M10 L3 Components of a Business Layout

3,821
-1

Published on

NCVPS
Small Business

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,821
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
17
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

M10 L3 Components of a Business Layout

  1. 1. Components of a Business Layout The floor layout diagrams used in this presentation were taken from Meyer, Earl C. and Kathleen R. Allen, Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management , 1st edition (New York: Glencoe-McGraw Hill, 1994), 185-186.
  2. 2. Business layout A floor plan or map that shows how the space in the site will be used to conduct business.
  3. 3. Physical Layout Patterns <ul><li>Right-angle grid </li></ul><ul><li>Open layout </li></ul><ul><li>Enclosed layout </li></ul><ul><li>Landscaped layout </li></ul>
  4. 4. Right-Angle Grid Layout <ul><li>Produces a pattern of crossing aisles that provides a highly-structured system for facilitating the flow of traffic </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces security concerns </li></ul><ul><li>Works well for self-service operations such as grocery stores </li></ul><ul><li>Diagram from Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (1994) , p. 185. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Consists of completely open sales space bounded by outside walls </li></ul><ul><li>Enhances visibility of merchandise and sales coverage </li></ul><ul><li>Provides security </li></ul>Open Layout <ul><li>Diagram from Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (1994) , p. 185. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Enclosed Layout <ul><li>Organizes types of merchandise into separate operations divided by walls </li></ul><ul><li>Creates individual shopping environments </li></ul><ul><li>Used by department stores </li></ul><ul><li>Diagram from Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (1994) , p. 186. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Landscaped Layout <ul><li>Combines the elements of the open and enclosed layouts </li></ul><ul><li>Improves customer and sales staff interaction </li></ul><ul><li>Encourages creative displays </li></ul><ul><li>Does not use space efficiently </li></ul><ul><li>Increases the danger of shoplifting </li></ul><ul><li>Diagram from Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management (1994) , p. 186. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Standard Items Necessary for Business Operations (will vary depending on the type of business) <ul><li>Furniture: desks, chairs, bookcases, filing cabinets, tables, computer stands </li></ul><ul><li>Fixtures: lamps, overhead lights, shelving, counters, showcases </li></ul>
  9. 9. Standard Items Necessary for Business Operations (continued) <ul><li>Office equipment: computers, telephones, photocopiers, fax machines </li></ul><ul><li>Office supplies: pencils, scissors, paper clips, manila folders, calendars, pens, stationery </li></ul>
  10. 10. Standard Items Necessary for Business Operations (continued) <ul><li>Maintenance supplies: paper towels, toilet tissue, cleaning supplies </li></ul><ul><li>Kitchen supplies: coffee maker, small refrigerator, microwave, coffee, tea </li></ul>

×