Framing and Scenarios - Design with Dialogue - July 14, 2010

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At our July DwD session we explored ways of framing the concerns we sometimes call “problems.” Impelled by the urgent and messy mix of issues we saw emerging following the G20 security event in Toronto, we inquired into the framing of the situation. What are the opportunities inherent in the problem as constructed? How do we establish and pierce through a problem frame so that the true concerns we share in common might emerge?

We then broke out into groups for a scanning and scenarios mapping exercise that explored the tension between entrenched and emergent systems. What kind of trends are we seeing today and how might those vector to become plausible future cultural norms?

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Framing and Scenarios - Design with Dialogue - July 14, 2010

  1. 1. FRAMING & SCENARIOS DwD Toronto July 14, 2010
  2. 2. TONIGHT’S SESSION » Explore the framing of a complex social issue, using Toronto’s G20 experience as a context » Build from this context into a scenarios mapping exercise DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  3. 3. FRAMING THE CONTEXT
  4. 4. ORIENTATION: G20 EXPERIENCE What did you personally observe? How did you feel about what happened? What does this mean for you? Did you have a change of opinion? What action did you or could you take? DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  5. 5. ORIENTATION: G20 EXPERIENCE Objective What did you personally observe? Reflective How did you feel about what happened? Interpretive What does this mean for you? Did you have a change of opinion? Decisive What action did you or could you take? DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  6. 6. WHAT ARE FRAMES? Biased to see G20 Inherent Cognitive Biases march as “protesters” Perceive losses with more concern than potential gain Value safety, belonging Values conflicts are common Is there really Subject to Metaphor a Black Bloc? Embodied Storming – Think physical Metaphors as given capture attention & create boundary Constant flood of misconceptions! We Tend to Problem Solve As soon as a problem is given … (But who is giving the problem?) America Speaks Rethinking the problem often not town halls: allowed. “We need to fix the deficit!” DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  7. 7. WHAT ARE FRAMES? “We proceed from the belief that problems have "solutions“... It also leads us to believe that to solve a problem it is sufficient to observe and manipulate it in its own terms by applying an external problem-solving technique to it.” Hasan Özbekhan The Predicament of Mankind (1970) DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  8. 8. MAPPING SCENARIOS
  9. 9. SYSTEM CHANGE TRANSITION BETWEEN CURRENT AND EMERGING VALUES/STRUCTURES concept courtesy Berkana.org DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  10. 10. SYSTEM CHANGE ROLES IN SYSTEMS TRANSFORMATION concept courtesy Berkana.org DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  11. 11. SYSTEM CHANGE TRANSITION BETWEEN CURRENT AND EMERGING VALUES/STRUCTURES TENSION! concept courtesy Berkana.org DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  12. 12. WHY SCENARIOS? Mont Fleur process in South Africa in the early 1990’s. DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  13. 13. SCENARIOS MAPPING GROUP DISCUSSION What faint signals and trends are we seeing now that may become cultural norms in the future? DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  14. 14. SCENARIOS MAPPING BREAKOUT GROUPS What are possible alternative futures that may emerge in Toronto 2020? DESIGN WITH DIALOGUE: FRAMING & SCENARIOS sLAB, JULY 14, 2010
  15. 15. REFLECTION (AND ACTION)
  16. 16. Peter Jones peter@redesignresearch.com Greg Judelman judelman@gmail.com

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