NOT print on cardstock. Cut books out. Fold both sides to the middle so that theyinterlock .Small Interlocks
    • Do NOT print on cardstock. Cut book out. Fold both sides to the middle so that they interlock .Medium Interlock
    • Do NOT print on cardstock. Cut book out. Fold both sidesto the middle so that they interlock .Large Interlock
    • Weekly NotesMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday© 2012 Notebooking NookPlan for Student’s Name:Subjects
    • © 2012 Notebooking NookWeek #:SubjectsWeek of:
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 1©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010Arrow 4Arrow 4Arrow 4Arrow 4----page Minibookpage Minibookpage Minibookpage MinibookCut out the 2 pages. Fold on the dotted lines. Place the inside pages inside the front page. Staple at the foldededge.Front page Back pageInside left page Inside right page
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 2©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010Hexagon Petal MinibookHexagon Petal MinibookHexagon Petal MinibookHexagon Petal MinibookCut around the whole shape. Cut on the lines leading to the middle hexagon. Fold the outer hexagon pages over eachother.Hexagonal MatchHexagonal MatchHexagonal MatchHexagonal MatchBookBookBookBookCut out as 1 piece.Fold like a matchbook.Write the heading/ title onthe small flap and fillinformation in on the frontflap and inside the booklet.
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 3©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010EnvelopeEnvelopeEnvelopeEnvelopeCut out whole piece.Use a ruler and scissor to score along the dotted lines.Fold the base tab up.Fold the side tabs to the middle.Paste the side tabs to create an envelope.Insert cards below.2. Fold side tab to middle1. Fold base tab up.3. Fold side tab to middle
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 4©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010TriaramaTriaramaTriaramaTriaramaThis is a 3D minibook which can be stored flat.Cut out the square. Fold the opposite corners over and then re-open. Cut along the black line to the centre.Draw, cut out pictures or design the illustration for the background. This will stand up as a corner.Write information on the right hand bottom corner. Fold this over the left bottom corner.(Match the symbols) Secure with the corner circle fold (or sticky tacky).Paste only the back of left bottom fold to your notebook page or lapbook.Flap over tosecure toptriangle
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 5©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/201010 Page Minibook10 Page Minibook10 Page Minibook10 Page Minibook Cut around whole template. Fold length wise on dotted lines. Then fold width wise along allthe dotted lines. Cut along grey line. Fold together: page 2 in to 3 and so on. Glue the back of the pages together.29384756
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 6©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010ArArArArrow Flap Shutter foldrow Flap Shutter foldrow Flap Shutter foldrow Flap Shutter fold Cut around the whole minibook. Fold along the dotted lines. Fold the arrowedge side over the straight edged side. Now cut along the horizontal lines to make flaps.Venn Diagram FlapVenn Diagram FlapVenn Diagram FlapVenn Diagram Flap MinibookMinibookMinibookMinibook Cut out the book. Fold in half lengthwise. Cut on dotted lines.
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 7©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010Larger Pull Tab MinibookLarger Pull Tab MinibookLarger Pull Tab MinibookLarger Pull Tab Minibook Paste/ draw picture on the front page. Cut slit on dotted line. Only glue the sideedges of the front page. Insert Pull Tab. Write the heading on the banner pull tab. Write information on the tab.Pull TabPull TabPull TabPull Tab MinibookMinibookMinibookMinibookssssPrint on cardstock.Cut the slits on the dotted lineof the FRONT piece.Insert the PULL TABsthrough the slits.When you glue down the book,make sure to glue only aroundthe outermost edges and notin the centre. You want theslider to remain free to moveup and down.If desired, have your studentdraw illustrations relating tothe words on the fronts of thepull tabs.
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 8©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010Front PageInside PagesRolled Inside Page MinibookRolled Inside Page MinibookRolled Inside Page MinibookRolled Inside Page Minibook Cut out top portion as one piece. Fold in half. Cut out long rectangle withthe page folded. Cut out bottom portion as one piece. Fold. Cut on grey lines. Open out and then roll upbottom portion horizontally and insert the roll through the rectangle on the top portion. Open the page andclose to form the booklet. Video to help- http://www.liveandlearnpress.com/movies/00_0441.mov
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 9©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010CCCCylinder Flap Minibookylinder Flap Minibookylinder Flap Minibookylinder Flap MinibookCollapsed Triangle FoldCollapsed Triangle FoldCollapsed Triangle FoldCollapsed Triangle FoldCut on solid lines. Mountain-fold diagonally on dashed grey line with text to the outside and then unfold.Mountain fold diagonally on the other dashed grey line with text to the outside and then unfold.Valley-fold the vertical dotted line. On the inside write the information.Collapse the whole unit into triangle so that the title is on the cover. Glue on to notebook page.
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 10©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010TallTallTallTall NarrowNarrowNarrowNarrow FoldFoldFoldFoldScroll FlapScroll FlapScroll FlapScroll FlapFact WheelFact WheelFact WheelFact WheelCut out the front wheel withthe arrow and space. Pin tonumbered circle with brad inthe centre.How to use this Fact Wheel:1. Write your question onthe outer numberedstrip.2. Write the answer tothat question on thesame numbered insidesegment.3. When the front wheel ispointing to thequestion on the outerrim of the bottomcircle, the answer isrevealed in the space.Great for revision!
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 11©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010Pocket with stripsPocket with stripsPocket with stripsPocket with strips Cut out pocket below as 1 piece. Fold on dotted lines and glue these to form a narrowpocket. Cut out the strips separately. Write your information on each strip.
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 12©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010Quilt Square FoldQuilt Square FoldQuilt Square FoldQuilt Square Folded ined ined ined in HHHHalfalfalfalf Cut out book as one piece. Fold each triangle under. Fold book closed in halfwith cover on the front . On the outer flaps write questions. Answer the questions under the flaps.Concertina Diamond foldConcertina Diamond foldConcertina Diamond foldConcertina Diamond fold21 345
    • Master Template Unusual Minibooks 13©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 11/2010`SimpleSimpleSimpleSimple FFFFlaplaplaplap MinibooksMinibooksMinibooksMinibooks ⇓⇓⇓⇓ ⇒⇒⇒⇒glue gluePop-up piecesCoverPopPopPopPop----Up CardUp CardUp CardUp CardPrint book on cardstock. Mountain-fold the book in half on the dotted line. Cut along the 4 solid lines. Foldthe bottom of each flap down in to the card on the grey dashed lines. Valley-fold the book in half, on thedotted line, so that the boxes pop in to the inside of the book.Cut out the small squares and paste or draw a picture on it. On the box marked “glue” glue the item youwant to pop-up sitting level with the bottom row of dots. Make sure it lies flat when closing the book.Cut out the cover and paste over the front of the folded card. Decorate.
    •  Cut books out. Fold on lines (matchbook style). Regular Matchbooks
    • Skinny Matchbooks
    • Cut out book as one piece and fold matchbook style. Write one topic on each side (suchas French fries and mashed potatoes). Use the inside of the book to compare and con-trast the two topics.Compare and Contrast Matchbook
    •    Cut on solid lines. Fold on dotted lines (matchbook style).Three Matchbooks
    • Cutonsolidblacklines.Foldbooksmatchbookstyle.FourMatchbooks
    • NineMatchbookTri-foldBook
    • Directions.:Cutoutbookonfirstpage.Foldondottedlines(likeapamphlet).Writeatitleonthefront.Assembleeachmatchbook(thereareninetotal)bycuttingonsolidlinesandfoldingondotted.Openthecoverbookandpastethreematchbooksoneachpartoftheinside.NineMatchbookTri-foldBook
    • NineMatchbookTri-foldBook
    • NineMatchbookTri-foldBook
    • Cut books out. Fold matchbook style.
    • Name___________________________________ Date_________________________Math Notebook Rubric4 3 2 1Table ofContentsToC is neat,organized, andcomplete; containsall assignmentsToC is completeand neatToC is completeToC is included.May be messy orincompleteAppearanceandCompletedAll assignments forthe unit areincluded,completed, andshow great effortand prideMost assignmentsfor the unit areincluded,complete, andshow effort andcareMostassignments areincluded in theunit and arecompleteNotebook is, forthe most part,incomplete;missingmany/mostassignmentsQuality ofWorkAll work issuperior in qualityand shows greatcare and pride; nodoodling, tornpages, etc.Work qualityshows time andeffort; noinappropriatedoodling, tornpages, etc.Work qualityshows someeffort; noinappropriatedoodling, tornpages, etc.Work qualityshows minimaleffort; Doodlingdoes not relate tosubject orconcept; tornpages have notbeen mendedRight SideAll right side workis neat, highlighted(main points/ideas), dated, andtitledAll right sidework is neatlydone, organized,titled, and datedMost right sidework iscomplete, neat,titled, and datedMuch of the rightside work is notneat, titled, anddatedLeft SideAll left side work iscomplete,thoughtfully done,dated, and titledAll left side workis complete, neat,titled, and datedMost left sidework iscomplete, neat,titled, and datedMuch of the leftside work is notneat, titled, anddated
    • Table of ContentsLeft Side Right Side
    • 1©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Bonds of 10 PuzzleBonds of 10 PuzzleBonds of 10 PuzzleBonds of 10 Puzzle9 14 6 5 53 72 810 01 97 38 26 4
    • 2©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20100 10Bonds of 10Bonds of 10Bonds of 10Bonds of 10 PuzzlesPuzzlesPuzzlesPuzzles1. Print on card stock or print on paper and laminate after youhave cut all the puzzles pieces apart.2. Cut out the blocks.3. Cut along the dotted lines –creating puzzle pieces.4. Cut out the pocket. Fold the sides over. Cut a slit in thefront flap. Insert the top flap into the bottom flap to close.To Play:To Play:To Play:To Play:1. Let the child place unifixunifixunifixunifix ((((MathsMathsMathsMaths counters)counters)counters)counters) blocksblocksblocksblocks on top ofevery number. This will be the concrete operation – workingwith groups of blocks.2. Match the puzzle pieces using the shapes to guide. Use theMaths unifix blocks and place the same number blocks abovethe puzzle pieces. Do this several times until the childrecognizes the matching numbers.3. Let the child first match all the pieces, and then remove allthe right sideright sideright sideright side pieces exceptexceptexceptexcept the twothe twothe twothe two 5555’’’’ssss. Now let the childmatch the correct number bonds without the shapesmatching! Repeat stage 1 or 2 if they are not sure of theconcept.4. Now the child can practice bonds of 10 on worksheets. (Usethe bonds 10 Maths Rockets or Amazing Maths Squaresfrom Practicalpages.wordpress.com)
    • 3©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Bonds of 10Puzzle
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20101+-MMMMaths Add and Subtractaths Add and Subtractaths Add and Subtractaths Add and SubtractWheeWheeWheeWheellllssssCut all thewheels, windowbars andwindows.Laminate fordurability.Attach thewindow bar overthe small wheel,on top of the bigwheel with a brad.Rotate only thebig wheel to addor subtract.(Not all numberscan besubtracted)
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20102
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20101AmazingAmazingAmazingAmazing MathsMathsMathsMaths SquaresSquaresSquaresSquaresThe numbers in every rowALWAYS add up to 10!Up, down or sideways!1111 44448888111111115555=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=105555 222244441111 3333=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=101111 11118888111122227777=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=100000 88885555 11111111=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=103333 3333777700001111=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=100000 99997777333311110000=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20102AmazingAmazingAmazingAmazing MathsMathsMathsMaths SquaresSquaresSquaresSquaresThe numbers in every rowALWAYS add up to 10!Up, down or sideways!2222 222277776666=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=1055553333222244441111=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10444411115555 3333=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=100000 9999000022227777=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=101111 11117777 2222=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10333333331111 55552222=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20103AmazingAmazingAmazingAmazing MathsMathsMathsMaths SquaresSquaresSquaresSquaresThe numbers in every rowALWAYS add up to 10!Up, down or sideways!5555 2222000044446666=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=100000 88881111 4444=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=107777 00001111 5555=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=102222111177771111=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=103333 33337777 22224444=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=104444000022223333=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10=10
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20101Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right====================11115555444433332222+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1====================55552222444411113333 ---- 1111====================11115555444433332222 ---- 1111====================55557777666644448888 ++++ 2222====================00005555333311112222 + 2+ 2+ 2+ 2====================33330000111144445555+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1====================77773333888811112222 - 0- 0- 0- 0====================66665555111144449999 + 0+ 0+ 0+ 0+/- 1; 2
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20102Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right====================33332222444411115555 + 3+ 3+ 3+ 3====================33336666444477775555 - 3- 3- 3- 3====================66665555444433332222 - 2- 2- 2- 2====================11114444222200003333 ++++ 6666====================55550000111144442222 + 5+ 5+ 5+ 5====================66661111000033332222 ++++ 4444====================77776666888899995555 - 5- 5- 5- 5====================66665555777744449999 -4-4-4-4+/- 3; 4; 5
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20103Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right====================55551111222233337777 x 1x 1x 1x 1====================55552222444411113333 x 3x 3x 3x 3====================101010102222444488886666 ÷÷÷÷ 2222====================444410101010666622228888 ÷÷÷÷ 2222====================44445555333311112222 xxxx 2222====================11112222444433335555 x 2x 2x 2x 2====================3333303030306666121212129999 ÷÷÷÷ 3333====================6666121212127777101010109999 x 3x 3x 3x 3x/÷ 1; 2; 3
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20104Math ButteMath ButteMath ButteMath ButterfliesrfliesrfliesrfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right====================44447777555599996666 + 5+ 5+ 5+ 5====================555511111111171717171616161620202020 - 5- 5- 5- 5====================101010101515151514141414999912121212 - 5- 5- 5- 5====================888810101010121212121414141411111111 + 5+ 5+ 5+ 5====================77771313131388881111111120202020 - 6- 6- 6- 6====================66661515151510101010121212129999 - 6- 6- 6- 6+/- 5; 6 = > 10====================777733338888101010102222 +6+6+6+6====================66665555111144449999 + 6+ 6+ 6+ 6
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20105Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right====================77774444111155552222 + 7+ 7+ 7+ 7====================777720202020141414141717171713131313 - 7- 7- 7- 7====================10101010888811111111999912121212 - 7- 7- 7- 7====================55557777666644448888 ++++ 8888====================00005555333311112222 ++++ 8888====================333310101010000099996666 + 7+ 7+ 7+ 7+/- 7; 8 = > 10====================1717171713131313181818181414141420202020 - 8- 8- 8- 8====================101010101515151512121212111111119999 - 8- 8- 8- 8
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20106Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right====================44445555333311112222 x 3x 3x 3x 3====================9999888877771111222211111111 x 4x 4x 4x 4====================44441111555533332222 x 4x 4x 4x 4====================333333332222777766662121212118181818 ÷÷÷÷ 3333====================99991111555533330000121212123333 ÷÷÷÷ 3333====================777766668888999910101010 x 3x 3x 3x 3====================888833336666444444443232323222224444 ÷÷÷÷ 4444====================121212124848484811116666444428282828 ÷÷÷÷ 4444x/ ÷ 3; 4
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20107Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right====================11115555444433332222+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1====================55552222444411113333 ---- 1111====================11115555444433332222 ---- 1111====================55557777666644448888 ++++ 2222====================00005555333311112222 + 2+ 2+ 2+ 2====================33330000111144445555+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1====================77773333888811112222 - 0- 0- 0- 0====================66665555111144449999 + 0+ 0+ 0+ 0
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20108Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right====================22225555777733334444 x 5x 5x 5x 5====================5555555522220000444400001111555533335555 ÷÷÷÷ 5555====================1111000055550000444455553333000022225555 ÷÷÷÷ 5555====================121212125555666677778888 x 5x 5x 5x 5====================00005555333311112222 x 5x 5x 5x 5====================66661111000011111111121212129999 x 5x 5x 5x 5x/ ÷ 5====================555555555555606060604040404025252525 ÷÷÷÷ 5555====================2020202030303030101010101515151535353535 ÷÷÷÷ 5555
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20109Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right====================44441111222233335555 x 10x 10x 10x 10====================60606060707070708080808011111010101090909090 ÷÷÷÷ 10101010====================1111000050505050202020204040404030303030 ÷÷÷÷ 10101010====================333310101010666644448888 x 10x 10x 10x 10====================1212121277775555999911111111 x 10x 10x 10x 10====================888899997777101010106666 x 10x 10x 10x 10====================600600600600484848480000595959590000888888880000777720202020÷÷÷÷ 10101010====================120120120120555520202020300300300300202020200000111100000000÷÷÷÷ 10101010x/ ÷ 10; 11
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/201010Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right========================================blank========================================================================================================================
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20101Math CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath Caterpillars+ 2 odd& even+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2++++ 2222+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2++++ 222210101010++++ 2222 ++++ 2222+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 211111111++++ 2222++++ 2222++++ 2222+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2++++ 222215151515+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2++++ 2222++++ 2222++++ 222211116666Use the number and operationin the circle, write your answerin the blank and use thatnumber for the next operation++++ 2222 ++++ 2222++++ 2222+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2++++ 222219191919++++ 2222++++ 2222++++ 2222++++ 2222++++ 222220202020
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20102Math CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath Caterpillars+/- 3; 4; 5+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5++++ 4444+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 49999+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2 -2-2-2-2++++ 4444---- 3333+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 55555++++ 5555-1-1-1-1-2-2-2-2+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 22222++++ 3333---- 3333+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2- 1- 1- 1- 1---- 444411114444Use the number and operationin the circle, write your answerin the blank and use thatnumber for the next operation+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5 ++++ 2222- 4- 4- 4- 4---- 3333-2-2-2-211111111- 5- 5- 5- 5---- 4444- 3- 3- 3- 3---- 2222- 1- 1- 1- 120202020
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20103Math CaterpillaMath CaterpillaMath CaterpillaMath Caterpillarsrsrsrs+/-/X/÷ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2- 2- 2- 2- 2÷÷÷÷ 2222+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2x 2x 2x 2x 23333÷÷÷÷ 2222 - 2- 2- 2- 2- 2- 2- 2- 2++++ 2222+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 210101010+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2÷÷÷÷ 2222+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 211113333x 2x 2x 2x 2÷÷÷÷ 2222+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2-2-2-2-2-2-2-2-29999Use the number and operationin the circle, write your answerin the blank and use thatnumber for the next operationx 2x 2x 2x 2 - 2- 2- 2- 2- 2- 2- 2- 2÷÷÷÷ 2222+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 26666÷÷÷÷ 2222+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2÷÷÷÷ 2222+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1÷÷÷÷ 222220202020
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20104Math CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath Caterpillarsx/ ÷ 3÷÷÷÷ 3333x 3x 3x 3x 3+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1÷÷÷÷ 3333+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 221212121x 3x 3x 3x 3 ÷÷÷÷ 3333x 3x 3x 3x 3÷÷÷÷ 2222+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 13333÷÷÷÷ 3333x 3x 3x 3x 3+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2÷÷÷÷ 3333+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 233333333÷÷÷÷ 3333÷÷÷÷ 3333+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1÷÷÷÷ 3333+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 333336666Use the number and operationin the circle, write your answerin the blank and use thatnumber for the next operation÷÷÷÷ 3333 ---- 1111÷÷÷÷ 3333+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 8x 5x 5x 5x 59999+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3- 3- 3- 3- 3+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3x 3x 3x 3x 3÷÷÷÷ 333324242424
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20105Math CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath Caterpillars+/- 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4++++ 4444+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 44444++++ 4444 - 4- 4- 4- 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4- 4- 4- 4- 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 48888- 4- 4- 4- 4-4-4-4-4- 4- 4- 4- 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4- 4- 4- 4- 416161616x 4x 4x 4x 4- 4- 4- 4- 4÷÷÷÷ 4444+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 42222Use the number and operationin the circle, write your answerin the blank and use thatnumber for the next operationx 4x 4x 4x 4 - 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4- 4x 4x 4x 4x 4- 4- 4- 4- 43333÷÷÷÷ 4444+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4x 4x 4x 4x 4+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4÷÷÷÷ 444448484848
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20106Math CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath Caterpillars+/- / x/ ÷ 5x 5x 5x 5x 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5- 5- 5- 5- 5- 5- 5- 5- 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 53333÷÷÷÷ 5555 ÷÷÷÷ 5555+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5x 5x 5x 5x 5- 5- 5- 5- 533330000- 5- 5- 5- 5++++ 5555x 5x 5x 5x 5+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5÷÷÷÷ 333320202020x 5x 5x 5x 5x 5x 5x 5x 5- 5- 5- 5- 5÷÷÷÷ 5555+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 56666Use the number and operationin the circle, write your answerin the blank and use thatnumber for the next operation÷÷÷÷ 5555 + 2+ 2+ 2+ 2÷÷÷÷ 5555- 2- 2- 2- 2+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 560606060÷÷÷÷ 5555x 5x 5x 5x 5÷÷÷÷ 5555x 2x 2x 2x 2+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 510101010
