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Deltek Insight 2012: PM Tools for Success. A Project Manager's Guide for Effective Management, Planning and Communication
 

Deltek Insight 2012: PM Tools for Success. A Project Manager's Guide for Effective Management, Planning and Communication

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Learn how to utilize Vision's planning, reporting, accounting, info center and time management functionality for effective project management. This session will discuss the basic elements of project ...

Learn how to utilize Vision's planning, reporting, accounting, info center and time management functionality for effective project management. This session will discuss the basic elements of project management, the role of project management in project finances, and how Vision can improve Project Manager's management, planning and communications. Intermediate Level.

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  • Welcome to Project Management Tools for Success. Our agenda for this morning is to look at project management and what some of its basic elements are. Then, for each element, we’ll look at how Vision can support it and what tools are available to increase project managers’ effectiveness and efficiency.So just what do we mean by project management?
  • First, we are always looking at requirements – what our clients’ and teams’ needs are. Then, we translate those needs into objectives and break them down into steps. We bring the important elements of management including quality, scope, time and cost into balance to achieve stakeholder expectations and goals. “Some of the important elements of project management we’ll be . . .”
  • Some of the important elements of project management we’ll be focusing on are: Time, which includes schedules and managing labor. Cost, which includes budgets, both internal and client budgets. Human Resources, including team development and selection. Communication, both internal and external. Risk identification and mitigation. Overall quality of deliverables and the scope of work.We’ll talk about each one individually and then look at the tools Vision has to help us manage them.Time
  • Time is one of the elements we have the most control over.“By the time we start a project . . .”
  • By the time we start a project, many of the other elements of project management are already fixed. Overhead costs are fixed, individual labor costs are fixed, the risks are already being taken, and our team has been assigned. What do we have control over? TIME! As we accurately allocate team members’ time by phases and deliverables, and track changes as they occur, we have the largest influence over the success of a project and its profitability. During the project, as we keep our plans current, we get back the information we need to stay on track.What does Vision offer for time management?
  • Let’s take a look.
  • Here are some of the ways to measure and allocate time – and thereby help track our fee and profits. I’ve highlighted the ones I often use and will talk about and how Vision helps.Top Down
  • The top down method works when the fee is fixed or already a given. For whatever reason, you’re given a fee and have to produce the scope of work within it with a profit left over. Perhaps the fee is derived from a cost per square foot or a percentage of construction. The fee is divided into phases (or labor codes) and spread over the time allocated to produce the deliverables. The initial estimate probably won’t match the actual time needed, so the plan will need to be updated regularly as the project unfolds. “Here’s an example . . .”
  • Here is an example of a fee breakdown directly from a proposal. Let’s look at how Vision helps us allocate these fees among standard phases – SD, DD, CD and CA.Labor Tab
  • On the labor tab, first, on the right side, we prepare the work breakdown structure and put in our resources (team members) for each phase. Second, we establish the dates as accurately as possible for each phase. Third, on the right side of the grid, in the compensation column, we enter the amount of fee for each phase from the proposal where the arrows point. Vision automatically totals the fee at the top of the column and spreads the hours for each team member by the phase dates you’ve already set up. (In this example all of the project phases are in the plan, but there are times that each phase has its own plan. These plans can then roll up to the main project number.)Labor Grid
  • When you look across the labor grid where the circled entry is, you’ll see that Vision’s allocation results in fractions of hours because it is spread evenly. I like to go back and round these to whole hours, or half days or some block of time that makes sense for the project and the team member. This is also good thinking time for me because as I’m doing this, I can review what each person will be doing during each phase and make adjustments as I go. Grid with whole hours
