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2010 Pride Survey Data Zone 1

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Zone 1

  1. 1. ZONE 1
  2. 2. A special thanks to these planning improvement partners: Council of Local Mental Hygiene Directors (CLMHD) Association of Substance Abuse Professionals (ASAP) - Prevention Committee Council on Addictions of New York State (CANYS) Onondaga-Cortland-Madison B.O.C.E.S. Tompkins-Seneca-Tioga B.O.C.E.S. NYS School Boards Association New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services Division of Outcome Management and System Investment William J. Phillips, Associate Commissioner Bureau of Research, Epidemiology and Practice Improvement Robert J. Gallati, Dr. Gregory A. Rainone Division of Prevention, Recovery, Technology and Management Services Mary Ann DiChristopher, Acting Associate Commissioner Bureau of Prevention Services Dr. Barry R. DonovanThe New York State Youth Development Survey was produced by International Survey Associates/Pride Surveys under a contract with the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services. For more information, visit www.pridesurveys.com
  3. 3. Contents C MODEL PROGRAMS RELATED TO RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS 401 INTRODUCTION 7 D RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS DEFINITIONS 502 RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS 9 E COMPARISIONS OF CTC VS NYS YDS ON RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS 55 2.1 HOW TO READ THE CHARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 F DATA TABLES 563 ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG USE 17 F.1 Risk and Protective Factors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 3.1 HOW TO READ THE CHARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 F.2 Lifetime Prevalence of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs . . . . . 644 GAMBLING PREVALENCE INFORMATION 27 F.3 Past 30 Day Prevalence of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs . . . 66 4.1 HOW TO READ THE CHARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 F.4 Heavy Use and Antisocial Behaviors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 F.5 Average Age of First Incidence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 705 SCHOOL SAFETY ISSUES 31 F.6 Sources and Locations of Alcohol Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 5.1 HOW TO READ THE CHARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 F.7 Gambling Behaviors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 746 DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES SUPPORT PROGRAM CORE F.8 School Safety Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 MEASURES 35APPENDICESA SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT USING SURVEY DATA 37 A.1 What are the numbers telling you? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 A.2 How to decide if a rate is ”unacceptable.” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 A.3 Use these data for planning: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37B PREVENTION RESOURCES 39 B.1 Additional Needs Assessment Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 4
  4. 4. List of Tables 22 Percentage of Students Reporting Protection for Family Domain . . 61 23 Percentage of Students Reporting Protection for School Domain . . 62 1 Student Totals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 24 Percentage of Students Reporting Protection for Individual/Peer Domain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 2 Grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 25 Lifetime Prevalence of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs, By Grade 3 Sex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Level and Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 4 Are you Hispanic or Latino? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 26 Lifetime Prevalence of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs, By Grade Level and Group (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 5 Ethnic Origin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 27 Past 30 Day Prevalence of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs, By 6 Risk Factors That Inhibit Healthy Youth Development . . . . . . . . 9 Grade Level and Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 7 Protective Factors That Promote Healthy Youth Development . . . 10 28 Past 30 Day Prevalence of Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs, By Grade Level and Group (continued) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 8 Core Measure by Grade for Past 30 Day Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 29 Percentage of Students With Heavy Use of Alcohol and Cigarettes . 68 9 Core Measure by Grade for Perception of Risk . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 30 Percentage of Students With Antisocial Behavior in the Past Year . 69 10 Core Measure by Grade for Parental Disapproval . . . . . . . . . . . 