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20107Math CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath Caterpillars+/- 10+ 10+ 10+ 10+ 10- 10- 10- 10- 10+ 10+ 10+ 10+ 10÷÷÷÷ 10101010+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 100003333÷÷÷÷ 11110000÷÷÷÷ 10101010+ 10+ 10+ 10+ 10x 10x 10x 10x 10+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 140404040x 10x 10x 10x 10÷÷÷÷ 10101010- 10- 10- 10- 10- 10- 10- 10- 10+ 10+ 10+ 10+ 1010101010÷÷÷÷ 10101010- 10- 10- 10- 10x 10x 10x 10x 10÷÷÷÷ 10101010x 5x 5x 5x 520202020Use the number and operationin the circle, write your answerin the blank and use thatnumber for the next operation+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5 ÷÷÷÷ 10101010xxxx 11110000+ 1+ 1+ 1+ 1÷÷÷÷ 1010101085858585x 10x 10x 10x 10+ 10+ 10+ 10+ 10x 10x 10x 10x 10÷÷÷÷ 10101010+ 10+ 10+ 10+ 101111
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20108Math CMath CMath CMath Caterpillarsaterpillarsaterpillarsaterpillarsx/-/x/÷ ?Write the number used with theoperation and write that numberin the underlined space+ _+ _+ _+ _ ++++ ____++++ ____++++ ____++++ ____66662222111155551111222211110000 11117777+ _+ _+ _+ _xxxx ____÷÷÷÷ ____xxxx ____÷÷÷÷ ____1111888888882222111122222222 11114444÷÷÷÷ ____ ÷÷÷÷ ____++++ ____÷÷÷÷ ____++++ ____111100002222000011115555555511110000 5555+ _+ _+ _+ _++++ ____++++ ____++++ ____++++ ____88885555111177771111222211111111 22220000---- ____---- ____++++ ____++++ ____---- ____88881111222211116666111122226666 11113333+ _+ _+ _+ _ ++++ ____xxxx ____÷÷÷÷ ____÷÷÷÷ ____222244442222111111116666444411112222 22220000
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20109Math CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsblankUse the number and operationin the circle, write your answerin the blank and use thatnumber for the next operation
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20101MathsMathsMathsMaths CornerCornerCornerCornerssssAdd the side blocks tomake the number in thecircle55551111333327777000011113333244444222233331111555554444333326666
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20102MathsMathsMathsMaths CornerCornerCornerCornerssssAdd the side blocks tomake the number in thecircle33331111555526666666611113333555588884777733331111999911114444333324444
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20103MathsMathsMathsMaths CornerCornerCornerCornerssssAdd the side blocks tomake the number in thecircle
    • 1©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010124379581+ 1Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath Flowers65329714+ 312141317 1915 1811+ 2121118131615910+ 1163978105+ 3Use the number in the center of the flowerand + it to the petals. Write the answer onthe outer petal.21975634+ 2+ 1,,2,,3
    • 2©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010124379581-1Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath Flowers210975634- 2653897104- 33497 25 810- 2121118131615910- 1563910874- 3Use the number in the center of the flowerand - it to the petals. Write the answer onthe outer petal.- 1,,2,,3
    • 3©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/201064379581+ 2Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath Flowers21975634+ 265329784- 212141317 1915 1811- 2121118131615910+ 2263978105- 2Use the number in the center of the flowerand + or - it to the petals. Write the answeron the outer petal.+ 2/ - 2
    • 4©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/201014379582+ 3Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath Flowers21975634+ 36532 97 14+ 310437 95 811-3121118131615910- 3364978105- 3Use the number in the center of the flowerand +/-/x/÷ it to the petals. Write theanswer on the outer petal.+ 3/ - 3
    • 5©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Use the number in the center of the flowerand + or 1 it to the petals. Write the answeron the outer petal.124379581+ 4Math FlowMath FlowMath FlowMath FlowersersersersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath Flowers21975634+ 46532 97 14+ 41214131719151811- 4121118131615910- 44611978105- 4+ 4/ - 4
    • 6©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/201024379581+ 5Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath Flowers65329714+ 512141317 1915 1811+ 5121118131615910- 510611978105- 5Use the number in the center of the flowerand + or - it to the petals. Write the answeron the outer petal.+ 5/ - 521975634+ 5
    • 7©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath Flowers21975634x 265329714x 21612148 206 1810÷ 212121881614102÷ 212620448102÷ 2Use the number in the center of the flowerand x/÷ it to the petals. Write the answeron the outer petal.x/÷ 214379582x 2
    • 8©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20102197 56 34x 365329714x 3312159216186÷ 31215183692124÷ 3Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersUse the number in the center of the flowerand x/÷ it to the petals. Write the answeron the outer petal.x/÷ 3336242136183012÷ 314379582x 3
    • 9©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/201021975634x 465329714x 416124820362416÷ 4123224816442028÷ 414379582x 4Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath Flowers Use the number in the center of the flowerand x/÷ it to the petals. Write the answeron the outer petal.x/÷ 4121620444284024÷ 4
    • 10©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20102197 56 34x 565329714x 5605453020251510÷ 5202551535451040÷ 5Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersUse the number in the center of the flowerand x/÷ it to the petals. Write the answeron the outer petal.x/÷ 5256020454015535÷ 514379582x 5
    • 11©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20102197 56 3410 -6532971410 -6245068110 -5283640710 -1437958210 -Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersUse the number in the center of the flowerand – the number in the petals. Write theanswer on the outer petal.bonds of1016244810510 -
    • 12©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/201065329714x 10602040803050 8010÷ 1040207080103010060÷ 1014379582x 10Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersUse the number in the center of the flowerand x/÷ it to the petals. Write the answeron the outer petal.x/÷ 1020601005040809070÷ 1021975634x 10
    • 13©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20102Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersUse the number in the center of the flowerand x/÷/+/- it to the petals. Write theanswer on the outer petal.22222
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20101MMMMathsathsathsaths In & OutIn & OutIn & OutIn & OutWrite the number thatcomes out when you usethe number in the circle2222 6666 1111 5555 8888 0000 33337777++++ 2222ininininoutoutoutout+3+3+3+3ininininoutoutoutout5555 1111 0000 3333 8888 2222 44449999+1+1+1+1ininininoutoutoutout9999 16161616 19191919 17171717 25252525 43434343 9898989812121212+10+10+10+10ininininoutoutoutout4444 2222 9999 3333 8888 5555 77771111-2-2-2-2ininininoutoutoutout10101010 3333 9999 4444 2222 7777 55556666-1-1-1-1ininininoutoutoutout7777 2222 8888 3333 5555 9999 11114444
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20102MMMMathsathsathsaths In & OIn & OIn & OIn & OututututWrite the number thatcomes out when you usethe number in the circle3333 1111 7777 2222 9999 0000 44448888++++ 5555ininininoutoutoutout+4+4+4+4ininininoutoutoutout1111 6666 2222 8888 0000 5555 44443333+1+1+1+1ininininoutoutoutout28282828 33336666 19191919 79797979 55553333 99999999 6565656547474747+10+10+10+10ininininoutoutoutout23232323 37373737 99990000 48484848 88881111 55554444 7777222211115555-2-2-2-2ininininoutoutoutout13131313 15151515 11111111 17171717 10101010 2222 1818181819191919-0-0-0-0ininininoutoutoutout7777 2222 8888 3333 5555 9999 11114444
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20103MMMMathsathsathsaths In & OutIn & OutIn & OutIn & OutWrite the number thatcomes out when you usethe number in the circle2222 6666 1111 5555 8888 0000 33337777++++ 2222ininininoutoutoutout+3+3+3+3ininininoutoutoutout5555 1111 0000 3333 8888 2222 44449999+1+1+1+1ininininoutoutoutout9999 16161616 19191919 17171717 25252525 43434343 9898989812121212+10+10+10+10ininininoutoutoutout4444 2222 9999 3333 8888 5555 77771111-2-2-2-2ininininoutoutoutout10101010 3333 9999 4444 2222 7777 55556666-1-1-1-1ininininoutoutoutout7777 2222 8888 3333 5555 9999 11114444
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20104MMMMathsathsathsaths In & OutIn & OutIn & OutIn & Out Write the number thatcomes out when you usethe number in the circle+100+100+100+100ininininoutoutoutout20202020 1111 99999999 72727272 36363636 22222222 5005005005008888-10-10-10-10ininininoutoutoutout59595959 33333333 71717171 84848484 11111111 45454545 6262626226262626+4+4+4+4ininininoutoutoutout92929292 61616161 59595959 28282828 37373737 45454545 7777777784848484x2x2x2x2ininininoutoutoutout2222 3333 9999 7777 4444 6666 11118888-5-5-5-5ininininoutoutoutout60606060 30303030 45454545 70707070 15151515 90909090 8585858525252525x3x3x3x3ininininoutoutoutout4444 6666 3333 8888 2222 10101010 55559999
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20105MMMMathsathsathsaths In & OutIn & OutIn & OutIn & OutWrite the number thatcomes out when you usethe number in the circleininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutout
    • 1© Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20106666 0 00 00 00 05555 0 00 00 00 07 07 07 07 01111 00008 08 08 08 06 06 06 06 05 05 05 05 04 04 04 04 03 03 03 03 02 02 02 02 01111 0 00 00 00 04444 0 00 00 00 03 0 03 0 03 0 03 0 02 0 02 0 02 0 02 0 0Maths Number Value CardsMaths Number Value CardsMaths Number Value CardsMaths Number Value Cards1111 8888777766665555444433332222 99999 09 09 09 0
    • 2© Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20109999 0 0 00 0 00 0 00 0 09999 0 00 00 00 07777 0 00 00 00 02 0 0 02 0 0 02 0 0 02 0 0 01111 0 0 00 0 00 0 00 0 07 0 0 07 0 0 07 0 0 07 0 0 06 0 0 06 0 0 06 0 0 06 0 0 05 0 0 05 0 0 05 0 0 05 0 0 04 0 0 04 0 0 04 0 0 04 0 0 03 0 0 03 0 0 03 0 0 03 0 0 08888 0 0 00 0 00 0 00 0 08888 0 00 00 00 0
    • 3© Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20106 06 06 06 0 0000How to use your Maths Number Value CardsHow to use your Maths Number Value CardsHow to use your Maths Number Value CardsHow to use your Maths Number Value CardsPrint the first 2 pages on card stock.Cut all the number cards separately.Laminate for durability.1. Let the child read each card. (Count in ones, tens, hundreds and thousands.)2. Call out a number and let the child find the correct card. (Identify name and number.)3. Arrange one of each on top of each other: 1, 10, 100, and 1000 from biggest tosmallest. (Identify value.) Tell the child that the cards’ right side edge must all bealigned on the right. (The 1 will cover the zero of the 10; the 10 will cover the 2 zerosof the hundred and so on.)4. Now call out/ write different number combinations; starting with only the ones andtens, then add the hundreds, then the 1000s. Let your child first find the correctcards and then arrange them in order with the right sides matching. Let the childwrite the number and say it correctly.5. Next you can do the missing number exercises.6. Now you can add or subtract 1s, 10s, 100s or 1000s.7. Use these as remedial cards if your child can not manage mental Maths.Maths Number Value CardsMaths Number Value CardsMaths Number Value CardsMaths Number Value Cards ExercisesExercisesExercisesExercisesRead these numbers aloud. Place them in the following numbers:9; 59; 609; 650; 659; 8009; 8600; 8650; 8659; 8050.8888 0 0 00 0 00 0 00 0 0 6666 0 00 00 00 0 5555 00008 0 0 08 0 0 08 0 0 08 0 0 06 0 06 0 06 0 06 0 05 05 05 05 099998 0 0 08 0 0 08 0 0 08 0 0 05 05 05 05 099999999 5 05 05 05 09999 6 0 06 0 06 0 06 0 05 05 05 05 0
    • 4© Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Maths number value cardsMaths number value cardsMaths number value cardsMaths number value cardsTake these cards out. Put the correct number cards ontop of each other to make the following numbers:7000 200 40 31. 432. 2033. 70034. 2405. 70406. 72007. 2438. 70439. 7243
    • 5© Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Maths number value cardsMaths number value cardsMaths number value cardsMaths number value cardsWrite the number in the box you need to make thesenumbers:7000 200 40 31. 7000 + + 40 = 72402. 7000 + 200 + = 72403. + 40 + 3 = 2434. 7000 + 200 + 40 + = 72435. + 200 + 40 + 3 = 72436. + 40 + 3 = 70437. 7000 + + 40 + 3 = 7243
    • 6© Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Maths number value cardsMaths number value cardsMaths number value cardsMaths number value cardsUse your number cards to make these numbers.Now write the number cards that are needed to makethese numbers:1. 5861 = + + +2. 9191 = + + +3. 4370 = + + +4. 5678 = + + +5. 6205 = + + +6. 2011 = + + +7. 3003 = + + +8. 1434 = + + +9. 7766 = + + +10. 8527 = + + +
    • 7© Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Maths number value cardsMaths number value cardsMaths number value cardsMaths number value cardsUse your cards to make these sums. Write theanswer on the line:1. 400 + 23 =2. 6000 + 310 =3. 500 + 99 =4. 1000 + 10 =5. 700 + 82 =6. 9400 + 23 =7. 810 + 2000 =8. 3 + 790 =9. 40 + 2001 =10. 1 + 5550 =11. 4210 + 8 =12. 76 + 3900 =13. 85 + 9100 =
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20101+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 2111122228888444400005555444411114444777788889999333355552222+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 36666+ 5+ 5+ 5+ 5444422221111333355556666+ 4+ 4+ 4+ 4999955557777888822223333555566661010101077778888121212129999+ 2+ 2+ 2+ 288881111333366665555444422227777+ 3+ 3+ 3+ 3Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsAdd the number in theroof to the number on theside. Write the answer inthe blank+ 2;3;4;5
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20102xxxx 44444444222233335555xxxx 5555222200001111333344445555xxxx 3333555544443333222222221111333377774444555566660000xxxx 77772222444433335555111166660000xxxx 666688882222444433335555111166660000xxxx 88887777Multiply the numberon the side by thenumber in the roofRememberx 0 willalways = 0x 2->8
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/2010311111010101099998888777766665555444433332222xxxx 222299994444101010106666333388881111777755552222xxxx 55558888666677779999222200003333555511114444xxxx 44444444999966665555333300007777111188882222xxxx 3333Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMultiply the numberon the side by thenumber in the roofx 2;3;4;5
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/2010411111010101099998888777766665555444433332222xxxx 666699994444101010106666333388881111777755552222xxxx 99998888666677779999222200003333555511114444xxxx 88884444999966665555333300007777111188882222xxxx 7777Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMultiply the numberon the side by thenumber in the roofx6;7;8;9
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/2010511111010101099998888777766665555444433332222xxxx 1010101099994444101010106666333388881111777755552222xxxx 131313138888666677779999222200003333555511114444xxxx 121212124444999966665555333300007777111188882222xxxx 11111111Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMultiply the numberon the side by thenumber in the roof x 10->13
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/2010611111010101099998888777766665555444433332222x 1x 1x 1x 1999944441010101066663333888811111111777755552222x 4x 4x 4x 48888666677779999111122221111000033335555111111114444x 3x 3x 3x 34444999966665555333300007777111188882222x 2x 2x 2x 2Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMultiply the numberon the side by thenumber in the roof x 1,2,3,4
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/201071111111110101010222277773333666699994444888811112222xxxx 66669999444410101010666633338888111111117777555511112222xxxx 9999888866667777999922221111000033335555111111114444xxxx 8888444499996666555533331111000077771111111188882222xxxx 7777Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMultiply the numberon the side by thenumber in the roof x 6,7,8,9
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20108222211111111999910101010777788885555444466663333-2-2-2-233331111333355552222555511115555222233332222000011113333111111113333000033333333-2-2-2-222220000222299992222555522228888222222222222333322227777222244441111999922221111-2-2-2-213131313191919191616161618181818171717171515151510101010121212121414141411111111-2-2-2-2Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsUse the number inthe roof with thenumber on the side - 2
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/2010933331111000077776666999944448888555522221111++++ 333333333333333388883333666633332222333355553333777733330000333344443333888833331111++++ 333322221111222277772222888822220000222244442222555522228888222222222222999922226666++++ 333311111111111177771111444422220000111199991111333311116666111122221111888811115555++++ 3333Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsUse the number inthe roof with thenumber on the side+ 3
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/20101022220000111100009999555533337777444411116666==== 1111000077778888111100004444222255556666333399991111==== 1111000066668888555544447777333311110000111122229999==== 1111000011110000444466661111000088885555999922223333==== 11110000Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsBonds of 10! All thenumbers on the sidemust be added to ?number to make 10
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/2010111111555500006666333399997777222288884444==== 22220000000011113333111144444444111177772222555511118888333311112222==== 222200002222000011119999666611117777111133338888111166665555999911111111==== 2222000011110000111133331111888811114444111177771111999911112222111166661111111111115555==== 22220000Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsAdd all the numbers onthe side to ? number tomake 20
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 02/201012Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths Rocketsblank
    • Math Butterflies
    • Math Caterpillars 
    • 
    • Math Flowers  
    •                                                             
    •  Maths Rockets
    • Maths Rockets
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 08/20101Math ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesMath ButterfliesUse the numbers on the left withthe number in the square andwrite your answer on the right========================================blank========================================================================================================================
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 08/20102Math CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsMath CaterpillarsblankUse the number and operationin the circle, write your answerin the blank and use thatnumber for the next operation
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 08/20103Add the side blocks tomake the number in thecircle
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 08/201042Math FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersMath FlowersUse the number in the center of the flowerand x/÷/+/- it to the petals. Write theanswer on the outer petal.22222
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 08/20105MMMMathsathsathsaths In & OutIn & OutIn & OutIn & OutWrite the number thatcomes out when you usethe number in the circleininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutoutininininoutoutoutout
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 08/20106Add to make thenumber in the rocketnoseMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths Rockets
    • ©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 08/20107Maths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths RocketsMaths Rocketsblank
    • 1©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Accordion minibooks
    • 2©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Quilt SquareShutterfold>
    • 3©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Cross/ 4 flapminibookPentagonShutter flapTriangle PetalminibookArrow flapminibook
    • 4©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Envelope/ pocketMatchbookminibooks
    • 5©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Flag minibookCut piecesseparately, fixwith bradPentagon petalminibookCircle minibook~Fold on dottedlines, cut ondark dashedlines. Fold intoquarters
    • 6©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Triangle minibook~Fold each triangle overFlap minibooks
    • 7©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20102 flap with cover~Fold on dotted lines, cut on dark dashed line4 flap minibook~Fold in ½, cut on dotted lines
    • 8©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Square petal minibook
    • 9©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20105 Tab minibook~Cut out shaded areas
    • 10©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Circle Accordion minibook~Fold and paste 2 strips tomake long fanGlue to 1ststrip
    • 11©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20101 23Step Book1. Cut out the 3 pages.2. Fold on the dotted lines.3. Place the 3 folded pages inside each otherwith page 1 on top, then 2, and then 3 inside.4. The folds should all be together creating 6steps! The reverse of each page will form thebottom 3 steps!5. To staple the pages, open the folds, keepingthe pages still stacked inside each other andstaple on the dark little line. (You could punch 2holes and tie ribbon or string knots instead ofstaples for a creative touch!)6. Write inside each step as you would in a tabminibook.1234 (page 3 inside)5 (page 2 inside)6 (page 1 inside)
    • 12©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/2010Lapbook PlannerLapbook PlannerLapbook PlannerLapbook Planner Topic:Topic:Topic:Topic:SubSubSubSub----TopicTopicTopicTopic MinibookMinibookMinibookMinibook RefeRefeRefeReferencerencerencerence/Website/Website/Website/Website
    • Cut out the book as ONE piece.Using the dotted line as your guide, foldthe top rectangle down and fold the leftLarge Vertical 3/4 Book
    • Cut out the book as ONE piece.Using the dotted line as your guide, foldthe top rectangle down and fold the leftrectangle (the cover page) over.Small Vertical 3/4 Book
    • Cut out the book as ONE piece.Using the dotted line as your guide, fold the top rectangledown and fold the left rectangle (the cover page) over.Small Horizontal 3/4 Book
    • Cut out the book as ONE piece.Using the dotted line as your guide, fold the toprectangle down and fold the left rectangle over.Large Horizontal 3/4 Book
    •     Cut out as one piece. Foldleft side in. Fold right side in.Fold bottom up. Fold topdown. T-book 5 Spaces
    •  Youarelookingattheinsideofthebook.Cutoutasonepiece.Foldleftsidein.Foldrightsidein.Foldtopdown.   T-book 4 Spaces
    • Accordion minibooks
    • QuiltSquareShutterfold>
    • Cross/ 4flapminibookPentagonShutterflapTrianglePetalminibookArrow flapminibook
    • Envelope/pocketMatchbookminibooks
    • FlagminibookCut piecesseparately,fix withbradPentagonpetalminibookCircleminibook~Fold ondottedlines, cuton darkdashedlines.Fold intoquarters
    • Triangleminibook~Fold eachtriangle overFlapminibooks
    • 2 flap with cover~Fold on dotted lines, cut on darkdashed line4 flap minibook~Fold in ½, cut ondotted lines
    • Square petalminibook
    • 5 Tab minibook~Cut out shadedareas
    • Circle Accordionminibook~Fold and paste 2strips to make longfanGlue to 1st strip
    • 123Step Book1. Cut out the 3 pages.2. Fold on the dotted lines.3. Place the 3 folded pages insideeach other with page 1 on top,then 2, and then 3 inside.4. The folds should all be togethercreating 6 steps! The reverse ofeach page will form the bottom 3steps!5. To staple the pages, open thefolds, keeping the pages stillstacked inside each other andstaple on the dark little line.(You could punch 2 holes and tieribbon or string knots instead ofstaples for a creative touch!)6. Write inside each step as youwould in a tab minibook.
    • Lapbook Planner Topic:Sub-Topic Minibook Reference/Website
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    • 1©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20101x2x3xMultiplicationMultiplicationMultiplicationMultiplication WheeWheeWheeWheellllssss Cut out the circles, number bar and its window.Laminate for durability.Attach the number bar with a brad on the topof the circle. Rotate to practice.
