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Building a WordPress Powered Website
 

Building a WordPress Powered Website

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As presented to the 2009 Nonprofit Bar Camp on November 14th in Austin, Texas, this presentation outlines building a WordPress powered Website. WordPress can be used as a feature rich CMS to power ...

As presented to the 2009 Nonprofit Bar Camp on November 14th in Austin, Texas, this presentation outlines building a WordPress powered Website. WordPress can be used as a feature rich CMS to power your entire Website. And, since it has built in RSS technology and is widgetized, it can help you build both a search engine and social media optimized Website.

This presentation demonstrates example WordPress powered Websites, the anatomy of a WordPress site, and outlines a best-practice plan for you to follow to build your own WordPress powered Website.

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    Building a WordPress Powered Website Building a WordPress Powered Website Presentation Transcript

    • Building a WordPress Powered Website... Copyright 2009, Deltina Hay
    • With Deltina Hay of Dalton Publishing, Social Media Power, and PlumbSocial.com... Author of A Survival Guide to Social Media and Web 2.0 Optimization As presented for the Nonprofit Bar Camp on November 14, 2009 in Austin, Texas.
    • What is WordPress?
      • A blogging platform
      • A CMS (content management system)
        • A platform for building robust Websites
        • Usually programmed in php and use MySQL databases
        • Usually open source, so many enhancements and support available, and easily customized
      • Don't confuse WordPress.org with WordPress.com
    • Why use WordPress to power your Website?
      • Easy to set up and maintain
      • Uses RSS technology so integrates easily with the rest of the Social Web
      • Widgetized, so easy to add widgets and badges from other Websites
      • Regular upgrades and security releases
      • Good support forums and network
      • Free!
      • Many themes and plugins available...
    • What are plugins?
      • Enhancements and add ons to WordPress
      • Since WordPress is open source, there are many developers creating plugins
      • Easy to install and set up
      • As simple as a comment spam filter
      • As complicated as a full-featured shopping cart...
    • What are plugins?
    • What are themes?
      • Templates that change the look and feel of a WordPress site
      • Very easy to install
      • Again, open source, so there are many free themes available
      • Most are easy to customize with new colors, headers, etc...
    • What are themes?
    • What are themes?
    • Diversity of WordPress powered Websites...
      • One reason some decide not to use a CMS is that they are concerned their site may look too “templated”
      • This is the case for some CMSs – but not for WordPress
      • The following slides depict a collection of sites that were built using WordPress as a CMS...
    • Diversity of WordPress powered Websites...
    • Diversity of WordPress powered Websites...
    • Diversity of WordPress powered Websites...
    • Diversity of WordPress powered Websites...
    • Diversity of WordPress powered Websites...
    • Diversity of WordPress powered Websites...
    • Anatomy of a WordPress Website:
      • Header
      • Navigation
      • Main body area
      • Sidebars
      • Footer
      • Sidebar widgets
      • Static pages
    • Anatomy of a WordPress Website... (note header and footer on this one, along with sidebars)
    • Anatomy of a WordPress Website... (static page that has no sidebars)
    • Anatomy of a WordPress Website... (note that sidebars to not have to be on the “side” - there are three on the bottom here)
    • Anatomy of a WordPress Website... (this one has a static home page - as opposed to blog posts on the home page)
    • Anatomy of a WordPress Website... (blog page with a different sidebar as the static pages)
    • Anatomy of a WordPress Website... (site with blog as home page)
    • Anatomy of a WordPress Website... (static page)
    • Anatomy of a WordPress Website... (the header and footer are only images – and the navigation and sidebar are combined – only thing that changes is the main body area of each page)
    • Setting up a WordPress Website:
      • Download and install
        • Make sure you install in your root folder and not in a directory
        • Need some knowledge of how to install php on your server and how to install MySQL and create databases and tables
        • You can get help from your host or from the WordPress forums