  • This is what the labor grid looks like after I’ve tweaked the hours. This process also lets me think about how reasonable it is to get the task done in that amount of time and identify problems and choke points. Now is a good time to review the entire labor plan with the team for their input and for them to see exactly what needs to be done, by when, in order for the project to be successful. As a group we can discuss how to handle possible problems. I should mention that I have this plan set up by weeks, but you can set it up by months or quarters, as well – whatever works best for your planning or the size of the project.Now, let’s look at another method. (Analogous)
  • The analogous method is a comparison of the scope and fee to similar projects. Many times, when we need to establish a fee for a new project or proposal, we identify a similar project recently done and use that fee. This is good to the extent that the project you’re using as a comparison was actually successful and made a profit. If not, you could be repeating a mistake. Vision can help make this comparison. Go to project review from the applications menu and select the projects you want to compare. I like to pull them up side by side like this and look at the data. In this example, there are two different projects for the same client with similar scopes of work. Comparing the profit/variance amounts and percentages reveals that they are both almost 95% complete and are almost breaking even. When the client asked for us to submit a proposal for a third project, we were able to successfully increase our fee enough to make a profit. Without this data, our client would have been in a strong position to insist we do the third project for the same fee as the first two. We were able to demonstrate that even though we believed we worked as efficiently as possible, we needed more fee to produce the quality project desired. (Note that you can make this comparison via summary tab, too.)Proportion
  • Another way to evaluate or allocate time is the proportion method. It can be applied a couple of ways. In the way shown here, the time is divided by the percent of effort various disciplines will provide. This is usually done while the fee is being calculated before it is even submitted in the proposal. A plan is then prepared for each discipline using their percentage.By phase
  • Another proportion method is one we use commonly and almost instinctively. The time allocation is apportioned for each phase of the work. We can either establish these amounts by historical records, by standard definitions or by client expectations or directives from their RFP. Regardless, Vision makes it easy to allocate percentages as we’ll see in the next example.Labor grid
  • After setting up the work breakdown structure, assigning team members and establishing start and finish dates for the phases, we take the total number of hours available and put the appropriate percentage in the grid at each phase as shown by the arrows. Vision automatically spreads the hours equally among team members and equally in the labor grid across the start and stop dates for each phase. You can then adjust them where the arrows indicate for those working full time on the project, for example, and those working only part time in a support or specialized role. Bottom up
  • Now let’s look at the bottom up method. Here we build the total time required for each phase by figuring how much time is needed to achieve each milestone. A helpful guideline is the PMBOK 8/80 Rule. PMBOK is Project Management Book of Knowledge published by PMI (Project Management Institute). The Rule says the no work package should be less than 8 hours, or one day, and no package should be more than 80 hours, or two weeks. This helps us to think about the time needed for each task and deliverable, by person, by day and by week.Labor grid
  • To build the time, again, we start with the work breakdown structure, the team members and the start and stop dates for each phase as circled.Allocate hours
  • Then, depending on the size of the project, we allocate hours to each person in multiples of days and weeks. In this example, the project is small and can be thought of by phase.Roll up to total hours
  • We proceed with each phase until we have allocatedthe total hours to complete each phase and the entire project. You’ll notice that the total planned bill fee is a little over $160K. If we think this is fair and the client is willing to pay us this amount, we’re all set and in pretty good shape. If, on the other hand, we believe we’ll never get this much fee, we’ll need to adjust the hours in the grid to reduce the planned amount of labor. If you remember, in the top down example, we had a fee of $140K. That was for the same project. Let’s look again at that allocation.
  • This is the actual fee for the project, but this might also represent the max amount the client indicated they would pay and you’ve agreed to take the project for that amount. Or, you have enough information about the market to know that this is a fair fee for the work and you won’t be considered if you go in higher. So, let’s go back to our bottom up labor plan.