    • 2©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20104x5x6x
    • 3©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/20107x9x8x
    • 4©Nadene of http://practicalpages.wordpress.com 03/201010x12x11x
    • Date: ____________Multiplying and Dividing Integers (1.4 & 1.5)Main Idea DetailsHow do Imultiplyintegers?Is there aneasy way toremember?Examples:You multiply integers just as you do _______numbers, but you must keep track of the________. When you multiply integers with the________ _______, the result is always__________. When you multiply integers with_____________ _______, the result isalways __________.Use the song to help you remember:A positive times a positive is a (um) positiveA positive times a negative is a (um) negativeA negative times a negative is a (um) positiveThese are the rules for signs.6 7 = ____-8 10 = ____How do Idivideintegers?Examples:The same rules for multiplying integers applyto __________ integers.You divide integers just as you do _______numbers, but you must keep track of the________. When you divide integers with the________ _______, the result is always__________. When you divide integers with_____________ _______, the result isalways __________.44 ÷ 11 = ____-100 ÷ 10 = ____Practice Assignment:______________________________________Date: ____________Multiplying and Dividing Integers (1.4 & 1.5)Main Idea DetailsHow do Imultiplyintegers?Is there aneasy way toremember?Examples:You multiply integers just as you do _______numbers, but you must keep track of the________. When you multiply integers with the________ _______, the result is always__________. When you multiply integers with_____________ _______, the result isalways __________.Use the song to help you remember:A positive times a positive is a (um) positiveA positive times a negative is a (um) negativeA negative times a negative is a (um) positiveThese are the rules for signs.6 7 = ____-8 10 = ____How do Idivideintegers?Examples:The same rules for multiplying integers applyto __________ integers.You divide integers just as you do _______numbers, but you must keep track of the________. When you divide integers with the________ _______, the result is always__________. When you divide integers with_____________ _______, the result isalways __________.44 ÷ 11 = ____-100 ÷ 10 = ____Practice Assignment:_________________________________________4 -6 = ____-8 -7 = ____36 ÷ -6 = ____-81 ÷ -9 = ____4 -6 = ____-8 -7 = ____36 ÷ -6 = ____-81 ÷ -9 = ____
    • Date: ____________Multiplying and Dividing Rational Numbers (2.3)Main Idea DetailsHow do Imultiplyrationalnumbers?Example:How do Idividerationalnumbers?Example:*Note*To ________ rational numbers,multiply across the ____(________) and multiply acrossthe _______ (_______).Then use the same rules for________ when deciding on the___.To _______ rational numbers,_____ the first number the same,change the _______ sign to amultiplication sign, and _____ thesecond number.Then use the same rules for________ when deciding on the___.If any of the numbers are ______numbers, change them to_______ _______ first.Date: ____________Multiplying and Dividing Rational Numbers (2.3)Main Idea DetailsHow do Imultiplyrationalnumbers?Example:How do Idividerationalnumbers?Example:*Note*To ________ rational numbers,multiply across the ____(________) and multiply acrossthe _______ (_______).Then use the same rules for________ when deciding on the___.To _______ rational numbers,_____ the first number the same,change the _______ sign to amultiplication sign, and _____ thesecond number.Then use the same rules for________ when deciding on the___.If any of the numbers are ______numbers, change them to_______ _______ first.
    • Multiplying & Dividing Integers3 2 means ___________________________________________________3 2 means __________________________________________________3 2 means __________________________________________________3 2 means ________________________________________________Rule Multiplying or Dividing Two IntegersThe product or quotient of two integers with the same sign is______________________________.Examples:The product or quotient of two integers with different signs is______________________________.Examples:
    • Date: ____________Multiplying and Dividing Integers (1.4 & 1.5)Main Idea DetailsHow do Imultiplyintegers?Is there aneasy way toremember?Examples:You multiply integers just as you do _______numbers, but you must keep track of the________. When you multiply integers with the________ _______, the result is always__________. When you multiply integers with_____________ _______, the result isalways __________.Use the song to help you remember:A positive times a positive is a (um) positiveA positive times a negative is a (um) negativeA negative times a negative is a (um) positiveThese are the rules for signs.6  7 = ____-8  10 = ____How do Idivideintegers?Examples:The same rules for multiplying integers applyto __________ integers.You divide integers just as you do _______numbers, but you must keep track of the________. When you divide integers with the________ _______, the result is always__________. When you divide integers with_____________ _______, the result isalways __________.44 ÷ 11 = ____-100 ÷ 10 = ____Practice Assignment:______________________________________Date: ____________Multiplying and Dividing Integers (1.4 & 1.5)Main Idea DetailsHow do Imultiplyintegers?Is there aneasy way toremember?Examples:You multiply integers just as you do _______numbers, but you must keep track of the________. When you multiply integers with the________ _______, the result is always__________. When you multiply integers with_____________ _______, the result isalways __________.Use the song to help you remember:A positive times a positive is a (um) positiveA positive times a negative is a (um) negativeA negative times a negative is a (um) positiveThese are the rules for signs.6  7 = ____-8  10 = ____How do Idivideintegers?Examples:The same rules for multiplying integers applyto __________ integers.You divide integers just as you do _______numbers, but you must keep track of the________. When you divide integers with the________ _______, the result is always__________. When you divide integers with_____________ _______, the result isalways __________.44 ÷ 11 = ____-100 ÷ 10 = ____Practice Assignment:_________________________________________4  -6 = ____-8  -7 = ____36 ÷ -6 = ____-81 ÷ -9 = ____4  -6 = ____-8  -7 = ____36 ÷ -6 = ____-81 ÷ -9 = ____
    • Assignment PageDate: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Student: ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________Subject:_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________Assignment (This can be a book, article, webpage, video, listening CD, field trip, etc.):________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________X Notebooking Project Project DetailsPhotos/Scrapbooking pageCopywork pageMapSketch/DrawingDiagramGraphBrochureMini posterTimelineFormal writingCreative & Journal WritingBook reportBiographyFoldableWorksheet/Activity pageTest/QuizChapter review/Study pageLanguage Arts
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    •         File Folder Minis Cut books out on solid lines; fold on dotted lines.
    • Cut book out on solid lines; fold on dotted lines.File Folder Large
    • Cut book out on solid lines; fold on dotted lines.File Folder Small
    • Clipboards
    • Cut out shapes. Fill in information. Stack together with cover on top and staple.Book Shapes
    • Cut out shapes. Fill in information. Stack together with cover on top and staple.Book Shape 2
    • Cut out shapes. Fill in information. Stack together with cover on top and staple.Book Shape 3
    • NotebooksCut out shapes. Fill in information. Stack together with cover on top and staple.
    • S t a r t i n g t h e S c h o o l Y e a r R i g h tL E S S O NBThe Interactive StudentNotebookHow will the ISN make you a betterstudent?OverviewIn a social studies skill builder, students analyze placardsdepicting portions of the interactive student notebook(ISN) and begin working on putting theirs together.Preview Students complete a “buddy clock” activity tobe used in paired activities for this lesson and futurelessons.Activity In a Social Studies Skill Builder, pairs study siximportant components to the interactive studentnotebook. Where appropriate, students will begin settingup their own notebook.Processing Students will create a simple editorialcartoon on the topic of the lesson essential question .ObjectivesIn the course of this lesson and participating classroomactivity, students will• analyze the importance of working in pairs as a way tolearn content.• describe the expectations for setting up a successfulinteractive student notebook in your class.• explain how maintaining a good notebook will allowthem to deepen their understanding of content.Materials•Copies of the StudentHandout B1: Buddy Clock(1 per student)•Copies of StudentHandout B2: ISN Matrix (1per student)•Copies of StudentHandout B3: ISNGuidelines & Expectations•12 or more folders withcopies of Placards B1-B6inside.•Colored Pencils•Glue Sticks•ScissorsOR•Materials consistent withhow you want students toput together their notebook.Basic Training: Starting the School Year Right 1
    • P r o c e d u r e sPreviewSuggested time: 10 minutes1. Greet Students at the Door. Distribute a copy ofStudent Handout B1: Buddy Clock to each student asthey enter the room.2. Explain the reason for the Buddy Clock Activity.Tell the students that from time to time, they will bedoing activities in class that require pairs to worktogether. Completing this Buddy Clock activity willallow the students to move quickly into pairs andallow them the opportunity to work with differentpeople throughout the year.3. Go over the rules for the Buddy Clock activity.Instruct the students to read the directions quietlywhile you read them aloud.• Using a projected Buddy Clock, digital, doc-cam, ortransparency, walk the students through each of thethree scenarios at the bottom of their handout.4. Give students 5 minutes to get as many signaturesas possible. Consider ringing a bell or announcing tothe class any time a student completes their clock andbrings it to you.5. At the end of time, have all the students who stillhave an opening for an hour to come to the middle ofthe room. Pair these students quickly by finding outwhat hours people have open, and if students have notsigned previously, signing them up. For those thatremain, use your professional judgement to allowpairs to work a second hour together or to have agroup of three in some circumstances. (note: if youhave absent students, either fill one in for themyourself or have another student fill one in for them.)6. Model how the Buddy Clock is used. Ask studentsto review their clock. Have them point, from theirseats, to their 7 o’clock buddy. Ask them to movetogether and work together for the lesson. ExplainBasic Training: Starting the School Year Right 2Student Handout B1Buddy ClockAlternate toClock SuggestionInstead of a clock,consider a map withselected locations forstudents to sign. Insteadof calling them clockbuddies, they would betravel companions.
    • P r o c e d u r e sBasic Training: Starting the School Year Right 3that for future lessons where students are to bepaired, you will use the buddy clock to pair them upquickly. Over time, they will have the opportunity towork with everyone in the class.Social Studies Skill BuilderSuggested Time: 30 minutes1. Explain the purpose of the activity. Tell thestudents in the next activity, they will learn about theinteractive student notebook (or ISN) and how it willbe used in class and at home.2. Create 12+ Manila Folders with copies of PlacardsB1-B6. Pass out a folder to each pair of students touse as they complete each step in the process.3. Pass out Student Handout B2: Matrix for ISN.Have the students look at each feature on their matrix.Pairs are to complete each column in their matrix,including the last column which must be initialed bytheir teacher.4. Have pairs begin work on the first feature. Havepairs begin with the first feature, ISN Setup, andcomplete all three columns of their matrix. Remindstudents that before moving onto a next feature insequence, they must check in with you and be signedoff. Pairs will repeat this process until they havecompleted all six features on their matrix. Once pairscomplete the fifth feature, give each student in a paira copy of Student Handout B3: ISN Guidelines &Expectations.5. Debrief all six features quickly. Explain to thestudents that it will be necessary to bring theirnotebook to class every day unless they are tolddifferently.Placards B1-B6Student Handout B2:Matrix for ISNStudent Handout B3:ISN Guidelines &Expectations
    • P r o c e d u r e sBasic Training: Starting the School Year Right 4ProcessingSuggested Time: 10 minutes; complete for homework1. Challenge students to create an editorial cartoon.Have students turn to page 4 of their interactivestudent notebook. Tell them that you would like tochallenge them to create an editorial cartoon.2. The subject of the cartoon should be on the ISN.Tell the students to use the interactive studentnotebook as the subject of their cartoon. The cartoonshould include things that would explain features thefeatures and benefits of the notebook.3. Challenge students to use appropriate materials.Students can draw their cartoon and color it, or useother means to create their cartoon.“Going Digital”SuggestionHave students use a webtool that allows them tocreate their cartoon andshare it. One possibilityis www.toondoo.com .“What if”SuggestionWhat if you don’t wantyour students to createtheir own notebook usinga spiral? What if youhave a consumablenotebook instead? Whatif you’d like yourstudents to include otherfeatures not listed as partof this activity? Teachingis a private practice. Thisway to set up thenotebook may differ fromwhat you like. Adjustyour matrix and materialsas needed. It is alsosuggested to review theSocial Studies Alive (forelementary) or BringLearning Alive (forsecondary) methodsbooks as a whole sectionin both is devoted tovarious configurations ofthe interactive studentnotebook.
    • Student Handout B1: Buddy ClockPrint Your Name HereDirections: When your teacherasks you to, circulate the roomand get a different student toPRINT their first, last name byeach hour on the clock. Hereare a five rules to complete thistask.1. Print your name in the middle ofyour clock on the line provided.2. You may only get anotherstudents name on your clockONCE.3. When asking someone to sign aparticular hour on your clock,you BOTH have to blanks by thathour.4. If you are having trouble findingsomeone that has an opening fora particular hour on the clock,ask aloud, “Does anyone have anopening for __ o’clock?”5. Take your completed clock toyour teacher when all twelvehours are filled.Want to bemy 2 o’clockappointment?I’ve alreadygot someonethere, can wedo that?Can you alsosign my 6o’clockappointment?Are weallowed tosign morethan once?I’m open at 10o’clock, areyou?Let me look.No one hassigned my 10.NO NO YES!
    • Student Handout B2: ISN MatrixNotebook Feature Two words to describe featureWhy is this feature important?To Do List for YouNotebook Setup Create a Table of Contents inside the front cover like the example.Number the TOC page 1Materials Used Create a bag with a glue stick, pack of colored pencils, and a pair of scissors from the supply area.Previews Cut out the Buddy ClockGlue it onto page 2Add the title to your TOCReading Notes Fold this matrix in halfGlue it onto page 3Add the title to your TOC.Process Pages On page 4 of the ISN, create a large rectangle on the top half of the page.Add the title, “Cartoon About ISN” at the top and TOC.Notebook AssessmentsGlue the “Notebook Expectations and Guidelines” to the inside‐back cover of the ISN.
    • Student Handout B3: ISN Guidelines & ExpectationsINTERACTIVESTUDENTNOTEBOOKGUIDELINESWhatisthepurposeofthenotebook?Thepurposeoftheinteractivenotebookistoenablethestudenttobeacreative,independentthinkerandwriter.Interactivenotebookswillbeusedforclassnotesaswellasotheractivitieswherestudentswillbeaskedtoexpresstheirownideasandprocesstheinformationpresentedbythisclass.Whatmaterialswillthestudentneed?*SpiralNotebook:Spiralbound,Collegeboundpreferable70sheetsto10011x8½in.Threeholedpunched*Highlighters*BlueorBlackPens,Pencil,ColoredPencilsorCrayons*Glue-sticksHowshouldthenotebookbeorganized?Studentswillgetdetailedinstructionsinclassthefirstweekofschool,butwhatfollowsisthebasicpremise.Thenotebookwillbeorganizedintoaleftsideandarightside.WhatgoesontheRightSideoftheInteractiveStudentNotebook?TherightsideoftheISNisforclassandreadingnotes.Asstudentstakenotes,theywillstructurethemsothatkeyideasareclearandsupportedbyexamplesfromclassinstruction,discussions,orreadingassignments.WhatgoesontheLeftSideoftheInteractiveStudentNotebook?TheleftsideoftheISNwillbeusedforavarietyofdifferentactivities,includinghomework.Thissideshouldbetheplacewhereallofthecreativeandartisticinklingscomebustingout!Leftsideactivitieswillaskthestudenttodemonstrateunderstandingofnewideas.Thekindsofnewactivitiesfortheleftsidearelistedasfollows:“PREVIEW”:isanactivitywherethestudentwillbeaskedtopreviewnewmaterialthatwilltieintothecontentofthelesson.Thisactivityreliesonstudents’priorknowledgeandismeanttobesomethingthatEVERYstudentcananswer.“PROCESS”:anactivityinwhichthestudentwillbeaskedtopresentnewideastheylearnedfromthelessoninawaythatismeaningful.Forexample,astudentmyshowtheirunderstandingofnewideasbywritingapoemorastory,drawingpictures,makingdiagrams,drawingpoliticalcartoons,orwritingaeulogy.Howwillitbepossibletoearnan“A”ontheInteractiveStudentNotebook?AstudentwhoexpectstoreceiveanA-orhighergradeontheirnotebookwillbeonewhohastakenthetimetoconsistentlyincludethorough,neat,accurate,andcolorfulwork.HowwilltheInteractiveStudentNotebookbegraded?Notebookswillbecheckedquarterlyforneatness,accuracy,andcompleteness.Allclassnotesandnotebookassignmentsshouldbeincluded,evenfordaysinwhichthestudentisabsent.StudentsarepersonallyresponsibletochecktheMASTERISNIkeeporMYSELFforwork.Studentscanexpecttohavetheirnotebookscheckedtwicefirstquarterandonceaquarterthereafter.WherewilltheISNbekept?Forthemostpart,theISNwillneverleavetheclassroom.OnlyondayswherethereisanextendedProcessactivityforhomework.AboxtoholdISN’sforeachperiodofAmericanHistorywillbeleftintheclassroom.Whathappenswhenthe70pagenotebookrunsoutofpaper?Studentswilluseonenotebookperquarter.Thiseliminatesthecumulativedamagefromdaytodayuseovertime.
    • Placard B1: Notebook SetupSetting up the Interactive Notebook is extremely important. It’s also important to beconsistent. Notice that the Table of Contents allows the student to find their placequickly. What other features in the set up of these notebooks allow students to findand know what is on the pages?
    • Placard B2: Notebook MaterialsThe materials used to maintain the Interactive Student Notebook are critical. Lookat the following pages. What did the student use to create a good looking notebook?Some of the pages look like handouts. What tools will be needed to get handoutsinside the notebook?
    • Placard B3: Notebook PreviewsThe first part of every lesson will begin with a preview. This part of the lesson isusually 5 to 10 minutes. Sometimes students recall previous information.Sometimes students share a thought on a possible scenario. When you hear theword “preview,” what role do you think this plays in the lesson? Why would it be animportant part of the notebook?
    • Placard B4: Reading NotesWhen the class moves into learning new content from an activity, textbook, lecture,or other source of information, students take their notes around graphic organizers.Note how both words and images are used to help the student to remember the keyinformation. Remember that this portion of the notebook is testable.
    • Placard B5: Notebook ProcessingThe class will engage in processing assignments at the end of each lesson. This isthe students opportunity to show what they know. Look at these examples ofprocess assignments, what are some characteristics? Would a student just be ableto memorize facts and complete these assignments? Why will these assignmentsmake you a better tester?
    • Placard B6: Notebook AssessmentFrom time to time, notebooks will be collected and assessed. The expectations andguidelines for keeping your notebook will help you to be ready for theseassessments. While every page in your notebook may not be reviewed, all are fairgame.