35 31 Average Age of First ATOD Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 11 Core Measure by Grade for Age of Onset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 32 Average Age of First Antisocial Behavior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 12 Core Measure by Sex for Past 30 Day Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 33 Students’ Response to ”If you drank alcohol in the past year, how 13 Core Measure by Sex for Perception of Risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 did you usually get it?” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 14 Core Measure by Sex for Parental Disapproval . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 34 Students’ Response to ”If you drank alcohol in the past year, where did you usually drink it?” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 15 Core Measure by Sex for Age of Onset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 35 Percentage of Students Engaged in Gambling Activities . . . . . . . 74 16 Risk and Protective Factor Scale Definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 36 Percentage of Students Engaged in Gambling Activities (continued) 75 17 Percentage of Students Reporting Risks for Community Domain . . 56 37 Percentage of Students Engaged in Gambling Activities (continued) 76 18 Percentage of Students Reporting Risks for Family Domain . . . . . 57 38 Students’ Response to ”How many times in the past have you taken 19 Percentage of Students Reporting Risks for School Domain . . . . . 58 a handgun to school?” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 20 Percentage of Students Reporting Risks for Individual/Peer Domain 59 39 Students’ Response to ”How wrong do you think it is for someone your age to take a handgun to school?” . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 21 Percentage of Students Reporting Protection for Community Domain 60 5
  5. 5. List of Figures 1 Risk Factors - Grades 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 2 Risk Factors - Grades 9-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 3 Risk Factors - Grades 11-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 4 Protective Factors - Grades 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 5 Protective Factors - Grades 9-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 6 Protective Factors - Grades 11-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 7 Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Grades 7-8 . . . . . . . . . 18 8 Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Grades 9-10 . . . . . . . . 19 9 Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Grades 11-12 . . . . . . . . 20 10 No Child Left Behind Profile - Grades 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 11 No Child Left Behind Profile - Grades 9-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 12 No Child Left Behind Profile - Grades 11-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 13 Sources and Locations of Alcohol Use - Grades 7-8 . . . . . . . . . 24 14 Sources and Locations of Alcohol Use - Grades 9-10 . . . . . . . . . 25 15 Sources and Locations of Alcohol Use - Grades 11-12 . . . . . . . . 26 16 Gambling Behaviors - Past Year - Grades 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 17 Gambling Behaviors - Past Year - Grades 9-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 18 Gambling Behaviors - Past Year - Grades 11-12 . . . . . . . . . . . 30 19 School Safety Profile - Grades 7-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 20 School Safety Profile - Grades 9-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 21 School Safety Profile - Grades 11-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 6
  6. 6. 1. INTRODUCTION Table 1: Student Totals Response Group 2010-11 Total Students county 8,378 zone 1 1,575This report summarizes findings from the New York State Youth Development Table 2: GradeSurvey conducted during the 2010-11 school year. The survey instrument was 2010-11designed to assess risk and protective factors that predict substance use and other Response Group pct nproblem behaviors such as delinquency. The survey also measures substance use,youth gambling and other problem behaviors. In addition, grade groups and gender 7 county 18.2 1,525comparisons often are provided as well. zone 1 17.1 269 8 county 16.7 1,402OASAS uses a number of surveys in assessing the prevalence of substance use, zone 1 19.8 312gambling and related problems. The YDS is especially valuable because it provides 9 county 17.2 1,440information on risk and protective factors for school districts and county planning. zone 1 18.2 287However, due to differences in survey design, sampling methods, months of admin- 10 county 17.1 1,433istration and estimation methods, the substance use, gambling and other results zone 1 17.1 269will differ somewhat across the different surveys, such as, the Youth Development 11 county 16.3 1,366Survey conducted by ISA/PRIDE, the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) con- zone 1 15.3 241ducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and The National Survey 12 county 14.5 1,212on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) conducted by the Substance Abuse and Mental zone 1 12.5 197Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) as well as other OASAS Surveys.All these surveys are used by OASAS for policy development and planning at thestate and regional