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Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
Teaching nonfiction
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Teaching nonfiction

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A presentation on why and how to pair fiction and nonfiction texts

A presentation on why and how to pair fiction and nonfiction texts

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  • Comprehension occurs in the interaction between reader, text, and activity, thus reading comprehension will vary based upon a variety of factors. We can improve comprehension by also intervening on the texts we use and the activities we construct.One student might read more effectively when there are differences in the text and in the activity. Comprehension does not just lie in the reader… it is an interactive process. Change the text or the activity, and you may influence students’ performance.This is an extremely important point to understand, because if we hold that comprehension only lies in the reader, all of our interventions directed at comprehension will focus only on the reader and will not look at the role of text and activity.
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  • Transcript

    • 1. + elanonfictionrw.wikispaces.com Teaching Nonfiction Reading Delia DeCourcy Oakland Schools November 5, 2013 delia.decourcy@oakland.k12.mi.us
    • 2. + Goals & Burning Questions  Define nonfiction.  Review the standards and expectations around nonfiction reading in the Common Core.  Explore strategies for teaching nonfiction reading paired with a fiction text.  Brainstorm the integration of nonfiction into a fiction unit you currently teach.  POST-IT: Write down a burning question that you want to get answered about teaching nonfiction.
    • 3. + What is Nonfiction? Stop & Jot – define it
    • 4. + What is Nonfiction?
    • 5. + Nonfiction Text Types bias ARGUMENT INFORMATIONAL Narrative Nonfiction implied argument
    • 6. + Why Teach Nonfiction?  MODELS  What we ask our students to write in high school  PREPARATION  The majority of the texts students will encounter in college and career  PREPARATION  So FOR AN INTELLECTUAL LIFE they can inform themselves and enrich their own lives
    • 7. + 4 Corners of Nonfiction Mediums WHAT’S YOUR PREFERENCE?  Articles & Books (printed and online, long and short form)  Graphic Novels, Photographs, Photo Essays, Cartoons  Speeches & Podcasts (Ted Talks, NPR journalism)  Videos & Films  Share with your neighbor the best piece of nonfiction in this medium that you recently read/heard/watched.
    • 8. + Your Nonfiction Reading Life What percentage of your extracurricular reading/viewing/listening is nonfiction? 100% 50% 0%
    • 9. The Challenge: + To become as expert in reading and teaching nonfiction as you are in teaching fiction/plays/poetry.
    • 10. + Nonfiction & the CCSS MYTHS FACTS  70%  70% of the texts seniors read throughout their school day must be informational texts.  The exemplar texts in Appendix B point to the breadth, quality, and complexity of the texts students should read. of the texts seniors read in English class must be informational texts.  The exemplar texts listed in Appendix B are required teaching.
    • 11. + The Informational Reading Standards Multi-draft Read of an Informational Text  #1 – Central Ideas and Key Details  Table talk  #2 – Craft and Structure  Table talk  #3 – Implications  Table talk
    • 12. Multi-draft Read Talk to the Text Focused Discussion + Activity Reflection What reading strategies did we just engage?
    • 13. + Group Discussion/Debrief Key Practices  Summarize: What must our students be able to do as readers of informational text? Jumps  Extension: How do those skills spiral up from 9/10 to 11/12?
    • 14. + FOUNDATION: Interactive Model of Reading
    • 15. + Our Students as Readers Students should…  enjoy/be engaged by reading  see connections within and across texts  ask their own questions of texts  grapple  make with those questions meaning via discussion, informal and formal writing (formative & summative)
    • 16. + Interactive Model of Reading Text COMPREHENSION Activity Reader Rumelhart, D.E. (1977). Toward an interactive model of reading. In S. Dornic (Ed.), Attention and performance VI. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. Snow, C.E. (2002). Reading for Understanding: Toward an R&D Program in Reading Comprehension. Santa Monica, CA: RAND.
    • 17. + Pairing Fiction & Nonfiction
    • 18. + Pairing Fiction & Nonfiction – Why? “English teachers need to teach more poetry, more fiction, more drama, and more literary nonfiction. More is more when it comes to reading. And we have evidence to prove it. “ - Carol Jago, “What English Classes Should Look Like in the Common Core Era”
    • 19. + Pairing Fiction & Nonfiction –Why?  Improve comprehension by expanding background knowledge connected to the narrative text. (Anderson & Pearson, 1984; Block & Pressley, 2002)
    • 20. + Pairing Fiction & Nonfiction –Why?  Expand student thinking: 2 Lenses/1 Topic  Narrative: illuminate human identity and feelings  Informational texts: provide knowledge of the natural and social world (Duke, 2000; Weinstein, 2003). “Nonfiction lets us learn more; fiction lets us be more.” - Kylene Beers, Notice & Note: Strategies for Close Reading
    • 21. + Pairing Fiction & Nonfiction –Why?  Increase relevance  Demonstrate connections between the Canon and modern texts INCREASED MOTIVATION & ENGAGEMENT
    • 22. + Turn & Talk How well do I strike a balance between fiction and nonfiction in my classroom? How do I help students think about the role of both genres in their lives?