      • Make some important initial settings (permalink structure, static home page, comment approvals, security settings, etc.)
      • Plan the site (what functionalities does it need)
      • Choose and customize a theme based on your plan
      • Choose, install, and set up plugins to accomplish functionalities (including essential plugins for anti-spam, security, and SEO)
      • Set up sidebars (place standard and custom widgets)
      • Build static pages and populate blog
    • Planning your WordPress site:
      • List the features you want (don't hold back)
        • RSS feed (blog) subscription options
        • Ways for others to share your site (like to social bookmarking sites)
        • Widgets from other social sites like Facebook and Twitter
        • Image/Video Galleries
        • Shopping cart or donation features
        • Event listings or calendar widgets
        • Submission forms
        • Surveys or polls
        • Imported feeds from other sites
        • And so forth...
    • Choosing a theme:
      • Choose your theme once you know the features you want, not before...
      • Make certain is has one more sidebar than you think you need (easier to delete than to add)
      • Is typically easy to change color schemes, headers, fonts and such – so choose based on look and feel
    • Choosing a theme:
    • Choosing a theme:
    • Choosing a theme:
    • Choosing Plugins:
      • Choose plugins to accomplish the functionalities in your plan
      • Try not to install plugins “just because they are cool” - sometimes it is best to use existing functionality
      • Pay attention to the ratings, how many times a plugin has been downloaded, and that it has been tested for the latest version of WordPress
      • Go to the plugin & author's Website to make sure the plugin is being supported
      • A good rule of thumb when setting up a plugin is that if you can't do it in two tries, find another plugin to do the job (they should be pretty straightforward to set up)
    • Choosing plugins:
    • Choosing plugins:
    • Choosing plugins:
    • A look at the WordPress Backend (dashboard):
    • A look at the WordPress Backend (adding posts – adding pages is the same):
    • A look at the WordPress Backend (can change themes with one click, add them and customize them):
    • A look at the WordPress Backend (can maintain, add, and customize plugins):
    • A look at the WordPress Backend (once a plugin is installed, you can maintain its settings here – where applicable):
    • A look at the WordPress Backend (this is where you create and place your sidebar widgets):
    • A look at the WordPress Backend (shows the resulting sidebars from the previous slide):
    • Upkeep and Security of Your WordPress Website:
      • Keep blog posts current
      • Always update to latest version of WordPress and plugins:
        • One-click upgrade with latest WordPress versions
        • Be careful if you have customized the code
        • Always back-up before an upgrade
      • Essential plugins:
        • Spam filter (Akismet)
        • Security plugins
        • SEO plugin
    • Optimizing Your WordPress Website:
      • Optimize blog by:
        • Using good keyterms in posts, as categories and tags
        • Burning your feed to FeedBurner.com
        • Adding to many blog directories
      • Optimize Website by:
        • Using (to its fullest) the latest version of a good SEO plugin
        • Making it easy for others to share, interact, and collaborate using tools like AddtoAny.com
        • Taking advantage of how your site can integrate with the rest of the Social Web...(that is a whole different session)
    • Finding Resources:
      • WordPress.org
        • Documentation and tutorials
        • Links to other resources
        • Links to WordPress-friendly hosts
    • Open Source “Netiquette:”
      • Search forums thoroughly before posting a question
      • Give back:
        • Donate to plugins you use regularly
        • Share your new-found knowledge on the forums
      • Never remove the “Powered by WordPress” statement and link from the footer of your site. It is one of the only license requirements for using this free software.
    • Questions... ?
    • Thank you for participating!
      • Buy the book at these trusted sources:
        • Barnes & Noble
        • Amazon
        • Indiebound
        • BookPeople (in Austin)
      • Upcoming Webinars and workshops:
          • Visit SocialMediaPower.com for info...
      • Deltina Hay
        • @socialmediapwr & @deltina
        • SocialMediaPower.com & PlumbSocial.com
        • [email_address]
    •