levels.Following receipt of the surveys, all survey forms were checked to determine thevalidity and reliability of the data. A small percentage of students were judgedto have returned invalid survey data. For example, students who claimed to useall drugs at the highest levels of use were eliminated from the final data set. Intotal, five separate checks of the logical consistency and validity of the students’responses were conducted.Tables 1 thru 5 contain comparisions of your data to larger aggregates of data, ifappropriate. For instance, a school report may also contain comparison data fromall the data collected in your district and in your county.Table 1 contains a count of the students included in this report. Table 2 providesinformation on the number and percent of students surveyed at each grade level(in order to protect student anonymity, grade levels which recorded fewer thanthe required minimum number of student responses per grade are reported as 0).Table 3 provides information on the number and percent of students surveyed bysex. Table 4 provides information on the number and percent of students surveyedby Hispanic status. Table 5 provides information on the number and percent ofstudents surveyed by race and ethnicity. 7
  7. 7. Table 3: Sex Table 5: Ethnic Origin 2010-11 2010-11Response Group pct n Response Group pct nMale county 47.2 3,839 Asian American county 2.0 163 zone 1 46.6 717 zone 1 2.2 34Female county 52.8 4,288 Black or African American county 5.7 465 zone 1 53.4 822 zone 1 2.5 39 Native American or Alaska Native county 0.9 77Table 4: Are you Hispanic or Latino? zone 1 1.2 18 2010-11 Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander county 0.5 38Response Group pct n zone 1 0.5 8No county 85.7 6,924 White county 71.3 5,866 zone 1 92.6 1,418 zone 1 81.9 1,274Yes county 14.3 1,153 Multi Racial county 10.1 831 zone 1 7.4 114 zone 1 6.2 97 Other county 9.6 788 zone 1 5.5 85 8
  8. 8. 2. RISK AND PROTECTIVE FACTORS chart to indicate where at least two well designed, published research studies have shown a link between the risk factor and the problem behavior. Table 6: Risk Factors That Inhibit Healthy Youth DevelopmentRisk and protective factor-focused prevention is based on a simple premise: Toprevent a problem from happening, we need to identify the factors that increasethe risk of that problem developing and then find ways to reduce the risks. Just as PROBLEM BEHAVIORS Delinquencymedical researchers have found risk factors for heart attacks such as diets high in Pregnancy Substance Drop-Out Violencefats, lack of exercise, and smoking, a team of researchers, the Social Development School Abuse TeenResearch Group (SDRG), at the University of Washington has defined a set of riskfactors for drug abuse. The research team also found that some children exposed Risk Factorsto multiple risk factors manage to avoid behavior problems later even though they Communitywere exposed to the same risks as children who exhibited behavior problems. Based Availability of Alcohol and Other Drugs on research, the team identified protective factors and processes that work together Community Laws and Norms Favorableto buffer children from the effects of high risk exposure and lead to the development Toward Substance Useof healthy behaviors. Transitions and Mobility Low Neighborhood Attachment Risk factors include characteristics of school, community, and family environments, Community Disorganization as well as characteristics of students and their peer groups that are known to predictincreased likelihood of drug use, delinquency, and violent behaviors among youth Extreme Economic Deprivation (Hawkins, Catalano Miller, 1992; Hawkins, Arthur Catalano, 1995; Brewer, FamilyHawkins, Catalano Neckerman, 1995). Family History of the Problem Behavior Family Management Problems Protective factors exert a positive influence or buffer against the negative influ- Family Conflict ence of risk, thus reducing the likelihood that adolescents will engage in problem Parental Attitudes Favorable Towardsbehaviors. Protective factors identified through research reviewed by the Social Drugs/Other Problem BehaviorDevelopment Research Group include: Social bonding to family, school, commu- Schoolnity and peers; and healthy beliefs and clear standards for behavior. Academic Failure Research on risk and protective factors has important implications for prevention Low Commitment to School efforts. The premise of this approach is that in order to promote positive youth Individual/Peerdevelopment and prevent problem behaviors, it is necessary to address those factors Early Initiation of Drug Use that predict the problem. By measuring risk and protective factors in a population, Early Initiation of Problem Behavior specific risk factors that are elevated and widespread can be identified and tar- Rebelliousness geted by preventive interventions that also promote related protective factors. For Friends Who Use Drugs/example, if academic failure is identified as an elevated risk factor in a commu- Engage in Other Problem Behaviornity, then mentoring and tutoring interventions can be provided that will improve Favorable Attitudes Towards Drug Use/academic performance, and also increase opportunities and rewards for classroom Other Problem Behaviorparticipation. Perceived Risk of Drug Use Risk and protective factor-focused drug abuse prevention is based on the work of J. Peer Rewards for Drug Use David Hawkins, Ph.D., Richard F. Catalano, Ph.D.; and a team of researchers at Depressive Symptoms the University of Washington in Seattle. Beginning in the early 1980’s, the group Indicates that 2 or more epidemiological prospective studies haveresearched adolescent problem behaviors and identified risk factors for adolescent found the risk factor to predict youth problem behavior.drug abuse and delinquency. The chart below shows the links between the 16 riskfactors and the five problem behaviors. The check marks have been placed in the 9