  • Our bottom up planning gave us a fee of $161K. You can adjust the total hours for each phase (circled numbers) to lower the planned bill amount. (When you change the hours at the circled areas, Vision automatically adjusts the hours for each person and in the labor grid proportionately to the original amounts you had.)During this process, it’s good to remember that billing rates have profit already built in. You should know how much that profit is, so if your Planned Bill winds up a little over the target fee, you can calculate how much less profit you would make using the new planned hours. (Note that if this is an hourly fee instead of a lump sum (or fixed fee), you can use the planned cost column on the right side times the target multiplier to get a more accurate picture of the total fee required.)Compare Planned Bill to compensation
  • By entering the amount of fee from the proposal on the right side of the grid in the compensation column, we can compare our Planned Bill to the compensation we know we’re going to get. Now we can play with the planned hours to bring down the fee. As you do this, Vision automatically totals the fee at the top of the column and spreads the hours for each team member by the phase dates. Remember, billing rates already have profit built in, so if you know this percentage, you can plan for a little less profit. This allows team members more time.Project Schedule
  • Another project management activity that Vision can help us with is project schedules. From the labor tab, complete the work breakdown structure and the team members. Adjust the start and complete dates for each phase. TIP: when you’re adjusting the dates for a phase, you can change the dates for the phase where they’re shown circled, then right click on the phase and select “match children” and all of the dates below for that phase will change. But, if you want, you can have different start and stop dates for each team member.(BTW, Vision also has “project restrictions” that can be enabled to prevent people from charging , or entering on their timesheets anything outside what is planned. At RTKL, only our project accountants have access to these restrictions, and we use them all.)Once you have these dates planned, it is easy to run a report, for example Resource Planned and Actuals, as in the next slide.
  • This report shows each team member’s planned hours by week that you can e-mail to team members. Also, each team member can find their planned hours via their timesheet.Another report is Labor Summary
  • So far, we’ve looked at time planning and allocation in the future. Vision is also where to go to find time already spent. I’m sure you’re all familiar with the Labor Summary report which you get from Reports on the Applications Menu. Here you can see that the circled numbers are Current Hours, Current Billing, JTD hours and % Complete (or expended). It is shown by phase and for the entire project. You can click on any of the blue numbers to drill down for detail. Labor Detail Report
  • And here is the Labor Detail. You’ll notice here that under each entry, there is a comment. At RTKL, via the “project restrictions”, we require team members to post comments for each entry on their timesheets. This is a good practice that helps PMs see what the time spent was for. As months go by on a project, it is almost impossible for team members to remember what they did on June 17, for example, but when comments are entered, it is easier to help reconstruct the effort if you need to justify labor. Resource utilization module
  • One of my favorite tools is the Resource Utilization Module. This is an interactive tool that lets you see the projects and hours that each team member is scheduled for. The module can be set up for a studio, for an office or for an entire firm. How you use it will depend on how you plan and manage your resources. In our office, resources, or team members, are shared across four studios, so we select all the team members in those studios. If resources are never or rarely shared outside a studio, then it would be set up for a single studio. In an office, where resource planning is done by one person or one group of people for the entire work force, then it would be set up for the entire office. There are three colors that vision automatically shows. Green means the person is scheduled correctly (within 20% of the target of 40 hours per week). Note that you can set the target tighter than 20% if desired. Blue means that the person is under utilized, and red means the person has been scheduled more than 20% over the target. Setting up the module
  • To set up the module, go to the Applications Menu and select Resource Utilization. Select the date range at the top and the employees to be included. You can create saved searches.On the options tab, you can sort employees alphabetically or from least utilized to most, or vice versa. (During a staffing meeting, I will pull up this module and look at it in all three formats.)Once you have the studio or office set up, you can drill down as in the next slide.
  • By drilling down (clicking on the plus signs), you can see the hours each person is scheduled for each project. The module is interactive allowing you to adjust the hours and balance them right here, as needed, for each project. In this case, Maria is only scheduled for 37 hours for the week shown and would be available for 3. You can add them right here. In the next week, she is schedule for 52 hours, but 16 of them are on a proposed project that may not happen. The following week, she is only scheduled half-time. The module helps you manage each person down to the hours per project level. Since this module is interactive, in our firm, only one person in each office has access to this tool. This is because if you make a change to a person’s hours here and save it, it also changes the hours in the actual project plan. It is possible to create confusion if this is not handled with the full knowledge and participation of each project manager.Another tool: Labor Resources, Planned and Actual
  • Another favorite tool of mine is the Labor Resource Planned and Actuals report because it can be scheduled to be sent out automatically. It is another way of looking at the same information as the Resource Utilization Module, but shows the time allocation by project, rather than by team member. This report is not interactive like the Resource Utilization Module, but is very helpful during project manager planning meetings as a check list of each project and its time and labor requirements.Earlier, we said we would review Vision’s contributions to the Time, Cost, HR, Communication, Risk and Quality aspects of project management. So now, let’s shift our attention to Cost.
