Holbrook establishing arguments

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Holbrook establishing arguments

  1. 1. ESTABLISHING ARGUMENTS: RESEARCH AND EVIDENCE By Denise Holbrook
  2. 2. What types of evidence should be used to support your paper?
  3. 3. There are two types of evidence First hand Research  Research you have conducted yourself. Would include:      Interviews Experiments Surveys Personal Experience Anecdotes Secondhand Research  Research you are compiling from various texts. Includes:    Books Periodicals Web sites
  4. 4. Regardless of the source, the evidence must be credible! In other words, sources should be reliable, accurate, and trustworthy.
  5. 5. To determine if a source is credible ask yourself the following questions:
  6. 6. Who is the author?   Credible sources are written by respected authors in their fields of study. Responsible, credible authors cite sources so that the reader can check the accuracy of and support what they’ve written.  Citations are a good way to find more sources in your research.
  7. 7. How recent is the source?    Seeking recent sources is relative to your topic. Source on historical events may be decades old but can still provide accurate information. Topics such as technologies or fields undergoing rapid changes should be much more current.
  8. 8. What is the author’s purpose?     Take the author’s purpose or point of view in to consideration. Is the author being objective, neutral, or persuasive? Who is funding the research? A source with a specific point of view may still be credible but be aware that your sources don’t limit you research to one side of a debate.
  9. 9. What type of sources does your audience value?    When writing for a professional or academic audience peer-reviewed journals may be seen as the most credible source. When writing for peers in your hometown your audience may be more comfortable with mainstream sources such as Tim e or N ws we e k. e When writing for a younger audience sources found on the internet may be more accepted.
  10. 10. Be especially careful when evaluating Internet sources!   Never use websites where an author can not be determined unless associated with a reputable institution such as a university, credible media outlet, government program or department, or a well know non-government organization. Beware of Internet sources such as Wikip e d ia because any user can add or change content with out verification.

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