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How-to-Guide - Social CRM Best Practices
 

How-to-Guide - Social CRM Best Practices

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Social media are now part of every business and consumer activity, joining telephone, Web, broadcast, and face-to-face interactions as primary communication channels. This means that all marketing, ...

Social media are now part of every business and consumer activity, joining telephone, Web, broadcast, and face-to-face interactions as primary communication channels. This means that all marketing, sales, and service organizations should include social media as part of their basic activities. Yet social media are still new enough that many organizations are still struggling to learn how to use them, while others are learning how to use them most effectively.

This How-to-Guide provides an overview of social media applications and emerging best practices for deploying social media at your company.

Read this 8-page guide to learn:

- The definition of social customer relationship management (CRM)
- The main functions needed for social CRM
- The vendor landscape for social CRM
- Social CRM best practices

To obtain this document, visit us at http://www.demandmetric.com/register

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How-to-Guide - Social CRM Best Practices How-to-Guide - Social CRM Best Practices Document Transcript

  • How-­‐To  Guide       Social  CRM  Best  Practices     By  David  Raab,  CEO  at  Raab  Associates   November  2013         EXECUTIVE  SUMMARY   Social  media  are  now  part  of  every  business  and  consumer  activity,  joining   telephone,  Web,  broadcast,  and  face-­to-­face  interactions  as  primary   communication  channels.    This  means  that  all  marketing,  sales,  and  service   organizations  should  include  social  media  as  part  of  their  basic  activities.     Yet  social  media  are  still  new  enough  that  many  organizations  are  still   struggling  to  learn  how  to  use  them,  while  others  are  learning  how  to  use   them  most  effectively.      This  paper  provides  an  overview  of  social  media   applications  and  emerging  best  practices  for  deploying  social  media  at  your   company.     WHAT  IS  SOCIAL  CRM?   Social  media  includes  every  type  of  content  that  is  generated  by  or  shared   with  individual  consumers  in  a  public  or  group  setting.    This  includes   social  networks  such  as  Facebook,  LinkedIn  or  Twitter,  where  people   connect  each  other  directly  and  have  at  least  some  control  over  what   information  is  shared  with  the  public.    It  also  includes  more  open  forms   such  as  blogs,  forums,  and  user-­written  reviews,  even  though  many  of  these   are  hosted  on  corporate  Web  sites.    Content  sharing  sites  such  as  Reddit,   StumbleUpon,  and  Pinterest  are  yet  another  version.    Social  media   tracking  systems  now  often  extend  to  traditional  media,  such  as  the  online   versions  of  newspapers,  magazines,  radio,  and  television,  less  because  those   are  truly  social  than  because  the  technologies  to  monitor  both  types  of   content  are  so  similar.     But  even  though  social  media  are  now  as  common  as  other   communication  channels,  they  play  a  different  role.      Specifically,  they   allow  companies  to  initiate  relationships  with  people  who  are  otherwise   ©  2013  Demand  Metric  Research  Corporation.    All  Rights  Reserved.  
  • How-­‐To  Guide   inaccessible,  because  they  are  not  paying  attention  to  conventional  mass   media  and  are  not  responsive  to  untargeted  direct  messages  such  as  bulk   emails.    Social  media  can  also  provide  an  opportunity  to  deepen  those   relationships  through  one-­on-­one  interactions,  while  at  the  same  time   letting  observers  see  how  a  company  treats  its  customers.    Finally,  and   perhaps  most  important,  social  media  allow  consumers  to  share  their  own   experiences  with  a  company,  providing  a  more  credible  source  of   information  than  the  company  itself.     These  benefits  are  accompanied  by  risks.    Poorly  executed  communications   can  annoy  potential  customers,  driving  them  away  from  relationships   instead  of  towards  them.    Public  visibility  of  formerly  private  transactions   can  illustrate  problems  with  products  and  poor  treatment  of  existing   customers.    Consumer  reviews  can  be  negative  as  well  as  positive,  and  even   enthusiastic  advocates  can  provide  incorrect  information  about  products  or   pricing.     This  combination  of  threats  and  opportunities  means  that  no  company   today  can  afford  a  hands-­off  attitude  towards  social  media  management.     Prospects  and  customers  will  be  discussing  you  in  social  media  at  every   stage  in  the  marketing,  sales  and  service  process,  so  the  only  choice  you    try  to  shape  it,  or  will   ignore  it  and  let  it  be  shaped  by  others.      And  that  is  really  no  choice  at  all.     SOCIAL  CRM  FUNCTIONS   Every  customer-­facing  department  within  your  organization  can  make  some   use  of  social  media.    Here  is  a  look  at  the  main  functions  needed  for  social   customer  relationship  management:     Monitoring:    Finding  relevant  conversations  is  the  first  step  in   working  with  social  media.    Monitoring  systems  listen  in  social   channels  for  company  or  product  names,  product  categories,  or   buyer  needs.    This  listening  is  usually  done  through  parsing  for   simple  keywords,  but  may  also  be  further  refined  through  rules  that   filter  out  irrelevant  posts  and  classify  the  relevant  ones  based  on   topic,  urgency,  sentiment,  author,  and  other  attributes.      Some   monitoring  systems  specialize  in  a  single  source,  such  as  Twitter,  or   single  type  of  activity,  such  as  comments  on  review  sites.    Others   scan  social  networks,  blogs,  Web  sites,  discussion  groups,  or   traditional  media.    Coverage  may  be  limited  to  text,  video,  images,   or  sound,  or  may  cover  several  of  those.      There  are  often  limits   ©  2013  Demand  Metric  Research  Corporation.    All  Rights  Reserved.  
  • How-­‐To  Guide   based  on  language  or  geographic  region.    Coverage  may  include   previous  conversations  or  be  limited  to  current  streams.    Systems   that  go  beyond  keywords  and  rules  may  apply  natural  language   processing  to  extract  concepts,  sentiments,  intentions,  or  problems;   the  natural  language  systems  themselves  vary  in  their  techniques,   accuracy,  and  ability  to  learn  from  past  mistakes.    Analytics  may  be   limited  to  simple  mention  counts  or  show  results  and  trends  for   individual  terms  and  broad  topics;  break  these  down  by  sources,       Responding:    Some  monitoring  systems  are  simply  designed  to  find   and  tabulate  mentions.    This  is  especially  true  for  systems  that   specialize  in  monitoring  media  outlets.    But  customer  service   departments  also  want  to  respond  to  at  least  some  items,  and   marketing  and  sales  often  do  as  well.  Response-­related  functions   include  presenting  messages  from  different  sources  in  a  unified   stream;  classifying,  prioritizing  and  routing  messages  based  on  their   nature;  issuing  alerts  for  urgent  situations;  converting  messages  to   cases  that  can  be  managed  over  time;  maintaining  a  library  of  pre-­ approved  responses;  and  recommending  responses  based  on  rules   or  language  interpretation.      Some  systems  provide  auto-­response   and  auto-­follow  features,  although  these  must  be  deployed  carefully   mechanically.           To  read  the  rest  of  this  How-­to  Guide,  become  a  Demand  Metric  member  today!   ©  2013  Demand  Metric  Research  Corporation.    All  Rights  Reserved.