  • What we have been looking at with time directly impacts cost. As project managers, we handle costs and budgets for both our firms and our clients.Internal costs
  • I’d like to focus on internal costs and how we either manage or influence them within our firms. These costs include direct labor, overhead and expenses, both direct and reimbursable.Vision tools
  • What are some of the tools Vision has to help manage costs?Project record
  • For an easy way to look at all project related costs, go to Projects under Info Center on the applications menu. You will get a summary of the complete project record. The tabs we have include Accounting, Billing, Budget & Revenue, Collections Data among others. A feature I use regularly is the Budget & Revenue tab.
  • By selecting Budget & Revenue, you can see the percent complete for labor, expenses and the overall percent complete. This is a good measure of fee against where you are relative to deliverables.I also often use the Project Review which is shown at the top with an arrow. When you select this, the screen shows a summary of labor, overhead and expenses.“Another way to get to Project Review . . .”
  • Another way to get to Project Review easily is to right click on the box next to a phase or project name and select Project Review. The dialog box will appear. Select Project Review at the bottom of the dialog box.Project Review screen
  • When Project Review comes up you can see the data on the General tab or the Accounts Receivable tab.General tab
  • This is the General tab screen showing a cost analysis of fees, labor, overhead, expenses and variances. Caps on reimbursables, if any, are shown as well as the total hours spent to date. At the bottom is the overall percent complete. We’ll touch on the Accounts Receivable tab later as we discuss risks and payment.Analysis tab (of the project plan)
  • You can also get a snap shot of where you stand for planned hours from the analysis tab in the project plan. If your plan is actualized, i.e., the actuals and planned JTD hours match, then the analysis tab can let you know % completes for labor. If you’re tracking direct expenses and they’re accurately listed in the grid as to when they’ll be incurred, their % completes are shown accurately – as is the overall % complete for the project.Good comparative information is shown on the Summary Tab.
  • Here, on the Summary tab of the project plan, we see a more complete breakdown of planned and actual costs, past, present and future. At the bottom of this page, there is a cost summary. This is a good place to keep your eye on and monitor the EAC (estimate at completion). The EAC is like a magic crystal ball which tells you where you will be at the end of the project given your JTD labor (past) and your planned labor (future).Consultant fee tracking
  • Consultant fees are also costs that we want to track carefully, especially if they are direct consultants, i.e., included in our fee and paid from our fee. At RTKL we set up direct consultant fees on a separate project plan since this revenue needs to be tracked and recognized on a different schedule than our own fee. This is easily done on the consultant tab. In this example, each consultant is listed and their fee is entered. If the consultant’s work will parallel our own, the dates will follow the project dates. But, if a consultant’s work will be done at the beginning of the project or during the design phase, for example, then you can adjust the dates to match their involvement and deliverables. There’s another advantage to tracking consultants in this manner, as we see in the grid on the next slide.
  • We can enter consultants’ fees broken down as to when they are expected to hit the project. This alerts accounting in their preparation of billing and helps them verify consultant expenses as invoices are received and costs are incurred.Track direct expenses
  • We can track direct expenses in the same manner. Again, direct expenses are those that are included in our fee and paid from it. So we want to pay particular attention to them – more so than reimbursable expenses, which “are what they are” and are invoiced as they are incurred in addition to the fee. On the expense tab, enter all the direct expenses that are included in the contract. By default, Vision will spread the costs evenly over the dates you’ve entered. Or, if you know when they will hit the project, you can enter them on the dates in the grid so you can track when they’ll be incurred and when they’ll have to be paid. Human Resources
  • Let’s turn our attention to people and our team.Aspects of HR
  • HR is a huge arena encompassing everything from recruiting and finding talent, to training and investing in them to handling their career development. As project managers, we often work hand in hand with HR as our teams evolve, grow and match project needs. We need to plan how we use talent, we need to bring the right people together for the project to positively influence the outcome.Vision tools
  • Vision offers many ways to help manage our teams.Resource search
  • The first, and most obvious, is scheduling people in the labor grid. But, perhaps you’re looking for a specific skill or discipline. If you right click in the box to the left of a resource name, you can select “Resource Search”. When you do, you will get a dialog box.