    • Name DateCopyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.Grade 6, Multi-Unit UseNumber CubeLearning Tool111 4 6325
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comOrder of OperationsPESMDA
    • PleaseExcuseMyDearAuntSally.© The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comOrder of OperationsPEASMD
    • Grades 2–3BY KAREN BAICKERNew York • Toronto • London • Auckland • SydneyMexico City • New Delhi • Hong Kong • Buenos AiresOrigami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • ᨺScholastic Inc. grants teachers permission to photocopy the reproducibles from this book for classroom use. No other part of this publica-tion may be reproduced in whole or in part, or stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without permission of the publisher. For information regarding permission, write toScholastic Teaching Resources, 557 Broadway, New York, NY 10012-3999.Cover and interior design by Maria LiljaInterior illustrations by Jason RobinsonCopyright © 2004 by Karen Baicker. All rights reserved.ISBN 0-439-53991-9Printed in the U.S.A.1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 40 11 10 09 08 07 06 05 04For Joseph Baicker with thanks for all thehelp with math, even though he wouldn’tlet me do it the teacher’s way.Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 3ᨺ3Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4How to Use This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Tips for Teaching With Origami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6The Language and Symbols of Origami . . . . . . . . 7Basic Geometric Shapes Reference Sheet. . . . . . . 8ActivitiesTurn a Rectangle into a Square . . . . 9Math Concepts: shapes, patterns, symmetry,spatial relationsNCTM Standard 3What a Card! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11Math Concepts: shapes, patterns, size,symmetry, spatial relationsNCTM Standards 2 and 3Whale of Triangles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13Math Concepts: size, symmetry, shapes,patterns, spatial relationsNCTM Standards 2 and 3Instant Cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16Math Concepts: spatial reasoning, shapes, volumeNCTM Standards 3 and 4Playful Pinwheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19Math Concepts: spatial relations, pattern,symmetry, motionNCTM Standards 2 and 3Handy Hat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21Math Concepts: spatial reasoning, sequence,symmetry, scaleNCTM Standards 2 and 3Box It Up! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24Math Concepts: multiplication, division, dimensionNCTM Standard 3Noise Popper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27Math Concepts: measurement, shape,spatial reasoning, symmetryNCTM Standard 3Itty-Bitty Book. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30Math Concepts: spatial reasoning, shapes, symme-try, fractions, multiplication, divisionNCTM Standards 1 and 3Jumping Frog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33Math Concepts: shape, measurement,distance, heightNCTM Standards 3 and 4Kitty Cat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36Math Concepts: angles, symmetryNCTM Standard 3Floating Boat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39Math Concepts: shape, fractions, areaNCTM Standards 2 and 3Page-Hugger Bookmark . . . . . . . . . . 42Math Concepts: shape, spatial reasoning,symmetry, congruenceNCTM Standards 3Paper Airplane Express . . . . . . . . . . . 45Math Concepts: symmetry, balance,spatial reasoningNCTM Standards 3 and 4Glossary of Math Terms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48Contents1234567109811131214Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 4ᨺ4IntroductionWhy fold? The learning behind the funThe first and most obvious benefit of teaching with origami is that it’s fun and motivating for students.But the opportunities for learning through paper folding go much further. Many mathematical principles“unfold” and basic measurement and computation skills are reinforced as each model takes shape.The activities in this book are all correlated with NCTM (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics)standards, which are highlighted in each lesson.In addition, origami teaches the value of working precisely and following directions. Students will experiencethis with immediacy when a figure does not line up properly or does not match the diagram. Also, becausemath skills are integrated with paper folding, a physical activity, students absorb the learning on a deeperlevel. Origami helps develop fine motor skills, which in turn enhances other areas of cognitive development.Best of all, origami offers a sense of discovery and possibility. Make a fold, flip it over, open it up——and youhave created a new shape or structure!Tactile Learning Suppose youwant to see if two shapes are thesame size. You can measure the sidesto get the information you needabout area. But the easiest way to seeif two objects are the same size is toplace one on top of the other. That’sessentially what you are doing whenyou fold a piece of paper in half.Spatial Reasoning Origami activi-ties challenge students to look at adiagram and anticipate what it willlook like when folded. Often, twodiagrams are shown and the readermust imagine the fold that wasnecessary to take the first imageand produce the second. These arecomplex spatial relations problems——but ever so rewarding when the endresult is a cat or an airplane!Symmetry Origami patterns oftencall for symmetrical folds, whichcreate congruent shapes on eitherside of the fold, and clearly mark theline of symmetry.Fractions Folding a piece of paperis a very concrete way to demonstratefractions. Fold a piece of paper in halfto show halves, and in half again toshow quarters. For younger students,you can shade in sections to showparts of a whole. For older students,you can explore fractions. You caneven show fraction equivalencies.Is of the same as of ?Through paper folding, you can seethat it is!Sequence With origami, it iscritical to follow directions in aprecise sequence. The consequencesof skipping a step are immediateand obvious.Geometry Most of the basicprinciples of geometry——point, line,plane, shape——can be illustratedthrough paper folding. One exampleis Euclid’s first principle, that there isone straight line that connects anytwo points. This postulate becomesobvious when you make a fold thatconnects two points on the paper.For another example, older studentsare told that the angles of a triangleadd up to 180º. Folding a triangle canprove this geometric fact, as you seein the diagrams below. You can alsodemonstrate the concepts ofhypothesis and proof. Predict whatwill happen, and then fold the paperto test the hypothesis.2__31__21__22__3Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • Lesson 25ᨺ5How to Use This BookThe lessons in this book are organized from very simple to challenging; all are geared toward theinterests, abilities, and math skills of second and third graders. Both the math concepts and the origamimodels are layered to reinforce and build on earlier lessons. Nonetheless, the lessons also standindependently and you may select them according to the interests and needs of your class, in any order.In each lesson, you will find a list of Math Concepts, Math Vocabulary, and NCTM Standards thathighlight the math skills addressed. At the heart of each lesson is Math Wise!, a script of teaching pointsand questions designed to help you incorporate math concepts with every step on the student activitypage. Look for related activities to help students further explore these concepts at the end of the lessonin Beyond the Folds!Step-by-step illustrations showing exactly how to do each step in the origami activity appear on areproducible activity page following the lesson. Encourage students to keep these diagrams and bringthem home so that the skills and sequence can be reinforced through practice. A reproducible patternfor creating the activity is also included for each lesson. The pattern is provided for your convenience,though you may use your own paper to create the activities. The pattern pages feature decorativedesigns that enhance the final product and provide students with visual support, including folding guidelines and ★s that help them position the paper correctly. To further support students’ work withorigami and math, you may also want to distribute copies of reference pages 7 and 8, The Languageand Symbols of Origami and Basic Geometric Shapes Reference Sheet.Origami on the WebThere are many great websites for teaching origami to children. Here are somerecommended resources:www.origami.com This comprehensive site also sells an instructional video for origami inthe classroom.www.origami.net This site is a clearinghouse for information and resources related to origami.www.paperfolding.com/math This excellent site explores the mathematics behind paperfolding. Although geared for older students, it provides a useful overview for teachers.www.mathsyear2000.org Click on “Explorer” to find some math-related origami projectswith step-by-step illustrations, suitable for elementary students.Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • Lesson 26ᨺ6Prepare for the lessonᨺ Try the activity ahead of time ifpossible. Moving through the stepshelps you anticipate any areas ofdifficulty students may encounterand your completed activity pro-vides a model for them to consult.ᨺ Review the Math Wise! section andthink through the mathematicalconcepts you want to highlight.You can find helpful definitions forthe lesson’s vocabulary list in theglossary on page 48.ᨺ Photocopy the step-by-stepinstructions found in the lessonand the activity patterns (or haveother paper ready for studentsto use).Teach the lessonᨺ Familiarize students with the basicfolding symbols on page 7.ᨺ Introduce or review the origamiterminology students will use in thelesson. Note that communication isenhanced when you can describe aspecific edge, corner, or fold withprecision.ᨺ When possible, use the language ofmath as well as the language oforigami when creating these proj-ects. By saying, “Here I am dividingthe square with a valley fold,” youreinforce geometry concepts aswell as the folding sequence. Someof the ideas expressed in the MathWise! notes in the lesson plan maysound sophisticated. Yet, by usingthe proper language as you makethe folds, you will begin to teachstudents concepts that become thefoundation for success with mathin later grades. You’ll be surprisedat how much they grasp in thecontext of creating the origami.ᨺ Demonstrate the folds with a largerpiece of paper. Make sure thepaper faces the way the students’paper is facing them.ᨺ Support students who need morehelp with following directionsor with manipulating spatialrelationships by marking landmarkson the paper with a pencil as yougo around the classroom. You canmake a dot at the point where twocorners should meet, for example.ᨺ Arrange the class in clusters, and letstudents who have completed onefold assist other students. This willfoster cooperative learning andhelp you address all students’questions.Fold accuratelyᨺ Make sure students fold on asmooth, hard, clean surface.ᨺ Encourage students to make a softfold and check that the edges lineup properly to avoid overlapping.They can also refer to the diagramand make sure that the foldedshape looks correct. After theymake adjustments, they can makea sharper crease using theirfingernails.Choose your paperᨺ You can reproduce the patternsin this book onto copy paper.However, you can also use packsof origami paper, or cut your ownsquares. Keep in mind that thinnerpaper is easier to fold. Gift wrap,catalogues, magazines, menus,calendars, and other scrap papercan make wonderful paper for theseprojects. It is best to work withpaper where the two sides, frontand back, are easily distinguished.Encourage students toexplore geometryᨺ Unfold an origami project just tolook at the interesting pattern andthe geometric figures you havecreated through your series ofcreases. Challenge students tocreate their own variations—andmake their own diagrams showinghow they did it.Jumping frog unfoldedTips for Teaching With OrigamiOrigami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • Lesson 27ᨺ7The Language and Symbols of Origamiwhite side or back of papercolored side or front of paperfold toward the front(valley fold)fold toward the back(mountain fold)fold, then unfold turn overfoldcreasecutfolded edgeraw edgeOrigami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • Lesson 28ᨺ8Squarea quadrilateralthat has fourright angles andfour congruentsides. All squaresare rectanglesRectanglea quadrilateralthat has fourright angles (90°).All rectangles areparallelogramsQUADRILATERALSA quadrilateral is any figure that has four sidesIsosceles trianglea triangle withtwo congruentsides and twocongruent anglesRight trianglea triangle witha right angleIsosceles righttrianglea triangle withtwo congruentsides and oneright angleTRIANGLESA triangle is any figure that has three sidesScalene trianglea triangle withno congruentsides and nocongruent anglesEquilateraltrianglea triangle withthree congruentsides and threecongruent anglesCIRCLEa round shapemeasuring 360ºOVALan egg-shapewith a smoothcontinuous edgePENTAGONa shape withfive sidesHEXAGONa shape withsix sidesOCTAGONa shape witheight sidesParallelograma quadrilateralthat has twopairs of parallelsides andtwo pairs ofcongruent sidesBasic Geometric Shapes Reference SheetCONGRUENTequal in measurementcongruent linesegmentscongruent anglescongruent figures60° 60°Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 9ᨺ9Knowing how to turn a rectangleinto a square is an invaluableorigami technique! It’s also agreat way to teach some basicgeometry. Use rectangular paperof any size. Then invite studentsto use the reproducible tangramspuzzle and geometric shapesreference sheet to furtherexplore basic shapes.Materials Neededpage 10 (steps and pattern), rectangularsheet of paper, page 7 (The Language andSymbols of Origami), page 8 (BasicGeometric Shapes Reference Sheet)Math Conceptsshapes, patterns, symmetry, spatialrelationsNCTM Standardsᨺ analyze characteristics and properties oftwo- and three-dimensional geometricshapes and develop mathematicalarguments about geometricrelationships (Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ use visualization, spatial reasoning, andgeometric modeling to solve problems(Geometry Standard 3.4)Math Vocabularyrectanglesquareright angleisosceles right triangletrianglecongruentBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Help students become familiar with the step-by-step directions they’ll read ineach lesson. Distribute copies of The Language and Symbols of Origami, page 7,and review the word and picture cues presented.ᨺ Explore shapes further by distributing the Basic Geometric Shapes ReferenceSheet, page 8.ᨺ Show how you can take a piece of paper with a square corner—any size—anduse it to test various corners in the classroom. If the edges line up with theirpaper, they have found a right angle. Note that if their right angle fits insidethe other angle with extra room, the other angle is bigger. It has a widermouth. If their right angle covers up the other angle, then the other angle issmaller. Find bigger angles and smaller angles around the classroom.ᨺ Distribute How to Make a Square, page 10. After students have madea square from any rectangular sheet of paper, you can try the tangrams activityat the bottom of the page. (For best results, photocopy onto heavier paperor glue onto cardstock.) Give students a little background on the history oftangrams. The tangram is a seven-piece puzzle that has been played in Chinafor over 200 years. Explain that squares, triangles, and rectangles can be usedtogether to make a wide variety of shapes. Challenge students to match thepictures shown and to create their own tangrams activities.Lesson 1Turn a Rectangleinto a SquareWhen we start, the corners of this rectangle are perfectsquare corners. Another word for a square corner is a rightangle. Let’s look around the room and find some right angles.(Point out the corners of the room, tables, books, and so on.) When wemake our fold, we’ve cut this angle exactly in half. And nowwe have two isosceles right triangles, which means that thetwo sides of the triangle that form the right angle are thesame length, or congruent.Now we have an extra shape we have to cut (or tear)away. What shape is this? (rectangle)Let’s open up this triangle. Now we have a perfectsquare. All four sides are the same length. We also have tworight angles. What is the word that describes lines, angles,or shapes that are equal in measure? (congruent)123Math Wise! Distribute copies of page 10. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 10ᨺ10Lesson 1Tangram Puzzle PiecesYou just made a rectangle into a square. Now you can take a square and make it into a whole lot more! These seven basictangrams shapes can be used to make hundreds of designs. Cut out the shapes below. Then try to make the shapes shownbelow. Or make up your own figures for others to solve. When you’re done, see if you can put them back into a square again.Cut off the extra rectangle, as shown.Or fold the extra paper at the top, using thetop of the triangle as a guide. Crease it well. Tearalong the crease.How to Make a SquareTake a rectangular sheet ofpaper. Bring the bottom rightcorner up, so that the bottomedge and the left side line up.Now open upyour square. Find thetwo triangles!2 31Tip: To tear, fold the creaseback and forth, scoring iteach time with your finger orfingernail. Then hold the paperdown firmly with one hand,and use the other hand to tearthe rectangle away. Keep yourhands close to the fold forbetter control.or creaseand tearOrigami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 11ᨺ11This activity is a simple butimportant introduction to basicmath and origami concepts—please don’t skip it! You mightteach how to make origamicards before a class party orholiday, and tailor the cardsaccordingly.Materials Neededpage 12 (steps and pattern), rectangularpaper or square paper (optional),crayons or markersMath Conceptsfractions, spatial relations, size, symmetryNCTM Standardsᨺ understand numbers, ways ofrepresenting numbers, relationshipsamong numbers, and number systems(Number and Operations, Standard 1.1)ᨺ represent and analyze mathematicalsituations and structures usingalgebraic symbols(Algebra Standard 2.2)ᨺ analyze characteristics and propertiesof two- and three-dimensionalgeometric shapes and developmathematical arguments aboutgeometric relationships(Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ apply transformations and usesymmetry to analyze mathematicalsituations (Geometry Standard 3.3)Math Vocabularyhalfquarterfractionline of symmetryBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Ask students to find different ways to express and . Folded paper isone way. Coins and dollars are another. Bar graphs, pie charts, and measuringcups are some others.ᨺ To further explore the “line of symmetry,” let students paint with watercolorson one half of a piece of paper. Then have them fold the page in half, press itfirmly, and open up again. They will have a symmetrical design.ᨺ Make a chart that shows “Folds” in one column and “Sections” in a secondcolumn. If you fold a piece of paper once, you have two sections; fill in the firstrow with 1 (fold) and 2 (sections). Have students fold the paper again (whileit is still folded) in the other direction. Then fill in the chart. Repeat again in theopposite direction again. Have students continue to fill in the chart. Have themtry to determine a pattern. (The number of sections doubles with each fold.)What a Card!1__21__4Lesson 2This fold is called a valley fold. That’s because we’remaking a little valley here. We started with a square, andnow we have two rectangles. The middle line is called the“line of symmetry.” That’s because the line divides therectangle into two halves that are exactly the same. We alsohave an inside and an outside now. Look what else hashappened. The short side is now the long side.& This fold is sometimes called a book fold. Why doyou think it has that name? Let’s unfold it for a minute justto see what’s happened. Look, we have four equal squares.Let’s say the whole card cost $1.00. How much would oneof these squares be worth? (25¢) So that’s a hundred centsdivided into 4 parts.Let’s fold it back up again, following the same steps. Noticehow one side now forms both the inside and the outside ofthe card? The other side is all folded up inside, you see.(Let students discuss and then decorate and fill in their cards. Encouragethem to use a square sheet of colored paper and follow these directions tomake a card of their own.)12 3Math Wise! Distribute copies of page 12. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 12ᨺ12Lesson 2Cut out the card pattern below.Place the paper facedown, with the ★in the bottom right corner. Fold in half,bringing the top down to meet the bottom.Fold in half again, bringing theleft side over to meet the right.Crease well again.How to a Make Card and Card PatternMake adesign on theback of this pageand fold itbackwards for areversible card!21★____________________________________________________________________________________This card was designed bydate:_______________________where:______________________time:_______________________RSVP:_______________________Decorate and fill in your card!3Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 13ᨺ13Lesson 3Our Whale Pattern page hassome features drawn in. But youmay also want to distribute blueor gray paper and have studentsmake their own.Materials Neededpage 14 (steps), page 15 (pattern)or 6-inch square paperMath Conceptsshapes, patterns, symmetry, spatial relationsNCTM Standardsᨺ analyze change in various contexts(Algebra Standard 2.4)ᨺ analyze characteristics and properties oftwo- and three-dimensional geometricshapes and develop mathematicalarguments about geometricrelationships (Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ apply transformations and use symmetryto analyze mathematical situations(Geometry Standard 3.3)ᨺ use visualization, spatial reasoning, andgeometric modeling to solve problems(Geometry Standard 3.4)Math Vocabularysquarediamondtrianglerightleftpointcenterline of symmetryquadrilateralisosceles trianglescalene trianglemultiplydivideBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Make a whole school of whales and put the school on a bulletin board.Make them form an array, with rows and columns. You can teach basicmultiplication from your array.ᨺ Have students use bigger and smaller squares to see how the whales turn outdifferent sizes, depending on the initial square. Show how you can measurethe size by putting the squares, and the whales, on top of each other.1Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 14 and 15. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.What shape are we starting with? (A square. You may wish topoint out that the shape is a quadrilateral—a shape that has four sides.)Notice how I turn or rotate the square like a diamond, so thepoint is at the top. Let’s make sure everyone’s paper is facingthe same way. (Encourage the class to look around the room to check forthe correct positioning. Looking from different angles will strengthen theirspatial relations skills.) Sometimes in origami we make folds, onlyto unfold them again! What’s the point? Well, as you’ll see,these folds always come in handy later on! Now we have twonew shapes. What are they called? (They are triangles; you may wishto point out that they are isosceles right triangles, each having a right angleand two sides of the same length.) Find the centerline we just folded.That’s called “the line of symmetry.” That means that theline divides two halves that match.This time we don’t have to unfold it! But look at whatshapes we’ve made. That’s right, two new triangles.(You may wish to note that these are scalene triangles, triangles that haveno sides that are the same length.)Now look how many triangles we have! Let’s count them.(Show students that some triangles are within larger triangles. There are eighttriangles showing, not counting the ones hidden underneath the folds.)Ah-hah! We’re using that line of symmetry again.Now you see why we folded it in the first place!& We just made our last triangle! When we slit the tail,we divided it in two. But it looks like we multiplied it, doesn’tit? That’s because we started with two layers. Go aheadand add some details to your whale—don’t forget to adda blowhole! What shape is that? (a circle)Whale ofTriangles2345 6Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 14ᨺ14Lesson 3Fold the two lower sides to meetthe center fold, or line of symmetry.How to Make the WhaleCut out the whale pattern on page15. Position the square so that it lookslike a diamond with the ★ at the topfacedown. Fold the left point over tomeet the right point. Open it up again.Fold the top point down to meetthe folded triangles.2 31Rotate the shapes so that the longflat line is at the bottom.Fold the right side over to meetthe left side.Fold the left point up along thedotted line to form a tail. Slit the tailalong the cut line. Fold the trianglesout to form the flukes.5 64Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 15ᨺ15Lesson 3Whale PatternFollow the steps on page 14 to create a whale.★✂Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 16ᨺ16Lesson 4This cup really works. It can holdliquid—until the water soaksthrough! You can adapt this modelto make a hanging pocket holder.Start with a bigger sheet ofpaper. At the last step, don’t tuckthe final flap in. Keep the back tri-angle up, punch a hole in it, andhang it up to collect Valentines.You can also punch holes and addstraps to make a little carryall.Materials Neededpage 17 (steps), page 18 (pattern) or6-inch square paper, water (optional)Math Conceptsspatial reasoning, shapes, volumeNCTM Standardsᨺ analyze characteristics and propertiesof two- and three-dimensional geometricshapes and develop mathematicalarguments about geometricrelationships (Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ apply transformations and usesymmetry to analyze mathematicalsituations (Geometry Standard 3.3)ᨺ use visualization, spatial reasoning,and geometric modeling to solveproblems (Geometry Standard 3.4)ᨺ understand measurable attributes ofobjects and the units, systems, andprocesses of measurement(Measurement Standard 4.1)Math Vocabularyquadrilateral squaretrapezoid isosceles right triangleparallel diagonalline of symmetryBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Ask students if they think that a square double the size of the original squarewill make a cup that holds double the volume. Then have them conduct anexperiment: Make two cups with different-sized paper and test the volume.Fill the larger cup and then pour it into the smaller cup once. Then dumpthat water (or grains of rice) out, and refill from the larger cup. See how manytimes the smaller cup fills to compare the capacity of the two cups.ᨺ Make a large cup out of a big square of newsprint. Turn it upside down and it’sa hat! Use this activity to discuss the fact that form and function are often amatter of perspective—just like turning the square into a diamond in the firststep. Let students make and decorate their own hats.Instant CupA diamond is just a different way of looking at a square!Let’s make two triangles. For each triangle, two sides are thesame length, and they have a right angle. That makes themisosceles right triangles.We’re making this point (the tip of the angle) meet the dot(a small circle). This bottom part of our cup is called the baseof the triangle. The top point is called the apex.Let’s fold this top triangle down and tuck it in. What kindof triangle is it? (Isosceles right triangle) What makes it so?