  9. 9. Table 7: Protective Factors That Promote Healthy Youth Development 2.1. HOW TO READ THE CHARTS Community 1. Brief definitions of the risk and protective factors can be found on page 50. Community Opportunities for Prosocial Involvement Community Rewards for Prosocial Involvement 2. The factors are grouped into 4 domains: community, family, school, and peer- Family individual. Family Attachment 3. Scanning across these charts, you can easily determine which factors are most Family Opportunities for Prosocial Involvement (or least) prevalent, thus identifying which are the most important for your Family Rewards for Prosocial Involvement community to address. School 4. Actual percentages are provided in the data tables in Appendix F on page 56. School Opportunities for Prosocial Involvement The tables provide percentage figures for county and zone 1 level. The headers School Rewards for Prosocial Involvement for each column represent the factors for each domain and the percentage Individual/Peer figures represent the percent of students whose factor score exceeds the cutoff Religiosity point for the particular factor. Suppose, for a specific risk factor, that the Social Skills percentage figure for the line ”Combined” and ”County” is 42.3. That would Belief in the Moral Order mean that 42.3 percent of all surveyed students in the county were above the cutoff point for that factor. Prosocial Involvement Peer Rewards for Prosocial Involvement 5. The bars represent the percent of students in the grouped grades who reported elevated risk or protection. 6. Bars are complemented by a red dash. The red dash shows the comparison from the highest aggregate level (i.e. usually county for a school report) and provides additional information for you in determining the relative importance of each risk or protective factor. If present, a yellow diamond shows the comparison of the aggregate that is the next level down (usually district for a school report). 7. A dashed line on each risk and protective factor chart represents the percentage of youth at risk or with protection for the seven state sample upon which the cut-points were developed. The seven states included in the norm group were Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Maine, Oregon, Utah and Washington. This gives you a comparison to a large multi-state baseline sample. 8. The following abbreviations are sometimes used in the tables and charts due to space constraints: ATOD stands for Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use. ASB stands for Antisocial Behaviors. PSI stands for Prosocial Involvement. 10
  10. 10. Percentages (%) 0 10 20 30 40 Low Neighborhood Attachment 50 High Community Disorganization Laws and Norms Favorable to Drug Use Community Perceived Availability of Drugs Poor Family Management Family Conflict Family History of Antisocial Behavior Family Parental Attitudes Favorable to ATOD Parental Attitudes Favorable to ASB Academic Failure School Low Commitment to School Rebelliousness Early Initiation of Drug Use11 Early Initiation of ASB Risk Factors - Grades 7-8 Favorable Attitudes to Drug Use Figure 1: Risk Factors - Grades 7-8 Favorable Attitudes to ASB Perceived Risk of Drug Use Individual/Peer Interaction with Antisocial Peers Friends Use of Drugs Depressive Symptoms Peer Rewards for Antisocial Behavior 7-State Norm Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11
  11. 11. Percentages (%) 0 10 20 30 40 50 Low Neighborhood Attachment 60 High Community Disorganization Laws and Norms Favorable to Drug Use Community Perceived Availability of Drugs Poor Family Management Family Conflict Family History of Antisocial Behavior Family Parental Attitudes Favorable to ATOD Parental Attitudes Favorable to ASB Academic Failure School Low Commitment to School Rebelliousness Early Initiation of Drug Use12 Early Initiation of ASB Risk Factors - Grades 9-10 Favorable Attitudes to Drug Use Figure 2: Risk Factors - Grades 9-10 Favorable Attitudes to ASB Perceived Risk of Drug Use Individual/Peer Interaction with Antisocial Peers Friends Use of Drugs Depressive Symptoms Peer Rewards for Antisocial Behavior 7-State Norm Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11