  • The dialog box will allow you to search for a specific skill. In the box near the center of the page,under skill, enter what you are looking for and be sure to check the “Required Skill” box to the right.Filling out the search
  • First, enter a job description you’re looking for. When I enter Environmental Graphic Designer in the Skill dialog box and, second, check the “Skill Required” box, I can click the Search button at the top where the number three is pointing. Then, in the Result box at the bottom (at number four), all eleven of the graphics designers in our firm are shown. Then, I can highlight one, click on the Select button (at number 5) at the bottom and that person will appear in the grid in my project plan.Utilization
  • Another excellent tool that helps when you’re selecting team members for a project is “Utilization”. Enter the name of the team member on the labor grid, then right click and select “Utilization”. This box appears showing the Utilization Ratio of the team member and a list of all the projects they are scheduled for. It shows the percentage of their time for each project. You can look at this daily, weekly, monthly or by another time frame by selecting the scale in the upper left and selecting “Apply” to change the scale. You can do the same with the Display Options, as well. Notice that at the bottom, the total utilization percent is shown. If the utilization is 95% or greater, the color turns red.We’ve looked at Time, Cost and Human Resources. Now, let’s look at Communication.
  • Communication is one of the most important elements of project management. Vision has features that can help in both internal, and external communication with our clients. I have one example of each.Internal
  • For internal communication, RTKL has used Vision to create Project Comments. We access it from the Info Center in the applications menu. It is a list of all projects sorted by project manager and project control manager. (In our firm there is one PCM in each office who oversees the use of Vision.) Only project control managers and finance personnel have access to it. By clicking on the job number, a comments field comes up.Project Comments screen
  • Each month and at a minimum each quarter, project control managers meet with each project manager to review the status of their projects. This meeting covers schedule, deliverables, finances, add services, ARs, percentage completion – anything that pertains to managing and successful completion of the project.In the comments field where the red oval is, project control managers enter a summary of the status of the project on a monthly basis. Special risks are noted and troubled projects can be tracked more closely to either provide additional support to the project manager or to make provisions for losses. After the comments are written, you click “Add Comments” at the bottom of the screen and the comment appears sequentially on the right, by date. Finance and accounting personnel can get a summary of these comments under Projects in the Info Center. Project Comments summary
  • This is a summary of the comments in Projects accessed from the Info Center. Financial personnel can review the comments in this window and scan for Risk issues that have been flagged, the status of add services, a major change in EAC, ARs, general comments or confidential comments. They can click on any blue underlined entry for the complete text. This can be a real time-saver in looking for specific information about projects.External
  • An example of a tool for external communication is access to invoices. How often do we need to follow up on invoices? I love that we can pull up an invoice that may be past due and e-mail it to our client’s accounts payable as a follow up to a phone call. It is a real time saver and can be done each and every time that pesky invoice seems to get lost.The next project management element supported by Vision is oversight of Risk
  • Risk is an inherent part of our profession and we are always looking to identify it and mitigate it. List of risks
  • Here are some of the risks we face on our projects. They include Terms and Conditions, or lack of them, in our proposals and contracts, and not communicating adequately either with our team or with our client.Certainly not getting paid is a risk. Potentially costly risks are our own errors and omission on documents in in our processes and, of course, construction defects of various kinds for various reasons. Fortunately, Vision has features to help us manage this risk.Tools in Vision that address Risk
  • We can call up accurate and current information about contracts, invoices, payments and communicate that information directly through Vision.GNG