(two sides the same length, one right angle)& In origami, you often do something to one side andthen repeat the exact sequence on the other side. That isone kind of symmetry. Our final shape is a trapezoid.A trapezoid is a quadrilateral with one set of parallel edges.Which sides are parallel? What would happen with a cup ifthe bottom and top were not parallel? (The liquid would spill out;it wouldn’t balance on a table!)1234Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 17 and 18. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.5Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 17ᨺ17Lesson 4Fold up the bottom right cornerto meet the opposite edge. Line upthe corner so that it meets the dot.Crease the fold.How to Make the CupCut out the cup pattern on page 18and place it like a diamond, with the ★in the top point, facedown. Or use asquare sheet, positioned facedown likea diamond. Fold in half, bringing thebottom corner up to meet the top.Fold down the top layer of the tri-angle above, tucking it into the pocketof the cup as far as it will go. Crease.2 31Turn over and repeat steps 2 and 3above tucking in the remaining triangle.4 Gently pinch the sides together toopen your cup.5Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 18ᨺ18Lesson 4Cup PatternThis cup actually holds water. Once you learn this simple model, you’ll alwaysbe able to whip up a cup anytime you’re thirsty and you’ve got paper to fold!★Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 19ᨺ19Lesson 5This classic paper-foldedpinwheel is fun to create andplay with, and it makes agreat model for exploringsymmetry and patterns.Materials Neededpage 20 (steps and pattern), square paper(optional), pencils with erasers, scissors,push pins, glue (optional), crayons ormarkersMath Conceptsspatial relations, pattern, symmetry,motionNCTM Standardsᨺ understand patterns, relations, andfunctions (Algebra Standard 2.1)ᨺ specify locations and describe spatialrelationships using coordinategeometry and other representationalsystems (Geometry Standard 3.2)ᨺ apply transformations and usesymmetry to analyze mathematicalsituations (Geometry Standard 3.3)Math Vocabularydiagonalintersectisosceles right trianglescenterBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Experiment with patterns and using the back and front of the paper:Have students decorate the backside of their pinwheel pattern before foldingit. (Or have them decorate both sides, if they are using different paper.)Ask them to make a design with a repeating pattern or image or to usecomplementary colors or patterns on the opposite sides. Then test what thedesigns look like in motion! Have them take their pinwheels apart and refoldthem from the opposite side. Encourage them to consider how the directionof the folds makes the backs and fronts interconnected and alternating.ᨺ Discuss the fact that motion, in a way, can have a shape. What shape doesthe motion of the pinwheel form? (a circle or a spiral)When we cut along these lines from the corner in, whatdirection are the lines? (diagonal) The cut lines stop beforethey reach the center of the square. Describe what wouldhappen if they continued. (They would come together or intersect inthe middle. If they were cut, you would have four equal triangles.)What are the four different shapes we’re folding?(triangles)Why do our folds allow the pinwheel to spin?(The pockets can catch the air, like a sail.)Tip: If students’ pinwheels do not spin freely, adjust thetension by pulling the thumbtack out slightly. Also adjust theangle of the blades so that they do not hit the pencil.123Math Wise! Distribute copies of page 20. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.PlayfulPinwheelOrigami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 20ᨺ20Lesson 5The magic ofpinwheels is the waythey look when they’respinning. Make somemore with differentdesigns and givethem a whirl!Place the pattern facedown. Foldthe top right corner to just past thecenter of the square. Do not crease.Hold in place with your finger, or usea dab of glue stick. Repeat this fold withthe other three corners.How to Make a Pinwheel and Pinwheel PatternCut out the pinwheel patternbelow or start with a 6-inch square.Cut along the diagonal lines, makingsure to stop well before the center,as marked. Color in the design.Ask a grown-up to push a thumbtackthrough all layers into the side of the eras-er end of a pencil, so that the folded sidesface out and the flat side faces the eraser.Spin away! If your pinwheel gets stuck,ask a grown-up to help you adjust it.2 31✂Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 21ᨺ21Lesson 6This is the traditional newspaperhat. It may help to do it firston a smaller scale using ourreproducible Hat Pattern,and then try it with big sheetsof newspaper. There is oneadditional step when using thenewspaper sheets (see MathWise! step 3).Materials Neededpage 22 (steps), page 23 (pattern)or newspaper sheetsMath Conceptsspatial reasoning, sequence, symmetry,scaleNCTM Standardsᨺ analyze change in various contexts(Algebra Standard 2.4)ᨺ specify locations and describe spatialrelationships using coordinategeometry and other representationalsystems (Geometry Standard 3.2)ᨺ apply transformations and usesymmetry to analyze mathematicalsituations (Geometry Standard 3.3)Math Vocabularyhorizontalverticalline of symmetryperpendicularisosceles right triangleright anglerectangleHandy HatBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Distribute copies of the tangrams puzzle on page 10, and ask students touse the shapes to make a design for their hats. They can color the shapesand make a design that reflects something about them.ᨺ Use strips of construction paper to make feathers to stick in the hat,Robin Hood-style. This presents another opportunity to explore symmetry.Students can fold a strip in half, length-wise, to make slits on both sides andopen to find a feather shape.We’re starting with a big rectangle. The bigger therectangle, the bigger the hat we’ll end up with. Open upthe page after these two folds, just to take a look at thelines. We have two lines of symmetry—one horizontal andone vertical. These lines are perpendicular—they form rightangles where they cross. How many rectangles do we have?(five: the big one plus the four smaller ones inside)What shapes are we folding down? (triangles) Notice that inorigami when we make a fold on one side, we often repeat iton the other and we get two halves that are exactly thesame. What is the word that means perfect balance orexactly the same on each side? (symmetry)& What is the shape we are folding up? (rectangle)Note: for a newspaper hat, fold the bottom up twice:Fold once to meet the base of the triangle. Then fold again,as described.123Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 22 and 23. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.4Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 22ᨺ22Lesson 6Fold in the top corners to meet thecenter line. Crease.How to Make a HatCut out the hat pattern on page23 and place the page facedown withthe ★ in the top left corner. Or use aplain rectangular sheet of paper, or asheet of newspaper opened up. Foldin half right to left. Crease and unfold.Then, fold in half top to bottom andcrease. This time, leave the paper folded.Fold up the top layer of thebottom edge. Turn over and repeaton the other side.2 31Pull out on the sides to open it.Try it on.4Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 23ᨺ23Lesson 6Hat PatternThis page won’t make a hat big enough for you, but you might use it for a doll or anaction figure! Make these same folds on a sheet of newspaper and you’ll be covered!★Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 24ᨺ24Lesson 7This is one of the simplest and mosttraditional origami box designs.With this box, the top and bottomare the same, so fitting themtogether may be a tightsqueeze—unless the lid is madewith a slightly larger rectangle.This activity works best withsturdy paper, so photocopy thepattern onto card stock ifpossible. Using the cover of amagazine also works well!Materials Neededpage 25 (steps), page 26 (pattern) or6-inch square of sturdy paperNote: For paper that’s just the rightweight and gives the box a glossy,colorful finish, use a magazine cover.Math Conceptsmultiplication, division, dimensionNCTM Standardsᨺ analyze characteristics and properties oftwo- and three-dimensional geometricshapes and develop mathematical argu-ments about geometric relationships(Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ specify locations and describe spatialrelationships using coordinate geometryand other representational systems(Geometry Standard 3.2)ᨺ use visualization, spatial reasoning, andgeometric modeling to solve problems(Geometry Standard 3.4)Math VocabularyheightvolumetrapezoidparallelBox It Up!Beyond the Folds!ᨺ Challenge students to figure out how to make the top slightly larger than thebottom. They can start with a slightly larger rectangle. But they can also“cheat” on the folding with the cabinet folds. They can make the edges notquite meet the center crease. They can imagine a closet door that can’t quiteclose! Ask them to think about why this will yield a larger box.ᨺ Ask students to explore different ways to make the box stronger. Then havethem list what properties add strength. Possible solutions include: usingheavier paper, making smaller boxes, using double layers, inserting cardboardon the inside.Let’s see if I can express this fold with an equation. WhenI fold it, it’s 1 ÷ 2 = . Now when I unfold it, I can say 1 x 2 = 2.This fold is sometimes called a cabinet fold. Can you seewhy? How would you express one of the “cabinet doors” asa fraction? ( )Now how many sections do we have? (8) So what is thefraction that represents each rectangle? ( ) We started outwith four sections for the “cabinet.” What equation could weuse to show what we now have? (4 x 2 = 8, or 4 + 4 = 8) Isn’tthat strange? When we fold it, we seem to be dividing it!But then when we open it, we’ve actually multiplied!We don’t need to open it up this time! But if we did, howmany sections do you think we would find? (16) You can takea peek and refold it to check your answer!When we fold our triangles, they don’t quite reach themiddle. You know what that tells me? These little sections arenot squares! If they were, the triangles would line up with thecrease, because all of the sides would be the same length.See how we have two trapezoids now! Trapezoids haveone set of parallel lines. But watch when we open it! Theseother sides will become parallel.& Voila! See how something that is two-dimensional,or flat, becomes three-dimensional! That’s why we had tomake all those creases. They formed the sides here, whichgive it the height, or third dimension.12345671__21__41__8Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 25 and 26. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.8Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 25ᨺ25Lesson 7Fold each side in half, folding inthe long edges to the center fold.Crease sharply. Unfold.How to Make a BoxCut out the box pattern on page26 and place it facedown with the ★in the upper left corner. Or use an8 by 11-inch rectangular sheet ofheavy paper and position the paperfacedown. Fold in half, right to left.Crease and unfold.Fold in half, top to bottom. Unfold.2 31Fold up the bottom right cornerup along the fold line so that the cor-ner meets the dot. Note that the topedge does not quite reach the centerfold. Crease firmly. Repeat this stepwith the other three corners.Fold in the short edges to meetthe center fold. Crease very sharply.This time, do not unfold.Fold back the edges, away fromthe center, to cover the top part ofthe triangles. Crease these bandssharply.5 64Now form the box by pullingopen the bands.71__2Help shape the corners of the boxby creasing the corners and bottomedges. Flex the sides inward.8Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 26ᨺ26Lesson 7Box PatternMake two of these so your box will have a lid or attach a strip of paperto make a basket with a handle. Use it for paper clips, pennies, rubberbands, your favorite collector cards, hair clips, or any other favorite item!Create adesign on the back,which will showon the inside of yourfolded box. Colorthis side as well,if you wish.★Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 27ᨺ27Lesson 8We know paper can fold, fly, spinand twirl. Add noise-making tothe list of paper’s possibilitieswith this snappy popper.Materials Neededpage 28 (steps), page 29 (pattern) or8 by 11-inch rectangle (loose-leafnotebook paper works best), crayonsor markersNote: The pattern on page 29 mustbe enlarged at least 125% to pop well.Math Conceptsmeasurement, shape, spatial reasoning,symmetryNCTM Standardsᨺ apply transformations and use symmetryto analyze mathematical situations(Geometry Standard 3.3)ᨺ use visualization, spatial reasoning, andgeometric modeling to solve problems(Geometry Standard 3.4)Vocabularyhorizontalparallelquadrilateralright angleNoise PopperBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Have students all snap their poppers in unison. Note how loud it sounds.Next divide the class into two groups. Have one half pop their poppers.Then have the other half snap. Does each group sound about half as loud?Then divide the group into quarters and let each group create the soundagain. Is it a quarter of the original volume? Point out that noise level canbe measured. What are some other things that can be measured?(Answers include: size, weight, volume, distance, speed, time.)Notice that we’re placing our paper horizontally.The longest side is going across. When people name themeasurements for something they usually give the widthfirst. A page of copy paper held this way (show vertically)is considered 8 by 11 inches. Turn it this way, and we’dsay 11 by 8 inches. But it’s the same piece of paper!The shape we end up with here looks a bit like a football.The shape of a football is made to spiral through the air.But this shape will be used to make sound.When we fold the shape in half, we have a shape withfour sides again—a quadrilateral. But there’s somethingspecial about this quadrilateral: two of its sides are parallel,equal distance apart at all points—like train tracks. Whichtwo sides are parallel? (The top and bottom. If students are ready foranother term, you may want to point out that a quadrilateral with two parallelsides is called a trapezoid.)Now we changed the shape again, but it’s still aquadrilateral. Are there any two angles that are the same?(Yes, there are two right angles.) Are there any two sides that arethe same length? (no)& Let’s take a look at it carefully before we use ournoise popper. How do you think we’ll make the noise? Whatkind of sound will be created? (Students may speculate that the trian-gular flap will pop out and make a popping or snapping sound. Show themhow to hold the popper straight down and snap with a flick of their wrists.)12345 61__21__21__2Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 28 and 29. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 28ᨺ28Lesson 8Fold the bottom right corner up sothat the right side lines up with thecenter crease. Repeat with the othercorners.How to Make a Noise PopperCut out the noise popper patternon page 29 and place it horizontally,facedown, with the ★ in the upperleft corner. Or use a sheet of loose-leafpaper. Fold in half, bottom to top, andcrease sharply. Unfold.Fold in half, top to bottomand crease.2 31Fold the front flap down, so that thetop edge lines up with the left edge.Turn over and repeat.Fold the top left corner over tomeet the top right corner.54 To snap the popper, pinch flapstogether firmly at the point, keepingyour fingers toward the bottom so theydo not block the action of the innerfolds. Snap your wrist forward andthe inner flap will pop out, making asnapping noise. If it doesn’t come out,loosen it a few times and try again.6pinchheresnap downand popOrigami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 29ᨺ29Lesson 8Noise Popper PatternBang! Pop! See how loud you can snap this noise popper.Who knew paper could make such a racket?★Enlarge thispattern to 125%or larger to create apopper with a greatsound. Or use asheet of loose-leafpaper.Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 30ᨺ30Lesson 9This is an elegant way to makean eight-page book out of a singlesheet of paper and one snip!The secret, of course, is in thefolds. There are dozens ofcross-curricular uses for thisproject—journals, poetry books,invitations, autobiographies,and more.Materials Neededpage 31 (steps), page 32 (pattern) orrectangular sheet of paper, scissors,crayons or markersMath Conceptsspatial reasoning, shapes, symmetry,fractions, multiplication, divisionNCTM Standardsᨺ understand numbers, ways of represent-ing numbers, relationships amongnumbers, and number systems(Number and Operations Standard 1.1)ᨺ understand meanings of operationsand how they relate to one another(Number and Operations Standard 1.2)ᨺ analyze characteristics and properties oftwo- and three-dimensional geometricshapes and develop mathematicalarguments about geometricrelationships (Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ specify locations and describe spatialrelationships using coordinate geometryand other representational systems(Geometry Standard 3.2)Math Vocabularyrectangle fractionsline of symmetry quarterseighths right angleItty-Bitty BookBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Students may use the Itty-Bitty Book pattern to create a “My ImportantNumbers Book.” Encourage students to list some of the many numbers thatare important in their lives. Numbers may include phone numbers, addresses,birthdates, grade level, number of classmates, and so on.ᨺ Have students make a blank book. Ask students to use their books to writeand illustrate a number story. For example, Jake had five books out from thelibrary (page 1). He went to the library and returned three books (page 2).But he checked out four more (page 3). How many did he have altogether?(page 4) Answer: Jake had six books (back of page 4).ᨺ Have students start with a blank page and plan a book. Ask them to figureout how the pages will fall when the book is folded. They can use the patternas an example, or open up a folded book and mark the page numbers.We’re going to make some folds and one snip, and turnthis piece of paper into a book. How many pages do youthink we can make?How would we show one of these sections as a fraction?( ) Now suppose we cut this section out. What fractionwould be left? ( )How many rectangles do we have? (five—the four smaller rectanglesplus the whole sheet as the fifth rectangle)Now we have one half of the page showing. The fold inthe middle divides that in half. Half of the half or xequals one quarter ( ). So each of these narrow rectangles isone quarter of our original sheet. Let’s fold it in half again.How many sections are there now? (8) So each section isone eighth ( ) of the whole page.We made our slit on an outer edge. But look now—it’s on theinside. And it’s twice as long! How did that happen? (The cutwas on a fold. When we unfolded, that fold became the middle. The slitwent through two layers. That’s why it’s double length.)Before we fold it in half, let’s count how many pages ourbook has. (8)& Watch what happens to the flat paper as we pushthe ends together. We’ve created a three-dimensional form.123451__21__21__41__81__43__4Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 31 and 32. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.6 7Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 31ᨺ31Lesson 9Fold in half, left to right. Crease itsharply, and leave it folded.How to Make an Itty-Bitty BookCut out the book pattern onpage 32 and place it facedown withthe ★ in the upper left corner. Oruse a rectangular sheet, and placeit horizontally, facedown. Fold thepaper in half, top to bottom.Crease and unfold.Fold again in the same direction.Unfold this last step.2 31Fold in half top to bottom, so thatthe two long edges meet.Cut in from the left side to thecenter, following the cut line. Makesure to stop at the middle crease.Open the whole sheet.Push the two outer edges in, sothat the slit opens and the inner pagesare formed. Crease the edges of allpages to make the book.5 64Design your book!7Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 32ᨺ32Lesson 9Book PatternHow can you turn one page into an eight-page book with one little snip?Try this brilliant paper-folding project. Use it to make a mini-journal,or a long card for your best friend.★Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 33ᨺ33Lesson 10This is a popular origami modelthat jumps! Introduce orreinforce measurement skillssuch as distance and height byholding an origami frog-jumpingcontest. You can measuredistance, height, and accuracy.Materials Neededpage 34 (steps), page 35 (pattern) ora 6-inch square of paper, crayons ormarkersMath Conceptsshape, measurement, distance, heightNCTM Standardsᨺ analyze characteristics and properties oftwo- and three-dimensional geometricshapes and develop mathematicalarguments about geometricrelationships (Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ specify locations and describe spatialrelationships using coordinate geometryand other representational systems(Geometry Standard 3.2)ᨺ understand measurable attributes ofobjects and the units, systems, andprocesses of measurement(Measurement Standard 4.1)ᨺ apply appropriate techniques, tools, andformulas to determine measurements(Measurement Standard 4.2)Math Vocabularyrectangle triangleintersection perpendicular linespentagon right angleBeyond the Folds!ᨺ In step 2, you can also introduce the concepts of line segmentsusing the top square with the intersecting folds. Label the cornersA (top left), C (top right), D (bottom left), and B (bottom right).Ask students to show you the fold that makes line segment AB. Point out thatthere are two ways that points A and B can be related through folding. One isto make a fold that forms the line segment. The other way is to make a foldin which A and B end up on top of each other. To make that fold, you end upmaking line segment CD! Line segments AB and CD are perpendicular.ᨺ Have a frog-jumping contest and measure the distances in both inchesand centimeters. You may also ask students to guess the distance beforemeasuring and record the accuracy of their estimates.We’re folding a square to make two rectangles. We couldjust start with a rectangle this size, but we make the paperthicker this way. That will help the frog keep its shape andjump better when we’re done.& Look, we’ve made an “X” here. The point where thetwo lines cross is called the intersection. See how we havefour perfect corners at the intersection? That means that thetwo lines are perpendicular to each other.When we’re starting this fold, we have three triangles,plus the bottom triangle that’s part of the house-shape(a pentagon). But we’re collapsing the two side triangles inhalf. That’s five triangles lining up over the bottom triangle.Now if we folded these triangles so that they line upperfectly with the top point, then we couldn’t see the feet.We’ll fold them so they stick out here. Did I just make theangle of the folded triangle bigger or smaller? (smaller/narrower)Take a look at how that changes the length of this edge.This looks a little like a house now. What is this five-sidedshape called? (a pentagon) When we fold these sides in, theshape looks more like a rocket.& First we make a valley fold and then a mountain fold.What letter are we making along the side edge? (Z) Let’smake a big “Z” on the board. Can you see why this shape isspringy? How will this Z-shape design help the frogs to hop?1245367 8Jumping FrogMath Wise! Distribute copies of pages 34 and 35. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 34ᨺ34Lesson 10Fold the top right corner over tomeet the dot on the left edge. Creaseand unfold. Repeat on other edge, andunfold so that you have an X at the top.How to Make a FrogCut out the frog pattern onpage 35 and place it facedown with the★ in the upper right corner. Or startwith a 6-inch square, facedown. Foldthe page in half, right to left.Fold the top points of the X downto meet the bottom points of the X.Crease and unfold.2 31Take the bottom two points of thetriangle and fold them up to create thefront legs.As you fold the top part downagain, collapse the side triangles inward.Use your fingers to poke the triangles inas you fold. The top becomes a triangle.Crease the sides of the triangle well.Fold the side edges in toward thecenter. Use the fold lines as a guide.5 64Fold in half, top to bottom. Do notcrease this fold sharply; simply bend it.7 Flip over. Fold the top layer in half,bottom to top, away from the legs andhead. Again, do not crease sharply.8 Your frog is ready to hop!Push down on the spot on the frog’sback and release to make him go.8Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 35ᨺ35Lesson 10Frog PatternHop to it with this little jumping frog. Hold a frog-jumping contest withyour own frogs or challenge a friend to a hop-a-thon.★Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 36ᨺ36Lesson 11Make these cat faces with blackpaper and use them as Halloweendecorations.Materials Neededpage 37 (steps), page 38 (pattern) ora 6-inch square of paper, crayons ormarkersMath Conceptsangles, symmetryNCTM Standardsᨺ analyze characteristics and propertiesof two- and three-dimensionalgeometric shapes and developmathematical arguments aboutgeometric relationships(Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ use visualization, spatial reasoning,and geometric modeling to solveproblems (Geometry Standard 3.4)Math Vocabularycongruentisosceles right trianglemidpointbaseanglescalene trianglehexagonBeyond the Folds!ᨺ You can display a litter of these cats by hanging a string across the room andthreading it through the top triangle fold of each origami cat. Tape the foldsdown over the string to make them stay in place. For a multiplicationconnection, ask students if cats have nine lives, how many lives are representedby this string of cats? Help them multiply by 9s. You can make this easier bycreating a story in which the cats have two lives each, and have them countby 2s. (Have students who need more support count two ears for each cat.)ᨺ Invite students to create an origami cat with a new piece of paper and drawtheir own cat faces that are exactly symmetrical. They might start by folding theshape gently in half to find the center line (line of symmetry). Have them workoff of this line, drawing eyes, whiskers, eyelashes, and so on in the same place,proportion, and number on each side.Kitty CatMake a valley fold to create two layers of congruent orequal-sized triangles. What special type of triangle is this?(isosceles right triangle)Before we make this fold, let’s find the midpoint, or middle,of the base of the triangle. How can we do that? (fold it in half)Let’s not crease it firmly here; just make enough of a fold tomark the midpoint. Now when we fold these corners up,notice that we are making three congruent or equal anglesat the base.Now that we’ve folded the top down, we can see wherethe ears will be, can’t we? What shape are the ears? (triangles)This kind of triangle has no congruent or equal sides orangles. It’s called a scalene triangle.