  12. 12. Percentages (%) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Low Neighborhood Attachment 70 High Community Disorganization Laws and Norms Favorable to Drug Use Community Perceived Availability of Drugs Poor Family Management Family Conflict Family History of Antisocial Behavior Family Parental Attitudes Favorable to ATOD Parental Attitudes Favorable to ASB Academic Failure School Low Commitment to School Rebelliousness Early Initiation of Drug Use13 Early Initiation of ASB Favorable Attitudes to Drug Use Risk Factors - Grades 11-12 Figure 3: Risk Factors - Grades 11-12 Favorable Attitudes to ASB Perceived Risk of Drug Use Individual/Peer Interaction with Antisocial Peers Friends Use of Drugs Depressive Symptoms Peer Rewards for Antisocial Behavior 7-State Norm Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11
  13. 13. Percentages (%) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Opportunities for Prosocial Involvement Community Rewards for Prosocial Involvement Family Attachment Family Opportunities for PSI Family Family Rewards for PSI School Opportunities for PSI School School Rewards for PSI14 Religiosity Social Skills Protective Factors - Grades 7-8 Figure 4: Protective Factors - Grades 7-8 Belief in a Moral Order Individual/Peer Prosocial Involvement Peer Rewards for Prosocial Involvement 7-State Norm Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11
  14. 14. Percentages (%) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Opportunities for Prosocial Involvement Community Rewards for Prosocial Involvement Family Attachment Family Opportunities for PSI Family Family Rewards for PSI School Opportunities for PSI School School Rewards for PSI15 Religiosity Social Skills Protective Factors - Grades 9-10 Figure 5: Protective Factors - Grades 9-10 Belief in a Moral Order Individual/Peer Prosocial Involvement Peer Rewards for Prosocial Involvement 7-State Norm Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11
  15. 15. Percentages (%) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Opportunities for Prosocial Involvement Community Rewards for Prosocial Involvement Family Attachment Family Opportunities for PSI Family Family Rewards for PSI School Opportunities for PSI School School Rewards for PSI16 Religiosity Social Skills Protective Factors - Grades 11-12 Figure 6: Protective Factors - Grades 11-12 Belief in a Moral Order Individual/Peer Prosocial Involvement Peer Rewards for Prosocial Involvement 7-State Norm Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11
  16. 16. 3. ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, AND OTHER DRUG 3.1. HOW TO READ THE CHARTS USE 1. Student responses for substance use and antisocial behavior questions are dis- played by grade groupings on the following pages.The graphs in this section of the report are six different areas of ATOD use and 2. Actual percentages are provided in the data tables in Appendix F on page 64.Antisocial Behavior. These are: The tables provide percentage figures for county and zone 1 level and, for stu- dents in grades 8, 10 and 12, estimates of lifetime and past 30 days substanceLifetime Use of ... The questions ”On how many occasions have you used ... in use from a national survey (MTF - Monitoring the Future). The headers rep- your lifetime?” are used to measure this statistic by reporting the percentage resent the various drugs or activities and the percentage figures represent the of students who reported any use of a particular substance in their lifetime. percent of students who responded positively to the question. For example, for the table ”Lifetime Prevalence of Use”, if the ”Combined” and ”county”Past 30 Day Use of ... The questions ”On how many occasions have you used ... percentage figure for a specific drug is 32.3, then 32.3 percent of all surveyed during the past 30 days?” are used to measure this statistic by reporting the students in the county responded that they had used that drug at least once in percentage of students who reported any use of a particular substance during their lifetime. In the case of the average age tables, the figures represent the the past 30 days. average age of the first use of a particular drug or first incidence of a partic- ular behavior. In the case of the average age tables, the figures represent theHeavy Use of Alcohol and Cigarettes The questions ”How many times in the average age of the first use of a particular drug or first incidence of a particular past two weeks have you had five or more drinks of alcohol in a row?” and behavior. ”How frequently have you smoked cigarettes during the past 30 days?” are used to measure this statistic by reporting the percentage of students who 3. The bars represent the percent of students in the grouped grades who reported report any binge drinking or smoking a pack or more of cigarettes per day substance use. during the past 30 days. 4. Bars are complemented by a red dash. The red dash shows the comparisonAverage Age of First Use of ATOD and Antisocial Behaviors The questions from the highest aggregate level (i.e. usually county for a school report) and ”How old were you when you first ...?” are used to measure this statistic provides additional information for you in determining the relative importance by reporting the average age of first exhibiting the particular behavior whether of each risk or protective factor. If present, a yellow diamond shows the it be using a particular drug or engaging in a particular behavior. The average comparison of the aggregate that is the next level down (usually district for a is based on only those students who reported the behavior. school report).How Students Get Alcohol and Where They Use It The questions ”How did 5. The following abbreviations are sometimes used in the tables and charts due you usually get alcohol?” and ”Where Did You Usually Drink it?” are used to to space constraints: measure this statistic by reporting the percentage of students for each method of acquiring alcohol and the locations where they used alcohol. ATOD stands for Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use. ASB stands for Antisocial Behaviors. 17