  • But first, I’d like to share an application that RTKL created in Vision to help assess risk before we even prepare a proposal. We call it Go-No-Go and it is accessed through the Info Center. The purpose of this application is to determine how much time and effort we want to spend pursuing a new business opportunity. The GNG process helps us evaluate how a particular project opportunity fits into our strategic business development plan and the reputation and creditworthiness of potential clients.Keith Williamson, RTKL’s controller developed this application and presented it here on Tuesday. If you would like more information about this, you can get his PowerPoint presentation and talk to him about it.Once we have a project, we need to execute contracts and agreements. In the enthusiasm of starting new work, we have found that getting documents executed can fall through the cracks. There are many reasons why a contract takes time to complete and it may still be in negotiations among attorneys after we begin. We use Vision to track agreements so that accounting and VPs can see at a glance what agreements are outstanding.Signed Agreement Tracking
  • On the Applications menu under Reporting, under Project, we have created three specific reports that help track the status of executed contracts and proposals: one to track contracts, one to track proposals and one to track consultant agreements. Each PM has direct access to these from their dashboards, shown in the red circle, where these reports can be selected.(If your project is not on the list, that means no worries, all the necessary paperwork has been signed and is on file.)Here’s what the reports look like.
  • Only the PM’s own projects show up. If the report is blank, you’re good to go. If one of your projects is listed, you need to get the contract signed.Proposals
  • The same holds true for proposals. Since we make a distinction between signed proposals and what triggers the need for signed contracts, we track both. Many times a signed proposal also requires a signed contract. A project may move from one list to the next.Consultant Agreements
  • We also track Consultant agreements, since our risk increases if a consultant is working for us on behalf of a client and we do not have an agreement with them. As before, if your project does not appear on the list, you’re good.ARs
  • Aging receivables represent risk as well, and Vision makes it easy to track. Remember that cool way to get to Project Review? In the upper right here, there’s a screen shot showing that from the Labor tab on the Project Plan, you can right click on the small box to the left of the project name or phase name and select Project Review. Then select the Accounts Receivable tab to review outstanding invoices and aging data. Retrieving an invoice
  • If you want to see an invoice, first, click on the line and then, second, select Preview Invoice. Actual Invoice
  • Remember what we were saying about how accessing invoices can help communication? It can also help us to get paid sooner – mitigating risk. When the invoice comes up you can review it. At the top of the screen, there’s an e-mail icon that you can select to send it directly to your client for quicker action or to respond to questions.We have discussed how Vision helps manage Time, Cost, Communication, Human Resources and Risk. As we conclude, let’s touch on the ultimate consideration: Quality. Quality
  • Quality is the end result we strive for in our work. It can be looked at as the sum of all we have talked about. But quality can mean different things at different times.Definition of quality
  • Quality is something that we instinctively know and sense, but sometimes have a hard time defining. One definition that I find very useful for PMs is that it is delivering a Scope of Work – exactly. On time, on budget and to the requirements. This makes sense to me and makes quality definable, measurable, and attainable.
  • If we define quality as delivering an exact scope of work, we can see that all of the Vision applications we have looked at so far support delivering Quality. These tools help us keep things in balance and alignment. And, there is still another way we can use Vision to increase quality and track the project changes and progress.Planning Notes
  • How often does your scope of work change during a project? Does it sometime seem like it never stays the same? Tracking the scope, fee changes and add services is essential to delivering quality and a scope of work. On the Project Data tab of a Vision plan, there is a “Planning Notes” box that is ideal for entering every activity and change as it occurs. We put the latest notes on top so it’s easier to see the most recent activity or change to the project.Example of Summary Notes
  • If every change is noted, there will be a written history of project activities, by date, that involve fees, scope and tasks. All the details can be captured in sequence to help manage time, costs, labor resources, risk and ultimately quality.Summary
  • In summary, using the Vision database, via the various portals, reports and tools it has, allows us to view and manage project data in different ways to help keep the basic elements of project management in balance and moving forward.Review of Basic Elements of Project Management
  • What we have looked at, are the basic elements of project management: Time, Cost, Human Resources, Communication and mitigating Risk, alongside the tools Vision offers to help us work more efficiently and effectively and achieve the Quality project that we are striving toward.Questions
  • If any of you have your own favorite tools, we’d like to hear about them. And, if you have any questions, please ask.