& If we cover up the ears, what shape does the facebecome? (a hexagon)1234 5Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 37 and 38. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 37ᨺ37Lesson 11Fold up the bottom right corneralong fold line. Repeat on the left side,so that the triangles cross.How to Make a CatCut out the cat pattern on page 38and place it like a diamond, with the ★at the top, facedown. Or start with a 6-inch square, facedown. Fold thebottom corner up to meet the top.Fold the top triangle down(both layers) along the fold line.2 31Fold the bottom point up to meetthe top point.4 Turn over and decorate the face ofyour cat.5Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 38ᨺ38Lesson 11Cat PatternMake a bunch of black cats to hang up on Halloween. Or make one bigcat with a large square and a litter of kittens with smaller squares.★Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 39ᨺ39Lesson 12This simple boat will actuallyfloat in water. Use a coin to helpbalance if the boat is too tippy.Materials Neededpage 40 (steps), page 41 (pattern) or6-inch square, crayons or markers,basin of water (optional)Math Conceptsshapes, fractions, areaNCTM Standardsᨺ understand patterns, relations, andfunctions (Algebra Standard 2.1)ᨺ analyze characteristics and propertiesof two- and three-dimensionalgeometric shapes and developmathematical arguments aboutgeometric relationships(Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ apply transformations and usesymmetry to analyze mathematicalsituations (Geometry Standard 3.3)Math VocabularyrectangletrianglehexagonareaBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Set up a basin of water and let students have a boat race. Measure speed,distance, and accuracy. Discuss and adjust balance as necessary. Experimentmaking boats from different weights and sizes of paper. Which floats better?Which moves faster?ᨺ This activity, like many, starts with a square. Show students how to determinethe area of a square by counting squares in a grid. Take a fresh 8-inch squareof paper and fold it in half, and then in half again two more times to create8 columns. Open it up and repeat these folds in the other direction to create 8rows. Open it again, and you should have 64 small squares. Tell students thateach square is 1 inch x 1 inch. Count the squares to determine that the areais 64 square inches. Show how you can multiply the width by the height(8 inches x 8 inches) to get the same answer. Explain that they can use thisformula to find the area of any rectangle.Let’s make a book fold. What two shapes do we havenow? (rectangles)How much of the page do we have with this strip here? ( )How much of the page do we have showing now? ( )What shape are these corners? (triangles) And what shapedo we have here when the corners are folded in? (hexagon)When we make this fold, all of the back side of the paperdisappears. It’s all tucked inside here.How do you think this shape helps keep the water out?Many boats have this shape, like a canoe. How does thisshape help it float through the water? (The pointed ends help theboat glide through the water smoothly. A flat front would slow down thespeed and make the boat hard to control.)123Floating Boat456Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 40 and 41. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.1__41__2Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 40ᨺ40Lesson 12Fold down the top edge, frontlayer only, to meet the bottom foldededge. Crease.How to Make a BoatCut out the boat pattern on page41 and place the ★ in the upper rightcorner, face up. Or start with a 6-inchsquare, face up. Fold in half, bottom totop. Crease and leave folded.Turn over and repeat step 2.This time, unfold that last fold.2 31Fold in half, top to bottom.Fold the top corners down to thecenter line and crease. Fold the bottomcorners up to the center line andcrease. Make sure to fold all the layers.Separate the top edges to openthe boat. Press down along thebottom and pull out the sides tocreate a flat bottom.5 64Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 41ᨺ41Lesson 12Boat PatternThis simple boat actually floats. Try blowing it across a small tub of water with astraw. Have a boat race with a larger and smaller boat to see which moves faster.★Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 42ᨺ42Lesson 13Students can use this friendlyfolded corner-hugger as abookmark.Materials Neededpage 43 (steps), page 44 (pattern) or6-inch square, crayons or markers,scissors, card stock, index cards, orheavy paper, glueMath Conceptsshape, spatial reasoning, symmetry,congruenceNCTM Standardsᨺ analyze characteristics and properties oftwo- and three-dimensional geometricshapes and develop mathematicalarguments about geometricrelationships (Geometry Standard 3.1)ᨺ use visualization, spatial reasoning, andgeometric modeling to solve problems(Geometry Standard 3.4)Math Vocabularydiamondsquaretriangleperpendicularpentagonline of symmetrycongruentPage-HuggerBookmarkBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Give students book-reading word problems or let them generate their own.Example: Joe read five pages at bedtime. The next morning he got upand read three more. On what page would you find his bookmark?ᨺ Note that this bookmark actually marks two pages——the front and theback of the folio corner it covers. If the bookmark is set on page 11, aright-hand page, what page does it also mark? (12) Suppose you use aregular bookmark——a rectangular strip. If the bookmark is set on page 11,what page does it also mark? (10)As you might know, the diamond is not really a shape.It’s just a square that we’ve rotated so that we see itdifferently. These two lines that we’ve folded areperpendicular to each other. See how the corners wherethey intersect, or cross, are perfect square corners?What fraction of the corners have we folded? ( )Before we make our fold, let’s look at this shape here.How many sides does it have? (5) What do we call a shapewith five sides? (a pentagon)How many sides does our shape have now? (4) We’retaking this big triangle and bisecting it, or cutting it in half,to form two equal, or congruent triangles. Actually, it’s threecongruent triangles, with this other flap here!& We’ve formed a pocket here that can fit on thecorner of our page. There’s another pocket in our bookmarktoo. Can you find it? Could we use this pocket as a bookmarkas well? (no) Why not? (because it’s not shaped like a corner, or right angle)123453__4Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 43 and 44. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.6Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 43ᨺ43Lesson 13Fold up the bottom point to meetthe center point. Crease. Repeat withthe left and top corners. Leave theright corner unfolded.How to Make a BookmarkCut out the bookmark pattern onpage 44 and place the square like adiamond with the ★ at the top, face-down. Or start with a 6-inch square,facedown. Fold in half left to right, sothe corners meet. Crease and unfold.Fold in half top to bottom so that thecorners meet. Crease and unfold.Fold down the top left corner tomeet the bottom right corner. Leavethat part folded.2 31Tuck the right hand point insidethe pocket formed by the left-handtriangle.Fold up the bottom left corner tomeet the top point. Crease well.54 Fill in your name on the back.Decorate your page-hugger bookmark.6Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 44ᨺ44Lesson 13Bookmark PatternKeep this bookmark buddy handy and you’ll never lose your place.Thisbookbelongsto____________________________★Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 45ᨺ45Lesson 14There are hundreds of ways tomake paper airplanes. This modelhas good gliding action. Use theairplane pattern on page 47, orany 8 by 11-inch sheet ofcopy paper!Materials Neededpage 46 (steps), page 47 (pattern)or 8 x 11-inch rectangle, paper clipMath Conceptssymmetry, balance, spatial reasoningNCTM Standardsᨺ apply transformations and use symmetryto analyze mathematical situations(Geometry Standard 3.3)ᨺ understand measurable attributes ofobjects and the units, systems, andprocesses of measurement(Measurement Standard 4.1)ᨺ apply appropriate techniques, tools, andformulas to determine measurements(Measurement Standard 4.2)Math Vocabularyhalfcenterweightcornerbisectanglesurface areaPaper AirplaneExpressBeyond the Folds!ᨺ Stage an airplane gliding contest and measure distance and accuracy.For distance, measure the distance between the launch and landing points.For accuracy, measure the distance between a target point and the actuallanding point. Calculate the average distance by compiling the flight recordsof all students.ᨺ Have students decorate their own planes, each wing with a different design.If we take a plain piece of paper and try to throw it, itdoesn’t travel very far! But if we crumple it up, look! We canthrow it much better. Why do different forms of the samepage fly better than others? (The crumpled-up ball has a smallersurface area—most of it is tucked into the center of the ball. Less of the paperhits the air, so it doesn’t slow down the way the open sheet does.) Whenwe fold an airplane, we want to make a design that has notmuch surface area and little wind resistance.Many paper airplanes have a sharp point at the front.Later, we’ll fold this point and make a blunt nose. How mightthe shape at the front affect the way a plane flies? (The shapeof the plane’s nose affects the flight pattern.)We’re folding these angles in half, or bisecting them.In this model you might notice that whatever we do onone side, we do on the other. That’s because planes dependon symmetry for smooth flying. What would happenif the two sides were different? (It would fly crooked.)& What happens to the plane when we fold the noseback? (The nose gets heavier.)& What does the paper clip do to the nose of theplane? (It adds more weight and keeps the sides together tightly, so there’sless surface area and wind resistance.)123475 6Math Wise! Distribute copies of pages 46 and 47. Use thesetips to highlight math concepts and vocabulary for each step.1__21__28Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 46ᨺ46Lesson 14Fold down the top corners to thecenter line.How to Make a Paper AirplaneStart with the paper airplanepattern, page 47, and place the patternfacedown with the ★ in the upperright-hand corner. Fold in half left toright. Make a light crease. Unfold.Fold in each side from the point,to meet the center line. Crease alongthe fold lines.2 31Fold in half, left to right. Crease well.Fold down the tip of the plane’snose toward the middle, along the foldline.Fold down the top layer of the rearwing, along the short fold line. Turnover and repeat on other side.5 64Fold down the wings to the base,starting from the nose. Use the longfold line as a guide. Repeat on theother side.7 Spread the wings. Add a paper clipto the nose for balance and weight.8Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 47ᨺ47Lesson 14Paper Airplane PatternWhat’s the longest distance your plane can fly?★Origami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • 48ᨺ48angle the space formed by two linesstemming from a common pointarea the measurement of a space formedby edgesbase the bottom edge of a shapebisect to divide in halfcircle a round shape measuring 360ºcongruent having the same measurementdiagonal a slanted line that joins twoopposite cornersdiamond a square positioned so that onecorner is at the top (A diamond is not adistinct geometric shape.)equilateral triangle a triangle with threecongruent sides and three congruent anglesfraction a number that is not a wholenumber, such as 1/2, formed by dividingone quantity into multiple partshexagon a shape with six sideshorizontal running across, or left to rightintersection the point where two lines crossisosceles triangle a triangle with twocongruent sides and two congruent anglesline of symmetry a line that divides two alikehalvesmidpoint a point that lies halfway alonga lineoctagon a shape with eight sidesoval an egg-shaped figure with a smooth,continuous edgeparallel two lines that are always the samedistance apart, and therefore never intersectparallelogram a quadrilateral that has twopairs of parallel sides and two pairs ofcongruent sidespentagon a shape with five sidesperpendicular at right angles to a linequadrilateral any four-sided figurerectangle a quadrilateral that has four rightangles (All rectangles are parallelograms.)right angle an angle of 90º, which forms asquare cornerright triangle a triangle with a right angle(90º)scalene triangle a triangle with no congruentsides and no congruent anglessquare a quadrilateral that has four rightangles and four congruent sides (All squaresare rectangles.)symmetry a balanced arrangement of partson either side of a central dividing line oraround a central pointtrapezoid a quadrilateral with one pair ofparallel sidestriangle a figure with three sidesvertical running from top to bottomvolume the space contained within athree-dimensional objectGlossary of Math TermsOrigami Math: Grades 2-3 © Karen Baicker, Scholastic Teaching Resources
    • Date: ____________Adding & Subtracting Rational Numbers (2.2)Main Idea DetailsHow do I addrationalnumbers?How do Isubtractrationalnumbers?How do Isolveproblemsinvolvingmore thantwo rationalnumbers?To ____ rational numbers, use thesame _____ as adding ________.When adding _______, make surethe ___________ are the same.Example:When adding _______, make surethe ________ are lined up.Example:When subtracting rational numbers,use __ __ __. Then use the rules for_________.Examples:To solve problems with more than_____ rational numbers, take theproblem ____ ______ at a time.Example:Practice Assignment: ____________________________________Date: ____________Adding & Subtracting Rational Numbers (2.2)Main Idea DetailsHow do I addrationalnumbers?How do Isubtractrationalnumbers?How do Isolveproblemsinvolvingmore thantwo rationalnumbers?To ____ rational numbers, use thesame _____ as adding ________.When adding _______, make surethe ___________ are the same.Example:When adding _______, make surethe ________ are lined up.Example:When subtracting rational numbers,use __ __ __. Then use the rules for_________.Examples:To solve problems with more than_____ rational numbers, take theproblem ____ ______ at a time.Example:Practice Assignment: ____________________________________
    • PythagorasNotebooking PagesCreated by JimmieCreated by JimmieCreated by JimmieCreated by JimmieClip art from http://etc.usf.edu/clipart/.
    • Pythagoras
    • Name DateCopyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.Grade 6, Multi-UsePentagonal-Prism NetLearning Tool55
    • Cut on solid lines. Fold in half on the dotted line. Fold bottom tab and glue down. Fold side tab and gluedown. Use the cards on the next page, if desired.bottom tabsidetabGlue this side toyour lapbook.Folder Pocket
    • Cut pocket out as one piece. Fold back up. Wrap flaps around the back and glue down.Pocket (fits 4x6 cards)
    • Cut pocket out as one piece. Fold flap on right side under. Fold top and bottomflaps under. Glue the back of the pocket to your lapbook. Store cards (found onnext page) in pocket.Small Side Pocket
    • Cut pocket out. Fold back flap up and wrap side flaps around the back and glue down.Glue the back of your pocket into your lapbook.Small Pocket
    • 3” circle pocket4” circle pocket
    • 5” circle pocket. Glue around inside circle from dot to dot.This will be back of pocket
    • 1. Cut two large circles. Setone aside. Take the otherand fold it in half vertically.Then fold it in half horizon-tally.2. Unfold3. Put rubber cement (orglue) on half and fold4. Put glue on onequarter and fold. 5. One quarter will beopen. This is yourpocket.6. Fill the other circlewith information, asdesired. Decoratecover of the pocket.Fold second circle (halfand half again) andslip into pocket.
    • You need a 8.5 x 8.5 squaresheet of paper to make yourdrinking cup. To make one—take a piece of regular sized 8.5x 11 paper. Take the top leftcorner and fold it across thepage. Cut the remaining stripoff.This is what your paperwill look like when youfinish. It should openfrom the top.Take the left corner andfold it across to meet theright edge (forming anarm).Take the right cornerand fold it across tomeet the left edge(forming another arm).Now your cup will looklike its arms are folded.Separate the trianglesthat are at the top. Foldone forward. Fold onebackward.If desired, tuck the fronttriangle into the slot inthe arm.Drinking Cup Pocket
    • glue This is a pop-up book. First, print bookon cardstock. Mountain fold the bookin half on the dotted line. Snip thetwo solid lines. Fold that flap downtowards you on the dotted line.Now, valley fold the book in half, onthe dotted line, popping the box tothe inside of the book.Cut out the small rectangle on thenext page and paste or draw a pictureon it.On the box marked “glue” glue theitem you want to pop-up sitting levelwith the paper. Make sure it lies flatwhen closing the book.Pop-Up BookPrint next two pages oncardstock.
    • Write a title on this page and glue iton as a cover.Paste or draw image here.Should not exceed this size.
    • Lesson: Date:Pre-AlgebraPractice EPractice DPractice CPractice BPractice A241223112210219208197186175164153142131
    • Lesson: Date:Test #28142713261225112410239228217206195184173162151
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comPresentationDate:Location:Title of presentation:Name of speaker:Schedule Menu
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    • A printable resource from the Saskatoon Public School, Math ResourcesWebsite - http://olc.spsd.sk.ca/de/math1-3/Pyramid: Cut out on dark lines. Fold dotted lines and assemble the pyramid.
    • Name DateRectangular-Prism NetCopyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.Grade 6, Multi-UseLearning Tool48
    • Name DateCopyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.Grade 6, Multi-UseRectangular-Pyramid NetLearning Tool53
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comLetter valueIVXLCDMRoman Numerals
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comLetter valueRoman Numerals
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comRomanNumerals
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comLetter valueIVXLCDMRoman Numerals
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comLetter valueRoman Numerals
    • © The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comRomanNumerals
    • positive Correlationno Correlationnegative Correlation
    • •Education and income•Number of pets a person has and number of books a person has read•Number of days absent from school vs. math average•Test scores vs. shoe sizes•Distance traveled vs. amount of gas in the car•Hours of studying vs. grades•Hours in the mall vs. amount of money spent•Weight on a skateboard vs. speed of the skateboard•A person’s height and a person’s age•How tall a person is and how fast they drive•Temperature and number of people wearing jackets
    • ShutterfoldCut on solid lines. Fold on dotted.
    • Shutterflap 4 SectionsCut on solid lines. Fold on dotted.
    • Print onto card stock and cut out.Punch holes where indicated. Foldon dotted lines. To secure book,string a ribbon through the holesand tie with a bow on the front.Shuttertied
    • .Cut book out as one piece. Fold right side under. Fold left side under. Unfold and cut on dot-ted lines. Refold. Fold book in half so that“Dialect”is on the front cover.Folded Shutterfold
    • Shutterfold Three AreasCut along solid lines. Fold top flap under. Fold bottom flap under. Unfold bottom and cut on solid line toform two flaps.
    • Shutterflap Six Areas Cut on solid lines. Fold on dotted.
    • BACK PAGGELabel____of a n____numb____that____numbPaSimplifl and define the_____________number and a va_____________ber before a var_____________are unknown or_____________ber by itselfrts of an Algebfying Algebrae parts of an a______ - numbariable______ - numeriable______ - symbr can change______ - a termbraic Expressioaic Expressalgebraic exprebers, variables, orical factors ofbols that represm that has no vonionsession.or the productf a term, or thesent numbersvariable or ae
    • To simplify an algebraic expression means to__________________________________________________.In other words, rewrite the expression in the most compact way,without changing the _______________ of the expression. Itslike organizing the expression and making it neater!Like terms have _______________________________________________________________________________.Draw shapes around the like terms in the algebraic expressionbelow. Then simplify.3 7 5 6 10 2 You Try It!1. 4a 7 2a 2. -4x 3 3x 8 2x 3. 12h 4g h 16g 2h 3gh Combining Like TermsSimplifying Algebraic Expressions
    • BACK PAGESimplifying Algebraic ExpressionsSometimes you need to use the Distributive Property tosimplify an algebraic expression.Remember, the Distributive Property states:To distribute and get rid of the parentheses, simply________________________ the number on the outside by theterms on the inside of the parentheses.2 5 can be read as“_________________________________________________”2 5Simplifying by Using the Distributive Property
    • You Try It!3 9 = 4 2 8When you distribute after subtraction, you must distribute the_______________________________.8 3 5 =You Try It!16 4 3 3 5 4In this case, you are looking for the _______________________of 6 4. To do this, add a 1 before the parentheses anddistribute -1.6 4 =You Try It!5 9 2 6When you are simplifying algebraic expressions, you should do soin the following order:1. _____________________ to clear the parentheses2. Combine ______________________Putting It All Together!4 8 7 4 8 2 3When No Number Is Present Outside the ParenthesesDistributing After SubtractionSimplifying Algebraic Expressions: Overview
    • REVIEW OF SLOPEUSED FOR:WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKEPOSITIVE NEGATIVE ZERO UNDEFINEDHOW TO FIND ITGIVEN TWO POINTS(X1, Y1)(X2, Y2)EXAMPLEGIVEN TABLEX YGIVEN EQUATIONy = mx + bGIVEN GRAPHOF PARALLEL LINES OF PERPENDICULARLINES
    • Date: ____________Solving Equations Using Addition or Subtraction (2.4)Main Idea DetailsWhat is anequation?How do Isolveequations?Examples:An __________ is a mathematicalstatement where two _________are equal. An equation alwayshas an _______ sign.To ______ equations, use_______ operations that “____”each other.For example, use _______ tosolve an equation with_________.Practice Assignment: ___________________________________Date: ____________Solving Equations Using Addition or Subtraction (2.4)Main Idea DetailsWhat is anequation?How do Isolveequations?Examples:An __________ is a mathematicalstatement where two _________are equal. An equation alwayshas an _______ sign.To ______ equations, use_______ operations that “____”each other.For example, use _______ tosolve an equation with_________.Practice Assignment: _____________________________________
    • Date: ____________Solving Equations Using Multiplication or Division (2.5)Main Idea DetailsHow do I solvean equationusingmultiplication?Example:How do I solvean equationusing division?Example:To ________ an equation, youmust get the _________ on a sideby itself. This means you mustget rid of everything that is“__________” to it.Use the ________ operation toget rid of what is attached to thevariable.In this case, the 1.6 is “attached”by _________. To undo thisoperation, you must use_____________.Use the ________ operation toget the ___________ alone on itsside of the equation.Practice Assignment: __________________________________Date: ____________Solving Equations Using Multiplication or Division (2.5)Main Idea DetailsHow do I solvean equationusingmultiplication?Example:How do I solvean equationusing division?Example:To ________ an equation, youmust get the _________ on a sideby itself. This means you mustget rid of everything that is“__________” to it.Use the ________ operation toget rid of what is attached to thevariable.In this case, the 1.6 is “attached”by _________. To undo thisoperation, you must use_____________.Use the ________ operation toget the ___________ alone on itsside of the equation.Practice Assignment: __________________________________
    • Date: ____________Solving Two-Step Equations (2.6)Main Idea DetailsHow do I solvea two-stepequation?Examples:To solve ___-_____ equations,______ operations in the__________ order of operations.__ __ __ __ __ __1.2. 4x – 10 = -23.4.Date: ____________Solving Two-Step Equations (2.6)Main Idea DetailsHow do I solvea two-stepequation?Examples:To solve ___-_____ equations,______ operations in the__________ order of operations.__ __ __ __ __ __1.2. 4x – 10 = -23.4.......
    • BACK PAGESolving Multi-Step EquationsSolving by Combining Like TermsSolve.2 5 5 14Solving by Using the Distributive PropertySolve.2 4 12Example 1Example 2
    • Solving Equations with FractionsMETHOD 123 27METHOD 223 27Solving Equations with Decimals0.5 8.75 13.25Steps for Solving Multi-Step Equations1. Clear the equation of ____________________ and___________________________.2. Use the _____________________________ to removeparentheses on each side.3. Combine ________________________________ on each side.4. Undo _____________________ or _____________________.5. Undo _____________________ or _____________________.Example 3 Example 4RULE
    • BACK PAGEn n201294
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    • Name DateCopyright © Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.Grade 6, Multi-UseSquare-Pyramid NetLearning Tool49✄
    • Cut out book as one piece and fold on dotted line so cover is on top. Cut out all pages of book on solid lines. Stack left side pages, andstack right side pages. Pages will be stapled inside book onto back page, on both the right and left sides. Stagger pages so that theyopen every other way, ie: left page, then right page, then left page, etc. Have child glue clipart onto appropriate pages.
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    • © 2012 Notebooking NookStudentPlannerThis Planner BelongsTo
    • Name: Week of:Subject Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday© 2012 Notebooking NookWeeklySchedule
    • © 2012 Notebooking NookSubject Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday FridaySunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday SaturdayName: Week of:WeeklyScheduleWeek ata Glance
    • Cut on the solid black lines, removing gray areas next to tabs. Stack tab book inorder with cover on top and staple on the left side.3 Tab Book
    • REMOVE THIS AREAREMOVE THIS AREA4 Tab Book
    • REMOVE THIS AREAAssembly Directions:Cut the five strips along the solid outer lines. If there is a rectangle piece in theright corner of the strip, cut it off as indicated (remove this area). Stack your stripsin order with cover on top and staple where indicated.4 Tab Book Page 2
    • REMOVE THIS AREAREMOVE THIS AREA5 Tab Book (Horizontal)
    • Cut the strips along the solid outer lines. If there is a rectangle piece in the right corner of the strip, cut it offas indicated (“remove this area”). Stack your strips in order with cover on top and staple where indicated.REMOVE THIS AREAREMOVE5 Tab Book (Horizontal) Page 2
    • 5 Tab BookCut cover and pages out on solid lines. Stack pages together with cover on top andstaple on the left side.