    • 23. + Pairing Fiction & Nonfiction – How? BACKWARDS DESIGN Literature  Essential Unit Questions Themes Summative Assessment Select Texts
    • 24. + Pairing Fiction & Nonfiction – How? PURPOSES of NONFICTION PAIRINGS  Develop background knowledge  Deepen perspective and analysis on a single topic or theme  Read one text through another to broaden perspective  Examine literary criticism or reviews of the fiction text  Explore interpretations of the text  Study models for upcoming writing task
    • 25. + Romeo & Juliet – a model To the WIKI
    • 26. + BREAK 10 minutes
    • 27. + Romeo & Juliet – a model  Theme: Romantic Love  Essential Questions   What is romantic love? How have depictions of romantic love changed and remained the same?  Summative Assessment  Write an argument essay that compares and contrasts popular depictions of romantic love in the play and advertisements we explored in this unit. What has changed since Shakespeare's writing of Romeo & Juliet and what has remained the same?  Write an informational essay in which you explain the definitions of and attitudes about romantic love explored in this unit. What do Shakespeare, hooks, Fisher, and corporate advertisers contend about love? Discuss the implications of each definition/attitude.
    • 28. Romeo & Juliet – first thoughts (2 min. freewrite) + Do you believe in true love-also known as romantic love?
    • 29. + Alpha Text – Talk to the Text  Context: after reading Romeo & Juliet’s initial meeting; close reading of the love sonnet.  Driving/essential question: What is romantic love? DIRECTIONS:  Read the excerpted essay below. As you read:  Underline the central ideas/claims.  Number key supporting details.  In the margin  Make notes to identify text structures (cause/effect, definition, list, compare/contrast, etc.)  Pose questions you have  Make notes about confusing words or ideas
    • 30. + Alpha Text – Talk to the Text WHAT IS ROMANTIC LOVE? INFORMATIONAL  Excerpt from the Times article “Watching New Love as It Sears the Brain” (science) ARGUMENT  Excerpt from bell hooks’ book All About Love, ch.10 on romance (essay) 1.Jigsaw: half the table reads one article, half the table reads the other. 2. Free write on the questions 3. Share thinking about articles. 4. Discuss together: Discuss Fromm and Peck’s thoughts on love through the lens of the New York Times’ article “Watching New Love as it Sears the Brain.” Who does Shakespeare agree with?
    • 31. + Before, During & After Approach Before  Activate reading interest and prior knowledge.  Build/review any necessary knowledge before reading.  Preview difficult concepts and vocabulary.  Introduce and set purpose with a driving question. (essential question)
    • 32. + Before, During & After Approach During  Have reading... students identify and organize important information.  Teach students to record developing understandings and questions.  Help students clarify things they don't understand.
    • 33. + Before, During & After Approach After  Guide reading… students to use evidence from texts to develop accounts.  Have students use evidence from texts to support arguments.  Facilitate synthesis and connection across the texts.
    • 34. + AUDIO & VIDEO
    • 35. + Viewing/Listening Scaffolding  Pause periodically  Stop & Jot – with prompt (summary, analytical question) or graphic organizer  Turn & Talk – with prompt (summary, analytical question)  Backchannel – Today’s Meet  Summary of content  Reflection on/ analysis of content  Tracking structure  Flow chart/idea mapping
    • 36. Television Ad: Multi-draft viewing/graphic organizer
    • 37. + How does the ad reinforce or conflict with the play’s ideas about romantic love?
    • 38. + Speech – Stop & Jot  After reading Act 5: The Brain in Love  Driving Question: What is romantic love?
    • 39. What do Dr. Fisher’s ideas help explain about Romeo’s behavior in Act 3 when he’s banished from the city and in Act 5 when he kills Paris? + Freewrite – 2 min.
    • 40. + Pairing Texts: Curriculum Design
    • 41. + Text Pairing – Curriculum Design  Backwards Design  Essential questions and themes?  Summative assessment for the unit? Length – Less is More  Make Choices: What’s most important about this narrative text?  Avoid Readicide: Are you over teaching the narrative text?  Unit
    • 42. + Pairing Fiction & Nonfiction  read-i-cide noun : The systematic killing of the love of reading, often exacerbated by the inane, mind-numbing practices found in schools. (Kelly Gallagher, 2009)  Under  Over  Big teaching text: You’re on your own. teaching text: Flogging a book to death. chunk/little chunk  Reading flow  Selected close reading
    • 43. + Text Pairing – Curriculum Design  Nonfiction Integration Purposes  Consider Multiple Text Types  Articles  Essays  Reviews  Develop background knowledge  Deepen perspective and analysis on a single topic or theme  Ads – print & video  Documentaries Read one text through another to broaden perspective  Op-eds  TED Talks Examine literary criticism or reviews of the fiction text  Explore interpretations of the text  Study models for upcoming writing task  Speeches  Podcasts  Interviews – print & audio  Images/photographs  
    • 44. + Text Pairing – Curriculum Design  Grade Level Planning  Select a Text - Google Docs Linked on Wiki  Google Docs  Real time editing  No need to save  Editing – like Word  Sharing – anyone with the link can edit
    • 45. + Virtual Gallery Walk
    • 46. + Discussion What was challenging about the brainstorming? What concerns came up? What was exciting or revelatory?
    • 47. + Burning Questions Did If you get your question answered? not – how will you get it answered? What new questions were raised for you today?
    • 48. + Thank you!

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