  17. 17. Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Grades 7-8 Lifetime Use Past 30 Days Heavy Use 40 30 20 10 Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11 0Percentages (%) Alcohol Marijuana Cigarettes Chewing Tobacco Prescription Drugs OTC Cold Medicine OTC Caffeine/Diet Pills Inhalants Cocaine Heroin Any Illicit Drug* Alcohol Marijuana Cigarettes Chewing Tobacco Prescription Drugs OTC Cold Medicine OTC Caffeine/Diet Pills Inhalants Cocaine Heroin Any Illicit Drug* Binge Drinking** Pack of Cigarettes*** *Any Illicit Drug - all drugs except for alcohol and tobacco **Binge Drinking - having five or more drinks in a row within the past two weeks. ***Pack of Cigarettes means smoking a pack or more per day. Figure 7: Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Grades 7-8 18
  18. 18. Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Grades 9-10 Lifetime Use Past 30 Days Heavy Use 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11 0Percentages (%) Alcohol Marijuana Cigarettes Chewing Tobacco Prescription Drugs OTC Cold Medicine OTC Caffeine/Diet Pills Inhalants Cocaine Heroin Any Illicit Drug* Alcohol Marijuana Cigarettes Chewing Tobacco Prescription Drugs OTC Cold Medicine OTC Caffeine/Diet Pills Inhalants Cocaine Heroin Any Illicit Drug* Binge Drinking** Pack of Cigarettes*** *Any Illicit Drug - all drugs except for alcohol and tobacco **Binge Drinking - having five or more drinks in a row within the past two weeks. ***Pack of Cigarettes means smoking a pack or more per day. Figure 8: Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Grades 9-10 19
  19. 19. Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Grades 11-12 Lifetime Use Past 30 Days Heavy Use 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11 0Percentages (%) Alcohol Marijuana Cigarettes Chewing Tobacco Prescription Drugs OTC Cold Medicine OTC Caffeine/Diet Pills Inhalants Cocaine Heroin Any Illicit Drug* Alcohol Marijuana Cigarettes Chewing Tobacco Prescription Drugs OTC Cold Medicine OTC Caffeine/Diet Pills Inhalants Cocaine Heroin Any Illicit Drug* Binge Drinking** Pack of Cigarettes*** *Any Illicit Drug - all drugs except for alcohol and tobacco **Binge Drinking - having five or more drinks in a row within the past two weeks. ***Pack of Cigarettes means smoking a pack or more per day. Figure 9: Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use - Grades 11-12 20
  20. 20. No Child Left Behind Profile - Grades 7-8 Avg. Age of First ATOD Avg. Age of First ASB 20 15 10 5 Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11 0Avg. Age of First Incidence Marijuana Cigarettes Alcohol Regular Alcohol Use School Suspension Been Arrested Carried a Gun Attacked to Harm Belonged to a Gang ATOD - Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use ASB - Antisocial Behavior Figure 10: No Child Left Behind Profile - Grades 7-8 21
  21. 21. No Child Left Behind Profile - Grades 9-10 Avg. Age of First ATOD Avg. Age of First ASB 20 15 10 5 Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11 0Avg. Age of First Incidence Marijuana Cigarettes Alcohol Regular Alcohol Use School Suspension Been Arrested Carried a Gun Attacked to Harm Belonged to a Gang ATOD - Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use ASB - Antisocial Behavior Figure 11: No Child Left Behind Profile - Grades 9-10 22
  22. 22. No Child Left Behind Profile - Grades 11-12 Avg. Age of First ATOD Avg. Age of First ASB 20 15 10 5 Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11 0Avg. Age of First Incidence Marijuana Cigarettes Alcohol Regular Alcohol Use School Suspension Been Arrested Carried a Gun Attacked to Harm Belonged to a Gang ATOD - Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Use ASB - Antisocial Behavior Figure 12: No Child Left Behind Profile - Grades 11-12 23
  23. 23. Percentages (%) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Did not drink alcohol in the past year 90 Bought it myself with a fake ID Bought it myself without a fake ID Someone I know age 21 or older Someone I know under age 21 My brother or sister Home with my parents permission Source of Alcohol Home without my parents permission Another relative A stranger bought it for me Took it from a store or shop Other Did not drink alcohol in the past year24 My home Someone elses home Open area like a park, etc. Sporting event or concert Restaurant, bar, or a nightclub Sources and Locations of Alcohol Use - Grades 7-8 Figure 13: Sources and Locations of Alcohol Use - Grades 7-8 Empty building or a construction site Location of Acohol Use Hotel/motel In a car At school Zone 1 2010-11 County 2010-11

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