    • 5 Tab Book Page 2
    • Cut on solid black lines. Stack book to-gether. Your student will have six tabs toflip through (two at the top, two on theside, and two on the bottom).6 Tab Book
    • 6 Tab Book Page 2
    • Cut out pieces on solid black lines. Stack together with cover on top and stapleon left side.6 Tab Book Vertical
    • 6 Tab Book Vertical Page 2
    • Entertainment6 Tab Book Vertical Page 3
    • 6 Tab Book Vertical Page 4
    • Cut out each piece. Stack together (you will have two tabs at the top and twoat the bottom) with cover on top and staple on the left side.4 Tab (2 Top, 2 Bottom)
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    • postcardsmapscoins & currencypostage stampspaperdollsword puzzlesjigsaw puzzlesflashcardsboardgamesexploding minibookphotographsbrochures & pamphletsflattened papercraftsbiographical sketchescreative writingcollagesmovie reviewsfield trip reportsart analysismusic listening guidepostersarticles from maga-zines or newspaperspoemshymnshandwriting practiceworksheetsflag booksNotebooking is so muchmore than lined pageswith a graphic. Here arefifty things — besideslined notebooking pages— that you can put intoa notebook.matchbook minibookssongsresearchcopyworkillustrationsdrawingswheel bookstickerstimeline figuresscrapbooking embellish-mentspictures printed fromthe Internetsummariesoutlinesparagraphs and essaysVenn diagramsgraphsmind mapstimelinesnumberlinespaper math manipula-tivesquotationsvocabulary words &definitionscoloring pages50 Things to PutInto aNotebook© The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.com
    • NOTEBOOKING SUCCESSMAXIMIZING THE IMPACT OF HOMESCHOOL LESSONS WITH NOTEBOOKSBy Jimmie Lanleyhttp://notebookingfairy.comnotebooking printables and how-tos with a pinch of pixie dust
    • About the AuthorJimmie is a homeschoolingmom of one child, ―Sprite.‖She loosely follows aCharlotte Mason style ofeducation, filled with livingbooks and notebooking, ofcourse.Her roots are in WestTennessee, but she spenteight years living in China where her homeschooljourney began.Her blogs are http://jimmiescollage.com http://notebookingfairy.comShe also writes at various online publishing sitessuch as Squidoo, Wizzley, and Hubpages and is aregular contributor to The Heart of the Matter.Jimmie holds a Bachelor’s Degree in English and aMaster’s Degree in Education. Before becoming astay-at-home-mom, Jimmie taught eighth gradelanguage arts for seven years.Contact her at jimmie@jimmiescollage.com.Legal NoticeYou do not have the right to reprint, resell, or giveaway this ebook or its contents.This book is copyright 2011 by Jimmie Lanley ofhttp://notebookingfairy.com.If you obtained this report from anywhere otherthan http://notebookingfairy.com, you have apirated copy. Unauthorized distribution should bereported to pixiedust@notebookingfairy.com.Limits of Liability and Disclaimer ofWarrantyThe author of this book has used her best effortsand expertise in composing this ebook. However,she makes no guarantees with respect to theaccuracy, applicability, fitness, or completeness ofthe book.DisclaimerSome of the links in this document are affiliatelinks which means the writer earns a smallcommission when you purchase through the link.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie3Table of ContentsCOVER PAGE...................................................... 1About the Author ........................................... 2Legal Notice .................................................. 2Limits of Liability and Disclaimer of Warranty .... 2Preface......................................................... 4Introduction..................................................... 5The Nuts and Bolts ........................................... 6Reasons to keep a notebook .............................. 9First reason: An answer to the question, ―Whatdid you learn in school today?‖........................ 9Second reason: Portfolios and documentation . 10Third reason: Retention................................ 10Fourth reason: Review and reference ............. 10Fifth Reason: Motivation ............................... 10Sixth reason: Organizational skills ................ 11Helping Students Organize Notebooking Pages:Questions to Ask ......................................... 14Seventh reason: Writing............................... 15Implementing Notebooking.............................. 16Narration & Expository Writing ......................... 161st-3rdgrades .............................................. 174th-6thgrades .............................................. 177th-12thgrades............................................. 18Planning for Notebooking................................. 18The Notebooking Action................................... 201st-3rdgrades (and for those just beginning withnotebooking)............................................... 204st-6th grades.............................................. 217th-12thgrades............................................. 22Notebooking Pitfalls ........................................ 22Notebooking everything everyday. ................. 23No variety in notebooking. ............................ 23Not letting children take ownership. ............... 23Notebooking and Educational Styles.................. 24Charlotte Mason .......................................... 25Classical ..................................................... 29Textbook .................................................... 29As a Substitute ......................................... 30As a Complement...................................... 30Conclusion ..................................................... 30Recommended Resources ................................ 31Printables ................................................... 31Links .......................................................... 31
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie4PrefaceAt my core, I am a teacher. Analyzing andexplaining concepts comes naturally to me. I get ahuge thrill when something finally ―clicks.‖I realize that many homeschool moms are notnatural teachers. They have a passionate desire tooffer their children the very best education. Theyknow that homeschooling is that path, but theteaching part does not come easily.That’s why I wrote this ebook – to make it easierfor those of you who struggle with the teaching,the lesson planning, and the constant self-doubts.Notebooking is not a silver bullet. It won’t solve allyour homeschooling problems, but it is an effectivetechnique that can streamline your lesson planningand give you a big return on your educationalinvestment.You may notice that although I use a lot of photoson my blogs, I have very few in this ebook. This isdeliberate. I want you to internalize the ideasbefore being influenced by the images.After you’ve read the book, visit the links I offer inthe Recommended Resources section for plenty ofpicture examples of notebooking.Thanks for reading my ebook. Feel free to contactme if you have any questions or comments. I lovegetting to know you.Jimmiejimmie@jimmiescollage.com
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie5Introductionou may be surprised to realize thatnotebooking is not a new way tolearn. In fact, artists, writers, andscientists throughout history have usednotebooking as a way to collect ideas, toruminate over theories, and to sketchtheir dreams. Think of Leonardo DaVinci and the amazing collection ofjournals he left behind. Scientists todayare still trying to create some of themachines he envisioned in hisnotebooks.Charles Darwin kept detailed notes ofhis nature observations, ideas he usedto create a theory that radicallyimpacted the face of modern science.In the footsteps of these innovators,your children can use notebooking toenrich their homeschooling experience.Unlike adult scientists, your children willprobably not be able to beginnotebooking without some cleardirection. But if you begin thenotebooking habit early, by the highschool years your students will be ableYIf you begin the notebooking habitearly, by the high school years, yourstudents will be able toindependently summarize, organize,and write about the subject matterof their courses in beautifulnotebooks.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie6to independently summarize, organize,and write about the subject matter oftheir courses in beautiful notebooks.Even if you are jumping into thisnotebooking method a bit late, yourchildren can quickly learn how to recordwhat they learn in personalizednotebooks.Notebooking is extremely versatile andadaptable to your child’s level andstrengths. If your child loves to draw,that passion can be utilized in thenotebooking he does. If she dislikeswriting, there is still a type ofnotebooking that she can enjoy.The Nuts and Boltsirst, the notebook itself. Somepeople use spiral boundnotebooks; others prefercomposition notebooks. By all means,use what works best for you. My ownrecommendation is a basic three-ringbinder because it is so easy to find andextremely versatile. With a binder, youcan add, remove, and rearrange pages.When you add page protectors to yourthree-ring notebooks, you have theoption to include a wide variety of realiato your notebooks.Normally, we think of a notebookingpage printed onto copy paper. It may befree or purchased, but it usually haslines for writing and a graphic or two.FREALIA -- rē-a-lē-əReal things associated with everydaylife, especially objects used to maketeaching more concrete and real. (fromLatin – realis, meaning real)
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie7Notebooking styles arelike Christmas trees.Some trees are decoratedaround a single theme – redand white or gingerbreadmen. They have a uniformbeauty.Other Christmas trees are ahodgepodge of ornamentswith the only unifying factorbeing the history andpassions of the family whodecorated it. Each object on ahodgepodge tree tells a story.For example, you are studying DNA inscience. You may have a page with agraphic of the double helix structureand a header that says ―DNA.‖ Yourchild uses the space on the page towrite in facts about what you havestudied.That conventional type of page isa mainstay of notebooking thatyou will turn to again and again.You can choose the themednotebook with pre-made pages ina single style. Your notebook willlook ultra-neat and professional. Oryou may prefer the hodgepodgenotebook that has a little bit ofeverything in it. Both are acceptable.Choose a style that fits your children.The notebook paper you buy at yourlocal super store in a package of 200sheets can be used just as easily.Simply affix yourown graphicsdirectly ontothe linedpaper.But thereare othertypes ofpages aswell.Some aremore likegraphicorganizerswith boxesor circles foryour ownillustrations andword clouds. Beyondthat, you can include realia such asrecipe cards, postcards, maps,
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie8brochures, paper dolls, flatteneddioramas, and photos.Field trips are a great source of realiafor notebooks. Save what you gatherand add it to your notebooks. The act ofarranging the materials on cardstock,and writing captions and explanatorynotes is an educational opportunity.More on that later.For a list of things to put in yournotebook, refer to the bonus printablechart Fifty Things to Put in a Notebook.(See the recommended resources at theend of this ebook.) Print this out andput it into your own planning notebook.Refer to it when you do your lessonplanning so that you remember toincorporate notebooking in varied ways.There are two main methods for puttingthese things into a notebook:1. Affix to cardstock.Why use cardstock rather than plainpaper? Cardstock is stronger and canhold heavy items. Your base needs to beat least as thick as if not thicker thanwhat you affix to it.2. Slide inside a page protectorPage protectors are perfect for slightlybulky objects, or for items that youdon’t want to deface with hole punchingor gluing.You can also use tools like envelopeshole-punched on the side or pre-madepockets for your notebooks, but thepage protectors are my favorite mainlyTip:Stick-on hole reinforcements are handy for adding strength to single sheets of paper.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie9because they are clear and instantlyreveal their contents.You can have one huge notebook perchild or a collection of individual subjectnotebooks. The choice is yours andeither method requires usingorganization to keep the pages in alogical arrangement.Reasons to keep a notebookHere’s where we get into the meat ofhow notebooking is going to help you.First, we’ll look at how notebookinghelps a child learn. And then I’ll discusshow notebooking helps you teach.Two huge reasons are going to take upa lot of space, so I’m saving them forthe end. The lesser important reasonsare first.First Reason: An Answer to theQuestion, “What Did You Learn inSchool Today?”It can be frustrating as a mom to planwhat you think are engaging lessonsjust to find that your children havealready forgotten the topic by fouro’clock in the afternoon. With anotebook, there is a concrete reminderof exactly what you studied. You canalso pull it down to show dad orgrandma.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie10Second reason: Portfolios andDocumentationStates have different requirements, butif you have to (or just want to) keep aportfolio of your child’s work,notebooking is a perfect fit. Yourassessor will be very impressed withorganized and thorough notebooks,chronicling what you studied througheach year.Third Reason: RetentionWriting about what you learn helps youto remember it. And if your child doesforget, he can always pull down thenotebook and look it up.Fourth Reason: Review and ReferenceThe notebooks you craft becomehomemade reference books. The longeryou use notebooking, the more oftenyou will find yourself using them to lookup facts you need to know.Consider this example: You read a bookand come across something you studiedmonths ago. You and your child can’texactly remember the details, so youboth look it up in the notebook. There itis in black and white, written in yourchild’s own hand. Here you have adouble benefit. You are encouragingreference skills (looking up what youdon’t know) and giving a chance toreview (re-reading the notebookingpages).Fifth Reason: MotivationThis advantage of notebooking will nothappen until you’ve beendoing it for at least ayear, maybe more. Whileyour children arerefreshing their memoryfrom a notebook, let thembrowse a little. Let them notice theirchildish handwriting from last year, theirspelling mistakes, their non-existent
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie11margins and simplistic explanations. Thefact that they see those imperfections isevidence of growth! When theyoriginally wrote those things, they didn’trealize the errors. And now they do.Hooray! Learning is happening. What agreat motivator for you and your childto recognize that growth is steadilyoccurring. Be sure to prod them towardsdevelopment with a reminder like, ―Inanother year and a half, you will lookback on today’s work and laugh at itbecause you will have progressed somuch farther. You will keep learning anddeveloping.‖Now I’m going to get into the twomajor advantages of notebooking:organization and writing. Actuallythese two elements are closely relatedsince you can’t have good writingwithout organization. But because it ispossible to learn organization and neverapply it to your writing, I’ll discuss themas two separate advantages.Sixth Reason: Organizational skillsEveryone on the planet needs to haveorganizational skills. Period.The beauty of notebooking is that it is aconcrete way to learn these skills.How so? You may immediately think ofthe physical structure of the notebookand organizing the pages. True, theseare elements of organization: Cover pages for notebooks Tabbed dividers between sections Arranging material chronologically,alphabetically, or by other logicalmethodsEach of these parts gives you a chanceto help your child think about organizinginformation. To get the maximumbenefit from notebooking, let your childmake decisions about organizing.
    • Help him work out the best methods for organizing. Sometimes, let him makeorganizational mistakes that will become evident with time. For example, if you returnto the notebook and find it hard to locate information, ask your child to identify theproblem and create an organizational solution. Nothing teaches better thanexperience. So let your children loose with the organizational process in ageappropriate ways. Here are some examples:1st-3rdgraders•What color dividers should we use?•Create a cover page for this Ancient Egypt section.•Should we put these President Pages in chronological order by their birth orby their terms as presidents?4th-6thgraders•What headings do we need for these dividers?•Include a table of contents after your cover page for Ancient Egypt.•Should this math poem go into the math folder or poetry folder?7th-12thgraders•What notebooks do you need this year?•How will you organize them?
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie13When you start notebooking at a young age, the organizational skills increase indifficulty over the years. Each year, you require the child to take more ownership overthe organization of the notebooks. In early elementary grades, you guide and model.By high school years, you only pay for thenotebooks, cardstock, hole-punch, and pageprotectors because your student knowsexactly what to do.Doing all the organization for your children’snotebooks or dictating specifically how itshould be done robs them of one of thebiggest benefits of notebooking – learningto organize.If you are starting notebooking with a childolder than third grade, the neededorganizational skills may not be established.In that case, start out with more direction and modeling. An older child will catch onquickly and soon be able to make more organizational decisions.If setting up the structure of the notebooks is a great learning activity, just wait.There’s more! Creating the pages themselves is where the real organizational skillscome into play. Imagine you’ve been on an educational field trip and have comehome with a few postcards, some photographs on your digital camera, a brochure, amap, and some small objects (maybe leaves, feathers, or beads). Maximize theDoing all theorganization for yourchildren’s notebooksrobs them of one of thebiggest benefits ofnotebooking – learningto organize.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie14learning opportunity! Spread out all your goodies, have your cardstock and pageprotectors handy, and let your child organize it all into a series of notebooking pagesabout your experience.Helping Students Organize Notebooking Pages: Questions to Ask1st-3rdgraders• What were the main things we learned today?• What should our headings be?• How should we label this object?4th-6thgraders• What captions should you add to these items based on what you learned on thefield trip?• What is a good order for these items? Is any section weak? What could we add toit?• What do we need to write out that is not already included in this brochure?• Explain the significance of each item you’ve included.7th-12thgraders• What other supplies do you need?
    • For 1st-3rdgraders, you will be rightbeside them, walking through thecreation of the notebooking pages,maybe even writing what they dictate.For 4th-6thgraders, you should let themplan and go over the plan with youbefore gluing and writing. At that point,you can ask probing questions to helpthem make better decisions: ―What about XYZ? That was one ofthe most fun parts. But you didn’tinclude it.‖ ―How will you connect this objectinto the main point of the field trip?Does it really fit?‖ ―When I see what you’ve gotplanned, I’m left wondering aboutABC. Can you explain that partmore?‖A few years of that intermediate level ofnotebooking will equip 7th-12thgradersto independently organize their materialonto notebooking pages.Seventh Reason: WritingBy writing I mean composition, nothandwriting. You can use notebookingas a way to practice handwriting, butI’m focusing on a much more importantskill – composing sentences,paragraphs, and essays.A key concept is coming up, so payattention here:Writing can beintegrated into yourother subjects so thatyou don’t have to do alot of pure writingassignments.IMPORTANT
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie16Writing can beintegrated intoyour othersubjects so thatyou don’t haveto do a lot ofpure writingassignments.You are goingto study math,history, andscienceanyway. Writeabout thesetopics andyou’ve killedtwo birds withone stone. Thisis efficienthomeschooltimemanagement.So, when you write about history, thatcounts as writing and history. You canmark two things off your list with oneassignment.Notebooking like this is narration –telling back what you’ve read or heardin your living book or textbook. Now I’mshifting into implementation ofnotebooking, so let’s talk about that.Implementing NotebookingNotebooking is not another topic in yourhomeschool day. You don’t do math,language arts, history, science andnotebooking.Notebooking integrates into all yoursubject areas and is a method ofteaching and learning.You may use notebooking with yourscience lesson today, with your mathlesson tomorrow, and with your historylesson the following day. NotebookingNarration &Expository WritingTo narrate is to tell back.It is a hallmark of CharlotteMason and classicaleducation.The writing you do innarration is expositorywriting, the same kind ofwriting on college entranceapplications and exams. It’salso the same type ofwriting most people use dayto day in the workplace andin real life.This ebook, for example, isexpository writing; itexplains notebooking.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie17complements whatever you werealready going to do.Notebooking answers the question,―We’ve just read about XYZ, but whatdo we do with it?‖The answer is to make a notebook page!Remember you are not limited to pre-printed pages or plain notebook paper.Anything goes. Refer to the list of 50Things (linked at the end of the ebook)for ideas for each lesson.Do you notebook everything? Yes andno. You can use notebooking for everysubject. For example, in our homeschoolwe have notebooks for each of theseareas: Art Music Science Geography History Language arts Math NatureBut if you require your children to makea notebooking page every day forevery subject you study, you are goingto be overloaded, and they will quicklydislike notebooking.Here are some general guidelines fornotebooking quantity:1st-3rdgrades No more than one notebookingpage per day, and much of thecontent may be drawings. Two to three notebooking pagesper week.4th-6thgrades Occasionally two pages a day,usually one page a day. Three to six pages a week.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie18About ―Pages‖The term ―page‖ may be a bitmisleading. A notebookingassignment for one topic mayrequire more than one physicalpage, especially when images andrealia are used. You can substitutethe word assignment for ―page‖ inthe above chart.7th-12thgrades Two or more pages each day. Six or more pages each week.Use these general guidelines to help youincorporate notebooking into yourhomeschool rather than look at them asrequirements. There will be seasonswhen your homechooling includes manynotebooking pages, and times when youchoose other activities for learning (suchas lapbooking or hands-on projects). Asyour child matures through hishomeschooling years, the quantity ofpages will organically increase.Planning for NotebookingWhen planning your weeklylesson, choose which days andwhich lessons you will notebook.Some topics lend themselves verywell to notebooking. Remember,however, you can notebook anytopic. I try to vary the subjects withwhich I use notebooking each week sothat notebooking is not just a historyactivity but a method we use forlearning all subjects. When planninglessons for younger children, spread outthe notebooking assignments over theweek so that no single day has an extra
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie19heavy load. You may even need twodays to complete a more challengingnotebooking assignment. Allow for thatin your lesson plans. These types ofdecisions require a lot of trial and error.So do some planning, but modify yourplan as you see things flesh out.Part of your planning will be to preparethe actual notebooking page unless youplan to use plain paper. Go ahead andprint them out beforehand and addthem to your stack of the week’smaterials.There are twooptions here – easyand super-easy.Search for afreebie online. (Besure to check thefree printables atThe NotebookingFairy.)Look through your purchased sets,stored on your computer.Make your own printable, customized foryour topic.TIP: If you have purchased any setsof notebooking pages, print out thetable of contents of each set for easyreference. Store them in your ownhomeschool planning notebook. It’stoo easy to forget what is stored onthe computer’s hard drive. With aprinted list, it’s quick and easy tocheck for a specific printable.1. EASYFind aprintable pagefor your topic.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie20This is a method Ilove usingbecause itrequires so littlepreparation timeand gives mydaughter morecontrol over herpages.At the beginning of a semester, I printout a wide variety of genericnotebooking pages, pages that work forany topic, pages without specificheadings or graphics. (Because we lovecolor, I print on a variety of coloredpaper along with standard white.)This stack of about 30-50 pages goesinto a folder that we keep with ourschool supplies. When it’s time for anotebooking assignment, my daughterchooses the notebooking pages with thelayout that best suits her topic.Sometimes your child might have anorganization layout in mind that doesn’tmatch any of your pre-printednotebooking pages. In that case,encourage her to create her own.Now that you’ve done the preparation,let’s address the actual notebookingaction.The Notebooking ActionAfter your regular lessons, ask yourchild to narrate (tell back, summarize,explain) what she learned in writing ona notebooking page. You cansupplement this with the list of FiftyThings to Put Into a Notebook, lettingyour child select an option or two.1st-3rdgrades (and for those justbeginning with notebooking)First, talk with your child about whatshould go on the notebooking page. Thisoral planning stage will show you if your2. SUPER EASYUse a stock ofgeneral purposenotebookingpages.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie21child understands what to write. You canguide with gentle comments andquestions to help your child articulatethe ideas. Help your child consider howto organize the information on the page.Are there two main parts or three? Whatdrawings would best fit into the boxeson the page? Where should you writethe headings or captions and whatshould they be?Have your child use pencil so that majorerrors can be corrected.You may even want to serve as a scribeand write down what your child canlater copy. (Let the child give you thecontent. You simply write it down to aidhim with the physical task of writing.)4st-6th gradesAssuming you’ve been usingnotebooking for some time, your 4th-6thgraders should be able to jump right toa draft of their notebooking pages. Youcan still do some oral pre-writing tocheck for understanding, though, if youfeel it is necessary. A word bank may bea helpful reminder too.At this age, a child should be expectedto create finished compositions(paragraphs or essays) that aregenerally free from spelling, grammar,and mechanical errors. In order toachieve this, the student probably needsto write a basic draft ofhis narration beforewriting directly on thenotebooking page. Forlonger notebookingtasks, you may need toschedule two days, especially if you arerequiring all errors to be corrected.You may not want every notebookingassignment to take so much time forpolishing. That’s okay. For example, Iallow my daughter to have some errors
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie22in her notebooking pages. Glaringspelling errors and factual mistakesshould be corrected, certainly. But don’tfeel that the assignment is of no benefitif it has a few punctuation errors orsome organizational weaknesses in it.Even in a language arts class, manywriting assignments never go past thedrafting stage. You do want to selectsome assignments to revise thoroughlyinto a masterpiece.For my sixth grader, I require onepolished essay per month. This can giveyou a baseline for younger and olderchildren. In the 1st-2ndgrades, youprobably will require only sentences. Bythird grade, a child can write completeparagraphs. Certainly by 7thgrade, achild should be able to write a fiveparagraph essay. Move graduallythrough the steps, knowing that youhave many years to build thesecomposition skills.7th-12thgradesFor older students with experience innotebooking, your direct participationdwindles. You’ve already invested thetime in teaching the skills of narrating,summarizing, and outlining in the lowergrades. Now the pay off comes whenyour children areable to work moreand moreindependently.You are there tospot check theirwork and helpwith honing thepages into fullexpository essayswhen desired.Notebooking PitfallsLike any instructional method,notebooking can be misused andbackfire. Avoid these pitfalls.DangerAhead!Avoid thesethreenotebookingpitfalls!