  • After selecting GNG, this is the home screen that appears where you can see your own GoNoGos in process or search for any in the system. This page also tells you the status of the evaluation; whether it is In-Progress, approved or declined. At the top you’ll see four tabs. The first tab is “Define”.
  • In addition to project and client data, addresses and contact information, there is financial information about the project that needs to be provided. This includes construction costs, fee, estimated profit, pursuit or marketing costs and size of the project. Once this information is entered, we move to the “Evaluate” tab.
  • The “Evaluate” tab brings up this screen with a number of relevant factors to respond to. If the selected answer to a query is positive, it turns green, if marginal, the response is yellow, and if negative, it turns red. There are many more questions than shown here, but this is representational.On the comments tab, evaluators can post thoughts, concerns or enthusiasm.
  • And finally, the Decide tab shows who has determined what. In this case, the final decision is still pending, but financial risk assessment has been completed. In our firm there are several VPs in each office who make the final Go-No-Go decision.This process really helps define risks and helps the project team think realistically about pursuing work and how potential projects fit into our strategic business goals. It also helps us begin mitigating risks before we even get the project.
  • As PMs, we strive for these qualities in our communication. Being clear, positive and consistent is the goal. Really understanding what our clients and team members are communicating back to us will help further the project goals, too.

Deltek Insight 2012: PM Tools for Success. A Project Manager's Guide for Effective Management, Planning and Communication Deltek Insight 2012: PM Tools for Success. A Project Manager's Guide for Effective Management, Planning and Communication Presentation Transcript

  • PM Tools for Success —A Project Manager’s Guide forMore Effective Management,Planning and CommunicationJohn Bondeson, Principal, RTKL Associates Inc.PS-208
  • AgendaProject Management  Activities  ElementsVision tools  Identifying them  Using them2 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • PM Tools for SuccessManaging is:  Identifying requirements  Establishing clear and achievable objectives  Balancing the competing demands for quality, scope, time and cost  Adapting the specifications, plans and approach to the different concerns and expectations of the various stakeholders3 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Elements of Project ManagementTime (Schedule)Cost (Budget)Human ResourcesCommunicationRiskQuality (Scope)4 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time and Vision . . . is of the essence5 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time ScheduleEstimate labor accuratelyIncorporate project changesWork to the plan and keep it updated6 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time and Vision How can project managers use Vision to estimate and control time?7 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time ScheduleMethods for estimating time  Top down  Analogous (similar project)  Parametric Estimating (i.e., Cost/SF)  Three-Point Estimating (Optimistic, Pessimistic, Most Likely)  Rolling wave planning (plan as you go)  Team proportion  Expert judgment  Bottom up8 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Top DownTop DownStart with the project feeThis is sometimes based the floor area of the project ($ / SF or SM)or a percentage of construction cost ($ x %)Divide the fee into the phases or labor codesThe percentage of the total fee for each phase is typicallydocumented in the contract or proposal. (Example 5% Predesign(Concept), 20% SD, 25% DD, 35% CD and 15% CCA)Estimate the time based on the expected feeThis may not match the time actually needed to complete eachphase. It may be greater or less. Plans need to be updated andadjusted during the project to reflect reality as it unfolds.9 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Top Down10 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Top DownVision screenshots 1 2 311 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Top Down12 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Top Down13 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Analogous14 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Team ProportionProportion percentagedetermined by disciplineArchitecture 38%Interiors 23%Structural 19%MEP 16%Direct expenses 3% 100%15 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — ProportionPhase percentage determined by scope of work Scope A Scope B Scope CSchematic Design 15% 20% 25%Design Develop 20% 20% 25%Contract Docs 40% 30% 20%Bidding 5% 5% 5%Contract Admin 20% 25% 25%TOTAL 100% 100% 100%16 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Proportion17 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Bottom UpBottom upStart with the work required to complete each phaseIdeally, these correspond to the labor codes in the Vision plan (SD,DD, CD, CA, etc.)Break into smaller milestones ( e.g. 50% progress set)Divide into smaller chunks of work to create work packages (thesmallest level a PM can monitor). Create the list in the order that theactivities occur.PMBOK 8/80 Rule*No work package should be less the 8 hours or greater than 80hours. Find the right work package scale for the project.