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Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
Producing Transliteracy
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Producing Transliteracy

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Part of a duo presented at the Institute of Creative Technologies, De Montfort University, UK to the Production and Research into Transliteracy (PaRT) group.

Part of a duo presented at the Institute of Creative Technologies, De Montfort University, UK to the Production and Research into Transliteracy (PaRT) group.

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  • 1. Points for discussion at seminar, February 20th, 2007 Chris Joseph, De Montfort University, UK Transliteracy = across and/or beyond literacy?
  • 2. Production in transliteracy = production across or beyond different literacies?
  • 3. Production beyond literacy: 'writing' for media
  • 4. Production beyond (textual) literacy: writing to be read 1. new types of textual or narrative structure 2. generative texts 3. visual texts 4. new vocabularies and languages
  • 5. Production beyond (visual) literacy: writing to be seen 1. visual text? 2. icons and graphics 3. still images 4. animation 5. film and video 6. 3D environments, virtual and augmented reality
  • 6. Production beyond (aural) literacy: writing to be heard 1. oral literature / spoken word 2. narration and voiceovers 3. radio (live) 4. podcasts (time-delayed)
  • 7. Production across literacy: writing for multimedia Multimedia is "a combination of different media which function next to each other and remain clearly discernable" (Joki Van de Poel 2005, Intermediality Reinterpreted, p.8)
  • 8. Production across literacy: writing for transmedia Transmedia refers to how a particular piece of content is handled across various media - not how the various media interact with one another.
  • 9. Production across literacy: writing for intermedia Intermedia was a concept employed in the mid-sixties by Fluxus artist Dick Higgins to describe the inter-disciplinary activities that occur between artistic genres. Intermedia "comes into being through an integrative combination of different media or the implementation of a new device or medium in an already existing realm. With the integration of different media I mean that the usual frames and structure of the different media are affected and influenced by each other. In my view this integrative combination opens up a new experiental domain to the viewer." [Joki Van de Poel (2005), Intermediality Reinterpreted, p.8]
  • 10.  
  • 11. Transliteracy = across literacy Production in transliteracy = production of intermedia?
  • 12. Intermedia theory: The basic rule for linking sounds and images is temporal coincidence. Exceptions: - In a relationship of cause and effect an action in one medium may precede reaction in another - In an imitation relationship one medium can be recognized to repeat what the another has shown before. In all other situations a link without some simultaneity is difficult to perceive. Links can be formed, reinforced and given unique quality by the similarities in each medium, categorised as internal or external correspondences: Internal correspondences: 1. Temporal correspondences ( e.g. parallels between rhythms, parallels in tempo changes ) 2. Textural correspondences ( e.g. matching media forces, similarities in density ) 3. Structural correspondences ( e.g. parallels of formal symmetry/asymmetry, formal complexity ) 4. Qualitative correspondences ( e.g. parallels of change in sharpness, brightness, size, motion, shape ) External correspondences: 1. Correspondence through a common physical object ( e.g. an animal and its sound) 2. Correspondence through a common cultural archetype ( e.g. church and organs) 3. Correspondence through a common emotional/psychological state ( e.g. anger, sadness, pleasure) 4. Complicity in depicting narrative ( e.g. a box falls with a sound of breaking glass revealing the unseen content)
  • 13. <ul><li>Production in transliteracy: </li></ul><ul><li>How are particular transliteral forms created? </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis of tools, methods, creativity </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis of structural forms </li></ul><ul><li>and/or </li></ul><ul><li>Why are particular transliteral forms created? </li></ul><ul><li>- Social, economic, political and cultural analyses of production </li></ul>

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