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie23Notebooking Everything Everyday.Result – burnout.I’ve already hinted at this one. Yes, youcan notebook every subject, but thatdoesn’t mean you have to have anotebooking page after every lessonevery day.No Variety in Notebooking.Result – boredom.Even Disney theme parks get boring ifyou go there every day. Variety makesthings interesting. Notebooking is onetool, not your only tool. Refer to theFifty Things to Put in a Notebook forhelp with variety. Your written narrationpages will be a mainstay, but even theycan be varied with creative touches.Not Letting Children Take Ownership.Result – frustration.Let the students make decisions. Letthem decorate the folders and dividers.Let them choose the color of the paper,the layout of the page, and whether touse glue or slide it into a pageprotector. The more decision makingyou turn over to your children, the morepride they take in their work.When you dictate every detail,notebooking loses its educational valueas well as destroys your child’sinitiative. You want the child to thinkabout the material, not simply followdirections.For young and beginning notebookers,you candiscusslayout,organization,anddrawings.You canguide andask questions during that discussionJust like the beauty ofhand-crafted gifts lies intheir unique details andsmall imperfections, yourchild’s notebook has anindividual personality.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie24time. But let them have a say and makethe final decisions. Let them makemistakes. These are a learning tool aswell.Accept grade appropriate imperfections.Just like the beauty of hand-crafted giftslies in their uniquedetails and smallimperfections, yourchild’s notebook hasan individualpersonality. Let it bethe personality of your child and notyour own perfectionism that shinesthrough.Ask yourself where the expectations forperfection come from:Is it fear of what others will think or adesire for the children to learn?EXAMPLEA student-created notebooking page willnot look like a worksheet printed from aScholastic or Evan Moor book. It will beunique, possibly with errors or crookedwriting and stick figure drawings. That isokay. As a document of his learning,these imperfect pages are exactly whatyou want – a true snapshot of thatchild’s learning and skills.Notebooking and Educational StylesI admit that I fall into the CharlotteMason (CM) camp of homeschoolphilosophies. That is why I am morefamiliar with the CM style of learningand can better articulate hownotebooking fits with it. However, youcan use notebooking with any style ofcurricula, from classical to unschooling,and from delight-directed to textbook.Let’s look at three of the most commonstyles and see how notebooking fitsthem. Most of you are probably aneclectic mix of these, so reading aboutall three styles will be of benefit.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie25Charlotte MasonCM homeschooling is based on livingbooks and real-life activities. When Iread what Miss Mason wrote in HomeEducation, I see what sounds similar towhat I call notebooking. She mentionswritten narrations with illustrations,timelines, and nature journals.Here are some quotations (emphasis ismine) that prove my point.CM writes about what we would call atimeline:In order to give definiteness to whatmay soon become a pretty wideknowledge of history––mount a sheet ofcartridge-paper and divide it into twentycolumns, letting the first century of theChristian era come in the middle, andlet each remaining column represent acentury B.C. or A.D., as the case maybe.Then let the child himself write, orprint, as he is able, the names ofthe people he comes upon in dueorder, in their proper century.We need not trouble ourselves atpresent with more exact dates, but thissimple table of the centuries willsuggest a graphic panorama to thechild’s mind, and he will see events intheir time-order.Here CM suggests that timelines areused as a way to learn and remember.(I add that they are helpful for narrationas well.) Her format may be differentfrom what modern homeschoolers use,but the idea is the same — visuallydemonstrating history in a ―graphicpanorama.‖CM also writes about illustrationscreated during a narration:
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie26History readings afford admirablematerial for narration, and childrenenjoy narrating what they have read orheard. They love, too, to makeillustrations.The drawings of the children in questionare psychologically interesting asshowing what various and sometimesobscure points appeal to the mind of achild; and also, that children have thesame intellectual pleasure as persons ofcultivated mind in working out new hintsand suggestions. The drawings, be itsaid, leave much to be desired, but theyhave this in common with the art ofprimitive peoples: they tell the taledirectly and vividly.In these original illustrations (severalof them by older children than those wehave in view here), we get an exampleof the various images that presentthemselves to the minds of childrenduring the reading of a great work; anda single such glimpse into a child’s mindconvinces us of the importance ofsustaining that mind upon strong meat.Imagination does not stir at thesuggestion of the feeble, much-dilutedstuff that is too often put into children’shands.Although CM doesn’tspecifically say to putthose illustrations into anotebook, I think thatadding drawings to anotebook fits well with thespirit of CM’s ideas. The point is forchildren to narrate what they learn,whether in an oral, written, or visualformat.About Narrations:Indeed, it is most interesting to hearchildren of seven or eight go through along story without missing a detail,
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie27putting every event in its right order.These narrations are never a slavishreproduction of the original. A child’sindividuality plays about what heenjoys, and the story comes from hislips, not precisely as the author tells it,but with a certain spirit and colouringwhich express the narrator. By the way,it is very important that children shouldbe allowed to narrate in their own way,and should not be pulled up or helpedwith words and expressions from thetext.A narration should be original as itcomes from the child––that is, his ownmind should have acted upon the matterit has received.Although CM is talking about the oralnarrations of younger children, thesame principles apply to the writtennarrations of older children. Thosewritten narrations are the main bulk of ahomeschool notebook.About Composition & WrittenNarrations:For children under nine, the question ofcomposition resolves itself into that ofnarration, varied by some such simpleexercise as to write a part and narrate apart, or write the whole account of awalk they have taken, a lesson theyhave studied, or of some simple matterthat they know.About Nature Journals:Calendars.––It is a capital plan for thechildren to keep a calendar––the firstoak-leaf, the first tadpole, the firstcowslip, the first catkin, the first ripeblackberries, where seen, and when.The next year they will know when andwhere to look out for their favourites,
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie28and will, every year, be in a condition toadd new observations.Nature Diaries.––As soon as he is ableto keep it himself, a nature-diary is asource of delight to a child. Every day’swalk gives him something to enter:three squirrels in a larch tree, a jayflying across such a field, a caterpillarclimbing up a nettle, asnail eating a cabbageleaf, a spider droppingsuddenly to the ground,where he foundground ivy, how it was growing andwhat plants were growing with it, howbindweed or ivy manages to climb.Innumerable matters to record occur tothe intelligent child. While he is quiteyoung (five or six), he should begin toillustrate his notes freely with brushdrawings; he should have a little help atfirst in mixing colours, in the way ofprinciples, not directions. He should notbe told to use now this and now that,but, ‘we get purple by mixing so andso,’ and then he should be left tohimself to get the right tint. As fordrawing, instruction has no doubt itstime and place; but his nature diaryshould be left to his own initiative.In regards to nature studies, CM doesuse the word ―diaries‖ which isessentially the same as a journal ornotebook.From what I read in CM’s original works,modern homeschool notebooking doesfit into a CM education. It is not identicalto what CM suggested, but it is not faroff either as long as the cornerstone ofnarration is maintained. Thus, CMnotebooking emphasizes theunderstanding of the child rather thanthe visual appearance of the pages.
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie29CM never promoted specially designednotebooking pages with headings andgraphics (like the freebies at TheNotebooking Fairy). As I’ve said before,plain paper is adequate for notebookingprojects and would surely be closer towhat CM had in mind, especially withchildren illustrating their ownnarrations.As a side note, worksheets, busy work,mindless activities, and twaddle wouldnot fit into a CM-style notebookwhatsoever.ClassicalClassical educators will find notebookinga good match for the same reasonsCharlotte Mason educators do –narration. In the classical method,narration, instead of tests, is theprimary way to evaluate understanding.Notebooking offers a simple way tostructure written narrations as studentssummarize the classic books they read.Susan Wise Bauer recommends using anEnglish language notebook and a historynotebook to organize what is learnedeach day.A chronological survey ofhistory is the center of aclassical curriculum suchthat most academicstudies revolve around thetime period beingstudied. History is oneof the easiest subjectsin which to beginnotebooking because ofits narrative nature.Students learn about history withinteresting books and, as they get older,with original historical texts. The storiestold in these books can be summarized,outlined, and re-told in notebooks.TextbookTextbooks are normally structuredaround comprehension questions at the
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie30end of a chapter and/or workbookexercise. For textbook users,notebooking can serve as a substitutefor or as a complement to thosetraditional classwork assignments.As a SubstituteAsk the child to summarize the chapterfrom the textbook onto a notebookingpage. If an entire chapter isoverwhelming, select a particularlyimportant section to summarize.Use a biography page to outline keyfacts about a person from the textbook.Use a one page timeline for listingevents in chronological order.As a ComplementUse the comprehension questions as aguide for the notebooking summary.Normally these questions go in order ofthe text, highlighting the mostimportant ideas. If a student can writethe answers to the questions incomplete sentences, he can easily drafta complete summary of the chapter.Use vocabulary notebooking pages forwriting about the vocabulary words in atextbook instead of merely copyingdefinitions.ConclusionNotebooking is as varied and as uniqueas the students who use the method.Therefore, this ebook can only hope toskim the surface of what notebookingcan do for your homeschool. Use theideas and guidelines here as a base, butfeel free to experiment and to changethe ―rules.‖Happy notebooking!
    • N o t e b o o k i n g S u c c e s shttp://notebookingfairy.com by Jimmie31Recommended ResourcesBonus Printables50 Things to Put in NotebookResource Pages[I pulled out the grade specific material andorganized it in individual documents for yourconvenience.] Resource Page Grades 1-3 Resource Page Grades 4-6 Resource Page Grades 7-12General Notebooking PagesLinksThe Notebooking FairyNotebooking photos at FlickrNotebooking ExhibitJimmie’s Collage – About Notebooking
    • Thank you for purchasingNotebooking Successfrom The Notebooking Fairy.notebookingfairy.comBonusNotebooking Pages
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    • Notebooking SuccessNotebooking for First-Third GradersFor 1st-3rd graders, you will be right beside them, walking throughthe creation of the notebooking pages, maybe even writing whatthey dictate.Notebooking Quantity No more than one notebooking page per day. Much of the content may be drawings. Two to three notebooking pages per week.The Notebooking ActionFirst, talk with your child about what should go on the notebookingpage. This oral planning stage will show you if your childunderstands what to write. You can guide with gentle commentsand questions to help your child articulate the ideas. Help yourchild consider how to organize the information on the page. Are there two main parts or three? What drawings would best fit into the boxes on the page? Where should you write the headings or captions? What should the captions be? What color dividers should we use? Should we put these pages in chronological order or other order What were the main things we learned today? What should our headings be? How should we label this object?Have your child use pencil so that major errors can be corrected.You may even want to serve as a scribe and write down what yourchild can later copy. (Let the child give you the content. You simplywrite it down to aid him with the physical task of writing.)© The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.com
    • Notebooking SuccessNotebooking for fourth-fifth GradersFor 4th-6th graders, you should let them plan and go over the planwith you before gluing and writing. At that point, you can ask probingquestions to help them make better decisions.Notebooking Quantity Occasionally two pages a day, usually one page a day. Three to six pages a week.The Notebooking ActionAssuming you’ve been using notebooking for some time, your 4th-6thgraders should be able to jump right to a draft of their notebookingpages. You can still do some oral pre-writing to check forunderstanding, though, if you feel it is necessary. A word bank maybe a helpful reminder too. What captions should you add to these items based on what youlearned? What is a good order for these items? Is any section weak? Whatcould we add to it? What do we need to write out that is not already included in thisbrochure? Explain the significance of each item you’ve included. What headings do we need for these dividers? Should this math poem go into the math folder or poetry folder? “What about XYZ? That was one of the most fun/interesting parts.But you didn’t include it.” “How will you connect this object/idea into the main point of thefield trip/lesson? Does it really fit?” “When I see what you’ve got planned, I’m left wondering aboutABC. Can you explain that part more?”© The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.com
    • Notebooking SuccessNotebooking for fourth-fifth Graders© The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.comAt this age, a child should be expected to create finished composi-tions (paragraphs or essays) that are generally free from spelling,grammar, and mechanical errors. In order to achieve this, the stu-dent probably needs to write a basic draft of his narration beforewriting directly on the notebooking page. For longer notebookingtasks, you may need to schedule two days, especially if you are re-quiring all errors to be corrected.You may not want every notebooking assignment to take so muchtime for polishing. That’s okay. For example, I allow my daughter tohave some errors in her notebooking pages. Glaring spelling errorsand factual mistakes should be corrected, certainly. But don’t feelthat the assignment is of no benefit if it has a few punctuation errorsor some organizational weaknesses in it.
    • Notebooking SuccessNotebooking for seventh graders and upAssuming they have been using notebooking during the intermediateyears, 7th-12th graders can independently organize and write theirmaterial onto notebooking pages.Notebooking Quantity• Two or more pages each day.• Six or more pages each week.The Notebooking ActionFor older students with experience in notebooking, your directparticipation dwindles. You’ve already invested the time in teachingthe skills of narrating, summarizing, and outlining in the lower grades.Now the pay off comes when your children are able to work moreand more independently.You are there to spot check their work and help with honing thepages into full expository essays when desired.© The Notebooking Fairy —http://notebookingfairy.com
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    • Small Trifold (vertical)Cut on solid lines. Fold (like a pamphlet) on dotted lines.
    • Trifold (vertical)Cut on solid lines. Fold (like a pamphlet) on dotted lines.
    • Small Trifold (horizontal)Cut on solid lines. Fold (in thirds) on dotted lines.
    • Hexagon TrifoldCut book out on solid black lines. Fold in thirds on dotted lines.
    • Cut book out on solid black lines. Fold in thirds on dotted lines.Trapezoid Trifold
    • Cut book out on solid black lines. Fold in thirds on dotted lines.Ticket Trifold
    • solutionstomath at tinyurl.com/solutionstomathUnit Circle32,12⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟22,22⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟12,32⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟−32,12⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟−22,22⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟−12,32⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟−32,−12⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟−22,−22⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟−12,−32⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟12,−32⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟22,−22⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟32,−12⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟1,0( )-1,0( )0,1( )0,−1( )0°30°45°60°120°135°150°90°180°210°225°240°270°300°315°330°0ππ6π4π2 π33π42π35π67π65π44π33π25π37π411π6360° 2πQuad 4:Points: ( +, –)Radians: the numerator is oneless than the twice denominatorTrig: sin: –cos: +tan: –Quad 1:Points: (+, +)Trig: sin: +cos: +tan: +Quad 3:Points: (–, –)Radians: the numerator is onemore than the denominatorTrig: sin: –cos: –tan: +Quad 2:Points: (–, +)Radians: the numerator is oneless than the denominatorTrig: sin: +cos: –tan: –
    • solutionstomath at tinyurl.com/solutionstomathUnit Circle___,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟ ,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,( ),( ),( ),( )_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°______________________________________° ___
    • solutionstomath at tinyurl.com/solutionstomathUnit Circle___,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟ ,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,( ),( ),( ),( )_____°_____ °_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°__________________________° ___
    • solutionstomath at tinyurl.com/solutionstomathUnit Circle,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟ ,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,( ),( ),( ),( )_____°_____°_____ °_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____________________________________________________° ___
    • solutionstomath at tinyurl.com/solutionstomathUnit Circle,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟ ,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟,( ),( ),( ),( )_____°_____°_____ °_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____°_____________________________________________________° ___
    • 1-UnitCircleNotes.docUnit Circle NotesDivide everything by 12:o Degrees: Each angle is 30° (360°/12 = 30° or the right angle divided by 3) Patterns with degrees: since we are adding 30, use multiples of 30 (or 3 then add a zero)o Radians: Each angle isπ62π12=π6⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟ . To get the following angles, add 1/6 to the previous angleand reduce or:• First label the right angles: pi/2, pi, 3pi/2, and 2 pi then• pi/6, 2pi/6 (reduce), 3pi/6 (skip), 4pi/6 (reduce), 5pi/6, 6pi/6 (skip), 7pi/6, 8pi/6(reduce), 9pi/6 (skip), 10pi/6 (reduce), 11pi/6, 12pi/6 (skip)Divide everything by 8:o Degrees: Each angle is 45° (360°/8 = 45° or the right angle divided by 2)o Radians: Each angle isπ42π8=π4⎛⎝⎜⎞⎠⎟ . To get the following angles, and 1/4 to the previous angleand reduce or:• First label the right angles: pi/2, pi, 3pi/2, and 2 pi then• pi/4, 2pi/4 (skip), 3pi/4, 4pi/4 (skip), 5pi/4, 6pi/4 (skip), 7pi/4 and 8pi/4 (skip)Points:• Combine: notice the numerator gets bigger for the y-points in the first quadrant: compare:• Flip everything (points and denominator for the radians) to the left then everything down• Quadrants (+, +), (-, +), (-,-), (+, -)What patterns do you see with the numerator and denominator of the radians in quadrant 2, 3 or 4?Quadrant 2: numerator is one less than the denominatorQuadrant 3: numerator is one more than the denominatorQuadrant 4: numerator is one less than twice the denominatorAlso, use reflections over the x- and y-axis for the denominator
    • VerbalDescriptionDefineVariablesMathematicalEquation
    • Key:Unknown amountsKnown amountsMath key wordsTo Define Variables:Choose a letter to represent each ofthe unknown amounts.Write a “let statement”Translate each part into math usingyour variables and math key words.The number of people that can comewill be five times the amount of cars.Let:
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    • WHAT IS A CYLINDER?____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    • WHAT IS PLANE GEOMETRY?____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
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    • I Can Write Linear Equations GI Can Write Linear Equations GI Can Write Linear Equations GI Can Write Linear Equations Giveniveniveniven…The slope andThe slope andThe slope andThe slope andyyyy----interceptinterceptinterceptinterceptslope =31; y-intercept = -5Standard FormStandard FormStandard FormStandard Form4x – 2y = 14A GraphA GraphA GraphA GraphA Point and SlopeA Point and SlopeA Point and SlopeA Point and Slope(-1, 3); slope = -3Two PointsTwo PointsTwo PointsTwo Points(-4, -7) and (8, -13)
    • I Can Write Linear Equations GI Can Write Linear Equations GI Can Write Linear Equations GI Can Write Linear Equations Giveniveniveniven…
    • BACK PAGEWriting Algebraic Equations________________ the word problem.The perimeter of an isosceles triangle is 20 cm.What is the length of its base if the sides are 8.5 cm?Dont just read it once. _____________________ the problemas you solve it to make sure you dont miss anything.Define the ______________________.Ask yourself: “What am I being asked to find?”The perimeter of an isosceles triangle is 20 cm.What is the length of its base if the sides are 8.5 cm?StartStep 1
    • _________________________ the problem.Ask yourself: “What _______________________ am I being given?”Ask yourself: “What do I already know about this situation?”The perimeter of an isosceles triangle is 20 cm.What is the length of its base if the sides are 8.5 cm?Perimeter means:______________________________________________________Isosceles triangles have:_____________________________________________________________________________ the problem fromwords to symbols.Ask yourself: “What ____________________ are being described inthe problem?”Ask yourself: “What do these words mean?”The first side plus the second side plus the base equals the perimeter._______________________ the problem.Ask yourself: “What steps can I take to determine the_________________ of the variable?8.5 8.5 20______________________ the question.Ask yourself: “Am I done?Ask yourself: “Have I _______________________ the question thatwas asked?The perimeter of an isosceles triangle is 20 cm.What is the length of its base if the sides are 8.5 cm?Step 2Step 3Step 4Last Step