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The Greenest Museum On Earth   Teacher's Sheet With Key
The Greenest Museum On Earth   Teacher's Sheet With Key
The Greenest Museum On Earth   Teacher's Sheet With Key
The Greenest Museum On Earth   Teacher's Sheet With Key
The Greenest Museum On Earth   Teacher's Sheet With Key
The Greenest Museum On Earth   Teacher's Sheet With Key
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The Greenest Museum On Earth Teacher's Sheet With Key

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  • 1. Teacher’s Sheet THE GREENEST MUSEUM ON EARTH CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES PRE-VIEWING This video is about the building of the greenest museum in the world. It talks about sustainable architecture. In groups of five, answer these questions: 1. What kind of museum do you think it is? ( ) arts ( ) natural history ( ) collection 2. What do you think makes the museum green? WHILE-VIEWING Check the aspects which make this museum green: ( x ) reduction of energy consumption ( ) plumbing installations that harvest rain water ( x ) solar panels ( ) gray water systems to recycle waste water ( x ) recycled steel ( ) lumber harvested from sustainable-yield forests ( x ) recycled denim insulation ( x ) wood for cabinets comes from a local park ( ) Solar powered elevators ( x ) The public environment is naturally cooled
  • 2. VIDEO SCRIPT California Academy of Sciences The Greenest Museum on Earth ALEXIS -We are here at the brand new California Academy of Sciences building with Stephanie Stone. And I wanna know what makes this building more than just your average size museum. STEPHANIE- Well, for one thing, the architecture is pretty stunning. It was done by Renzo Piano. And it’s also been designed to be the greenest museum on Earth. Everything from solar panels on the roof to recycled denim insulation in the walls. Let’s start right here. Just behind me is the Rain Forests of the World Dome. This is a 90-foot-diameter glass dome that allows visitors to walk through four different rain forests. ALEXIS - What’s really fascinating about this to me is that it seems like an... like an incredible mix of the built environment and the natural environment. STEPHANIE - Yes. The way the exhibit works: You walk in on the first floor. You get on to this steel ramp and you wind your way up through the different levels of rain forests until you get to the top. These ramps that wind up their way through the dome are one of the big challenges in constructing the dome. As you can see, they have a lot of complex curves and the radius of the dome is constantly changing, so figuring out how to bend the steel for these ramps is a real challenge. We ended up going to a roller-coaster manufacturer to ask them to bend the steel for us. And all the steel in this building is recycled. A hundred percent of the steel is recycled steel. ALEXIS - So what are we seeing in this sort of space-age piazza that we are looking at? STEPHANIE - This is the central courtyard for the Academy. It’s also a crucial part of the natural ventilation scheme. You don’t have any air-conditioning on the public floor, so we rely on the natural environment around us to cool the space. So as cool air drains down the slopes of the hills on the living roof, it drops in here to the piazza. Then there are louvered windows all the way along the sides of the building that open to funnel that air out onto the exhibit floor. The glass that’s around the parameter at the top here is supported by this cable-net structure rather than by columns. Renzo Piano fought very strongly. He wanted this space to be an open space that wasn’t interrupted by columns, so he used this cable-net structure to support the glass and he said he drew his inspiration from a spider web; it uses the same principles of tension as a spider web. ALEXIS - I think I can see a little bit of the hills around here poppin’ up. Can you show us the living roof?
  • 3. STEPHANIE - Yeah, absolutely. Let’s just go upstairs and take a look. So we’re up here on the living roof of the Academy now. It’s planted with over 1.7 million native Californian plants. There are seven hills up on this roof, a reference to the Seven Hills of San Francisco. The two biggest hills: This one here houses the Rain Forest and the other big hill houses the Planetarium Dome. ALEXIS - We are here inside the Planetarium, which we have been assured will actually have seized by the time the place opens. It was difficult for the architect to incorporate this sort of really sciency dome into sort of his overall vision. What is this all about? STEPHANIE - Well, this Planetarium is actually the reason that we have hills up on our roof. The building itself is thirty-six feet tall in most parts of the building. This Planetarium Dome has to be much taller than that. So when Renzo was trying to figure out how to fit the building into the park seamlessly, he wanted the building to keep a low profile. Then of course the roof had to curve up to accommodate the dome of Morrison Planetarium, had to curve up again to accommodate the dome of the rain forest exhibit. So it’s really like we’ve taken a piece of the park, lifted it up and then as it settles down over the exhibit elements the roof takes the shape of those hills. ALEXIS - Hey, Stephanie, what are we looking at? What are these? STEPHANIE - Well, these are cabinets for our store and they are an example of the sustainable materials that we are using in the building, they are made up of cypress trees that have fallen down. ALEXIS - Where do you get like a bunch of cypress trees that have fallen down? STEPHANIE - We actually get them right in our backyard in Golden Gate Park. ALEXIS - So clearly this is still under construction, but what are you actually building? STEPHANIE - African Hall is twenty-one dioramas and they are recreated from the originals, the same taxidermy animals that were there back in the 1930’s. But we’ve added a few little surprises. We’ve added some live animals into some of the dioramas; we’ve added some new technology. You’ll see at the end of the hallway there’s a colony of African penguins which are sure to be favorites here. ALEXIS - We’re underneath the Rain Forest Dome, inside a tube where you can kind of look up and see what’s supposed to be a model of the Amazonian Rain Forest? STEPHANIE - Exactly! ALEXIS - Uh, how do say it, it kind of reminds me of a hotel in Dubai that has this huge underwater sort of restaurant.
  • 4. STEPHANIE - Yeah, you know, that hotel was actually a problem for us as we were constructing this building because there are only two companies in the world that make acrylic for aquariums like this. That hotel used so much acrylic that there was a backlog on the global orders of acrylic. ALEXIS - So how thick are we talking? I mean, is it like ... like... STEPHANIE - It depends on the window. This one is only about four inches thick here, but the acrylic over on the other side of the elevator is seventeen inches thick. The reason that this one doesn’t have to be as thick is that the curvature of the tunnel diffuses the pressure. ALEXIS - I think some of the fish are kind of scary looking... STEPHANIE - Those little guys are actually piranhas. ALEXIS - Really? STEPHANIE - But they are vegetarian piranhas though. They are not very menacing. ALEXIS - It’s nice, huh? STEPHANIE - Yeah! POST-VIEWING In pairs, think about the two places where you probably spend most of your time: home, working place, for example. What aspects of these places could conceivably - without overwhelming investment or inconvenience – be made more “green”? Discuss these “green” living and/or work-place alternatives and share your list with the whole group.
  • 5. Student’s Sheet THE GREENEST MUSEUM ON EARTH CALIFORNIA ACADEMY OF SCIENCES PRE-VIEWING This video is about the building of the greenest museum in the world. It talks about sustainable architecture. In groups of five, answer these questions: 3. What kind of museum do you think it is? ( ) arts ( ) natural history ( ) collection 4. What do you think makes the museum green? WHILE-VIEWING Check the aspects which make this museum green: ( ) reduction of energy consumption ( ) plumbing installations that harvest rain water ( ) solar panels ( ) gray water systems to recycle waste water ( ) recycled steel ( ) lumber harvested from sustainable-yield forests ( ) recycled denim insulation ( ) wood for cabinets comes from a local park ( ) Solar powered elevators ( ) The public environment is naturally cooled
  • 6. POST-VIEWING In pairs, think about the two places where you probably spend most of your time: home, working place, for example. What aspects of these places could conceivably - without overwhelming investment or inconvenience – be made more “green”? Discuss these “green” living and/or work-place alternatives and share your list with the whole group.

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