*Project Management Body Of Knowledge – a general projectmanagement standard18 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Bottom UpVision screenshots19 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Bottom UpVision screenshots20 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Bottom UpVision screenshots21 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Bottom Up22 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Bottom UpVision screenshots23 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Bottom UpVision screenshots24 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — ScheduleVision screenshots25 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Schedule26 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Labor Summary27 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Labor Detail Report28 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Resource Utilization Module29 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Resource Utilization Module30 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Resource Utilization ModuleVision screenshots31 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Time — Planned32 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost and Vision Budgets: Internal and External33 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — BudgetInternal Costs  Labor  Overhead  Direct Project Expenses  Reimbursable Project Expenses34 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost and Vision How can project managers use Vision to help understand and control costs?35 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — Fees and Billing36 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — TrackingVision screenshots37 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — Tracking38 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — Tracking39 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — TrackingVision screenshots40
  • Cost — Analysis Tab41 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — Summary Tab42 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — Consultant Tracking43 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — Consultant TrackingUsing the grid to plan anticipated invoices44 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Cost — Expense TrackingUse the grid to plan when expenses will be incurred45 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Human Resources and Vision People Power46 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Human ResourcesHuman Resource PlanningAssembling a Project TeamFinding the right peopleDeveloping a Project TeamManaging a Project Team47 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Human Resources and Vision How can project managers use Vision to manage human resources48 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Human Resources — Resource Search Right Click49 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Human Resources — Resource Search50 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Human Resources — Resource Search 3 1 2 4 551
  • Human Resources — Utilization52 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Communication and Vision Can you hear me now? Vision can help internal and external communication53 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Communication54 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Communication55 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Communication56 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Communication — E-MailVision Screenshots57 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk and Vision Nothing ventured, nothing gained58 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • RiskAreas of risk  Proposals and Contracts  Lack of communication during design  Client payment  Drawing errors and omissions  Construction defects59 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk and Vision Track proposals and contracts Track payments and invoices Enhance communication60 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk Customization – Go / No Go61 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk Signed Agreement TrackingVision Screenshots62 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk Signed Contract Tracking63 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk — Signed Proposal Tracking64 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk — Signed Consultant Agreement Tracking65 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk ARsVision screenshots Right Click66 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk ARs 2 167 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk ARs68 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Quality and Vision What is Quality?69 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • QualityThe word comes from Latin through Anglo-French and MiddleEnglish originating from “of what kind”  Degree of Excellence  Descriptive of nature, caliber, class, grade, rate  Implies superiority of kind  For PMs it can relate to delivering Scope of Work or Service70 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Quality and Vision How can project managers use Vision to help enhance Quality?71 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Quality72 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Quality73 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • QualityVision offers:  A database  Tools to help keep things in balance  Different ways to look at (the same) data74 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • SummaryVision Tools for Effective Project Management  Time (Schedule)  Cost (Budgets)  Human Resources  Communication  Risk  Quality (Scope)75 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Questions?76 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Thank You!77 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • PM Tools for SuccessA Project Manager’s Guide forMore Effective Management,Planning and CommunicationJohn Bondeson, Principal, RTKL Associates Inc.PS-208
  • Risk Customization – Go / No Go79 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk Customization – Go / No Go80 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk Customization – Go / No Go81 12/13/2012 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • Risk Customization – Go / No Go82 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • CommunicationConsistencyProfessionalismClarityConcisePositivityDiligenceUnderstanding83 ©2012 Deltek, Inc. All Rights Reserved